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I could have sworn there was a thread on this topic at some point, but I'm going cross-eyed looking at so many different threads this week so I may have missed it -- LOL.

I currently have two 10th graders and "we" are looking at maybe trying a cc class this summer or next year. 

I've read enough on here to know that it might be best to start with something easier to get their feet wet and I also know the grade counts!!!!

So...would anyone like to help start a list of CC classes that might be good for a newbie to CC to take :-).

 

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Something of high interest to the student. What that is will vary for different students. 
My DD's first college class for credit was French 2 at a 4 year uni. Followed by English and physics classes.
My DS' first one was an English course on Myth & Folklore. Followed by more English and astronomy.

In general, I would stay away from math classes below calculus. CC students are adults, and if they need to take a high school level math at CC, it means they didn't learn the math in high school - which means classes are likely filled with weak math students. 

 

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7 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

Thank you!  Yes, they are going to be done with high school math this year!

That means they're very strong math students, completing calculus 1 in 10th grade. In that case, I recommend they take calculus 2 at CC, but not as a summer class 

Edited by regentrude
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2 minutes ago, regentrude said:

That means they're very strong math students, completing calculus 1 in 10th grade. In that case, I recommend they take calculus 2 at CC, but not as a summer class 

My bad...not doing Calculus.  Done with everything up to that at the end of 10th.

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3 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

My bad...not doing Calculus.  Done with everything up to that at the end of 10th.

If they are very strong math students, Calculus could be a good option. I do want to caution you though that often the grades are based on just few exams, so it could be a shock. At our CC, the teacher bases the entire grade on 4 exams. No participation, no homework....

So I would start with something less stressful. 

Edited by Roadrunner
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One exception could be if the CC has a program for high school students. Some schools have a “middle college” program where some early HS classes are run separately, but then the students transition to CC classes. Then classes like precalc or a basic chemistry would not just be less prepared adults.

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We started with a couple of languages studied previously. It was a good experience because the teacher responded quickly and was organized. The only problem was that Dd was partnered with a high school student who was not invested in it and ended up dropping out, leaving all the work for Dd to do. All the adults (and the rest of the high school kids) in the class took the class seriously. 

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In general I wouldn’t start with a summer class. The 8 week classes are double-time, and the 4-6 week classes are 3-4 times the pace of a regular college class. I’ve seen a lot of kids struggle with them the first time, especially if they don’t understand the time commitment of college classes (generally 2-3 hours  of study per credit hour per week, and then 2-4times that depending on how many weeks the class meets. So, a 3 credit class that meets for 4 weeks could easily feel like a full-time class load.) It can be a shock to new students.

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I had my DC start with a mathematics teaching class. The content was review, so it made it easy to adjust to college pacing. There were also individual reasons.

 

L started at 12, I wanted a class that would be supportive, not competitive. I was a little afraid that a 12 yr old in calculus would be seen as a threat, but Ed classes tend to be more cooperative.  After that, the sky was the limit.
 

S has dyscalculia, and I hoped that the teaching course, which spent a long time on different ways to model basic concepts would help her develop strategies that worked for her for some of her weaker areas, and get some confidence in her skills. Which seemed to be effective, until she had her first stroke two weeks before finals. 

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In our situation, which involved both a cc and a four year university, we relied heavily on recommendations from other homeschoolers and online reviews at Rate My Professor. I also started out erring on the side of taking easier courses rather than what would be most rigorous.  I think I only one time signed a kid up for a class without having at least a good number of positive online reviews and that was because the kid really needed the particular class and we were ready to roll the dice.

College grades are forever and attitudes of teenagers can be a little fragile. While I generally pushed my kids and challenged them and had no trouble with them feeling some stress or discomfort in life, first de experiences were ones I chose to be gentle. 

Foreign languages are good if you can't do them at home but I would be familiar with the reputation of the professor. The comp 101/102 series was one our dc were all ready for as juniors and is likely to transfer. Again, we researched the teachers first. 

