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Attending public school for senior year and NCAA


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Hi!

It's been a while since I've been on this forum, so hello! I am homeschooling my last child, who is a high school junior this year. He thought about going to a brick and mortar school last year, and attending one of the local public schools for his last two years of high school, but with the pandemic and everyone learning online anyway, he decided to continue homeschooling. He would really like to go to school for his senior year, though. Does anyone have any experience with a student going to school for just their final year?

I am looking for advice on how this will work. The local school is open to accepting credits from "certified" classes. For other classes, they will allow the student to take an SOL-type test for the credit and if they pass (60%), they will get the credit but not a grade. I am trying to figure out how this will work in terms of graduating and a transcript. Would it be better for him to just attend the school next year, but not actually graduate from it, and then add those classes to his homeschool transcript? I would love to hear from anyone whose student attended a public school for their senior year.

Additionally, he is interested in playing college sports and is talking to coaches now. If he plays D3 it won't be an issue, but if he should be recruited for a D1 school, then I'm not sure how that will work. I would appreciate any help or advice on either front. Thanks for any advice or stories you have to share!

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We did this with my dd for junior and senior year so she could get DE funding (free for ps, but not for homeschool students).  Her situation was a bit different since she was enrolled as a student, but never attended classes since she was doing DE full time.  Our ps was very easy to work with - we gave them her homeschool transcript and they accepted everything - credits and grades (some were from DE).  She graduated from ps and applied to colleges as a ps student, but included her homeschool under "schools attended" on college applications.  It certainly made things easier to apply for college since I didn't have to write a counselor letter or course descriptions - everything came directly from the high school.  But I didn't like the loss of control and I selfishly didn't like that the ps got credit for dd's SAT scores and NMF status.  😛  

Good luck!  Your situation is more complicated with your high school not just allowing everything to transfer over easily.  I was surprised at how easy ours was - no questions asked, but we did have DE grades and SAT scores to back up homeschool grades/courses.

 

 

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One more thing is to check his transcript against graduation requirements for the state/school district to make sure he's not missing anything and can complete all credits if you plan on having him graduate from ps.  

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Thank you! Stripe, he would like to go full-time.

Kassia, I think that's what I'm trying to determine, is if he would fully transfer and graduate from the public school, or if, since it's only a year, if he would just attend classes there and they would be added to the homeschool transcript, just like one might take CC classes. 

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4 hours ago, Grantmom said:

... he is interested in playing college sports and is talking to coaches now. If he plays D3 it won't be an issue, but if he should be recruited for a D1 school, then I'm not sure how that will work...

First: Research and find out if completing NCAA requirements for D1 is even going to be an option. NCAA requires 16 core courses be completed in a way that satisfies NCAA. If what you have used for those core courses in the first 3 years of high school while homeschooling doesn't match up with NCAA's particular requirements, there is no way your DS is going to be able to make up enough credits "in the NCAA required manner" to be D1 eligible. If that is the case, then that takes a bit load of stress off in the rest of the decision-making.

If you find that most/all of your homeschool courses DO match up with NCAA requirements for the core courses, then you need to talk to NCAA and find out if they will accept your homeschool transcript for those courses which will have a GPA attached to the required core credits. Because one of the NCAA requirements is a minimum 2.3 GPA, which will be "stripped out" of your homeschool courses if the public school only accepts the credits, not the grades.
 

4 hours ago, Grantmom said:

... If he plays D3 it won't be an issue...

If you go with the high school, having a public high school transcript that has a lot of credits with no GPA attached it *might* be problematic when applying to even D3 colleges. Of course you will ALSO be sending your homeschool transcript which will show the grades and GPA from homeschooling, but it may mean missing out on merit scholarships, if the college is only looking at the public high school transcript, even though you have also sent the homeschool transcript.

While there are no sports scholarships awarded for D3 sports, I understand that often coaches of the D3 schools are able to get other types of scholarships awarded to their sports students. So that is something to consider -- would DS stand out better to colleges for admission and for scholarships with grades for all credits, and a "complete" comprehensive GPA, or is it a non-issue? I don't know... Perhaps start talking to some of the potential D3 colleges and find out what they like...?
 

4 hours ago, Grantmom said:

Does anyone have any experience with a student going to school for just their final year?

