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1 hour ago, MamaSprout said:

This is pretty trustworthy, right? If a professor is 1.8/ 5 or 2/5 they really should be avoided? Especially if the reviews are about quality of the teaching?

It's a weird situation as they are actually teaching advanced classes at a "high school", but I thought I should look them up, you know, just in case.

We've found that a lot depends on the subject and the level of courses that the professor may teach. A particular math teacher that we absolutely love has four or five students a semester who are motivated to go on RMP and give him very low ratings. He does not give fluff grades, and students fail his classes. Students who start off at the cc in lower level math classes often leave reviews that I don't consider "trustworthy" because they encounter difficulty with the subject and don't necessarily put in the work to improve. Then they go on RMP and excoriate professors because they got bad grades.

I try to read enough reviews to get an idea of the kernels of truth about a professor, not necessarily the overall number. If a professor is a very harsh grader overall, you will usually be able to figure that out. You can usually get an idea of the grading structure of the course: 4 exams with dropping the lowest score? 3 exams with no partial credit? study guides available? etc.

With math in particular, I tend to disregard bad ratings from students in precalculus courses or lower (usually 100 level courses). I give a lot more weight to the ratings given by students in calculus or above. 

It's also worth considering that many students who are motivated to write ratings on RMP tend to feel strongly one way or the other. People who think a professor is ok or adequate don't necessarily go and write a rating!

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Posted (edited)

Hmmm. Both teachers would be unavoidable. The one 2/5 review for one of the teachers looks like it's from when he was a teaching grad student (Calc 2, though). Dd would have to have him for 3 classes and he is the head of couple of extra-curricular things. I'll have her reach out to some current students.

The other one just has terrible reviews all around, 1.5/2 consistently.

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25 minutes ago, MamaSprout said:

Hmmm. Both teachers would be unavoidable. The one 2/5 review for one of the teachers looks like it's from when he was a teaching grad student (Calc 2, though). Dd would have to have him for 3 classes and he is the head of couple of extra-curricular things. I'll have her reach out to some current students.

The other one just has terrible reviews all around, 1.5/2 consistently, and it kind of looks like he's teaching high school because he washed out in universities. Dd would need to have him for calc-based physics, so a full year probably. 

Ooof... Well, if you don't have a choice, it is what it is. High school students don't usually get to select different sections with different professors, so there's that. If you expect that the teacher will be a complete disaster, perhaps your daughter could get a head start on self-teaching herself the material over the summer to overcome some of the likely instructional shortfalls? That certainly won't help if the professor is a bad grader or writes unfair exams, but perhaps getting ahead in the course content will help? Good luck!

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Our other option is to keep homeschooling (which is looking more attractive atm depending on next year's DE options). When dd visited this school they pretty much only showed her humanities classes (which seem to have really great instructors). Since she's kind of a STEM kid though, I thought we should dig a little deeper. 

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Rate My Professor is usually trustworthy, but we've found this semester it can't be relied on to be accurate all the time. The Speech class DD is currently taking at uni has a professor that has very low ratings on RMP, but the professor is actually very fair w/ grading and kind. Another place to check is the Reddit for the university -- sometimes it is more accurate than RMP if you find a thread on the class or professor.

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Many professors don't have any comments, some have a few comments, others have many comments. If one sees a pattern there is probably truth to that.

1 or 2 semesters back my DD was looking at a Professor and there was little or no feedback on him.  I googled him (or read about him on the school web site) and he seemed interesting and with a lot of background in the subject.

I suggested to my DD that she give it a shot and it was a good class for her.

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We've used RMP for years and certainly look for many of the things mentioned above.  We also check Reddit.  

One thing we've found is that the pandemic has really changed things.  Some professors haven't adapted well (or at all) to doing virtual classes.  They may have been great in person, but are very disappointing as online instructors and that is too recent to show up much on reviews anywhere.

 

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As the wife of a former college professor, I strongly dislike sites like RMP for the reasons Ummlbrahim mentioned. If a professor has high standards and grades students accordingly, he/she ends up with terrible reviews from disgruntled students. (I never searched DH on these sites, but some of his end-of-semester evaluations were painful — and correlated to the grade a student earned).