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41 minutes ago, crazyforlatin said:

We started with a couple of languages studied previously. It was a good experience because the teacher responded quickly and was organized. 

My dd did the same - she knew Spanish very well but started with Spanish 1 at DE when she was 13.  It was a great experience for her and a really good start for college classes.  

 

24 minutes ago, MerryAtHope said:

In general I wouldn’t start with a summer class. The 8 week classes are double-time, and the 4-6 week classes are 3-4 times the pace of a regular college class. I’ve seen a lot of kids struggle with them the first time, especially if they don’t understand the time commitment of college classes (generally 2-3 hours  of study per credit hour per week, and then 2-4times that depending on how many weeks the class meets. So, a 3 credit class that meets for 4 weeks could easily feel like a full-time class load.) It can be a shock to new students.

My dd did start with summer classes (2 consecutive classes with five weeks each), but she knew the material very well before taking the classes.  She loved the professor and really enjoyed the classes.  But I agree I wouldn't start with a summer class unless you knew ahead of time that it wasn't a heavy workload or your child knows the material well and enjoys the subject.

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Foreign Language is often a good one to start with, as it also works towards knocking out a possible foreign language credit requirement for the future college degree program. Students who already have 1 or more high school foreign language credits will take the community college placement test to see if they can start at a higher level, or need to start with the basic 101 course. It's not necessarily a bad thing to start with the 101 level with some previous foreign language exposure, as it allows the student "breathing space" for getting all the college aspects figured out:

- when/how to schedule themselves time for study and doing homework/projects to meet deadlines
- workin at the faster college pace
- getting their "my college page" and portal figured out
- figuring out how to access their online syllabus, how to upload required work, and how to contribute toward required discussions online

A lot of homeschool families here have their students take the Writing 101 and 102 ("Freshman Comp"). Do be aware that some literature (usually a few short stories and poems) are covered in these classes and can include adult topics.

Another good first option might be Fine Arts -- Intro to Art or Digital Arts, or an Appreciation class (theater appreciation, music appreciation, film appreciation, etc.). One thing to bear in mind is the maturity level of the student to handle adult topics, as an intro to Drawing class *will* have live nude models, while a Film Appreciation class will likely cover R-rated films.

Some people like to start off with a Science. There are a lot of fun and interesting courses such as Meteorology and Astronomy that count both towards high school and college requirements. Some homeschoolers with advanced STEM students have started with an Advanced Science, such as college Chemistry.

Whatever you go with, be sure the student is ready to move at a FAST pace, work out a schedule with the student as to when they want/need to do their study and homework for the DE during your homeschool schedule, and also be sure they know to contact the teacher or the tutoring center as SOON as they have a question. Because each class builds on the previous class material, if you don't get a concept from one class and don't get help, by the end of two classes you can be VERY far behind...

Use Rate My Professor to try and find good instructors and avoid bad ones.

Also helpful is to know when the Withdrawal deadline is, in case "stuff happens." And encourage your student to let you know EARLY in the semester if this is not working for them. Let them know that it is absolutely okay if they find DE to be more than they are ready for, OR, if they get stuck with a poor instructor -- it's not their fault, and you don't want them drowning. 😉 

Here are a few past threads on this same topic (these are all inked close to the BOTTOM of PAGE 5 of the big pinned thread "High School Motherlode #2", at the top of the High School Board). Have fun!

Good first class to dual enroll in?— Mar 9 2018
First dual enrollment class (suggestions, and why) -- Feb 26 2016
Dual Credit -- which classes? -- Apr 29 2012
Dual Enrollment -- what type of classes did your students do or will do? (and why?) -- July 31 2008
Concurrent enrollment question -- how do you decide (which classes, why) -- Jan 14 2009

Edited by Lori D.
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4 hours ago, mlktwins said:

I could have sworn there was a thread on this topic at some point, but I'm going cross-eyed looking at so many different threads this week so I may have missed it -- LOL.

I currently have two 10th graders and "we" are looking at maybe trying a cc class this summer or next year. 

