Jump to content

Menu

What order would you fix up a house?(pictures added)


Recommended Posts

Here is what needs to be done...flooring, drywall, painting, new cupboards in the kitchen, painting the ceiling. This involves hallways, entry way, kitchen, living room, dining room, and family room. All ruined by the winter storms. No general contractors available right now so we are thinking of moving forward with individually hiring people to do everything. Any other good advice for this venture would be great! Thanks!

Edited by Janeway
Link to post
Share on other sites

Subfloors, drywall, paint, cabinets , paint ceiling floor, appliances.  That way you don’t have to stress about the floors during the drywall and painting stage and while moving around the cabinets.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Drywall and paint, first.    There are some people who do 'paint and drywall' (I mean that is their business-both paint and drywall), so I would see if you can find someone like that to come look at it and give a quote.  
Then floors. 
Cabinets.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, WildflowerMom said:

Oh yeah, I didn't think about subfloors.  Are they ruined, too?   

Since we are in the south, it is concrete. So we are fine on that. What do you all think of leaving the kitchen with the tile and then putting wood everywhere else? Or something that looks like wood. The kitchen tile was not damaged but everything else was.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We have had lvp that looks like wood.  I don't think I would like tile-to-lvp.  We have tile (1980s tile) and need to replace carpet (at some point) and I am leaning towards going with replacing carpet and keeping the tile.  My husband and I both like the tile, have positive associations with it, and we have no intention of selling this house.  

If that were not the case and you were looking at lvp -- I think lvp is good in kitchens, it is pretty good as far as potential water damage -- it can stand up to a lot of water, even though I think not as much as tile. 

What you think counts for a lot too, what do you think about a transition of tile to lvp?  

I have no experience with wood, just lvp -- I have been pretty satisfied with lvp.  

Edit:  But in this house, leaning towards tile and carpet, because frankly we are people who like tile and carpet!  

Edit:  If we were possibly moving soon I would think lvp would be more sensible.  My husband actively likes carpet, though, so it's a preference, and we both like 1980s tile ----- why, I don't know, but we both just do, we both have good memories from it and like it.  

Edit:  for our house, wood would be a personal preference, I don't think it would be more valuable for resell compared to lvp -- that has to do with the price range of our house.  That is my opinion/understanding.  It could be different in your neighborhood -- to some extent, if you know everybody in your neighborhood has one or the other, I think go with what is the standard for your neighborhood.

Our current neighborhood does have wood, but we aren't selling, so......

Edited by Lecka
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Janeway said:

Since we are in the south, it is concrete. So we are fine on that. What do you all think of leaving the kitchen with the tile and then putting wood everywhere else? Or something that looks like wood. The kitchen tile was not damaged but everything else was.

Are y'all selling this house?  Or is this your home?  (I ask because if it's your home, tear out the kitchen tile if you don't like it for whatever reason--now is the perfect time to do that)   Has there been any water damage before?  If so, I'd probably tile everything with regular tile or a wood-look tile.   (Having a home water-damaged would probably scar me for life, that's why I've suggested regular tile or the wood-look tiles.)  

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Marazzi-Montagna-Dapple-Gray-6-in-x-24-in-Porcelain-Floor-and-Wall-Tile-14-53-sq-ft-case-ULM7/205216805

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am seeing that tile-wood look in kitchens and bathrooms in my area, I think it looks great -- I have no idea if it is going to just get really popular, or end up looking dated, because it's kind-of new and trendy here.  But my area is very possibly behind the times nationally if you know what I mean.  

Edit:  in flips -- there are a lot of flips in my neighborhood right now, and several have this in kitchens and bathrooms.  Other have wood in the kitchen and other parts of the house, and this in the bathrooms.  

Or it looks like wood to me.  I can't tell from pictures and there are actually hardly any open houses right now, bc covid.  We did go to an open house for a house on our street, and it looked like this kind of tile in the entry way, kitchen, and bathroom, and I would assume those had previously been older-looking tile.    

Edited by Lecka
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lecka said:

We have had lvp that looks like wood.  I don't think I would like tile-to-lvp.  We have tile (1980s tile) and need to replace carpet (at some point) and I am leaning towards going with replacing carpet and keeping the tile.  My husband and I both like the tile, have positive associations with it, and we have no intention of selling this house.  

