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Karen in CO

Looking to add more challenging writing - IEW FMF or CW Aesop or some better idea?

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Advice Please. I am thinking of accelerating writing plans for my dd. I had planned to use WWE this year and next then move into CW.

 

My problem is that my dd is picking up the methods and techniques from WWE much faster than I had planned. I think that after the holidays I want to add a meatier writing program for her.

 

She does copywork daily, a couple of sentences of unstudied dictation once a week, and four lines of poetry from studied dictation once a week. She gives good summaries for her narrations and can write them. She is currently writing her own fairy tale. She loves different versions of classic fairy tales and is writing her own with elements from several others.

 

She was an unwilling captive during her brother's IEW C lessons and endured years of listening to us discuss literature and writing. I thought IEW Fables, Myths, and Fairy Tales might appeal to her love of tales and leverage the recent work I have done with IEW.

 

My ultimate plan is to have us work through CW. I am certain she is ready for Aesop A. Is this the best place to start her? Would something more gentle like Writing Tales be better?

 

And of course, since she is only in second - I haven't actually started formal grammar yet. We have talked about grammar in dictation. She knows basic parts of speech and punctuation. Is it time to add in formal grammar if I move to a more formal writing?

 

My other option is to just keep doing what we are doing and increase the length or complexity of the passages. There is merit in this option, but I think she is ready for more.

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We thought WT was a lot more FUN than CW Aesop, so that's where I'd recommend you put her. And yes, she's very ready for WT/CW. I did WT2 last year with my dd (3rd), and it was a good year. She's going to be fine with the amount of grammar. If you want to do some formal grammar with her, you can, but I wouldn't stress over it. Just completing FLL2 (or memorizing the defs of the parts of speech) gives you enough grammar to go into WT2 comfortably, or at least it did my dd. We did SG alongside in gentle doses, and it was more than adequate. You could start into WT and see what you think, but you could just as easily wait till WT2 to add some grammar. Actually, what I added in WT2 was daily editing work and a punctuation study. That was time well spent, highly recommend.

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Thanks Elizabeth. I'll look at WT again too. I'm always going back and forth between feeling like I am pushing and feeling like I am holding her back. This week she revolted against the copywork I had picked out and insisted on using Jabberwocky for copywork and dictation. I don't see how she can spell those words, but she does.

 

Has the new baby smell worn off yet?

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I've never used Writing Tales, but it does seem like it is more fun and gentler than Aesop. And if you use WT, you can still transition into the CW series later.

 

If you do decide to go with Aesop, I urge you to spend some time really learning the program yourself, so that you can customize it for your dd. Also, I advise you to not fret about the speed at which you move through it. IMO, Aesop is pretty easy for a kid like your dd, with aptitude for and interest in writing. However, Homer is a big step up after that in terms of grammar; I think most kids are not going to be ready for Homer before 5th grade. That's been my experience.

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Karen, I douse him in lavendar baby wash and lotion to keep him extra sweet. :)

 

Just so you know, you might have an issue I haven't had, since you have a dc who writes so actively on her own. Don't think that your writing program has to usurp her writing or let it turn into a battle. You're actually not trying to accomplish a lot in WT1, but you're trying to develop the habit of her writing because she's told to (not just because she wants to) and accepting criticism. And that will create the foundation for you to do more advanced things in WT2 and when you move on to Homer, etc. So don't think that it's not valuable just because it's not HARD. Figure out exactly what you're trying to accomplish (which may be one of those psych goals and not even actual writing skills for a while) and stick to your guns on that point. Everything else within the program can flex. If she wants to flex it in other ways, that's fun. Don't get hung up on minor points in the program or her not wanting to do certain things.

 

I guess I'm rambling here about something I've never experienced, might not even be what happens to you. But anyway, that's a word to the wise. Doing her assignments is different from her pleasure writing, and it's ok to just have her do them. It's in WT2 where the earth moves and it gets amazing. The discipline of WT1, writing for an assignment and not just pleasure, prepares you to be able to do WT2. In other words, you don't have to stop WT/CW if she happens to think she doesn't "like" it. It won't ruin her writer soul. :)

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Figure out exactly what you're trying to accomplish (which may be one of those psych goals and not even actual writing skills for a while) and stick to your guns on that point. Everything else within the program can flex. If she wants to flex it in other ways, that's fun. Don't get hung up on minor points in the program or her not wanting to do certain things.

 

Yes exactly. That is what I have been coming to terms with. I had to figure out why I wanted her to do copywork and dictation. I had originally wanted it to be everything - writing, spelling, grammar, handwriting, poetry, and maybe do the dishes too. Which was fine for it in K and 1st. Once she started growing in her own writing, it wasn't meeting all of those goals anymore. That is why I want to pull writing out into its own place and some of the grammar with it.

 

Okay - where was I going with this? Hmmm, I think I was agreeing with you. You are wise. I try to figure out why I have certain things in our schedule, if they are still meeting our needs, if they are just things she is being stubborn over, if there is a better way to do them. Like with the copywork. She is ready for more thinking in her writing, but copywork isn't going anywhere. I'm going to add to the writing and let her continue to choose her own poetry for copywork which adds to her enjoyment of it and lets it meet the pared-down goals of copywork and dictation.

 

and don't let that baby grow up. keep him fresh and new for as long as you can.

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Since CW is where I do want to end up, I think I will go ahead and order the core book for Aesop - but I wouldn't want to start it until I at least January. Thanks for the advice about grammar. I knew it would hold her back from writing eventually. I guess it is time to start grammar - again.

 

Suggestions that WT is more fun that CW, make me think she won't like it. She prefers Singapore IP word problems to RS games. She likes her work to be challenging and prefers to play when she is done - unless you count science experiments.

 

 

Nobody is suggesting IEW?

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Advice Please. I am thinking of accelerating writing plans for my dd. I had planned to use WWE this year and next then move into CW.

 

My problem is that my dd is picking up the methods and techniques from WWE much faster than I had planned. I think that after the holidays I want to add a meatier writing program for her.

 

She does copywork daily, a couple of sentences of unstudied dictation once a week, and four lines of poetry from studied dictation once a week. She gives good summaries for her narrations and can write them. She is currently writing her own fairy tale. She loves different versions of classic fairy tales and is writing her own with elements from several others.

 

She was an unwilling captive during her brother's IEW C lessons and endured years of listening to us discuss literature and writing. I thought IEW Fables, Myths, and Fairy Tales might appeal to her love of tales and leverage the recent work I have done with IEW.

 

My ultimate plan is to have us work through CW. I am certain she is ready for Aesop A. Is this the best place to start her? Would something more gentle like Writing Tales be better?

 

And of course, since she is only in second - I haven't actually started formal grammar yet. We have talked about grammar in dictation. She knows basic parts of speech and punctuation. Is it time to add in formal grammar if I move to a more formal writing?

 

My other option is to just keep doing what we are doing and increase the length or complexity of the passages. There is merit in this option, but I think she is ready for more.

 

 

 

She sounds a little like my dd, 6.5 doing 2nd grade work in most things. She loves writing, spelling, grammar--all of it. She's comfortable with WWE Year 2 work and I"m thinking ahead for next year. I think we'll continue WWE and not start Aesop until 4th grade. I have Matt Whitling's "Imitations in Writing" for next year to work with. I have a 7.5 year old son who is also a 2nd grader and I really want to keep them together, and I just don't think he'll be ready for Aesop (or later CW) levels early, so I'll encourage her to do extra writing on the side. I think. :001_smile:

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