I've read enough on here to know that it might be best to start with something easier to get their feet wet and I also know the grade counts!!!!

So...would anyone like to help start a list of CC classes that might be good for a newbie to CC to take :-).

 

Hey there. As you know we are in the same community college system as you, and I'll tell you what I've done with my two boys who have done DE so far. 

My first son was a huge fan of in-person classes and a lot more mature than his younger siblings. With him, he started off running by taking 12 credits in his very first semester when he was in 10th grade. He ended up doing Precalc 2 (the trig class) (they call it MTH 162 now after the math department course renaming from a few years ago), German 101, and CHM 101. We learned pretty quickly the importance of reading the professor reviews at ratemyprofessors.com and not just making a convenient schedule. That first math teacher we got was absolutely terrible. He got lucky with the German and chem professors, but math was a doozy. We never, ever signed up for another class after that without considering the reviews. The professor quality varies tremendously! We have some profs that we absolutely loved and who really made DE an amazing experience.

My second son started doing DE this year (he's in his second semester now) and he's a very different kid. Not nearly as mature as his older brother, so we have been easing him in much more gradually. He started last semester with one math class (MTH 161) with a prof that we knew was awesome from my older son. That class topic was completely review for him, because he took precalculus last year. He's actually taking a homeschool AP Calc AB class online this year, and the idea was to build his confidence by getting him through his first DE class successfully that would be lots of review. The professor is pretty challenging (his reviews are actually not the best because lots of students fail his lower level classes), so he ended up with a much harder course than a typical high-school level precalc class. This worked out better than I could have imagined, because he's solidifying all of his precalc, and the material often dovetails perfectly with the topics he's covering in calculus. He had to learn to manage his time, communicate with his teacher, and just keeping up with higher college expectations, so it was great to learn those extra study skills in a "review" class.

This semester, he is continuing with MTH 162 but also added CSC 200 (again with a prof that my older son had taken who had great reviews). He's doing fine with the extra class, and a slow, gentle start was definitely the route to take with this child.

I think a lot will depend on what your boys like, but I just wanted to throw it out there that SOOO much depends on getting the good professors. The same class can be a COMPLETELY different animal depending on who you take it with. As far as general subjects, I am most happy that we outsourced higher level sciences (the lab facilities at our CC are absolutely fabulous. My older son fell in love with chemistry because of the combination of a fabulous teacher and really amazing labs. I could never have duplicated that experience at home. Foreign languages were another hit for DE. We had a harder time finding decent math profs (with the exception of the one my younger son is taking now) in this cc system. Economics was another area that my older son explored and enjoyed his professors. Good luck as you shop around for options for next year, and I highly recommend building the rest of your homeschool schedule around the cc schedule. Our successes really all boil down to getting the good professors who can inspire that excitement and curiosity! 

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I am surprised that so many of you find foreign languages to be a good first class. We tried and quickly withdrew because the amount of work was so overwhelming - daily classes plus a ton of busy work. Click, click, click ..... a ton of this on a digital platform. It was going to be at least 1.5 hours of work just to click away in a language DS already speaks. We ran. 
I have found homeschoolers very happy starting CC courses with art appreciation, music appreciation, general art and music courses...

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2 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I am surprised that so many of you find foreign languages to be a good first class. We tried and quickly withdrew because the amount of work was so overwhelming - daily classes plus a ton of busy work. Click, click, click ..... a ton of this on a digital platform. It was going to be at least 1.5 hours of work just to click away in a language DS already speaks. We ran...

I think it really depends on the student.

We did not even attempt DE until 12th grade, and for both DSs it was Foreign Language -- one Spanish, one ASL. It worked very well for both of them, as it was the only DE class, I cleared the decks to give them as much time at home to do the work as they needed, and they were both older/mature students by that time. Yes, they needed 3-4 hours a week outside of the class to practice and do the required work, and to study.