If that were not the case and you were looking at lvp -- I think lvp is good in kitchens, it is pretty good as far as potential water damage -- it can stand up to a lot of water, even though I think not as much as tile. 

What you think counts for a lot too, what do you think about a transition of tile to lvp?  

I have no experience with wood, just lvp -- I have been pretty satisfied with lvp.  

Edit:  But in this house, leaning towards tile and carpet, because frankly we are people who like tile and carpet!  

Edit:  If we were possibly moving soon I would think lvp would be more sensible.  My husband actively likes carpet, though, so it's a preference, and we both like 1980s tile ----- why, I don't know, but we both just do, we both have good memories from it and like it.  

Edit:  for our house, wood would be a personal preference, I don't think it would be more valuable for resell compared to lvp -- that has to do with the price range of our house.  That is my opinion/understanding.  It could be different in your neighborhood -- to some extent, if you know everybody in your neighborhood has one or the other, I think go with what is the standard for your neighborhood.

Our current neighborhood does have wood, but we aren't selling, so......

We are selling the house as soon as it is fixed up. What is LVP? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a tile kitchen and the rest of the house is hard wood flooring.  It flows well and doesn’t look odd. Part of me would like to have wood looking tile in the kitchen but it is fine as is  and I don’t see a need to remove it and replace it.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, WildflowerMom said:

Are y'all selling this house?  Or is this your home?  (I ask because if it's your home, tear out the kitchen tile if you don't like it for whatever reason--now is the perfect time to do that)   Has there been any water damage before?  If so, I'd probably tile everything with regular tile or a wood-look tile.   (Having a home water-damaged would probably scar me for life, that's why I've suggested regular tile or the wood-look tiles.)  

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Marazzi-Montagna-Dapple-Gray-6-in-x-24-in-Porcelain-Floor-and-Wall-Tile-14-53-sq-ft-case-ULM7/205216805

It is my parents' house. It was ruined from the storms just a couple weeks after Dad died. So we will sell it once it is fixed up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Janeway said:

Here is what needs to be done...flooring, drywall, painting, new cupboards in the kitchen, painting the ceiling. This involves hallways, entry way, kitchen, living room, dining room, and family room. 

Some of these have to be done at the same time. You need your cabinets off of the wall to replace the drywall behind it.

If your flooring going in is wood or tile, you can cover and then do drywall, but if you are putting in carpet, I would do it last....and I would pull the carpet first and just live on subfloors while drywall and painting are going on....

You didn’t add trim..:but your baseboards have to be pulled for some of this also. 
 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, if no one is living there, I would strip the house bare and then put back in what you have to for resale. Like, flooring and cabinets and drywall out and then build back. I would do drywall, then flooring (if not carpet), then paint (ceilings and walls), then cabinets.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd do floors last & paint right before the floors go in.

So, pull cabinets & trim if necessary, do drywall/mudding & prime those walls, put in new cabinets, paint everything, then replace the flooring & trim.

Source: I just had my kitchen stripped down to drywall & holes in the wall & ceiling. The order I listed was the order the contractors went in putting it back together.

 

20210322_173122.jpg

Edited by RootAnn
I lived it (street cred)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It could. Does it depend on the type of flooring? That would be a question I would ask the contractors.

@JanewayYou are going to find long wait times for contractors & high prices because so many people in your area need work done for the same reasons. I'd start calling immediately to get on lists & get bids. And check references & get locked in on calendars. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lvp is luxury vinyl plank.  It is cheaper than wood and it’s pretty popular.

If you are selling — you might need to put in what fits your house and neighborhood.

For some houses — wood would be more expensive than what would fit the house or neighborhood, and then the luxury vinyl plank or the tile stuff that looks like wood could be good. 
 

The tile stuff that looks like wood is new to me — I think it looks great though and it is in a lot of flips locally.  I think it is desirable.

 

If you have a more expensive house/neighborhood, lvp won’t fit and could lower your sale price.

