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Colleges requiring covid vaccine to live on campus


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7 minutes ago, TechWife said:

There has been significant thought put into it. It’s no different than tracking administration of any other vaccine, which has been happening for decades. Mine is in both my medical record and in the state records. I also have the hard copy CDC card. I doubt there’s anyone giving vaccines that isn’t keeping records, that would be unethical and, I believe, illegal. If an eight year old was vaccinated at a clinic, then someone was acting unethically & it certainly isn’t the norm in vaccine clinics. 

But, see I was at the doctor's office yesterday and it is NOT in my medical records.  I was vaccinated at a clinic.  I was told by the doctor's office that this is not all being reported for state records.  

Yes, the clinic is keeping records, but the amount of time it would take for hundreds of  thousands of college students to track down these pop-up clinics, request, and receive any official documentation would be massive. 

The hard copy CDC cards are, IMO, worthless.  There is nothing official about it at all.  I think that if we ask someone to show that as proof they are vaccinated we are fooling ourselves.

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Welcome to this homeschool forum, brand new member. You will find many of your questions discussed in great detail in the long general coronavirus and vaccine threads. I will give your post the b

The college where I teach announced this morning that we are at 69% faculty and staff and 68% of students who have received at least one shot.  Also that the random testing for last week had zero posi

A lot of the anti-vaccine folks are saying that because it's emergency use, that they can't require it. But the Pfizer will be fully approved before long and the others will follow. Assuming colleges

19 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

But, see I was at the doctor's office yesterday and it is NOT in my medical records.  I was vaccinated at a clinic.  I was told by the doctor's office that this is not all being reported for state records.  

Yes, the clinic is keeping records, but the amount of time it would take for hundreds of  thousands of college students to track down these pop-up clinics, request, and receive any official documentation would be massive. 

The hard copy CDC cards are, IMO, worthless.  There is nothing official about it at all.  I think that if we ask someone to show that as proof they are vaccinated we are fooling ourselves.

I sent my doctor a message through the patient portal with a  copy of my vaccination card and asked for the Covid vaccine to be added to my medical records. Done

And, as I said before, almost all records of past vaccination are based on patients self reporting at the intake survey anyway

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10 minutes ago, regentrude said:

I sent my doctor a message through the patient portal with a  copy of my vaccination card and asked for the Covid vaccine to be added to my medical records. Done

And, as I said before, almost all records of past vaccination are based on patients self reporting at the intake survey anyway

If a vaccine record is created simply by self-reporting, then an "official" record is meaningless.  If we are simply going to go off of people uploading pictures of an easily duplicated card and self-reporting that they had vaccines to produce official records, we might as well just go by self-reporting that we had a vaccine instead of asking for an officical record which is really unofficial self-reporting.  

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3 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

If a vaccine record is created simply by self-reporting, then an "official" record is meaningless.  If we are simply going to go off of people uploading pictures of an easily duplicated card and self-reporting that they had vaccines to produce official records, we might as well just go by self-reporting that we had a vaccine instead of asking for an officical record which is really unofficial self-reporting.  

but a requirement will still be beneficial because most people will not go to the length of faking their record - they will simply get the shot. It is not perfect, but it is better than throwing our hands up and saying we can't require vaccinations because the records can be falsified. (We don't do that with the meningitis or MMR requirement either)

 

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If anyone is interested in how it works in my province..... I presented my provincial health card at the time of immunization. They verified my identity by date of birth, address. I did get a card stamped with the date, but I’ve also just checked my electronic health record, and it’s there, with date and time, place and vaccine type.

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3 minutes ago, regentrude said:

but a requirement will still be beneficial because most people will not go to the length of faking their record - they will simply get the shot. It is not perfect, but it is better than throwing our hands up and saying we can't require vaccinations because the records can be falsified. (We don't do that with the meningitis or MMR requirement either)

 

It would take a young person who wants to attend a special event about 3 seconds to falsify a COVID test record--much less time and trouble than actually getting the COVID vaccine.  

