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Working up to reading the classics?


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Years ago there was an awesome thread about helping kids work up to reading the great classics incrementally, suggesting specific books and the order to read them in. Then more recently (but still probably a couple years ago) I asked on here about that thread because I couldn’t fine it. Well, here I am again. 😆 I’ve tried various searches, and even don’t see any activity in my account. It’s likely the site has been upgraded and things have changed while I’ve not been here. 
 

Does anyone remember this thread? Or can we start a new one? Obviously learning to read the classics starts with lots of read alouds for young kids, but my oldest is now in 7th grade and I’d love to have a plan for her going forward. I’m also happy to read these types of books alongside her. 

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16 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

Thank you 💗

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I can offer one successful trail:

1) The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus by Aliki, then 

2) D'Aulaires Book of Greek Myths, then

3) The Myths of Greece and Rome by H.A. Guerber, then

4) The Metamorphoses, by Ovid.

Ovid is surprisingly accessible if you are familiar with your mythology.  And definitely entertaining.  It feels like a worthy reward for all the time we’ve put into mythology.  We are reading the David Rayburn translation, which is in verse and quite lovely, but doesn’t rhyme, so the syntax isn’t as convoluted as earlier translations.

Obviously Ovid gets *all* the trigger warnings.  Lots of bad stuff happens. But by the time you get to The Metamorphoses you should have *lots* of practice criticizing the Greek gods...  I read aloud to my kids so I can stop in my tracks and loudly lament Jupiter’s latest kidnapping/rape/errant thunderbolt.  Lots of conversation starters in the classics!

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Lawyer&Mom said:

I can offer one successful trail:

1) The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus by Aliki, then 

2) D'Aulaires Book of Greek Myths, then

3) The Myths of Greece and Rome by H.A. Guerber, then

4) The Metamorphoses, by Ovid.

Ovid is surprisingly accessible if you are familiar with your mythology.  And definitely entertaining.  It feels like a worthy reward for all the time we’ve put into mythology.  We are reading the David Rayburn translation, which is in verse and quite lovely, but doesn’t rhyme, so the syntax isn’t as convoluted as earlier translations.

Obviously Ovid gets *all* the trigger warnings.  Lots of bad stuff happens. But by the time you get to The Metamorphoses you should have *lots* of practice criticizing the Greek gods...  I read aloud to my kids so I can stop in my tracks and loudly lament Jupiter’s latest kidnapping/rape/errant thunderbolt.  Lots of conversation starters in the classics!

 

 

 

Thanks, this is very helpful! My kids are currently binging on the Percy Jackson series and using D’Aulaire audiobook to brush up on their Greek myths. This should help is go forward!

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1 hour ago, three4me said:

Thanks, this is very helpful! My kids are currently binging on the Percy Jackson series and using D’Aulaire audiobook to brush up on their Greek myths. This should help is go forward!

I failed to mention a boatload of Goddess Girls and Heroes in Training...

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