I can totally see that amount of study and practice and required online exercises would be busy work if you already knew the language. BUT... neither had any familiarity with or knew the language they were taking, and both ended up with an A for each semester. So a very worthwhile and successful first college class experience for both DSs! 😄 

[ETA: Also, if your student already speaks the language, you can usually request to take the placement test and start at a higher course level than the 101 entry level ... Just an FYI in case anyone else has @Roadrunner's situation. 😉 ]

 I know 3 other homeschoolers in our local support group who also did Foreign Language as their first DE:
- one was 9th grade, an advanced student, and did great; he went on to do more DE all through high school
- one was 10th grade, an average student; he fell behind, got intimidated, mom didn't step in, and he got a "D"; I believe he did do DE in 11th grade with another subject; I don't know if he re-did foreign language as DE or not
- one was 10th or 11th grade; she got a difficult teacher, and withdrew; she re-took Spanish the following semester with a different teacher and did fine

I also have known other local homeschoolers who have done other subjects as their first DE course, based on what their strong area was:
- Writing 101 and 102
- higher maths (Calculus 1)
- Drawing 101
- History or other Social Science course

I think there are 3 keys to successful DE:
1. is the student mature enough and academically ready to tackle the college class challenge
2. what is a strong area for the student, OR, what do you think they can succeed at--start there for confidence-building
3. good DE instructor

JMO! 😄 Your students will have different strengths and interests, so Foreign Language may not be the way to go for your DC. Totally okay! There is no "right" or "wrong" first DE subject. 😉  Warmest regards, Lori D.
 

Edited by Lori D.
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2 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Also helpful is to know when the Withdrawal deadline is, in case "stuff happens." And encourage your student to let you know EARLY in the semester if this is not working for them. Let them know that it is absolutely okay if they find DE to be more than they are ready for, OR, if they get stuck with a poor instructor -- it's not their fault, and you don't want them drowning. 😉 
 

DS15 has a W. He realized a certain programming language isn’t his cup of tea. 
 

The community college my kids are taking classes with has extended the withdrawal deadlines for this quarter and allow students to ask for grades to be converted to pass/fail for last quarter. They are extending more grace due to the local COVID situation. 

6 hours ago, mlktwins said:

I currently have two 10th graders and "we" are looking at maybe trying a cc class this summer or next year. 

Last summer everything was online here so taking a cc class in summer was great for DS16. He had classes four days a week and all the time in the world to dedicate to that one class. 

However, if your twins are having competition swim practice in summer as well, I would factor in the homework load. 


My boys opt to start dual enrollment in 10th grade. They started with math and computer science in Fall quarter, then added Japanese in Winter quarter.

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8 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Last summer everything was online here so taking a cc class in summer was great for DS16. He had classes four days a week and all the time in the world to dedicate to that one class. 

When I was in college, I took one requirement for my major that was very hard during the summer because it was basically my only obligation. It was 8 weeks long, and that particular institution operated on 10 week trimesters, so it was only slightly more accelerated. My class grade, incidentally, was calculated by 10% HW, 40% midterm, 50% final. A classmate took it in the fall and homework was about 50% of the grade. So many factors to consider.

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5 hours ago, Lori D. said:



I think there are 3 keys to successful DE:
1. is the student mature enough and academically ready to tackle the college class challenge
2. what is a strong area for the student, OR, what do you think they can succeed at--start there for confidence-building
3. good DE instructor

JMO! 😄 Your students will have different strengths and interests, so Foreign Language may not be the way to go for your DC. Totally okay! There is no "right" or "wrong" first DE subject.
 

This sums it up perfectly

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Dd started with a government class, but withdrew because it was a 3-test and a paper for a grade (and we didn't have any reviews for this subject on Rate My Professors). The next semester she went with a Business Applications class (Excel, Access, Word, etc). That was a good choice, and she's done well in DE since then.

Edited by MamaSprout
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9 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I am surprised that so many of you find foreign languages to be a good first class. We tried and quickly withdrew because the amount of work was so overwhelming - daily classes plus a ton of busy work. Click, click, click ..... a ton of this on a digital platform. It was going to be at least 1.5 hours of work just to click away in a language DS already speaks. We ran. 
I have found homeschoolers very happy starting CC courses with art appreciation, music appreciation, general art and music courses...

