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2021-2022 Kindergarten Planning Thread


MeaganS
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I haven't seen one of these yet and I love to do them, so I thought I'd start a planning thread for upcoming Kindergarteners. (I've updated some stuff since I last wrote)

Dd5 will be my last Kindergartener, so planning for her isn't super hard for me. I've done it 3 times already. Also, I start school when they turn 4yo, so she's already been doing school for a year and a half. We're very much a family that moves to the next thing when ready regardless of age. Since she turns 6 in December, a lot of this will look more like 1st grade work.

Reading: OPGTR. She's almost done with it and will probably finish at the beginning of Kindergarten, right before her 6th birthday. She's already becoming a good little reader. I'm excited to never teach reading again! I also recently had her start reading independently for 10 minutes a day and will continue that and maybe up the time if I think she can handle it. 
She's already finished OPGTR. So now we're just doing independent reading and reading aloud during family scripture study.

Math: Singapore 2A&B. She's halfway done with Singapore 1B right now, so I imagine that's where we'll be when we start our new school year. She's a very motivated kid, so she might actually finish Singapore 2B. At which point we'll start Beast Academy, but I'm not sure if she'll get there this year. I'm also considering having her do Reflex Math when she starts 2A for math facts practice. She has a subscription to Prodigy and plays whenever I let her. 
She's already finished 1B and is several lessons into 2A. My guess is she'll finish 2A right when our new school year starts (early July). So its very possible she might start Beast Academy in the middle of the year, which we usually do after the child has completed a second grade program. She's also started Reflex Math.

Writing: Writing With Ease. Continue level 1, probably start level 2. 
I was bored with WWE after doing it with 3 kids. So she's doing Winning With Writing level 1 right now. She'll probably start level 2 in 6 months or so.

Spelling: All About Spelling. We'll probably be done with level 1 by then so I'm guessing she'll be doing level 2.

History: Unschool with books, tv, movies, audiobooks, travel, discussions. We do listen to Story of the World in the car. I've done this for her older sisters and have been very impressed with the results. They all have a lot of curiosity and interest in history and science because of it. I don't plan on a formal curriculum for it until about high school

Science: Unschool with books, tv, movies, auidobooks, kits, toys, discussions. Same as with history.

Piano: Hoffman Academy

Geography: Evan Moore Beginning Geography. I'm waiting until she's a little more fluent as a reader, but I'm guessing she'll love this. I had her sisters do it and they all enjoyed it and she's very much a workbook-loving kid. 

 

Dd5, as the last of my kids, gets the benefit of very regular school days unlike her sisters who slowly worked up to it over time. That could be difficult for some kids but honestly, she's a dream to homeschool. She's very internally motivated and loves book work. Mostly I just want to keep from crushing her love for learning. We do most of these subjects already and they take her about an hour a day, so I don't really think it is too much for her or anything. She actually gets mad if cancel her schooling on any given day.

 

 

Edited by MeaganS
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My most challenging kid is my upcoming kinder kid, so we'll see how this year goes...

Phonics/Reading: LOE Foundations B and I See Sam readers; working on penmanship.  I have no idea where he will end the year reading wise, so I'll just plan as we go.

Math: Kindergarten Math With Confidence has been perfect for this guy.  I think he's capable of more, but he melts down completely at a challenge in any sphere of life.  KMWC has pushed him very incrementally, so we're able to move forwards without meltdowns (at least in math).  We'll finish KMWC and move right into First Grade Math With Confidence. I think eventually he will thrive in Beast Academy, but he won't be doing it early like my oldest.  We have a lot of work on frustration tolerance first.

Geography: We're working through all 50 states as a family right now, so he'll keep tagging along.  I think we're going to map Asia next year, so again he'll tag along as he likes.

History: Any eavesdropping he does on big brother's history.  And I have no idea what big brother will be doing yet, so I don't know what eavesdropping will happen.

Science: Scientific Connections through Inquiry 0 with DD6, because I can't juggle two levels of BFSU.

Lots and lots of work on family chores, working without complaining, handling sibling conflict, etc.  Life stuff.  More important than the school stuff for him.

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"Plan" is a strong word for what I have so far. My Kindergartner this coming year will be turning 5 in September but is a very quick and eager learner. The big changes will be that I'll require him to do minimal work rather than trying to make time when he requests it, and he'll be able to participate in cub scouts and gymnastics. Otherwise we'll be continuing what we are currently doing. We may be doing Subtraction Facts that Stick, or we may be done with that by then. We'll trying through a first grade math curriculum or two. We'll be doing the worksheets that go along with Bob Books unless we are done already, and then I'll find other handwriting opportunities. We'll read together daily to practice his reading. He'll tag along with year one of American history using Joy Hakim books. He'll hear lots of read alouds. We do tons of science in daily life.

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I love these kind of threads too.  My 3rd kinder is turning 5 in October, so we're doing a mix of preschool/kindergarten.  My plan so far:

Bible: I read, they listen, they draw a picture. I like this part simple.

History/Science: listen in with his older brothers.  I also have a book that I enjoyed with the older ones at this age (Little Pilgrims something, I think) that I'll try to read with him too.

