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What writing would you recommend for this Grade 5er? W&R, TC, Wordsworth, IEW...?


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5 hours ago, Demeter said:

I think she is just guessing from her experience with reading.  

AKA studied dictation. So you give her a nice model, you analyze it for the punctuation of the week, then you dictate to her.

Have you thought about doing a basic editing program? I had a couple I used with my dd around that age. 

https://www.teachercreated.com/products/take-five-minutes-a-history-fact-a-day-for-editing-3051  This was GREAT for dd. I printed the whole book, wrote the number of errors for each task, and cut it into strips to fold and put in a jar. That way each day she could just pull out one and do it independently.

https://www.criticalthinking.com/punctuation-puzzler-run-ons-b1-ebook.html  Punctuation Puzzlers were also good with my dd.

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I just want to say a big THANK-YOU to everyone who replied to my post. There are some great options for curriculum here 😀 ...and you've all helped broaden my understanding of how to *think* about our writing journey in homeschooling. I've appreciated all the comments, perspectives, advice and support!

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On 3/14/2021 at 3:58 PM, Demeter said:

I was wondering too about a program like IEW, but the consensus seems to be that it can be stifling for natural writers.

My DS8 loves to write & IEW has been great for him! I think a lot of people overdo the checklist side of IEW, making it more rigid than it ought to be & losing sight of the actual intentions of the program. Then it becomes arduous & monotonous.

Units 1 & 2 focus on pulling key words from individual sentences in a source, putting them into an outline, then rewriting from that outline. It hands them what to write about so they can focus on how to write. 

Unit 3 has them continue to look for key words, but now they are answers to specific questions & retelling with far less information from the original source. 

Unit 4 transitions to finding key facts that answer their own questions & further narrowing the number of ideas they are selecting directly from a source. 

Unit 5 has them begin to pull from their own minds to describe images & adding context before & after. 

Unit 6 expands upon Unit 4, having them now pull from multiple sources & tying facts from each into a cohesive whole. 

Unit 7 is inventive / creative writing. 

Unit 8 & Unit 9 are found in later levels. They introduce formal essay models (both the basic “5-paragraph” model & others that are longer or shorter) & literary analysis. 

These offer a lot of variety & can be covered at different paces to suit your needs. At the same time, you’re introducing & practicing stylistic techniques (one at a time, until “easy”). Everything from word choice to sentence length / organization to literary devices. 

It’s not meant to be the only way they ever write. The techniques they learn aren’t meant to be the definition of “good writing”. You’re simply providing tools (& experience using those tools) that the student can later pull from as desired to suit their audience & purpose. It’s all meant to be outgrown. 

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On 3/15/2021 at 4:44 PM, PeterPan said:

If you were to go to a psychologist for evals, usually for ADHD they're going to do an EF (executive function) survey and maybe a sustained attention computer test. Some of that, if you think hard enough, you already know. I'm all for evals, been down that path a lot, lol, but you are already seeing it. The biggest jolt for me was the processing speed. That I knew nothing about and didn't anticipate. She did everything so FAST that I really had no clue how affected her processing speed was. That just varies with the kid, but it's something to notice too. It caused the issues with math, because her brain would bog down in the processing. They can quantify it and it's a disability. It responds to meds btw. I probably should have medicated a bit early than we did (16). If I had realized the things it would improve on her, I would have medicated earlier. It wasn't really about behavior or being bad, because her behavior was good. Her math and ACT scores went up dramatically with the ADHD meds.

Thank-you for bringing up psych evals.  When my daughter was in Montessori preschool/kindergarten her teacher noticed a few *red flags*.  The psychologist said she was a bit young for a PsychEd test, but the school offered to use some funding to pay for it so we went ahead.  I just found some of my scribblings of her results.  Everything was high-average (working memory, processing speed, visual/spatial, fluid reasoning)....everything *except* verbal comprehension (50%) and they said specifically 'verbally expressing concepts.'  Their recommendations are very much in line with some of yours (like her getting concepts better in isolation, keeping things simpler/shorter, keeping learning visual and/or written). Oh, and they said she had some 'Emotional-Attention disregulation', but not ADHD.  When my daughter went on to French PS for grades 1 to 4 the teachers said she was doing just fine and that she had been too young for the PsychEd results to be meaningful 🤔.  And honestly, I was totally overwhelmed by the report... and since the public school disregarded it, I kinda did too!