Please teach your students how to seek help when they are struggling with a professor’s method or style and how to leave constructive and civil feedback for professors. ❤️

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On 3/3/2021 at 7:27 AM, UmmIbrahim said:

 

I try to read enough reviews to get an idea of the kernels of truth about a professor, not necessarily the overall number. If a professor is a very harsh grader overall, you will usually be able to figure that out. You can usually get an idea of the grading structure of the course: 4 exams with dropping the lowest score? 3 exams with no partial credit? study guides available? etc.

 

How do you get that information before the course begins? Do you contact the professors and ask them ahead of time?  

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2 minutes ago, Garga said:

How do you get that information before the course begins? Do you contact the professors and ask them ahead of time?  

The reviews in RMP often have students who mention specifics about the class setup. Professors who have more reviews overall (i.e. ones who have been teaching for more than just a semester or a year, for example) are more likely to have previous students who mention the course structure in the reviews. We never contacted a professor in advance of registering for a section, but that might be a good idea if you have specific questions about how they run the class. At our cc, there is a fair amount of variability with regards to the number of exams and whether the lowest score is dropped. Likewise with regards to homework formats/calculator use on exams/exams matching the material covered in lectures/etc. We've found that sort of information (provided there is a large enough volume of reviews) to be fairly accurate on RMP.

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35 minutes ago, LAS in LA said:

Please teach your students how to seek help when they are struggling with a professor’s method or style and how to leave constructive and civil feedback for professors. ❤️

Yep. The professor that we really love, who has less than stellar reviews, is so accessible to students. He is constantly promoting his office hours and offers students with questions so many opportunities to meet up with him after class to go over problems. Sadly, many students don't take him up on those offers.

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40 minutes ago, LAS in LA said:

 If a professor has high standards and grades students accordingly, he/she ends up with terrible reviews from disgruntled students. 

 

This is so true!  My dd had an amazing (and very difficult) professor and she loved him, but he had terrible ratings because the students didn't want to do the work.  She admired him so much and chose to take more classes with him instead of taking easier ones just because she thought he was so great - but she had to work very hard in his classes.  He is a brilliant man with high standards and I feel bad that he is teaching in the wrong environment (teaching mostly required core courses in a community college).

3 minutes ago, UmmIbrahim said:

Yep. The professor that we really love, who has less than stellar reviews, is so accessible to students. He is constantly promoting his office hours and offers students with questions so many opportunities to meet up with him after class to go over problems. Sadly, many students don't take him up on those offers.

We see this too - with the professor I mentioned above as well as others.  

 

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10 minutes ago, EKS said:

We've found that if you see the same sorts of comments over and over, it is generally pretty accurate.

especially if you sort by class.  Like it was said above, sometimes the lower levels get worse reviews and upper levels with more serious students get better ones.  

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I think it’s worth reading for details. Sometimes a theme emerges. Sometimes you get details on how the course is graded. 
It’s important to weed out embittered students. For example, one of the math teachers here with super low ratings teaches stats, a course designed to satisfy math requirement for those who don’t want to take any other math class. So kids assume stats should be super easy and rant at this Professor for actually having standards. But then when I looked closely at reviews, I realized kids taking upper level math with this guy were fairly happy - they thought he was a tough but thorough teacher. Those same qualities weren’t appreciated by stats students. 

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I would look at consistency of comments and scores across students and semesters in RMP.  If all of the reviews come from one semester, I would not pay as much attention as I would if I were seeing the same thing semester after semester.  There can be things that happen that upset a student and makes them write a bad review, but there are also things that can happen in one semester, such as a group of students are caught cheating.  Some schools have students who tend to be negative, students at other schools tend to be very polite, and students at other schools tend to be apathetic--so I would also look and see how professors at that particular school tend to be rated by students.  

Also, there have been instances where some of the best reviews of professors are fake reviews; so good reviews are not always reliable, etiher.  

And then there are always the mysteries--as a college professor I look at my reviews and see the student who complains about the simulation game when I have never had any such game in my class, or complain about the presentation in a class in which there was no presentation--I don't know if they are students who are enrolled in my class but can't keep there various professors straight, if they just got a wrong professor/school, or if they are simply mystery bots on RMP.  

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DH said that when they did statistics about course evaluations, it correlated very well with the grade the student got in the course. 

I can tell you that I've gotten many course evaluations over the year, and I never felt like they represented how well the students learned the material at all. For one thing, the students honestly can't tell. How would they know if they learned something? 

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9 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

 

I can tell you that I've gotten many course evaluations over the year, and I never felt like they represented how well the students learned the material at all. For one thing, the students honestly can't tell. How would they know if they learned something? 

