Jump to content

Menu

Book a Week 2021 - BW4: Alexandre Dumas and The Count of Monte Cristo Readalong


Recommended Posts

Happy Sunday, dear hearts. I’m looking forward to next week and beginning our adventure, reading the  novel  The Count of Monte Cristo written by Alexandre Dumas.  

“Life is a storm, my young friend. You will bask in the sunlight one moment,
be shattered on the rocks the next. What makes you a man is
what you do when that storm comes.”
― Alexandre Dumas

 

 Book Synopsis:  "Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantes is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration."

Written in serialized format in 1844 -1845, the story is inspired by real life events which took place between 1815-1838,  and by real life people, among whom is Alexandre's father Thomas-Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie, who was the highest ranking black officer during the Napoleonic wars, and thrown in prison,  along with fellow sailor and scientist Déodat de Dolomieu.  The story behind the story  is taken from the life of shoemaker Pierre Picaud, who was engaged to a rich woman, and falsely accused by three very jealous friends of spying for England, and is thrown in prison for a period of time, and uses his exploits during and after. 

We're going to take it slowly with plenty of time built in to talk about the story. The Count of Monte Cristo is composed of 117 chapters and we'll read three chapters a week, (approximately thirty pages give or take a few)  and get to know the characters,  dig into the themes presented, and allow us to explore rabbit trails.   The page numbers are based on the Penguin Classics paperback version, translated by Robin Buss. 

  

Chapters

Pages

 

 

01 – 03

07 - 32

04 – 06

33 - 61

07 – 09

62 - 88

10 – 12

89 -111

13 – 15

112 – 147

16 – 18

148 – 186

19 – 21

187 - 211

22 – 24

212 – 235

25 – 27

236 - 266

28 – 30

267 - 299

31 – 33

300 – 358

34 – 36

359 – 412

37 – 39

413 – 435

40 – 42

456 -484

43 – 45

485 – 524

46 – 48

525 – 557

49 – 51

558 – 581

52 – 54

582 – 620

55 – 57

621 - 652

58 – 60

653 - 677

61 – 63

678 – 704

64 – 66

705 – 732

67 – 69

733 - 760

70 – 72

761 – 773

73 – 75

774 - 820

76 – 78

821 - 860

79 – 80

861 - 895

81 – 83

896 – 931

84 – 86

932 – 962

87 – 89

963 - 986

90 – 92

987 - 1012

93 – 95

1013 – 1039

96 – 98

1040 – 1056

99 – 101

1069 - 1090

102 – 104

1091 - 1115

105 – 107

1116 – 1150

108 – 110

1151 – 1173

111 – 113

1174 – 1206

114 - 116

1207 – 1229

117

1230 – 1243

 

Alexandre Dumas was a prolific writer and if you've already read The Count of Monte Cristo, and don’t want to reread it, dive in to any one of his stories. If you have a hard time deciding, Molli of Discover Walks Blog suggests 5 Best Books Written by Dumas.   Bill Morris of the Millions explores Seven Reasons Why Alexandre Dumas Will Never Die.   

The story is available to read online through multiple resources including Gutenberg and the Literature Network  as well as in audio format.  

 

Do you have any preconceived notions about the story?  Have you watched the movie with either Richard Chamberlain or  Jim Caviezel?   

 

Please join me in reading The Count of Monte Cristo. 

 

**********************

 

Link to week three

 

Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers around the globe.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Dragons of Dorcastle, the 1st book in the Pillars of Realty series by Jack Campbell.  There was a lot of talk about dragons but nary a one to be seen until the next to last chapter and its presence was short lived.  The focus was on the two young main characters:  A young man raised as a Mage and taught to ignore all emotion and think of the rest of the world as an illusion, and people are shadows, nonexistent to his reality.  And a young woman, the youngest Master Mechanic, also taught the Mechanics were better than everyone else, including the Mages, and the commons beneath their notice.   Both their lives are on the line and they must work together, in secret, behind their Guilds backs.  Great premise but I unfortunately don’t like the characters enough to continue the series.     (Dragons, steampunk,  A to Z read by Title)