Start OPGtTR.  He's still learning the alphabet and I like to have that done before we start opg.

Math: start level 1 of R&S at some point during the year. It starts off really slow with number recognition.

Misc: we started the Rod & Staff preschool books this year because I needed something a bit more laid out and I like them. We'll continue those and probably add in the kindergarten books too.  So that will be handwriting, math, letters, cutting practice, etc. I also plan on using BFiaR book list as a jumping off point for activities.

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On 2/18/2021 at 11:45 AM, MeaganS said:

Dd5 will be my last Kindergartener, so planning for her isn't super hard for me. I've done it 3 times already. Also, I start school when they turn 4yo, so she's already been doing school for a year and a half. We're very much a family that moves to the next thing when ready regardless of age. Since she turns 6 in December, a lot of this will look more like 1st grade work.

This is very much where we are with my youngest. She has an October birthday, so last fall she was almost 5 and I considered her almost a kindergartener. This coming fall she will be straddling the line between K and 1...lots of first grade level work, but still very much a wiggly kindergartener.

Phonics - Finish OPGTR, maybe finish Explode the Code though she is quickly outpacing it, plus lots of reading. Probably start WISE OWL Polysyllables by the end of next year.
Literature - Probably start independent reading of short chapter books and sentence level narrations.
Writing - WWE 1
Spelling - AAS 2
Grammar - Grammar Land and tag along through MCT Grammar Island

Math - Math Mammoth 2

Spanish - Lots of listening and speaking, perhaps start Duolingo, maybe learn to read Spanish with Coquito if her English reading is strong enough.

Science - Mr. Q Physical Science with brothers

History - Middle Ages focus, listening to OUP books

Piano - Playground Sessions

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My 3rd kindergartener 

Horizons math K with extra games and manipulatives 

All About Reading 1 with montessori pink and blue series stuff (into 2??) 

Beautiful Feet Around the World with Picture books plus anything I add from various sources;) with older sister

Study animals and ecosystems around the world for science, and nature study

D'nealian moving from tracing sandpaper letters to slate to copybook at his speed

Spanish listen in with sister on Songschool Spanish 2 and little Pim with little sister

Read Bible together and weekly memory verse

 

 

Edited by countrymum
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first time homeschooler, with DD who just turned 5. Won’t be surprised if this all changes by Fall 😆 

Phonics/Reading: Abeka K5 and/or Explode the code and other beginning readers

History: Sonlight history/bible/lit core K (new for 2020)

Math: TGATB K 

Handwriting: TGATB K or HWOT K

Geography: Evan Moor Beginning Geography

Science: MB adventures in creation 1

 

DD5 is doing 100EZ now and we’re doubling up lessons in the beginning because it’s too slow for her, she’s devouring the Usborne very early readers we have and scrambling to keep up with her. She also has a Spectrum hands on PK math book she will finish mid summer I think. I’m contemplating doing Abeka K4 math and phonics during the summer to see if she’s ready for K5. Also will try out HWOT kick start K this summer to see how she likes it. 

Probably too optimistic considering i have twins DD3 and i’m considering BFIAR for their pre school. Too much? DD5 brings me readers every day excited and I don’t want to loose that momentum!

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11 minutes ago, Stephanie W said:

Probably too optimistic considering i have twins DD3 and i’m considering BFIAR for their pre school. Too much? DD5 brings me readers every day excited and I don’t want to loose that momentum!

I don't know about "too much", but I think I can safely say "not necessary".

In your shoes, I might think ahead to whether, a couple years down the road, you envision running two separate history curriculums, science curriculums, bible curriculums, etc. for your eldest and twins. If yes, then maybe now is a good time to dip your toe into those waters, but if the answer is no, then maybe it makes sense to hold off on Sonlight K for a year and do it with them all (at their own levels).

When my oldest was 5, I had a 3 year old, a 1 year old, and was pregnant with #4. I felt that my only hope in those early years of regularly exposing my kids to science, history, art, poetry, Spanish, and other content subjects was to find a way to include them all so that I could dedicate baby/toddler nap times to reading, writing and math that had to be done individually with me.

That first year we read so many science and history picture books while the kids were eating meals and snacks. We did all the fun preschool "science experiments" - vinegar and baking soda, color mixing, blowing cotton balls around with straws, etc. We learned Spanish finger rhymes, read and memorized silly poetry, explored various simple art media, drew maps of houses and neighborhoods and zoos, went on nature walks, etc. Of course, the K'er was also doing math and reading and writing each day, and the Preschooler was counting and practicing phonemic awareness, but at those ages, those were done in short sessions, and done mostly orally for the preschooler.

The most important thing we accomplished that first year was establishing a new routine. By the second year, the kids were 0, 2, 4 and 6, and we continued on much the same, but were able to add in Story of the World for history and an enjoyable science curriculum. 

My kids are now 5, 7, 9, and 11, and we still do most content subjects together. In fact, up until last year, they did all their history and science together. This year, they are all studying the same history and science subjects, but using deeper resources for the oldest and lighter for the younger three.

All that to say, don't be fooled that your oldest has to use curriculum with a big 'ole K on the front. It would be just fine to use BFIAR or FIAR with the three year olds and the 5 year old, and then add in a little math, handwriting and reading for the K'er...and if she just wants to read readers, there is nothing wrong with that!!