I don't understand - how would students not know if they learned something?  It seems obvious to me that they'll know whether or not they learned material from the beginning to the end of the semester.  

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33 minutes ago, Kassia said:

I don't understand - how would students not know if they learned something?  It seems obvious to me that they'll know whether or not they learned material from the beginning to the end of the semester.  

Not really. They don’t know what they are SUPPOSED to know. Trust me — kids who get an A usually feel like they learned enough, especially if they worked hard.

Edited by Not_a_Number
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5 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

DH said that when they did statistics about course evaluations, it correlated very well with the grade the student got in the course. 

I suppose this might sometimes be the case, but I know of plenty of times when a group of students who received As wrote negative reviews of a professor that was a bad teacher, an inconsistent grader, or a person who publicly favored (and/or denigrated) a subset of the students. They knew a bad teacher when they experienced one even if they survived with a good grade.

I could usually tell if I didn't learn what I hoped/wanted to at the end of a class. I think my kids mostly know that feeling, too.

I like RMP. It isn't to be taken as gospel, but it sure can be helpful.

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2 hours ago, RootAnn said:

I suppose this might sometimes be the case, but I know of plenty of times when a group of students who received As wrote negative reviews of a professor that was a bad teacher, an inconsistent grader, or a person who publicly favored (and/or denigrated) a subset of the students. They knew a bad teacher when they experienced one even if they survived with a good grade.

I could usually tell if I didn't learn what I hoped/wanted to at the end of a class. I think my kids mostly know that feeling, too.

I like RMP. It isn't to be taken as gospel, but it sure can be helpful.

How do students know if a professor is an inconsistent grader?  I know that we have various questions on our evaluations about professor graded fairly, consistently, and equitably.  Because students do not see all of the grades/papers and do not see the final grades of other students, I do not know how they can effectively evaluate this. They may know some other students in the class, but probably not all other students.  Do enough other students really hand them their papers and that person read the entire paper and evaluate it?  Is the student really in a position to evaluate it?  This has always puzzled me.

I have seen some situations of "I know it was graded unfairly because I didn't get the same grade as Sally"--well you are correct, you have the same answers as Sally and a different grade than Sally becasue the numbers in your problems are different than the numbers in Sally's problems.  

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5 hours ago, Bootsie said:

How do students know if a professor is an inconsistent grader?  I know that we have various questions on our evaluations about professor graded fairly, consistently, and equitably.  Because students do not see all of the grades/papers and do not see the final grades of other students, I do not know how they can effectively evaluate this. They may know some other students in the class, but probably not all other students.  Do enough other students really hand them their papers and that person read the entire paper and evaluate it?  Is the student really in a position to evaluate it?  This has always puzzled me.

I have seen some situations of "I know it was graded unfairly because I didn't get the same grade as Sally"--well you are correct, you have the same answers as Sally and a different grade than Sally becasue the numbers in your problems are different than the numbers in Sally's problems.  

I've seen professors inconsistent from assignment to assignment.

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9 hours ago, RootAnn said:

I suppose this might sometimes be the case, but I know of plenty of times when a group of students who received As wrote negative reviews of a professor that was a bad teacher, an inconsistent grader, or a person who publicly favored (and/or denigrated) a subset of the students. They knew a bad teacher when they experienced one even if they survived with a good grade.

I could usually tell if I didn't learn what I hoped/wanted to at the end of a class. I think my kids mostly know that feeling, too.

I like RMP. It isn't to be taken as gospel, but it sure can be helpful.

*shrug* I’ve always cared about my evaluations and didn’t want this to be true. I can tell you that I’ve seen very little correlation between whether I’ve communicated what I wanted to and my ratings. This has been true both for AoPS and college classes. I’ve gotten many more than 20 datasets like this in my life and they’ve almost all looked about the same.

For the record, I’ve always gotten good evaluations. This isn’t me being bitter.

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I have heard that some professors encourage students to review online, so it’s possible that positive reviews are there because kids felt compelled to write them. 

I do wonder what prompts students to go and review? 

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Back when I used to get reviews at a TA and as a CC instructor, there seemed to be a couple of kinds of reviews.  Some were accurate reflections on the class, for better or worse.  I got some great reviews and comments from students who failed the class - 'Instructor did everything that they could to do help me succeed...I should have come to class more often'.  Some students accurately report things that may or may not matter to any given student - they expect you to do a lot of reading, they rarely use the book, they don't give a lot of reminders to make sure to pay attention to the syllabus, they talk quickly. 