My Dd took 5 semesters of French at uni while in highschool.  There was no online work. We had studied French since 6th grade and then plateaued, despite a tutor, so she was happy to finally progress with a fluent instructor. It was time consuming, but no digital stuff.

I would not have paid college tuition for an art appreciation course that I could have easily put together myself.

Did your CC language dept not have a placement exam? Sounds like your DS wasn't placed in the correct level; if he was already fluent, he should have placed in an advanced lit or comp class. Dd started with French 2 and received French 1 credit- by- examination.

Edited by regentrude
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1 hour ago, regentrude said:

My Dd took 5 semesters of French at uni while in highschool.  There was no online work. We had studied French since 6th grade and then plateaued, despite a tutor, so she was happy to finally progress with a fluent instructor. It was time consuming, but no digital stuff.

I would not have paid college tuition for an art appreciation course that I could have easily put together myself.

Did your CC language dept not have a placement exam? Sounds like your DS wasn't placed in the correct level; if he was already fluent, he should have placed in an advanced lit or comp class. Dd started with French 2 and received French 1 credit- by- examination.

It’s not the placement. It’s how they are put together. They all use the same book with online component and it’s a lot of busy work. One can learn vocabulary words in a much more efficient manner than clicking through pages and pages of the same thing. It’s a lot of busywork for a kid who is already busy. I am not complaining, just saying at least here foreign languages is a massive time commitment. Given how busy homeschoolers are with all the honors and AP courses, 2-3 hours per day on a foreign language seemed insane to us. 

CC here is free, which is why so many parents start with an easy course like art appreciation to ease their kids into the classroom. Plus many focus on getting the general requirements for our public universities out of the way, and I believe those courses satisfy one of the areas. 

 

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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

... It’s how they are put together. They all use the same book with online component and it’s a lot of busy work... 2-3 hours per day on a foreign language seemed insane to us. 

CC here is free, which is why so many parents start with an easy course like art appreciation to ease their kids into the classroom...

... and I guess there are a 4th and 5th keys to consider regarding DE :
4. what's available from the CC and how its run
5. and, what works for the parent to outsource 
😉
 

What @Roadrunner describes is very different from what our CC foreign language classes looked like. And the only free CC classes in our 2 state CC systems are specific vo-tech courses in the special "free for high school students" program -- things like Fire Service, Automotive & Aviation Mechanic, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Medical or Dental Assistant, etc. 

So you do have to make decisions based on what's available to you for DE...

Edited by Lori D.
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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

It’s not the placement. It’s how they are put together. They all use the same book with online component and it’s a lot of busy work. One can learn vocabulary words in a much more efficient manner than clicking through pages and pages of the same thing. It’s a lot of busywork for a kid who is already busy. I am not complaining, just saying at least here foreign languages is a massive time commitment. Given how busy homeschoolers are with all the honors and AP courses, 2-3 hours per day on a foreign language seemed insane to us. 

 

I guess it's not surprising that there is a wide range of materials used across different cc systems. My son loved his DE German classes. No online homework component and the entire class time was an immersive speaking experience (this was pre-covid, but students in the course now say it continues to be all spoken practice, just via zoom). They had a textbook and homework came from the book. Assessments were both written exams and oral exams. The workload wasn't overwhelming, but a lot of the time spent depends on how easily vocabulary acquisition comes to the student. I'm sorry to hear that your child's class was an online click fest... Ugh, that sounds like a miserable way to interact with a new language!

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2 minutes ago, UmmIbrahim said:

I guess it's not surprising that there is a wide range of materials used across different cc systems. My son loved his DE German classes. No online homework component and the entire class time was an immersive speaking experience (this was pre-covid, but students in the course now say it continues to be all spoken practice, just via zoom). They had a textbook and homework came from the book. Assessments were both written exams and oral exams. The workload wasn't overwhelming, but a lot of the time spent depends on how easily vocabulary acquisition comes to the student. I'm sorry to hear that your child's class was an online click fest... Ugh, that sounds like a miserable way to interact with a new language!