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49 minutes ago, wendyroo said:

I don't know about "too much", but I think I can safely say "not necessary".

In your shoes, I might think ahead to whether, a couple years down the road, you envision running two separate history curriculums, science curriculums, bible curriculums, etc. for your eldest and twins. If yes, then maybe now is a good time to dip your toe into those waters, but if the answer is no, then maybe it makes sense to hold off on Sonlight K for a year and do it with them all (at their own levels).

When my oldest was 5, I had a 3 year old, a 1 year old, and was pregnant with #4. I felt that my only hope in those early years of regularly exposing my kids to science, history, art, poetry, Spanish, and other content subjects was to find a way to include them all so that I could dedicate baby/toddler nap times to reading, writing and math that had to be done individually with me.

That first year we read so many science and history picture books while the kids were eating meals and snacks. We did all the fun preschool "science experiments" - vinegar and baking soda, color mixing, blowing cotton balls around with straws, etc. We learned Spanish finger rhymes, read and memorized silly poetry, explored various simple art media, drew maps of houses and neighborhoods and zoos, went on nature walks, etc. Of course, the K'er was also doing math and reading and writing each day, and the Preschooler was counting and practicing phonemic awareness, but at those ages, those were done in short sessions, and done mostly orally for the preschooler.

The most important thing we accomplished that first year was establishing a new routine. By the second year, the kids were 0, 2, 4 and 6, and we continued on much the same, but were able to add in Story of the World for history and an enjoyable science curriculum. 

My kids are now 5, 7, 9, and 11, and we still do most content subjects together. In fact, up until last year, they did all their history and science together. This year, they are all studying the same history and science subjects, but using deeper resources for the oldest and lighter for the younger three.

All that to say, don't be fooled that your oldest has to use curriculum with a big 'ole K on the front. It would be just fine to use BFIAR or FIAR with the three year olds and the 5 year old, and then add in a little math, handwriting and reading for the K'er...and if she just wants to read readers, there is nothing wrong with that!!

Yes to all of this.  My kids are younger than Wendy's; they are 3, 4.5, 6, and 7.5.  Next year I will have a 3rd grader, a 1st grader, a kindergartener, and a 3.5 yo.  Everyone has separate work for their skill subjects (math, handwriting, phonics/reading) but so much of our learning time is communal.  I consider it cultural literacy - music, art, geography, history, science, French, lots of time in nature, and lots of literature.  Kindergarten skill work takes no more than 30 minutes - 10-15 minutes of math; 10-15 minutes of phonics; 5 minutes of handwriting if my kinder is ready.  I have always had too many balls in the air to commit to more time for kindergarten, and I needed to make sure that the skill subjects were addressed in a short, targeted burst. BFIAR is lovely for 3-5 year olds; everyone would enjoy it! Or the first volume of FIAR.  Or Wee Folk Art.  Mostly we just read.  A lot.  We are always reading 1 chapter book, we cycle through a book on mythology or fairy tales, we have a daily poem, a history and science trade book, and all the picture books they request. On average, I spend about three hours reading aloud - broken up in several sessions throughout the day.   Often I use something like BFIAR as a springboard for more books - a week of Eric Carle; a week of picture books about colors after Brown Bear Brown Bear; a few weeks spent on insects after reading Eric Carle.  I have a loose list I work from, but lots of our reading is inspired by the kids interest in topics.  I also try to make sure I'm switching up the target audience.  About 60% of what I read is for my oldest and 30 % is for the middle two and 10% is making sure I get some preschool subjects in for my littlest.  

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so based on @wendyroo and @medawyn sounds like maybe I can get them all 3 to do BFIAR OR FIAR vol 1 and then math/phonics/ handwriting with DD5. 

I was really wanting to try Sonlight because Inwas drawn to the history lit/readers for their new K HBL/core. If I liked it I wanted to pursue it for all 3 by level 1/3 to have them on the same HBL together and then do their individual subjects. Is this not the correct thought process? Wait until DD5 is 6 or 7 and try with all 3 girls? 

 

Science/Geo was definitely optional and we want to do 4 day K and do a coop on Fridays. 

 

Maybe I’ll just do the readers from FIAR and/or Sonlight K HBL/core because I think DD5 would love the books! I know the new homeschool mom in me is drawn to the schedule and organization on Sonlight, but it would be cheaper and easier just to go off their book list, so I’m all for that! 

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I'm so excited to be doing k with my 3rd. I was stressed out with my first, we did not enjoy it like we should have. I was sick and pregnant with my 2nd so it was bare minimum.

I plan on doing

Abeka Phonics

Kate Snow Math ( I can never remember what it's called)

A Reason For Handwriting

Five in a Row

And whatever fun shows, books and activities we decide to get into. 

 

 

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On 2/18/2021 at 2:55 PM, medawyn said:

My most challenging kid is my upcoming kinder kid, so we'll see how this year goes...

Phonics/Reading: LOE Foundations B and I See Sam readers; working on penmanship.  I have no idea where he will end the year reading wise, so I'll just plan as we go.