And then there are the students who blame their lack of success on the instructor.  I got one review that said 'When I came to turn in my lab report late, the instructor wasn't at their desk, causing me to lose even more points because I had to turn it in later'.  Did they come during office hours?  Did they ask a colleague where my desk was so that they could leave it? No, they just asked if I was there and left when I wasn't.  Apparently I wasn't supposed to go to class or eat lunch or go to seminars lest somebody come by to turn in late work??  In my CC lab class, where instructors had almost no flexibility because, like most labs, the lab prep people set up the supplies and you had to do the specified lab, and everybody took a common practical final, I had a trio of students come to me and say that they had 'talked to everybody' and I was putting too much focus on the metric system/exponents.  Did they think that I was going to rewrite the lab manual because they didn't think that they needed to know it? 

I list those examples because there are totally legitimate things that a student could dislike about my teaching (it could be a real problem, or could be something that some students love and others hate)...but the complaints were generally of the bizarre variety.  But, those are the things that they said to me or wrote on my course evals.  If they had used RMP, they likely would have just said that I wasn't available and that I focused on details too much.  My RMP reviews were actually pretty good, but not as good as the evals that I got when everybody filled them out in class (and turned in anonymously).  I think that, like reviews elsewhere, some percentage of happy people post but a lot of disgruntled ones do.  

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1 minute ago, Clemsondana said:

I think that, like reviews elsewhere, some percentage of happy people post but a lot of disgruntled ones do.  

Yeah, I think these public sites get a higher fraction of the disgruntled students than when everyone's forced (or even just encouraged) to fill one out. 

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The other ugly little truth about evaluations is how much stereotyping there can be in them. There is a serious effect of charisma and good looks, and there's also some sexism thrown in: the only people I ever knew who would get comments like "they don't seem confident in their math" were female, and they were all ridiculous -- kids would interpret women saying things like "Hmmmm, I'm not sure, let's figure it out!" as admission of incompetence as opposed to what was ACTUALLY supposed to happen if given a question you hadn't worked ahead of class. 

Edited by Not_a_Number
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23 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

 I do wonder what prompts students to go and review? 

The desire to help other students -- for better or worse. Or, in some cases, to punish or "get back at" a professor, in the case of a disgruntled student.

On 3/5/2021 at 11:12 PM, Bootsie said:

How do students know if a professor is an inconsistent grader? 

This, IMO, is seen more in classes like English or History than in something like Math or Science.

On 3/6/2021 at 5:07 AM, MamaSprout said:

I've seen professors inconsistent from assignment to assignment.

This was what I was thinking of. [Removed example for privacy]

My dd#2 just finished an online class where it was not clear the professor read either of her papers. She was required to provide a review to the school but did not mention how disappointed she was to get zero feedback (other than a perfect grade) on them. She did not believe she learned anything in the class although she received an A. Those type of classes are such disappointments to students who want to learn. She is my kid who is unlikely to ever write a RMP review.

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I agree with everything @RootAnnposted.  My dd will sometimes leave reviews and she tries to be balanced and fair.  There was one professor who was very crude during class and it bothered her to the point where she was uncomfortable in class (she's very conservative), but most students seemed to enjoy his humor and she mentioned that in her review just so potential students would be aware of that.  

Dd had a professor last semester who did absolutely nothing, but he has good reviews so maybe he was better before online learning.  His tests were all multiple choice and poorly worded.  The final in the class was a paper, but it was clear that he didn't even read them.  So disappointing.  

And I've also seen many cases of inconsistent grading in the classes RootAnn mentioned above - not so much in math and science, but many times in English and other classes with more writing assignments.  My dd just had a bunch of points taken off an assignment not because of anything she did wrong, but she didn't have suggestions that the professor had as feedback.  There have been many times something similar happened where the grading makes no sense and that's a big reason she prefers her STEM classes.  



 

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For the record, I think you can get information from the comments, if they say anything specific and aren't just "This professor is SO clear!" or "This professor is confusing!" I do feel like I learn things from comments. 

It's average ratings I don't trust at all. 

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3 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I do wonder what prompts students to go and review? 

A) the professor was amazing and the student loved the class

B) the student hated the professor 

Most reviews fall into either category.