Most people won't fake a COVID vaccine record--because they want to get a COVID vaccine.  It is the people that are NOT going to get a COVID vaccine unless they are prevented from doing something that are the ones who are likely to produce a fake record.  So, I am not seeing how requiring unofficial, official records, really changes anything.  It simply creates a lot more paperwork and paper shuffling and provides a false sense of having official records. 

There is a big difference between saying something is requried and asking for an official record/documentation.  As far as meningitis and MMR records, I think those are more likely to be correct.  Many of those vaccines are being given by the same medical provider who is providing more official documentation than a card that says CDC on it.  Most of those vaccines are given to minors who are more likely (at least in the state of Texas) to be recorded in a state database.  Most of those vaccines are given under a different scenario than lets inject this in as many arms as possible as quickly as possible--and worry about the details later, which is what many of the vaccine clincs are.  And you do not have millions of people who all at once need an official record for MMR and meningitis.  

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58 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

But, see I was at the doctor's office yesterday and it is NOT in my medical records.  I was vaccinated at a clinic.  I was told by the doctor's office that this is not all being reported for state records.  

Yes, the clinic is keeping records, but the amount of time it would take for hundreds of  thousands of college students to track down these pop-up clinics, request, and receive any official documentation would be massive. 

The hard copy CDC cards are, IMO, worthless.  There is nothing official about it at all.  I think that if we ask someone to show that as proof they are vaccinated we are fooling ourselves.

Computer records didn’t always exist and I can assure you that the vaccination record from our county clinic was accepted as proof of vaccination everywhere. It’s what we turned in at school, up to and including college. I had a job that required updated vaccinations and the county record was accepted there, too.  Before computers, it was my moms job to keep up with the card. Just like then, most people now are capable of keeping track of a card. 
 

My husband has had to present proof of vaccination occasionally when he travels. Guess what? It’s a card that he has to keep track of - the front of it looks like this:

IVC200_06_26.pdf?ua=1

If you want to see the whole thing, follow this link to the WHO.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, TechWife said:

Computer records didn’t always exist and I can assure you that the vaccination record from our county clinic was accepted as proof of vaccination everywhere. It’s what we turned in at school, up to and including college. I had a job that required updated vaccinations and the county record was accepted there, too.  Before computers, it was my moms job to keep up with the card. Just like then, most people now are capable of keeping track of a card. 
 

My husband has had to present proof of vaccination occasionally when he travels. Guess what? It’s a card that he has to keep track of - the front of it looks like this:

IVC200_06_26.pdf?ua=1

If you want to see the whole thing, follow this link to the WHO.

 

 

Computerized records do not make anything more official.  The card that you linked contains a lot more information than the CDC card regarding both the identity of the person receiving a vaccine AND the administering of the vaccine.  There is no official stamp or signature on the CDC card.  A place the vaccine is administered can simply be several letters such as "CVS"  Mine contains my handwritten name and birthdate, no other identifying information and that handwritten info was not checked against any ID.  

How easy would it be to fill out one of these cards that is simply printed on white card stock?  There were stacks of blank cards on the table when I received my vaccine for people to pick up and fill out.

You can easily go to COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card (army.mil) and print off a card.  

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Most places are doing a better job than say, Texas, at keeping track. I'm in Florida and my doctor's office had my vaccine info before I told them. I was vaccinated at a mass vaccine clinic run by FEMA, but they scanned your drivers license or ID

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19 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

Computerized records do not make anything more official.  The card that you linked contains a lot more information than the CDC card regarding both the identity of the person receiving a vaccine AND the administering of the vaccine.  There is no official stamp or signature on the CDC card.  A place the vaccine is administered can simply be several letters such as "CVS"  Mine contains my handwritten name and birthdate, no other identifying information and that handwritten info was not checked against any ID.  

How easy would it be to fill out one of these cards that is simply printed on white card stock?  There were stacks of blank cards on the table when I received my vaccine for people to pick up and fill out.

You can easily go to COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card (army.mil) and print off a card.  