Happy Happy Joy Joy.  Dirty Deeds: an Urban Fantasy Collection, written by Faith Hunter, Devon Monk, Diana Pharaoh Francis, and R.J. Blain was just released.  Hunter and Monk are two of my favorite authors and I enjoyed the continuation of two storylines.  Hunter’s Yellowrock series with Bound into Darkness showcasing Eli and Liz, and their budding romance while in the midst of a dangerous job, and The Ties that Bind, featuring Bedilia (Molly’s mother) and the Vampire Master of the City of Asheville, Lincoln Shaddock. Plus Monk’s Ordinary series with Sealed with a Tryst in which the every day chaos of policing the town is preventing Delaney from leaving for a vacation with Ryder.  Followed by At Death’s Door highlighting Than, the God of Death which is amusing.  The collection was also a lovely introduction to Francis and Blain whom I’ve never read before.  At 643 pages, the stories kept me entertained.  (Fantasy)

Taking another Nora Robert’s break with the Gallaghers of Ardmore trilogy set in Ireland: Jewels of the Sun, Tears of the Moon, and Heart of the Sea.   (Fantasy Romance)

Still sipping from Harry Potter, and When Christ and his Saints Slept, and craft books and continuing to listen to Christopher Paolini’s To Sleep in a Sea of Stars on audio book while going to and fro in the car.

I didn’t know what to expect about the Count of Monte Cristo. All I knew was that it was about a man in prison and it was a classic.  While putting together the 52 Books post, enjoyed learning about the story and now I’m even more eager to begin reading it. Plus watching and comparing the two different movies.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve never joined in reading challenges or anything else before. However, I am looking forward to participating in the Dumas read-along. I probably won’t have much to say, though, as I’m not as learned as many here. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Robin! I’ve had this book [CMC] on my shelf for years, it’s a favorite of my eldest. I’ve wanted to read it, but haven’t. I will attempt it with this group!

So far my 2021 reading is still going slow. I picked up what I thought was another Jessica Brody YA, to help prime the pump. Turns out it’s actually middle grade fiction. It has short chapters and I went through a few thinking they were presenting the characters in younger years, but they haven’t grown up yet! I’ll probably read it through because it’s not a little book. I think I need to also grab the next Mrs Pollifax just to get the reading year in faster gear. 
 

Edited by Seasider too
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
I am listening to Pillars of the Earth right now. It’s a reread but it’s been awhile.  After reading the new prequel, The Evening and the Morning, my renewed interest Kingsbridge got my reread going. So far I only remember small bits so a refresher was definately in order!

I have been reading a series of Amish quilt shop mysteries before bed as they help me fall asleep. I’m on my last one but have checked out a few more similar books that will hopefully fill the role. https://www.goodreads.com/series/102467-amish-quilt-shop-mystery

I am about halfway through Marion Lake and the Midnight Murders https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49374508-marion-lane-and-the-midnight-murder?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=xcKBBjiFPb&rank=1. This book is a mash up of several different genres it’s an alternate history set in special secret tunnels under London where a Harry Potterish school for detectives is being ran using implements that are rather Steampunkish. It’s holding my interest so far!😉 

I have also been reading a Christmas present book called Magic and the Shinigami Detective https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39890034-magic-and-the-shinigami-detective. I am finding it quite interesting......a police dectective is magically transported via an evil witch’s magic to another world.  After killing the witch there is no path home so she must learn to adapt to her new world.  This book isn’t scary so far and may be my bedtime read for a few nights.   😉

 

Edited by mumto2
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you @Robin Mfor the read-along and inspiration even though I am not participating! I read it some years ago - 2014 according to Goodreads! - and while it could stand a re-read, I am sticking with War and Peace as my big chunkster right now. Still, I look forward to reading peoples' thoughts.

@brehondon't sell yourself short; you will likely have opinions and thoughts and this is the place to share them!

I didn't finish anything this week. Still moving slowly through W&P but also some other things.  I just got Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY and the Lost Story of 1970 from the library. It is not a new book but it just came to my attention. I spent much of the early 70s in my room listening to James Taylor and while I have not remained such a big fan as I had been, I wanted to read this one as soon as I saw it.  I used to joke that JT saved my life; well, it was not as bad as all that, but for a lonely girl his music was such a balm. 