Math: Kindergarten Math With Confidence has been perfect for this guy.  I think he's capable of more, but he melts down completely at a challenge in any sphere of life.  KMWC has pushed him very incrementally, so we're able to move forwards without meltdowns (at least in math).  We'll finish KMWC and move right into First Grade Math With Confidence. I think eventually he will thrive in Beast Academy, but he won't be doing it early like my oldest.  We have a lot of work on frustration tolerance first.

Geography: We're working through all 50 states as a family right now, so he'll keep tagging along.  I think we're going to map Asia next year, so again he'll tag along as he likes.

History: Any eavesdropping he does on big brother's history.  And I have no idea what big brother will be doing yet, so I don't know what eavesdropping will happen.

Science: Scientific Connections through Inquiry 0 with DD6, because I can't juggle two levels of BFSU.

Lots and lots of work on family chores, working without complaining, handling sibling conflict, etc.  Life stuff.  More important than the school stuff for him.

Haha I'm on most challenging kid as well, so it should be a fun year. I am so thankful she has an October bday and she wine almost 6 when we start. Good luck lol!

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10 hours ago, Elizabeth86 said:

Haha I'm on most challenging kid as well, so it should be a fun year. I am so thankful she has an October bday and she wine almost 6 when we start. Good luck lol!

Unfortunately, I have the opposite here.  He's a young kinder - May birthday.  It's one of the reasons I'm thrilled to be homeschooling him; I don't have to really decide what grade he is until we're closer to high school.  If we survive that long!

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3 hours ago, medawyn said:

Unfortunately, I have the opposite here.  He's a young kinder - May birthday.  It's one of the reasons I'm thrilled to be homeschooling him; I don't have to really decide what grade he is until we're closer to high school.  If we survive that long!

Yes, I'd give anything if I had realized this with my first. His birthday was the actual cut off to put him in K the year he was 4, turning 5 a few months after we started school. I put so much pressure on us both. He did great,but my I would change it all if I could because he wasn't necessarily ready. Sigh.

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14 hours ago, Elizabeth86 said:

I'm so excited to be doing k with my 3rd. I was stressed out with my first, we did not enjoy it like we should have. I was sick and pregnant with my 2nd so it was bare minimum.

I plan on doing

Abeka Phonics

Kate Snow Math ( I can never remember what it's called)

A Reason For Handwriting

Five in a Row

And whatever fun shows, books and activities we decide to get into. 

 

 

I think you’ll really like the Kate Snow math - Kindergarten Math With Confidence. It’s gentle, thorough, and hands on without too many moving pieces. Just right for moms who have close together kids.  We’ve also enjoyed the recommended picture books, and the four day schedule has left plenty of room for games or other manipulatives.

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1 hour ago, medawyn said:

I think you’ll really like the Kate Snow math - Kindergarten Math With Confidence. It’s gentle, thorough, and hands on without too many moving pieces. Just right for moms who have close together kids.  We’ve also enjoyed the recommended picture books, and the four day schedule has left plenty of room for games or other manipulatives.

I'm pretty excited about it. I LOVED Math Facts That Stick.

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I am still not 100% certain I am homeschooling mine for K. I used to be 100% certain he was going to school, but now with all the COVID rules I just don’t know. My biggest deal breaker right now is that I would not be allowed inside the school at all, even to walk him in for the first few days. I’ve already homeschooled two, now in 6th (homeschool) and 9th (private school for first time). So I can’t see dropping my baby off at the door with strangers. 
 

I have obviously done this twice before. Luke is a pretty well-rounded kid and will be 6 in October so school stuff will be easier than if he was a young one. We are working on AAR and Singapore Earlybird kindergarten. He’s writing letters fairly well. I went in Gung-ho with my bigger kids but I’m more relaxed with him. We will get the three Rs done and the rest will be gravy 🙂 

 

Im also doing all the fun art projects I couldn’t do with my big kids much because dealing with the crazy mess of two young kids and art projects burned me out quickly (plus they got art at coop). He does too, but he’s not too wild and really has good fine motor skills, an artistic bent, and a 6th grade sister to help keep the crazy down or at least not encourage it!

 

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I'll be schooling my 4th kinder this next year.  She has been a wonderful preschooler to school, very interested and engaged in all we have tried.  I'm hoping for more of the same in K.  

All About Reading 1, Singapore Dimensions K, Handwriting with Tears K

Tagging along with sister who is in 1st for history (modern era) and science (life sciences)

I'm still trying to figure out what Bible I will do with my K and 1st grader.  I know I'll be bringing them more into our family morning time and requiring more memory work and involvement from them.  I'm not sure what that will look like yet as there is a big gap between these two and their brothers who will be in 5th and 8th next year.  

I'm also hoping co-op will happen for some structured art and gym time as well as ballet if she's still interested in the fall.  

 

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4th child is definitely my most challenging—this should be interesting.  Working on attention span and attitude.  Reminding myself he is not his brothers and that’s okay. 