So what? People will always forge documents. Any org that left blank cards around for anyone to pick up is being careless. I also didn’t fill out my card, that was done for me. In any case, no matter how shoddy some places are at record keeping, it doesn’t mean  we shouldn’t require proof of vaccination.

Ultimately, this is not about being able to produce proof, it’s about actually preventing the spread of disease. Universities are more of a closed community than many other places. If someone doesn’t get the vaccine and then forges their records, the university requiring vaccination will actually help prevent the unvaccinated person from becoming ill because most people will follow the rules and get vaccinated. I’m hopeful that if they are going to the trouble of requiring proof of Covid-19 vaccination, then they will also have quarantine and contact tracing measures in place should someone become ill. 

 

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38 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Most places are doing a better job than say, Texas, at keeping track. I'm in Florida and my doctor's office had my vaccine info before I told them. I was vaccinated at a mass vaccine clinic run by FEMA, but they scanned your drivers license or ID

This system works well with certain groups of people but not with others.  What happens if someone does not have a drivers license or ID?  (Especially as we have started vaccinating 16 and up).  What happens when a college student has a drivers license issued in Tennessee but is vaccinated in Florida?  What happens when someone lives in an area right be a state line and crosses into the other state to be vaccinated (or works in another state and is vaccinated at work).  I think this has been much more complicated that we realize.  And I think the, justifiable, focus has been on getting people vaccinated.  I jsut don't think the records are as accurate and as official as many people seem to think.

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20 minutes ago, TechWife said:

So what? People will always forge documents. Any org that left blank cards around for anyone to pick up is being careless. I also didn’t fill out my card, that was done for me. In any case, no matter how shoddy some places are at record keeping, it doesn’t mean  we shouldn’t require proof of vaccination.

Ultimately, this is not about being able to produce proof, it’s about actually preventing the spread of disease. Universities are more of a closed community than many other places. If someone doesn’t get the vaccine and then forges their records, the university requiring vaccination will actually help prevent the unvaccinated person from becoming ill because most people will follow the rules and get vaccinated. I’m hopeful that if they are going to the trouble of requiring proof of Covid-19 vaccination, then they will also have quarantine and contact tracing measures in place should someone become ill. 

 

Ironically, I got my vaccine at a university.  One reason they were having people fill out their own cards was to minimize mutliple people touching a pen, card, etc.  They were focused more on minimizing the possibility of disease transmission than writing info on a meaningless unofficial card.

I agree this is about preventing the spread of the disease.  So, I would rather more focus on that.  Having people provide and track meaningless documents does nothing to prevent disease. 

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7 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

Having people provide and track meaningless documents does nothing to prevent disease

It sure does when most people will go ahead and get vaccinated so they can participate in colllege or whatever else they are wanting to do that requires it. There will be some people who forge it, but most will not. Texas is an outlier when it comes to vaccine records. It requires someone to specifically opt in, which I would expect a large percentage of adults have not done, nor young people who became adults after this went into effect. Most states will not have that problem. 

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24 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

This system works well with certain groups of people but not with others.  What happens if someone does not have a drivers license or ID?  (Especially as we have started vaccinating 16 and up).  What happens when a college student has a drivers license issued in Tennessee but is vaccinated in Florida?  What happens when someone lives in an area right be a state line and crosses into the other state to be vaccinated (or works in another state and is vaccinated at work).  I think this has been much more complicated that we realize.  And I think the, justifiable, focus has been on getting people vaccinated.  I jsut don't think the records are as accurate and as official as many people seem to think.

I assume they have a protocol for no id, and someone from another state I think would still be in our state records, which they could request. 

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49 minutes ago, KSera said:

It sure does when most people will go ahead and get vaccinated so they can participate in colllege or whatever else they are wanting to do that requires it. There will be some people who forge it, but most will not. Texas is an outlier when it comes to vaccine records. It requires someone to specifically opt in, which I would expect a large percentage of adults have not done, nor young people who became adults after this went into effect. Most states will not have that problem. 