...and we only have 1 language available in 2 levels to us for DE. Definitely a variety for experiences for language DE!

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I'd look into what class will best prepare them for future classes. Our CC emphasizes writing across the curriculum so dd has had to write at least 10 pages (either in one longer paper or 3 shorter ones) for every humanities and social science class she's taken. She's even had to do a paper/powerpoint for her geology classes. The only classes that didn't require papers are the calc sequence. Foreign language classes are also exempt from the writing requirement.

If you have a CC that has a similar emphasis, I highly recommend having them take the first comp class as their first class at the CC. It should introduce them to the online research resources and the writing supports that the CC offers. At dd's school, that introduction is essential to being able to succeed in other classes. 

I agree that checking the professor ratings is key to having a good DE experience. Dd's writing professor is a published author and it was nice to be able to have her read the teacher's story in Houston Noir. That definitely helped motivate dd in a class that can be sort of a grind.

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FWIW, other DE classes that have been successful here for L are Spanish, English (both general composition and literature), Psychology and Sociology, and History. Math has been a mixed bag-and in fairness, a lot of that has to do with COVID, because L has never liked doing math online. Philosophy was also forced online, and a good, discussion based, fun class became a very tedious one.  Media Writing and Graphic arts have both mostly served to show that neither Graphic Design nor Journalism is a good major. Geology, so far, has been enjoyable, but I think part of that is that it is the only on campus course since last March (the professor is doing the lab component outdoors or spread out in a BIG lab room with open windows. Some of the biggest hits have been due to attending a majority-Minority school-an excellent Race, Culture, and Gender studies honors class, Black Literature, and Black History. 

Both Cultural Anthropology and European history were done in 3 week summer sessions (at the SAME TIME) as part of an early college program for gifted teens. They were successful classes, but the speed made it feel very rushed and frustrating and simply not enough sleep. 

Unfortunately, an excellent looking summer field study course was cancelled last summer due to COVID, and the online Marine Bio that we picked up that at least looked interesting and had a great instructor didn't get enough enrollment. 

Our local CC, due to state residents being able to get tuition-free CC, has a decent number of students enrolling for financial reasons, especially if they're in the middle income bracket where they won't get financial aid. So, the honors sections of classes, and, in general, classes designed for transfer to a 4 year school tended to have a pretty academic bent and a decent number of capable students. 

English Comp 1 with an instructor experienced in working with students with LD issues ended up being a very positive experience for S. In that case, the SSD office recommended it. Unfortunately, due to health issues, S has been unwilling to return to school, so the semester of DE ended up being her only college coursework thus far.  I would strongly suggest involving the SSD office in scheduling and professor selection for students who have 504 accommodations-they were able to suggest specific professors that worked well with them and were willing to work with S. I am still hoping that eventually she will return and at least do a 2 year certification in something. 

 

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6 hours ago, MamaSprout said:

...and we only have 1 language available in 2 levels to us for DE. Definitely a variety for experiences for language DE!

The college we use for DE (technically my kids are "non-degree seeking students") has no foreign language classes. Although they list one language in their class bulletin, they have not offered any [foreign language] classes in several years and the last one they offered was a Spanish-for-Teachers class and it was taught by an English professor.

We pay full price for these classes. Only certain public school students get cheap DE - but they can't take classes on campus--only online or taught by their high school professors that count as college equivalents.

I had one start with Intro to Psychology. It covered some tough topics, but mine was a junior at the time, picked that class, and enjoyed it. My next did a summer science class that was brutal, but followed it with a high interest & relatively easy health & nutrition class. Each kid is going to be different and what is available & good is going to vary tremendously by area.