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Looking at reviews only makes sense if there are a large number of them, because even specifics a student mentions can be completely incorrect.

A student may claim that no help was available when the instructor offers ten hours of help sessions per week. A student may claim that there are no examples worked in lecture when, in fact, every lecture contains examples. Etc. Only if multiple reviews say the same would I be inclined to take it as factual.

Some complaints are factual and ludicrous.  I had a student complain that I only provide 3 hours of homework help the day before hw is due, and not more)

Edited by regentrude
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3 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

The other ugly little truth about evaluations is how much stereotyping there can be in them. There is a serious effect of charisma and good looks, and there's also some sexism thrown in: the only people I ever knew who would get comments like "they don't seem confident in their math" were female, and they were all ridiculous -- kids would interpret women saying things like "Hmmmm, I'm not sure, let's figure it out!" as admission of incompetence as opposed to what was ACTUALLY supposed to happen if given a question you hadn't worked ahead of class. 

And don't forget comments about appearance. Male profs do not get comments about the way they dress.

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11 minutes ago, regentrude said:

And don't forget comments about appearance. Male profs do not get comments about the way they dress.

I have seen reviews for male professors where there are comments about their attractiveness (only in a positive way - like he's a hottie or something like that).  

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When my kids were starting de I would check RMP to make sure they were not getting a prof with awful reviews. I ended up going for, and being happiest with, teachers that were described as really caring and engaged. Some of those were easier graders, some were tougher, but I felt like the quality of a truly caring and devoted person was most what we needed at that point. In our experience the reviews have been pretty spot on. It is easy to pick out the disgruntled ones or the the poor students from the way they write their reviews. 

With my least academic and least engaged student I definitely looked for ones that not only were described as caring but as funny, quirky, irreverent even. He had some profs he really enjoyed picked on those reviews. 

I also recommend reading them for tips. Sometimes there will be info like "the first test is awful but it gets easier", or tips to show up to optional meetings because extra credit is given or that teachers will allow rewrites to improve grades or such. 

Of course, some are useless. My dh teaches a class that is 100% online/asynchronous and he always gets bad evaluations based on the class being online or for not holding live meetings or live office hours. He teaches for the community college system that serves students all over the state. There isn't even a centralized campus he could hold meetings or live office hours if he wanted. 

Once my kids were done with de and off to their ultimate colleges away from home I don't think they used RMP much, if at all. I think they prioritized getting their classes whenever they could and/or at the most convenient days and times. DE was much more flexible for us so we were able to hand pick our professors (at the university my dc attend for de, the de students actually get priority registration so they really can choose the best professors). 

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9 hours ago, MamaSprout said:

I've seen professors inconsistent from assignment to assignment.

What does this mean?  I have had classes where some assignments are graded more thoroughly than other assignments, sometimes as a sampling issue and sometimes depending on the purpose/difficulty of the assignment.  But, I have also had students think that an assignment is graded inconsistently when they really don't understand the material, they have made an illogical argument, they have not used the terminology from the discipline correctly, they have misinterpreted an argument, they have left out a major part of what needs to be assigned.  

To me, this is a real dilemma.  If the student is able to really evaluate whether the professor is grading correctly/consistently is the student needing to take the course?   Can students really effectively grade their own work?

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37 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

What does this mean?  I have had classes where some assignments are graded more thoroughly than other assignments, sometimes as a sampling issue and sometimes depending on the purpose/difficulty of the assignment.  But, I have also had students think that an assignment is graded inconsistently when they really don't understand the material, they have made an illogical argument, they have not used the terminology from the discipline correctly, they have misinterpreted an argument, they have left out a major part of what needs to be assigned.  

To me, this is a real dilemma.  If the student is able to really evaluate whether the professor is grading correctly/consistently is the student needing to take the course?   Can students really effectively grade their own work?

I think you are taking my comment too personally, lol. RootAnn did a good job describing it above.

 

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3 minutes ago, MamaSprout said:

I think you are taking my comment too personally, lol. RootAnn did a good job describing it above.

 

I am not taking it personally, I just think it is easy for a student to say "i was professing my belief that..." and the professor did not like it.  But, did the professor say to justify, provide evidence, etc. that the student did not do.  Or, was the assignment not supposed to be about professing a belief?  

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3 hours ago, regentrude said:

And don't forget comments about appearance. Male profs do not get comments about the way they dress.