But this is ONLY if someone would have chosen not to vaccinate otherwise and is only vaccinating because they have to show proof.  And, then they have choose to make an appointment, travel to a vaccine location, go back several weeks later, etc.  Versus, OOOPS I need proof, OK here is what a card looks like put my name on it, done.  

Even if records are in a state database, if all we require is for someone to show a 3X4 inch card on a piece of white cardstock which is not signed, stamped or anything else (and not some official record), I trust someone having that card in their possession (or a picture on their phone, etc.) no more than them just saying they had a vaccine.  

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3 hours ago, Bootsie said:

As far as meningitis and MMR records, I think those are more likely to be correct

One of my kid's official records indicates she received the MMR on such-and-such a date but she actually received individual does of the separate Measles & Mumps vaccines (no Rubella). It was a mistaken entry when switching to a new computer system. I've never had them fix it. 

Neither my dd#2 nor I had to show US for any of our shots. She had to verify her birth date out loud & they took a copy of my insurance card (pharmacy shots for her). But I could probably bring my dd#3 in (under 16) & claim she was DD#2 to get her vaccinated now & no one would know. No state system here that I know of.

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I take that back! I just found the online database for my state & it has my Moderna shots in there & my tetanus booster!

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44 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

But this is ONLY if someone would have chosen not to vaccinate otherwise and is only vaccinating because they have to show proof.  And, then they have choose to make an appointment, travel to a vaccine location, go back several weeks later, etc.  Versus, OOOPS I need proof, OK here is what a card looks like put my name on it, done.  

Even if records are in a state database, if all we require is for someone to show a 3X4 inch card on a piece of white cardstock which is not signed, stamped or anything else (and not some official record), I trust someone having that card in their possession (or a picture on their phone, etc.) no more than them just saying they had a vaccine.  

I think we’re not going to agree on this. I think even among people I disagree with on the Covid vaccination issue, that most of them are still fundamentally good people who are going to follow the rules and will get their vaccine if it is required. Some won’t and will forge it, others will have to just forgo the activity. I think the percentage that will forge it is small, even if it’s easy to do. There’s not a chance I would do that, for instance if I had to prove I had some other vaccine I don’t have, and I suppose I could be wrong, but from what I know of people, I think I’m in the majority on that and it’s a minority of people who would lie and even go to the point of forging a document. 

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2 minutes ago, KSera said:

I think we’re not going to agree on this. I think even among people I disagree with on the Covid vaccination issue, that most of them are still fundamentally good people who are going to follow the rules and will get their vaccine if it is required. Some won’t and will forge it, others will have to just forgo the activity. I think the percentage that will forge it is small, even if it’s easy to do. There’s not a chance I would do that, for instance if I had to prove I had some other vaccine I don’t have, and I suppose I could be wrong, but from what I know of people, I think I’m in the majority on that and it’s a minority of people who would lie and even go to the point of forging a document. 

Being surrounding by young people every day, I am aware of how many are already carrying fake IDs--which are much more difficult to counterfeit.   I have had a number of wallets and backpacks left in college classrooms and when I go to see who it belongs to...

I also have seen a number of fake (or recycled) doctor's excuses.  

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Yeah, I am with Bootsie.  I am guessing most Texas college kids will forge them if they have to have it to go to college.  Unlikely Texas colleges will require it, but if they go out of state, then I bet most will forge it.  That said, it should still be required.  It is the safest thing to do.  But yeah, most Texas teens won’t comply.

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1 hour ago, TexasProud said:

Yeah, I am with Bootsie.  I am guessing most Texas college kids will forge them if they have to have it to go to college.  Unlikely Texas colleges will require it, but if they go out of state, then I bet most will forge it.  That said, it should still be required.  It is the safest thing to do.  But yeah, most Texas teens won’t comply.