Edited by RootAnn
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On 2/28/2021 at 9:00 PM, Roadrunner said:

I am surprised that so many of you find foreign languages to be a good first class. We tried and quickly withdrew because the amount of work was so overwhelming - daily classes plus a ton of busy work. Click, click, click ..... a ton of this on a digital platform. It was going to be at least 1.5 hours of work just to click away in a language DS already speaks. We ran. 
I have found homeschoolers very happy starting CC courses with art appreciation, music appreciation, general art and music courses...

Depending on the language, do you think CLEP would be a good option? (French, German, or Spanish?)

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2 minutes ago, MagistraKennedy said:

Depending on the language, do you think CLEP would be a good option? (French, German, or Spanish?)

Here one state university system (CSU) accepts CLEP but not the other (UC) so my teens Saturday German class schoolmates has taken or are taking the AP German exam. My teens opt to take two years of dual enrollment Japanese as that is accepted by both state university systems. Besides the fact that my teens rather do two years of foreign language at community college than do four years of foreign language in high school.

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5 minutes ago, MagistraKennedy said:

Depending on the language, do you think CLEP would be a good option? (French, German, or Spanish?)

I don’t know anything about CLEP. They aren’t the most popular option in CA (UCs don’t accept them for example). I have yet to decide what to do, but I can’t imagine AP taking nearly as much time as CC for us. 

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1 minute ago, Roadrunner said:

I don’t know anything about CLEP. They aren’t the most popular option in CA (UCs don’t accept them for example). I have yet to decide what to do, but I can’t imagine AP taking nearly as much time as CC for us. 

I get it. Just throwing that out there as a possibility. My daughter takes Latin, so testing out of a foreign language for college credit doesn't look like it's going to be an option for us. (unless we went with AP Latin, and that's not likely) In KY, the state schools look to be generous in their CLEP credit for foreign languages. 

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We started with an “intro” level science. It was biology and was probably comparable to an honors high school biology class, with a lot of labs. The teacher was very highly rated and my dd loved the class. She took photography the same semester and that was a good class too. She learned how to use a digital camera, compose/edit photos, and develop black and white film. 
 

We chose the classes because they had lab components that would have been hard for me to replicate at home. 

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20 minutes ago, lovelearnandlive said:

We started with an “intro” level science. It was biology and was probably comparable to an honors high school biology class, with a lot of labs. The teacher was very highly rated and my dd loved the class. She took photography the same semester and that was a good class too. She learned how to use a digital camera, compose/edit photos, and develop black and white film. 
 

We chose the classes because they had lab components that would have been hard for me to replicate at home. 

We did this too - not for a first class, but an early one with subject matter that dd wasn't familiar with.  She took an "Elementary Chemistry" class in fall of her freshman year that was similar to a high school honors chemistry class with lab.  We knew the professor was good from reading Rate My Professor reviews.  I didn't want to do chemistry lab at home, so this was perfect for us.  She also took Intermediate Spanish as DE that semester (third semester of Spanish), but she already knew the material.  The rest of her courses we did at home 

 

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Maybe not the first... but my girls loved sociology at the local CC. They had such a diverse group of students in the class that the discussions were so real and rich. In my dds' small groups they  had high school students, true freshmen, return to school moms, retired military, so many students from a variety of countries and economical differences, lots of different ages and life experiences. It was an amazing opportunity that they would not have gotten at their four-year state university. 

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I tried to make our first CC classes something that the kids would enjoy.  DS1 did World History, DD1 did Geography, and DD2 did Drawing.  All three helped pick these since they were some of their interests.   After those, we moved to tougher classes like English and Math, etc.   

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My oldest wasn't ready for DE until summer before her senior year, though I guess technically that was part of her senior year. She did Stats online via LUOA. Then she took Earth Science with the lab at our local university and absolutely loved it. The next semester she took an elective and another science class -- that is the semester the pandemic hit. It ended up working out and she got all A's doing DE but she hated taking the classes online. Here the DE is free but one can't take more than 6 credits / semester at the university. The community colleges allow up to 12 credits/semester I think, but it would have been a longer commute and more of a headache to register, so we didn't go that route. 