I have a colleague who was on a university committee that studied evaluations.  Apparently females with tatoos get higher evaluations than those who do not have tatoos...  

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2 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I have a colleague who was on a university committee that studied evaluations.  Apparently females with tatoos get higher evaluations than those who do not have tatoos...  

Oh darn it, no hope for me then

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Posted (edited)
On 3/6/2021 at 4:01 PM, Bootsie said:

I have a colleague who was on a university committee that studied evaluations.  Apparently females with tatoos get higher evaluations than those who do not have tatoos...  

That would not surprise me! It does seem pretty arbitrary. I’ve taught CC and college classes for over 10 years and think the evals are of limited usefulness.

I’ve managed to avoid being on RMP so far. For DE I just walk around the corner and as Accessibility Services what they think of a given professor. 😁

Edited by MamaSprout
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Really seconding that a lot of the reviews are now pointless in the pandemic with the transition to online. Ds is in a class with a professor who had a large portion of bad reviews. Reading between the lines, we decided she was a tough grader, but excited about her subject and that ds would just have to be really on things because she didn't give enough support all the time. The section was just the best option so we decided it was worth the risk. But she apparently changed how she does things in the pandemic. So much more support. She's great. Ds raves about her and how she structures assignments. On the other hand, he had a prof with almost universally good reviews last year. After the pandemic started, he was a total bomb. We'd gotten from the reviews that the class was an easy A, but it went from great discussions, to a complete joke. The prof basically ghosted them. Ds kept saying, "I can't believe I'm getting actual college credit for this." 

We really try to read between the lines on them. There's a difference in how people talk about hard graders that they're giving bad scores to vs. how they talk about profs who were disorganized and changed their assignments and syllabus and so forth.

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2 minutes ago, Farrar said:

We really try to read between the lines on them. There's a difference in how people talk about hard graders that they're giving bad scores to vs. how they talk about profs who were disorganized and changed their assignments and syllabus and so forth.

Yeah. I think that's the right thing to do. Read the COMMENTS carefully, ignore the ones where someone just has an axe to grind, don't pay any attention to the average. 

It's like Yelp reviews. If you're in the mood for Szechuan, maybe don't go to that place where all the reviews are raves about sweet and sour chicken, even if it's rated 4.99/5. 

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2 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

Yeah. I think that's the right thing to do. Read the COMMENTS carefully, ignore the ones where someone just has an axe to grind, don't pay any attention to the average. 

It's like Yelp reviews. If you're in the mood for Szechuan, maybe don't go to that place where all the reviews are raves about sweet and sour chicken, even if it's rated 4.99/5. 

Right. And don't be put off by the reviews complaining about how spicy it was.

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34 minutes ago, regentrude said:

Oh darn it, no hope for me then

Me, too.  My colleague who is a very conserative finance professor has threatened to go in with a temporary tatoo, fake nose ring, etc, and see if her evaluations improve.  

My university has decreassed the importance of student evaluations in tenure and promotion decisions.  The bias against female professors appears small at first glance, but it points to what would be the equivalent of a letter grade difference in a course grade.  Given the consistent biases that appear when class evaluations are done in a somewhat standardized setting in a college classroom really makes me question how much to read into ratings on RateMyProfessor.  

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There are other flags for "inconsistent grader." Those of us who have seen them would likely look for a different professor if they had more than a few of those type comments in their reviews. Some others might shrug them off.

 My family often like online teachers that others don't or have bad fits with teachers others love. That is why If I leave a review here of an online provider, I try to be specific why my particular kid liked a class or didn't. My loves-live-classes kid had a different experience than my hates-to-be-called-on-so-give-me-a-recorded-class kid. Not every teacher is great for every kid. At the same time, some teachers don't do a good job teaching certain levels (could be either intro or advanced) of classes or in certain situations  (like the forced-to-go-online last spring).

Those who have the luxury of picking professors like to have a heads-up.

Edited by RootAnn
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Like others have said, go by the comments not the ratings. We found a favorite Calc 1 and 2 teacher by looking through the actual comments. Hardest teacher in the school but when you leave, you will know your stuff and they were right.

 

Specific themes that appear throughout comments like disorganized, cares, communicates well,  replies to questions, etc are often correct. 

It's like reading book reviews. There will always be the one stars or five stars based on agreement with the author but the more nuanced reviews tell you a lot more. Often, it is the one stars reviews that make me want to read a book. 😁

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