I wouldn't say that most would forge it, but I just don't think getting a easily reproducible card that needs to be shown somewhere is going to be a motivating factor for those who would not be getting a COVID vaccine otherwise.  I just don't really see any way that concert venues, sports arenas, graduations, etc. will be able to really monitor.  It is just not reasonable that these places will be able to consistently check against multiple state databases.  If people attending these activities will simply flash a cardstock 3X4 card with little identifying information, there is little security in knowing that only vaccinated people are attending the event.  

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A guy in CA who was selling fake vaccine cards has been arrested and charged with felony forgery of a government document, felony identity theft, and misdemeanor falsification of a medical record. Maybe colleges should make students aware that anyone caught forging a vaccine card can be charged with a felony and expelled from school.

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1 hour ago, TexasProud said:

Yeah, I am with Bootsie.  I am guessing most Texas college kids will forge them if they have to have it to go to college.  Unlikely Texas colleges will require it, but if they go out of state, then I bet most will forge it.  That said, it should still be required.  It is the safest thing to do.  But yeah, most Texas teens won’t comply.

Maybe colleges outside Texas shouldn’t accept students from Texas if that’s the case 🤣 (I jest…but only a little.)

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27 minutes ago, KSera said:

Maybe colleges outside Texas shouldn’t accept students from Texas if that’s the case 🤣 (I jest…but only a little.)

Or perhaps it should be students from California that are suspect... since that is where arrests for selling fake cards has occured.  

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16 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

Or perhaps it should be students from California that are suspect... since that is where arrests for selling fake cards has occured.  

At least California is catching them 😉. I’m being tongue in cheek, it’s just surprising to me that someone would readily state that they think the majority of kids in their state are dishonest to that degree. Obviously, there will be those kids anywhere, it’s just not the case for most of the college kids I know. In the case of Covid, my college kids and all their friends have all been eager to get vaccinated as soon as they can, and interestingly, it’s not primarily so they don’t get Covid themselves, but because they sincerely don’t want to pass it on to anyone else and they don’t want to contribute to continuing and prolonging the pandemic. It’s such a stark contrast in mindset to “most college kids in Texas will forge it.”

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8 minutes ago, KSera said:

At least California is catching them 😉. I’m being tongue in cheek, it’s just surprising to me that someone would readily state that they think the majority of kids in their state are dishonest to that degree. Obviously, there will be those kids anywhere, it’s just not the case for most of the college kids I know. In the case of Covid, my college kids and all their friends have all been eager to get vaccinated as soon as they can, and interestingly, it’s not primarily so they don’t get Covid themselves, but because they sincerely don’t want to pass it on to anyone else and they don’t want to contribute to continuing and prolonging the pandemic. It’s such a stark contrast in mindset to “most college kids in Texas will forge it.”

Yes, most kids I know aren't liars. Of course, birds of a feather and all that.

 

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The UK will have some kind of certification in the end. It's not set up yet, but the vaccination databases exist in each of the four nations.

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6 hours ago, frogger said:

Yes, most kids I know aren't liars. Of course, birds of a feather and all that.

 

So far, other than my children, I do not know of any young adults/ older teens that are vaccinated.  Everyone that I know that is vaccinated is 50 or older. 

And what I witnessed with driver’s ed .... Oh my goodness.  I know TONS of parents who created and signed a log, but didnt actually do it.  None of my close friends at the time, but still probably 10 or more parents that I knew of.  My daughter is taking an online pe class this summer.  She will be doing it, but she knows many people that just faked that log.  As Bootsie said, these cards are easy to fake. It will happen. The logic will be that it is a stupid requirement and kids don’t get sick anyway.  I know, please do not give me all your proof.  I know that is not true.  My town has not been affected much at all and still believes the shut downs were overkill. 

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I’m surprised by the Texas comments. It’s where I was born and raised and where the majority of my family are still living. They are spread all over the state. They are very different from me in regards to religion and politics but almost every single one of them, ages 16 to 80s, have had their vaccines. My college age niece and college cousins have all at least had their first dose. It wasn’t even a question. I was honestly surprised they’ve received the vaccine but according to them it’s what most people they know are doing. 