 

It could be worth talking to a realtor or looking at houses for sell to see if you can tell what is popular.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Was there home owners insurance or a mortgage (or both) on the property?  I ask because if either of those things are in place, you may not have a choice on how you choose to fix it. 

 

Even if there was no mortgage or insurance....if you are wanting to sell it, I still recommend finding a general contractor.  Perhaps get in touch with your realtor and see if they can help you in that regard.  DH and I had the home that we owned sustain $20k+ worth of water damaged due to a burst pipe while it was vacant (we had the heat on and were doing regular checks, it was just one of those things.)  Anyway, even with the work performed by a quality general contractor approved by the mortgage and insurance company, we still eventually ran into some inspection issues when it finally sold.  They were minor, but they easily could have been so much work.

 

If you don't plan to sell as is to a cash investor (which we also did with FIL's house after he passed) then I suggest doing what you can to get a quality general contractor or at minimum, a good project manager to handle all of this for you.  If you ARE planning to sell as is to a cash investor, and there's no mortgage or insurance to worry about...............................just leave it as it is and take what you can get.  Let them handle the repairs. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

Some of these have to be done at the same time. You need your cabinets off of the wall to replace the drywall behind it.

If your flooring going in is wood or tile, you can cover and then do drywall, but if you are putting in carpet, I would do it last....and I would pull the carpet first and just live on subfloors while drywall and painting are going on....

You didn’t add trim..:but your baseboards have to be pulled for some of this also. 
 

 

The baseboards were ruined. All carpet and baseboards and even the laminate flooring and tile is gone. The drywall has been cut in places to air to keep mold out. That was all done by a company that does water damage type stuff. I think they were called Service Master. The insurance sent them out. The cupboards were torn out too and counters. Flooring in the kitchen remains and ...I just remembered, one bedroom also had damaged floors.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

Was there home owners insurance or a mortgage (or both) on the property?  I ask because if either of those things are in place, you may not have a choice on how you choose to fix it. 

 

Even if there was no mortgage or insurance....if you are wanting to sell it, I still recommend finding a general contractor.  Perhaps get in touch with your realtor and see if they can help you in that regard.  DH and I had the home that we owned sustain $20k+ worth of water damaged due to a burst pipe while it was vacant (we had the heat on and were doing regular checks, it was just one of those things.)  Anyway, even with the work performed by a quality general contractor approved by the mortgage and insurance company, we still eventually ran into some inspection issues when it finally sold.  They were minor, but they easily could have been so much work.

 

If you don't plan to sell as is to a cash investor (which we also did with FIL's house after he passed) then I suggest doing what you can to get a quality general contractor or at minimum, a good project manager to handle all of this for you.  If you ARE planning to sell as is to a cash investor, and there's no mortgage or insurance to worry about...............................just leave it as it is and take what you can get.  Let them handle the repairs. 

I thought about selling to an investor. But my sister wants to fix it up. I think maybe she feels like it is “the right thing to do.” She has referenced that Mom would have been so upset by the damages so she wants to make it look nice. For me, I am secretly hoping we keep the house and my sister stays. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are just three pictures. The water mitigation company removed parts of walls, flooring from most rooms. Left kitchen tile and upper cabinets. We are working to move everything out. I have SO MUCH stuff in my own garage now!!!! My parents garage was packed and now has been largely cleaned out.

CF965218-F64F-44D8-82F2-C18022451948.jpeg

184B6F47-59D4-4048-B931-3F68D591B2AE.jpeg

0C58E097-2991-471E-AC07-87934CC93BF0.jpeg

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Janeway changed the title to What order would you fix up a house?(pictures added)

Yeah, you're going to get way more money if you update as you go along rather than just selling it to an investor. 

I'd make sure to put into the insurance claim that they need to do a full cabinet replacement because those are going to no longer match and that on things like the wallpapered wall that had to be cut away that because you are now are either going to have to remove wallpaper (which I do recommend---they can skim coat as they come to fix drywall if there are tears from the wallpaper removal) and paint or replace wallpaper. 

ETA: If you are going to flip the house--and you are already doing painting + flooring, I would get the price down by just having them spray the entire interior. You'll need to update for resale anyway, and it's so much cheaper for them to just spray in 1-2 colors and move on.

Edited by prairiewindmomma
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...