As far as CLEP for a foreign language, my advice is not to count on getting a high enough score and have an alternative plan. DD studied Spanish for 3 years and was not able to score a 63, which is what our state requires for getting credit for 2 semesters of a foreign language. She got a good enough CLEP score to get out of one semester of Spanish, but is now in a major that doesn't require a foreign language. The CLEP for foreign language should be doable for those who have done 4 years (i.e. Spanish 1-4). Some states only require a 50 on the CLEP to get out of 2 semesters of a foreign language, which is much more doable.

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Recopying  from an old post:

My daughter took a variety of classes at the local community college in 11th and 12th grades while also taking classes at home and at a local resource center for homeschoolers.  We looked at these classes as a way of enriching her studies; we were not expecting them to transfer for credit at whatever four year college she attended.  My daughter's experience was similar to what regentrude mentioned above; none of her credits were accepted at her fairly selective liberal arts college.  But we were not disappointed as that had not been her goal in taking them.

 

Her first quarter, my daughter took College Algebra, a writing course, and Geology.

Second quarter, Trigonometry, a literature course, and Geology.

Third quarter, another literature course, another Geology course, and (I think) Archery. 

 

Her first and second quarters she took 13 and 12 hours at the community college and was thus considered a full time student.  However, since she was also taking two AP courses elsewhere, taking a lighter load in her third quarter worked well since it gave her more time for her upcoming AP exams.

I'll go on to add that you know your child best.  My daughter was fully capable of handling challenging community college classes while also taking additional challenging courses elsewhere. 

Something to consider: My daughter's writing and literature classes contained content that would make many conservative homeschoolers uncomfortable.  I think that such content is unlikely to be found in math and foreign language classes and, if you're comfortable with evolutionary content, science classes.

Regards,

Kareni

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19 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Something to consider: My daughter's writing and literature classes contained content that would make many conservative homeschoolers uncomfortable.  I think that such content is unlikely to be found in math and foreign language classes and, if you're comfortable with evolutionary content, science classes.

Spanish wasn't conservative.  My teens are taking Japanese and all the Japanese lecturers are about my age and about as conservative as my family. 

Math and computer science courses were the "safest" in terms of being "conservative" but I had a computer science lecturer who is political in her comments and examples used.  You could definitely tell that she is pro democrat from her comments and examples. My teens computer science lecturers for programming classes also tend to make political comments. Their computer science lecturers for non-programming courses are more neutral.

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Older son's first classes: Trigonometry (which he placed into but mostly knew), freshman composition, and drawing

Younger son's first class: Astrobiology

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On 3/2/2021 at 3:36 PM, MagistraKennedy said:

Depending on the language, do you think CLEP would be a good option? (French, German, or Spanish?)

My oldest did CLEP out of Spanish, but that was after he was accepted into his 4 year university and knew what score they required to waive the requirement. I don't know that it would have done him a whole lot of good to do it before admission. Maybe.

 

For DE, we have done high interest courses in an area of strength. Stats for the oldest, Intro to Business for the 2nd, and Soc next year for the 3rd.

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DS started with foreign language (two different ones) and DD will too. There’ll be a lot of click click click on cengage for her but I imagine she needs the drill because, well, French. And we study the language at home and it’s fun but we could use more drill. 

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For DE, we went with high interest classes, dd1 took Chem, dd2 took English, and ds took Calc. I think it is very dependent on the student’s interest and strengths. 

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On 2/28/2021 at 2:55 PM, Roadrunner said:

If they are very strong math students, Calculus could be a good option. I do want to caution you though that often the grades are based on just few exams, so it could be a shock. At our CC, the teacher bases the entire grade on 4 exams. No participation, no homework....

So I would start with something less stressful. 

My son's charter school teacher suggested retaking a math course he took already for a gentle introduction to the CC grading format. But he is a younger student he took PreCalc with AoPS in 6th grade and took the course with the CC in 7th. It was a good strategy for a student who is not use to studying, he gained a lot of confidence.

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