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14 hours ago, Bootsie said:

Computerized records do not make anything more official.  The card that you linked contains a lot more information than the CDC card regarding both the identity of the person receiving a vaccine AND the administering of the vaccine.  There is no official stamp or signature on the CDC card.  A place the vaccine is administered can simply be several letters such as "CVS"  Mine contains my handwritten name and birthdate, no other identifying information and that handwritten info was not checked against any ID.  

My card contains the stickers with the vaccine charge numbers. 

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1 hour ago, TexasProud said:

So far, other than my children, I do not know of any young adults/ older teens that are vaccinated.  Everyone that I know that is vaccinated is 50 or older. 

And what I witnessed with driver’s ed .... Oh my goodness.  I know TONS of parents who created and signed a log, but didnt actually do it.  None of my close friends at the time, but still probably 10 or more parents that I knew of.  My daughter is taking an online pe class this summer.  She will be doing it, but she knows many people that just faked that log.  As Bootsie said, these cards are easy to fake. It will happen. The logic will be that it is a stupid requirement and kids don’t get sick anyway.  I know, please do not give me all your proof.  I know that is not true.  My town has not been affected much at all and still believes the shut downs were overkill. 

So, those religiously proud Texan are all going to be paying for forged vaccine cards or making forgeries? That's a little different than just signing a homework sheet, especially if is illegal. 

Again, I think you need a different circle of friends, if they are all fake id forging liars. 

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1 minute ago, regentrude said:

My card contains the stickers with the vaccine charge numbers. 

My dds' cards have those stickers, too. Mine and dh's don't. Different pharmacies, different practices. We did all give our primary care physicians' names, and we all showed our insurance cards (obviously not everyone has those). I should call our doctors and see if they've gotten any notification of our vaccinations. 

Ultimately, I think requiring vaccinations for college students sets a reasonable and sensible standard. Yes, some people will falsify their documentation. That doesn't change the fact that the standard is appropriate.

Of course it would have been better to have perfect documentation, but that flies in the face of all sorts of concerns about government overstep. Given the total experience of the last eighteen months, I'll take availability of vaccines, and sensible requirements for their use, happily, in places where we're lucky enough to have them, with or without perfect documentation. Hopefully various people are keeping notes for the better management of the next pandemic. Seems like a good plan would be helpful. Hmmmm. Somehow that strikes a chord...

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4 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

 

So, those religiously proud Texan are all going to be paying for forged vaccine cards or making forgeries? That's a little different than just signing a homework sheet, especially if is illegal. 

It is righteous if you are battling against government oppression.

That's the attitude I have seen among many in my state.

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17 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

 

So, those religiously proud Texan are all going to be paying for forged vaccine cards or making forgeries? That's a little different than just signing a homework sheet, especially if is illegal. 

Again, I think you need a different circle of friends, if they are all fake id forging liars. 

It depends.  Most of my true friends are vaccinated.  The ones that are not would just transfer universities if need be.  These are friends that are not anti-vacs.  They just want to wait 3 years or so to get more definitive info.  They have every other shot. Bur the general population of my town. Yep.  Those at the public school most definitely.  The homeschooling ones  would not lie, are outright defiant, but their kids are just getting an AA or are in the workforce anyway.  College prep isn’t big in my community and especially the homeschool community.

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My hope is that requiring vaccination will be enough to reduce spread on college campuses so that those who are not are protected, especially at smaller schools which tend to have a more likely to vaccinate population. I imagine that MIT, for example, will have a pretty high level of compliance. 

 I'm also guessing that every decent sized community will have some medical person who will be willing to sign waivers quite liberally, and I'd rather see that than falsified records since it will give a better picture of what percentage of students are actually vaccinated. At least, that's what happens here for school vaccine requirements for K-12. 

 

I will say that my expectation of risk would be significantly higher if I were still at Texas Tech, regardless of whether or not it is required, because I know that when there were measles outbreaks in the 1990's and Tech was trying to revaccinate all the students, there was a booming business in forged vaccination records, and the MMR is a much less controversial shot. It was simply that they didn't want to wait in line to get the shot, or were scared of needles. And a lot of it was couched in the "You can't make me" type rhetoric, even then. 