Soooo....I guess now I'm going to find her report and pop on over to the LC board to do some sleuthing!  Hoping I can glean some more tips for maximizing her success in all learning.  Really glad you brought up that *something* might be going here! 

 

On 3/19/2021 at 4:16 PM, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

My DS8 loves to write & IEW has been great for him! I think a lot of people overdo the checklist side of IEW, making it more rigid than it ought to be & losing sight of the actual intentions of the program. Then it becomes arduous & monotonous.

It’s not meant to be the only way they ever write. The techniques they learn aren’t meant to be the definition of “good writing”. You’re simply providing tools (& experience using those tools) that the student can later pull from as desired to suit their audience & purpose. It’s all meant to be outgrown. 

Thank-you...this was very helpful!  I'm considering the program... just a bit apprehensive due to the combined cost of the Structure and Style for teaching AND student.  It's a bit of a leap!

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31 minutes ago, Demeter said:

Thank-you...this was very helpful!  I'm considering the program... just a bit apprehensive due to the combined cost of the Structure and Style for teaching AND student.  It's a bit of a leap!

Yeah, we don’t use TWSS or the SSS - we jumped directly into one of the Theme Books. My order came with temporary access to a set of video workshops (about 24hrs of material) & those were plenty to get going. 

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15 minutes ago, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

Yeah, we don’t use TWSS or the SSS - we jumped directly into one of the Theme Books. My order came with temporary access to a set of video workshops (about 24hrs of material) & those were plenty to get going. 

Oh gosh...clearly I need to explore the program more.  I didn't get past the TWSS or SSS and thought you *had* to do those first.

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/20/2021 at 1:16 AM, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

My DS8 loves to write & IEW has been great for him! I think a lot of people overdo the checklist side of IEW, making it more rigid than it ought to be & losing sight of the actual intentions of the program. Then it becomes arduous & monotonous.

Units 1 & 2 focus on pulling key words from individual sentences in a source, putting them into an outline, then rewriting from that outline. It hands them what to write about so they can focus on how to write. 

Unit 3 has them continue to look for key words, but now they are answers to specific questions & retelling with far less information from the original source. 

Unit 4 transitions to finding key facts that answer their own questions & further narrowing the number of ideas they are selecting directly from a source. 

Unit 5 has them begin to pull from their own minds to describe images & adding context before & after. 

Unit 6 expands upon Unit 4, having them now pull from multiple sources & tying facts from each into a cohesive whole. 

Unit 7 is inventive / creative writing.  Starting from the fifth grade, it is also possible to give as an assignment, writing essays. For convenience, you can use eduzaurus if it is difficult for a student to cope with the assignment.

Unit 8 & Unit 9 are found in later levels. They introduce formal essay models (both the basic “5-paragraph” model & others that are longer or shorter) & literary analysis. 

These offer a lot of variety & can be covered at different paces to suit your needs. At the same time, you’re introducing & practicing stylistic techniques (one at a time, until “easy”). Everything from word choice to sentence length / organization to literary devices. 

It’s not meant to be the only way they ever write. The techniques they learn aren’t meant to be the definition of “good writing”. You’re simply providing tools (& experience using those tools) that the student can later pull from as desired to suit their audience & purpose. It’s all meant to be outgrown. 

Thank you so much for your recommendations. They helped me, I am 29 years old, and I am learning English writing. Your answer is the quintessence of practice with these programs. I immediately felt it. I decided not to send to school in the US but to learn to write on my own. Yesterday I tried your recommendations, thank you very much!

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/16/2021 at 10:41 AM, regentrude said:

I like her writing. very fresh, and I can see how she is mimicking the style of the books she is reading.

If this were my child, I would not do ANY formal writing curriculum. I would let her read liberally, a wide variety of genres and periods, and have her write, and write, and write. Go over some of her writing and correct language mechanics, word choices. Focus on one aspect each time.

I pulled my kids out of PS in 5th and 6th grades respectively and never did any writing "curriculum". We read LOTS. Both became excellent writers.

Yes.  It looks like she is doing fine and is quite age appropriate.  Just keep going on and give her chances to write for fun.

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