Not quite the same as your situation (your DS *wants* to go brick & mortar school), but: a friend of mine homeschooled one of her boys up through 11th grade and then put him public school for the final year. It was based on her need, not his desire. There were no issues with the public school about accepting credits. He finished the year and got his diploma, but wasn't very happy. He ended up refusing to go to his public school graduation ceremony because he wanted to graduate with his homeschool friends at the homeschool ceremony.  😢 

 

ETA:

4 hours ago, Grantmom said:

... The local school is open to accepting credits from "certified" classes. For other classes, they will allow the student to take an SOL-type test for the credit and if they pass (60%), they will get the credit but not a grade...

Forgot to address the most important part of your question -- doh!

Being "open to accepting credits" would be a big red flag to me. That kind of "maybe" is NOT worth risking the student's ability to graduate, if the school ends up "changing their mind" along the way.

Also, it's not worth wiping out 3 years of GPA from the grades on the courses taken up to this point just to jump a school's hoop. That's pretty much a smack in the face to your DS and all his hard work up to this point. If passing the SOL-type test meant they accepted the credit AND the grade, then maybe...
 

4 hours ago, Grantmom said:

... Would it be better for him to just attend the school next year, but not actually graduate from it, and then add those classes to his homeschool transcript?...

No, it doesn't work that way. The only way you can do something sort of like this is if the public school has the policy of allowing homeschoolers to take 1-2 classes from them (like an outsourced course provider), while the parent still administrates the transcript. But the public school is onboard with it -- it's not the parent making a decision to pull a student just before the end of the year. There would still be semester 

One possible compromise idea:
Can the student continue to homeschool and graduate from homeschooling -- and just play sports with the public school next year? Many school districts allow that.

Edited by Lori D.
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18 minutes ago, Grantmom said:

 

Kassia, I think that's what I'm trying to determine, is if he would fully transfer and graduate from the public school, or if, since it's only a year, if he would just attend classes there and they would be added to the homeschool transcript, just like one might take CC classes. 

Will your ps allow him to take classes without being enrolled (ours won't)?  If not, it would be complicated since he'd be applying to colleges as a ps student and not a homeschool student.  Except for any applications he completes over the summer before school begins I guess. 

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You mentioned SOL.  Because of that, I assume you're in Virginia, as we are.  In our school district, it would not be an option.  They will not accept any homeschool credits unless they were taken with an accredited, outside provider.  Our distance ed classes from the community college would not count.  Classes from Derek Owens or WTM Academy would not count.  

I would have real concerns about if graduating from ps would mess up his chances for college.  

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39 minutes ago, Terabith said:

You mentioned SOL.  Because of that, I assume you're in Virginia, as we are.  In our school district, it would not be an option.  They will not accept any homeschool credits unless they were taken with an accredited, outside provider.  Our distance ed classes from the community college would not count.  Classes from Derek Owens or WTM Academy would not count.  

I would have real concerns about if graduating from ps would mess up his chances for college.  

I'm in VA too and it would be a no go in our district also.  We had to make the decision before 9th grade to keep them home for all of high school if we homeschooled 9th.  The only other option was to put them in PS in 9th, see how it went, with the option to bring them home for the remainder of high school.  I do know of 1 person that did successfully put their 10th grader in PS after homeschooling 9th in my district.  She had to provide all the course materials, work, grades, tests, etc. for 9th grade work done at home.  It took about the whole school year for the school to accept those credits while the kid was attending the school for 10th grade.  I would not have spent a whole year wondering if they were going to be accepted or not.  

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I'm impressed it is even an option for you. Our local school superintendent has commented that homeschooling is akin to asking a random person to perform brain surgery.  I did see a student transfer in for 10th grade, but they had to spend the first semester at home meeting course requirements and taking end of course tests to validate everything they "missed" in 9th grade.

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2 hours ago, Grantmom said:

Thank you! Stripe, he would like to go full-time.

Kassia, I think that's what I'm trying to determine, is if he would fully transfer and graduate from the public school, or if, since it's only a year, if he would just attend classes there and they would be added to the homeschool transcript, just like one might take CC classes. 

Fully transferring to the PS and receiving a diploma from them without the requisite hoops is unlikely. In our VA district, it’d be a total no-go. You might be able to negotiate it so that *you* issue the diploma and not the district tho. I’d ask about that option.

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