Character: Myself and Others 2 & 3

Latin: song school Latin 

Math: finish Singapore K (maybe), start Singapore 1, R&S 1

Handwriting: zanerbloser k, MP handwriting 

Reading: AAR 1, Memoria Press First Start Reading 

History/Science: MP enrichment, listening to SOC with brothers,  Follow along with Christian Studies3

Co-op: 5 in a Row, STEM

PE: soccer

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On 2/23/2021 at 9:24 PM, countrymum said:

March modifications bolded

 

My 3rd kindergartener 

Horizons math K (mostly workbook only?)and miquon for exploration and Montessori manipulatives for teaching

All About Reading 1 with montessori pink and blue series stuff (into 2??) 

Beautiful Feet Around the World with Picture Books combined with MFW countries and cultures  plus anything I add from various sources;) with older sister

Study animals and ecosystems around the world for science, and nature study

D'nealian moving from tracing sandpaper letters to slate to copybook at his speed

Spanish listen in with sister on Songschool Spanish 2 and little Pim with little sister

Read Bible together and weekly memory verse

 

 

 

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I feel so unprepared now... My plans so far. This is my first kid I'm homeschooling and he does present some challenges. He is advanced intellectually but maturity-wise very much his age. 

Reading: Waseca (we tried AAR and it was not a good fit for us, he was not mature enough for the amount of repetition) 

Language Arts: unknown - love the idea of MCT, but again it's not offered for kindergarten.

Math: unknown  - I wish Beast Academy had a Kindergarten program. My son is doing really well using Montessori materials but I would like something more structured so I don't miss anything.

Handwriting: unknown - I don't need anything fancy or pretty just get him to be able to write legibly enough. (Figure if they can learn copperplate on their own. ;P)

Science: unknown - We have a kiwi crate subscription... I bought a set of biome readers from Waseca so I could use that for some geography/science

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1 hour ago, Clarita said:

Language Arts: unknown - love the idea of MCT, but again it's not offered for kindergarten.

What are you looking for a kindergarten "language arts" program? To me, kindergarten language arts is learning to read (which you have covered) and lots of picture book read alouds (plus perhaps some early chapter book read alouds if the kiddo is ready). Some of my kindergarteners have listened to Grammar-land, but just because I was reading it to everyone and they were along for the ride. I don't think any grammar is required for a kindergartener. I do LOVE MCT grammar and poetry books, but my kids get more out of them when they are older. For K'ers, I stick to gentle, occasional exposure to poetry and simple definitions of parts of speech (without expecting mastery).

Quote

Math: unknown  - I wish Beast Academy had a Kindergarten program. My son is doing really well using Montessori materials but I would like something more structured so I don't miss anything.

Really, truly there is not a lot to miss in kindergarten math. We use Math Mammoth (which starts in first grade). It offers a brief review of K level math with only includes: Same/Different, More/Less with quantities up to 12, Writing 0-9, Counting objects to 20, Counting backwards from 10, Colors, Simple shapes, Position words, and Simple patterns. Math Mammoth starts its first grade curriculum with simple addition (like 1+2) using pictures.

If you think he is ready for more challenge than what he is currently getting, then by all means explore other options. But I would not change what is working simply out of fear that you will miss a crucial kindergarten math concept.

Quote

Handwriting: unknown - I don't need anything fancy or pretty just get him to be able to write legibly enough. (Figure if they can learn copperplate on their own. ;P)

In my experience this can be as simple or complex as the child needs or you want. There are tons of free handwriting worksheets available online. I really like the Universal Handwriting books. But what has worked best here is making personalized handwriting/copywork sheets. I bought a handwriting font that includes guide lines, arrows, tracing letters, etc. I can customize the difficulty and content of the copywork; my current K'er traces and copies words/names/sentences about Paw Patrol, family members, her favorite foods, etc. Older kids copy longer sentences about Star Wars or whatever their current interests are.

Quote

Science: unknown - We have a kiwi crate subscription... I bought a set of biome readers from Waseca so I could use that for some geography/science

You really, really don't need a formal science curriculum in K. There are so many great science picture books to enjoy. Plus nature and simple, everyday "experiments" (blowing bubbles, mixing colors, planting seeds, watching ice melt on a hot day, etc).

If you want just a little more structure, have you considered something like Five in a Row? That would add gentle exposure to literature, science, history, math, geography, art appreciation, vocabulary, etc.

Or Wee Folk Art is a gentle seasonal curriculum that introduces literature, social studies, art appreciation, crafts, and science.

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Thank you wendyroo. I guess it's my very first time (I did all my years of schooling in public school including college), so I'm super nervous. 

I love the idea of making my own handwriting/copywork sheet. Thank you!

 

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10 hours ago, Clarita said:

I feel so unprepared now... My plans so far. This is my first kid I'm homeschooling and he does present some challenges. He is advanced intellectually but maturity-wise very much his age. 

Reading: Waseca (we tried AAR and it was not a good fit for us, he was not mature enough for the amount of repetition) 

Language Arts: unknown - love the idea of MCT, but again it's not offered for kindergarten.

Math: unknown  - I wish Beast Academy had a Kindergarten program. My son is doing really well using Montessori materials but I would like something more structured so I don't miss anything.