 

 

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My dd#1 is in one of the states with the lowest percentage of the population vaccinated. Yet, among her friends, she was one of the last to get vaccinated. Many work for the U or in nursing homes & had access earlier this year. Maybe she still knows lots of kids who didn't get vaccinated, but among her wide circle of friends, most chose to go into their summer jobs or to travel back home fully vaccinated.

Here, there are much less vaccinated even though my state as a whole is in the top 1/2 for percentage vaccinated. I do wonder how the colleges here will be able to be "back to normal" even though they've said they won't be requiring vaccinations. Note that where my dd#2 is going, they were all in person all this school year - just with slightly small class sizes & mandatory masking. Testing every two weeks was theoretically mandatory but there was never follow through by the Powers That Be & compliance was spotty. 

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3 hours ago, regentrude said:

My card contains the stickers with the vaccine charge numbers. 

What is a vaccine charge number?  I was born in mid sixties. My shot record from before age 20 is on a piece of paper my doc and my mom scribbled on.  One of my sons was vaccinated in New Orleans, no info taken.  None for me either at the mass vaccination place.  Just looked.  Not in my medical records, but I have a card.

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My covid vaccine card has a sticker with all the info, including a barcode, my name/birthday/etc etc. Nothing filled out by hand. 

But yeah, most states will have a registry. 

Texas not as much. 

The only solution to not having some people fake stuff would be to have had a national tracking system, and the same people who are unlikely to vaccinate would have FREAKED OUT over the government tracking their info. 

I truly think in any given situation, most people I encounter who have "proof" of vaccination will actually be vaccinated. Plus I will be. That seems pretty safe, even with a few people faking it. 

Now, this thread does make me not want to travel to Texas...

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Posted (edited)

DH and I got our vaccines in different places.  His card has preprinted stickers for his doses and mine are just handwritten.  I'll have to check with my kids and see what theirs are like.  DH and I did fill out the same medical forms and entered our PCP info on it but the vaccine info hasn't been entered into our medical records (yet).  

Dd's college was very locked up last year and had almost no in-person classes but plans on being back to normal in the fall.  I think this is too big of a jump - they have increased enrollment but don't have large classrooms.  I can't see classrooms crammed with students being a good idea yet in the fall, but we'll see.

ETA;  As of now, Dd's school is having vaccinated students self-report if they've been vaccinated.  If they have been, they don't need to fill out daily health screening anymore or quarantine if exposed to someone with Covid.   They are also allowed to be outdoors without masks I think.  Dd won't be vaccinated until she's home for the summer.

She attends school in TX.  

 

 

 

Edited by Kassia
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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Arctic Bunny said:

If anyone is interested in how it works in my province..... I presented my provincial health card at the time of immunization. They verified my identity by date of birth, address. I did get a card stamped with the date, but I’ve also just checked my electronic health record, and it’s there, with date and time, place and vaccine type.

We have a centralized provincial database for covid vaccinations here too.  DH and I both got emails with provincial vaccine receipts that have all the details: what, where, when, given by whom, which arm, lot numbers, all of it's on there.

ETA I was vaccinated at a provincially run health unit mass vax site, DH had his at t eh family doctor.  All covid vaccinators in the province are using the same database

Edited by wathe
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21 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

My covid vaccine card has a sticker with all the info, including a barcode, my name/birthday/etc etc. Nothing filled out by hand. 

But yeah, most states will have a registry. 

Texas not as much. 

The only solution to not having some people fake stuff would be to have had a national tracking system, and the same people who are unlikely to vaccinate would have FREAKED OUT over the government tracking their info. 

I truly think in any given situation, most people I encounter who have "proof" of vaccination will actually be vaccinated. Plus I will be. That seems pretty safe, even with a few people faking it. 

Now, this thread does make me not want to travel to Texas...