Handwriting: unknown - I don't need anything fancy or pretty just get him to be able to write legibly enough. (Figure if they can learn copperplate on their own. ;P)

Science: unknown - We have a kiwi crate subscription... I bought a set of biome readers from Waseca so I could use that for some geography/science

If it helps at all, last year I had a very smart but very 5 year old boy. He was not reading or writing yet (his sister who is close in age had been at 3, so I had to be careful not to make comparisons) but was great with math. My goals for the year were mostly about developing "soft skills" like not quitting in frustration if his letters were wobbly or he lost a game, in addition to continuing to plug away at reading. 

We used Math Mammoth 1 for math. This was very easy for him, but my main purpose for it was to get him used to writing down answers and doing work without (too much) complaint. We used The Good and the Beautiful handwriting. I wouldn't use their other products because I disagree with their philosophy about what is good and beautiful in literature, but their handwriting throws in "fun things" like mazes that really do build up handwriting skills. We used ProgressivePhonics.com as our main reading program. We did First Language Lessons for the Well Trained Mind orally together with big sister. We skipped the writing portions. We did Story of the World together also. Science was basically unschooled. We read some interesting books, raised chickens, had a garden, built marble runs, went to the science museum, and watched lots of shows like Wild Kratts. My kids have learned tons from this approach. 

That kid is now doing great in Beast Academy. We're taking a relaxed pace, but he finished 2B Thursday. His reading has taken off considerably this year, and he's matured tremendously as well. Now he's talking his 4 year old brother through frustration, helping him not melt down upon losing games. It's very sweet to see. I strongly encourage a focus on "soft skills" in these early years. (As an illustration of how the needed skills are different for each kid, my daughter primarily needed to develop a willingness to speak up about problems, while I had to teach my son to give teachers a chance to notice things on their own before jumping in).

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11 hours ago, Clarita said:

I feel so unprepared now... My plans so far. This is my first kid I'm homeschooling and he does present some challenges. He is advanced intellectually but maturity-wise very much his age. 

Reading: Waseca (we tried AAR and it was not a good fit for us, he was not mature enough for the amount of repetition) 

Language Arts: unknown - love the idea of MCT, but again it's not offered for kindergarten.

Math: unknown  - I wish Beast Academy had a Kindergarten program. My son is doing really well using Montessori materials but I would like something more structured so I don't miss anything.

Handwriting: unknown - I don't need anything fancy or pretty just get him to be able to write legibly enough. (Figure if they can learn copperplate on their own. ;P)

Science: unknown - We have a kiwi crate subscription... I bought a set of biome readers from Waseca so I could use that for some geography/science

You've gotten great advice from @wendyrooand @Xahm, so I just want to throw in another reassurance.  My third kid is going to be in K this year.  He's very bright, but he's also my most difficult kid.  We are going to spend most of kindergarten on life skills.  We are focusing on independence in self care and basic chores without whinging and meltdowns.  We are working on frustration tolerance, so when he's older he can work to the level that I THINK he's intellectually capable and meet challenges without shutting down.  We're working on being a good loser/winner. We are working on fine motor strength, because he's resistant to writing/coloring and building hand strength will make handwriting more successful, even if I don't really tackle it until first grade.

Ultimately, even if you did NOTHING this year, your little guy isn't going to be behind for life.  My kinder kid is going to do a phonics program, handwriting probably with salt trays most of the year, and a very simple hands-on math program (I'm using Kindergarten Math with Confidence and First Grade Math with Confidence).  We try to spend 2 hours a day outside, and I put a high value on family read aloud (usually 2-3 hours per day).  He will sit down with me for probably two 15 minute school sessions, but most of his days will be playing and working on the life skills I mentioned above.  Improving his self-regulation will make him a much better 3rd grade student than any kindergarten math program I could throw at him.

I am not suggesting that your student has any need for the kind of focus I'm doing on self-regulation and life skills, but kindergarten is a perfect year for a simple, sweet introduction to academics with a heavy focus on creative play and time spent exploring outside.

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Oooh, this is the first year I can contribute to two planning threads! Exciting. 

Like some other posters, we've been doing school for a few months now, anyway, so this is basically going to be continuous. DD5 will turn 4 in April, so she's going to be 5.5 in the fall. 

We'll probably continue more or less what we're doing:

Math: I'll write her math lessons, with a focus on concepts and early introduction of ideas. She's very mathy, just like her sister, so I expect to be working on multiplication and division and the properties thereof with her. We'll probably introduce negatives if she's interested. We'll continue to explore equality, variables via shapes, and place value. 

Language arts: I'm hoping we'll finally finish up with her phonics -- we've now been doing nonsense words for more than a year -- and that she can simply just enjoy her free reading. Since both of my kids have been avid early readers of chapter books, I have not yet had to assign literature to my little ones, and that's my expectation for her. 

We'll continue with a handwriting program: we'll probably continue Handwriting Without Tears, since she's enjoying that. She may enjoy writing little stories after she can write a bit better, so then we'll do that. 

History and science: She tags along for the history and science reading that I do with DD8, and she also tags along for any science experiments we do. 

Music: She'll start lessons with DD8's piano teacher. She's already doing some pre-lesson practicing with DH (music is generally his domain, despite the fact that he doesn't play piano) and she's very excited about that. 