I don't know why you think Texas is any different.  The same little 3X4 card is being used in all states.  Unless universities in other states, and graduations, and stadiums are checking against a database it is the same exact issue.  Texas may have less centralized data collection, but from what I can tell other states are not using those to prove vaccination.  In fact, it is California where people have been arrested for selling fake cards.  Multiple states have been asked to take down the template that could be used to print cards.  

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All of the colleges DD applied to are requiring the vaccine.  She is very happy about that.  One of her criteria for picking where to attend next year was how the school is handling Covid safety.

When I got vaccinated I had to sign a form acknowledging that the information would be sent to the state, but I could have opted out of them sending it to my doctor's office.  I checked my online chart for my doctor and both doses of my covid shots show up there even though I was vaccinated at a Walmart.

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You know, stepping back a bit from being zoomed in on how will people fake it and who will fake it and all that, what a jerk move for people to be putting other people’s health and very lives at risk by lying about being vaccinated in an environment where people are going to be counting on people being truthful about that in order to keep everyone safe. I just can’t get over how selfish and thoughtless of anyone but their own self that is. I have nothing good to say about anyone who would do that.

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The college kids I know of have been eager to get vaccinated as soon as possible. This will allow them to return to a more normal life. You have a different feeling knowing most of the people you encounter on campus will be vaccinated (both dds' CA schools and our local university will be requiring students to be vaccinated in the fall). I don't see eagerness to cheat on this--people here want to be vaccinated. We've been advertising our local vaccine clinics that are now open to walk-up shots to our high school students over 16, and I'm actually a little bit surprised how many have already been vaccinated or are in the process. And maybe that attitude is because in our state, there are consequences when our Covid numbers are high. Restaurants are closed to in-person, no large events like proms, graduations, no spectators at sports. People are motivated to do what they can to get the numbers down so life can be normal. I think that attitude is different than in Texas.

ETA--though I know there is more vaccine hesitancy in rural parts of the state, but not in our college towns.

Edited by Ali in OR
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4 minutes ago, Loowit said:

All of the colleges DD applied to are requiring the vaccine.  She is very happy about that.  One of her criteria for picking where to attend next year was how the school is handling Covid safety.

Same. That’s another part of the extreme self-centeredness. How people handle this affects everyone else as far as whether people can do things like have a semi-normal colllege year next year. My college kids have been taking classes from home for over a year. They desperately want to be able to be back on campus. It’s beyond rude that there are people who think it’s their right to mess that up for everyone else. They can just stay home themself if they don’t want to play by the rules that everyone else is willing to.

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12 hours ago, KSera said:

At least California is catching them 😉. I’m being tongue in cheek, it’s just surprising to me that someone would readily state that they think the majority of kids in their state are dishonest to that degree. Obviously, there will be those kids anywhere, it’s just not the case for most of the college kids I know. In the case of Covid, my college kids and all their friends have all been eager to get vaccinated as soon as they can, and interestingly, it’s not primarily so they don’t get Covid themselves, but because they sincerely don’t want to pass it on to anyone else and they don’t want to contribute to continuing and prolonging the pandemic. It’s such a stark contrast in mindset to “most college kids in Texas will forge it.”

I am not sure who has the mindset that "most college kids in Texas will forge it."  I certainly don't have that mindset.  I think most young people will choose to be vaccinated.  I do not think asking people to show a paper card that is easily reproducible is going to increase vaccination rates.  I think that applies to other parts of the country as well as Texas.  

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26 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I don't know why you think Texas is any different.  The same little 3X4 card is being used in all states.  Unless universities in other states, and graduations, and stadiums are checking against a database it is the same exact issue.  Texas may have less centralized data collection, but from what I can tell other states are not using those to prove vaccination.  In fact, it is California where people have been arrested for selling fake cards.  Multiple states have been asked to take down the template that could be used to print cards.  

We don't have anywhere yet asking for proof, so I don'tknow what type of proof they are asking for, at this point. It all seems theoretical so far?

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