Russian: She'll continue watching Russian cartoons with DD8 and will do a bit of spoken practice with me. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

My least academic, only non autistic and most insane child, who had no formal academics this year:

Bible: What's In The Bible? and The Jesus Storybook Bible.

History: Exposure to SOTW III with older siblings.

Science: CLE Nature Readers read by big sis.

LA: Emma Serl's Primary Language Lessons and Reading Lessons Through Literature.

Math: Ray's Primary Arithmetic.

Art: Home Art Studio.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Reading: Phonics Pathways

Math: Singapore 1A, 1B, etc.

Handwriting: Zaner-Bloser

We currently do tons of process art, so I'm not sure we need to start Artistic Pursuits yet. I might end up using it over the summer leading into 1st grade.

Other than that, we're going to continue to do lots of reading aloud, listening to music, hiking/nature play, and following dd's natural interests. I may also get some of the interdisciplinary units from ThoughtfulPlay (their free samples have me intrigued). 

 

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  • 1 month later...

We are keeping it very simple for K5. 

Bible reading and scripture memorization as a group, plus Bible coloring books

Mathematical Reasoning K, which I anticipate we will complete before winter holidays

CLE LTR, which is more thorough than the 100 Easy Lessons we have completed in K4

Draw Write Now book 1 for handwriting and drawing

Read alouds as a group and all the library books his heart desires, plus tons of outside play

Anything else is just icing. 🙂

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On 3/2/2021 at 3:20 PM, gradchica said:

Math: finish Singapore K (maybe), start Singapore 1, R&S 1

Reading: AAR 1, Memoria Press First Start Reading 

 

This sounds a lot like me.  We are using singapore K now and we mostly enjoy it but I also like the idea of more drill that R&S provides.  We are also almost done with All About Pre-Reading and Ziggy is a huge hit in our house and I have loved the program but I am also interested in FSR and their philosophy.  I have thought about going all in with Memoria Press K but I can't seem to let go of Singapore and AAR.  Do you plan to combine the programs in the entirety or use one as a spine and supplement with the other?

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My son is turning 5 late this summer and could technically go into Kindergarten. A lot of his work will be K level but we will be calling it PK5.  We are currently working through All About Pre-Reading, finished Explode the Code A-C, HWT PK, Singapore KA and went through Torchlight K this year.  

Morning Time - Gentle+Classical Primer.  We started this about a month ago and basically just use this for our nursery rhyme, fairy tale/fable, poetry, and artist/composer study.  

Math - Probably stay with Singapore KB/1A but I am completely undecided on this.  I have also purchased Miquon, MM and printed some MEP.  He really like Miquon so who knows what we will end up doing.  Probably stay with Singapore mostly and use Miquon/MEP occasionally to mix things up.  But, who knows, I might scrap it all and go with RightStart.  We are having trouble finding our footing with math. 

Phonics/Handwriting - AAR 1, HWT, I already have explode the code 1-3 so we will work through those if extra practice is needed and we do Draw Write Now a couple times a month

History/Literature/Geography - I really want to do American history this year.  He is interested and I think he will love it.  I have already purchased playful pioneers and plan on going through this lightly.  Mostly just the literature, narration, copywork and related activities/recipes.  He really loves being read to so I am also looking into the new Sonlight K Heroes and Happenings or Notgrass Our Star Spangled Story.  I would love feedback if anybody has experience with either program.

Nature - We are working through Gentle+Classical Nature.  I really love this program.  We will probably just go back through it using the level 2 books/memory statements once we have completed it the first time.  I also enjoy Our Journey Westward: 100 Creative nature walks

Science - He gets a lot of science from our nature study and the books we have already.  I will probably just get an Usborne science experiment book and work through that and I am thinking about getting LEGO BricQ Motion Essential. He loves building LEGOs.  We also have a subscription to Kiwi Crate.

Art - We really enjoyed Art Lab for little kids this year.  I will probably just buy another one of the lab books and pick an activity to do each week.

PE - He plays soccer, t-ball and takes swim lessons

We homeschool year-round so we take our time going through things, stringing things out for a couple weeks at a time, choosing the things that interest us and skipping the rest.  We read a lot but I don't make him do all the handwriting from everything we use.  

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14 minutes ago, jar2542 said:

He really like Miquon so who knows what we will end up doing.  Probably stay with Singapore mostly and use Miquon/MEP occasionally to mix things up

Why not just use Miquon if he likes it? It's a good program from all I've seen. 

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1 hour ago, jar2542 said:

Morning Time - Gentle+Classical Primer.  We started this about a month ago and basically just use this for our nursery rhyme, fairy tale/fable, poetry, and artist/composer study.  

How do you like this? Do you think it's too much? I looked through primer and it felt like a lot of work to me along with learning to read and math. Otherwise my kids and I LOVE Erin's choices in literature. My eldest is turning 5 in the fall. I am on the fence with doing the new preschool 1 or primer when he starts school. 

 

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13 hours ago, Clarita said:

How do you like this? Do you think it's too much? I looked through primer and it felt like a lot of work to me along with learning to read and math. Otherwise my kids and I LOVE Erin's choices in literature. My eldest is turning 5 in the fall. I am on the fence with doing the new preschool 1 or primer when he starts school. 

 

I really like her programs alot.  I would suggest buying her physically product though.  It cost a fortune for me to print everything and it took a whole day to organize it all.  It looks like she uses quality material in her physical products and I think it would have been cheaper overall.  There is also a bit of a learning curve to using the program but if you get organized, use a memory board and/or a morning menu, it just takes a few minutes each week to change everything out and then you are ready for the next week.

As far as if it is too much, we don't use it in it's entirety.  We basically use this program while we are eating breakfast.  I put what I want to use from both primer and nature in a morning menu and we read the bible story, the poem, nursery rhyme, fable/fairy tale and look over the artist/composer for the week.  Then we are off to do our morning chores and play before we start our school day which mostly just consist of phonic and math for about an hour.  

We tried using the morning binder stuff but he was too tired of writing by the time we made it to our phonics and math programs so I stopped using that part. I read over the manner of the week but we don't typically read from everyday graces because my son did not enjoy it.  We also don't read the fairy tale/fable everyday, probably just 2-3 times a week.  On Fridays, I cut out everything from our storyboard and we act out the story., my son really enjoys this. On Tuesdays, we do the art project that she recommends which is usually very simple.  She has a math suggestion but I really just use that as a reference throughout the week.  If it is "count to 50" then I just try to make a conscious effort to count to 50 for some reason or another throughout the week.   I could probably put something together myself that has the components I use from the program but I like having it all laid out for me each week.  I also like having the artist works printed and her story boards.  

We also use her nature program which I really like a lot. Again, we don't use every component of it.  I don't make him do the copywork but we do the unit projects, use her suggested readings, read the nature nuggets/creature corners and use the memory statements/spanish vocab cards.  The nature readings are usually bedtime stories for us just a couple days a week.  Nature nuggets and memory statements/spanish vocab are part of breakfast and then we do the outside exploration in the afternoons a couple days a week. This part doesn't feel like school to him at all.

It seems like a lot but it really doesn't take much time because we spread it out throughout the day.  He is my only child though so I realize I have more time than alot of other moms.

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14 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

Why not just use Miquon if he likes it? It's a good program from all I've seen. 

It's more because of my teaching style that I don't feel like it could be our main program.  I am a first time homeschooling mom and I just feel like I need more structure in Math as the teacher.  I feel a little lost right now but maybe that's because we just started dabbling in it a few weeks ago?

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On 5/18/2021 at 3:38 PM, jar2542 said:

This sounds a lot like me.  We are using singapore K now and we mostly enjoy it but I also like the idea of more drill that R&S provides.  We are also almost done with All About Pre-Reading and Ziggy is a huge hit in our house and I have loved the program but I am also interested in FSR and their philosophy.  I have thought about going all in with Memoria Press K but I can't seem to let go of Singapore and AAR.  Do you plan to combine the programs in the entirety or use one as a spine and supplement with the other?

I mostly went w MP K for my third, but kept Singapore and AAR. He needed some extra practice with phonics and writing, do FSR took care of that. I do prefer AAR though. We use R&S just for drill, and as practice “independent” work.

 

So Singapore and AAR are our main curricula and FSR and R&S are drill/review. 

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 2/23/2021 at 9:15 AM, wendyroo said:

Spanish - Lots of listening and speaking, perhaps start Duolingo, maybe learn to read Spanish with Coquito if her English reading is strong enough.

Wendy - I've looked at this on Amazon, but it's hard to see what it's really like. Could you tell more about it? Does it have any teacher guide or direction or something? Or does it assume you know what to do with the workbook pages? Do you use the Clásico or the Oro? I can't really tell what is the difference. 

Anyway anything about how it works or your experience would be great. 

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5 minutes ago, JessinTX said:

Wendy - I've looked at this on Amazon, but it's hard to see what it's really like. Could you tell more about it? Does it have any teacher guide or direction or something? Or does it assume you know what to do with the workbook pages? Do you use the Clásico or the Oro? I can't really tell what is the difference. 

Anyway anything about how it works or your experience would be great. 

Sure.

I use Clásico just because that is what I have...I don't know what differences there are between the versions. There is no teacher's guide that I know of. It is completely in Spanish, so you need to be able to understand the directions to know what to do on the workbook pages...or, just guess or skip them.

The pages are very predictable. There are a few pages introducing the vowel sounds at the beginning, but after that each page focuses on one consonant paired with each of the vowels. So, for example, the "p" page has words and sentences with pa, pe, pi, po, and pu words. The pages are largely decodable - only using sounds that have already been introduced. For example, "p" is very early when they have only introduced the vowels and "m". So most of the sentences are things like "Amo a mi papá." and "Pepe mima a Pipo." Each page has a small interactive section - writing numbers, answering a question, etc - which we almost entirely skip. Many of those activities would be perfect for native 5 or 6 year olds but are entirely too difficult for my second language learners.

The workbook pages are interspersed as review after every 6ish letters. They have activities like coloring matching words, connecting words to pictures, coloring animal names one color and food names another, drawing lines to complete sentences, very simple picture crosswords, etc. Many of these activities are much too difficult for my kids when they are learning to read. Instead, I use many of the workbook pages years later when they have much larger Spanish vocabularies.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

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