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished two books this past week - honestly, since I deactivated my FB account, I'm reading SO much more.  And getting other projects started, too.  Gah - I never realized how much time I spent on the endless scroll!

There were two books in the Miss Read Fairacre series that weren't available for Kindle so I listened to them through Audible.  I talked last week about listening to Miss Clare Remembers and this week I listened to Emily Davis.  Having finished the latter, I'm now finished with all the Fairacre books. 🙂  I enjoyed them.  They were comforting, mild, a bit sarcastic in places, somewhat dated, and they seemed to hit a comfort spot for me.  The school in Fairacre reminded me of my own elementary school (not that I went to a one room schoolhouse but I did attend a very small school in a small town and we were probably one of the last to get any new tech or innovations).  I'm sad to say goodbye to Fairacre but I'm looking forward to starting on the Thrush Green series.

I also finished I Remember You by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir.  Very slow burn but I liked it.  Everything came to a head at the end.  If you get frustrated by books that hold back until the very end, this probably isn't for you but if you like just being fed tiny bits until the very end - go for it! 🙂

I've started listening to Mythos by Stephen Fry through Audible.  The audiobook is just over 13 hours long and I've listened to just a bit over 2 hours.  His dry commentary is amusing - if you stop to think about it, the story lines in the Greek myths really are borderline absurd. 😉 I don't know how many of the names I'm managing to keep straight in my head (that's where reading vs. listening is far better for me - I would remember the spellings which would better help me to place the different character names) but it's great fun to listen to.  I've gotten back into colouring while listening to audiobooks.  I feel guilty about it - like maybe there's a more productive hobby I could be doing while listening that would produce useful garments to wear or something - but I've enjoyed colouring since I was a tiny child so to heck with it - a-colouring I shall go. 🙂

Books read in 2021

6. I Remember You by Yrsa Sigurðardóttir  *Horror

5. Emily Davis (Fairacre #8) by Miss Read  *Fiction (audiobook)  With this book, I’ve finished the entire Fairacre series. 🙂

4. A Peaceful Retirement (Fairacre #20) by Miss Read  *Fiction

3. Farewell to Fairacre (Fairacre #19) by Miss Read  *Fiction

2. Miss Clare Remembers (Fairacre #4) by Miss Read  *Fiction (audiobook)

1. Changes at Fairacre (Fairacre #18) by Miss Read   *Fiction

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dicentra said:

  I've gotten back into colouring while listening to audiobooks.  I feel guilty about it - like maybe there's a more productive hobby I could be doing while listening that would produce useful garments to wear or something - but I've enjoyed colouring since I was a tiny child so to heck with it - a-colouring I shall go. 🙂

Coloring sounds like a fun way to multitask, Dicentra. Do you care to share what you're coloring?

1 hour ago, Maus said:

More audio books this last week!

13. "The Scarlet Pimpernel" by Baroness Orczy. Audible book.

This was a book my father recommended when I was a teen and I in turn recommended to my daughter... a three generation favorite. Are you aware of the sequels, Maus? My daughter so liked the book that she read at least half a dozen of them. You can see a list here.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Robin, for posting the Count schedule. I'm excited to begin.

I have been able to listen to audiobooks while helping my daughter and caring for the baby. I listened to Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid and The Giver by Lois Lowry. 

I am currently reading Ghost Night by Cornelia Funke as DGD wants to read it and we are unfamiliar with this particular Funke book. I am also trying to read Screwtape Letters. I knew I would have to adjust my reading wishes with available time (I forgot how much work a young infant is) and responsibilities. I am quite proud of myself for maintaining a cheerful attitude and just going with the flow. 

DS's Wheel of Time update: He is in  Book three of the series and has finished three, the prequel plus books 1 & 2.

__

I haven't been on the forum in two weeks so I'll have to go back and read the threads from Weeks 2 & 3. Happy reading!!

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Some bookish Reddit posts ~

Engaging and interesting nonfiction books about very specific things

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/kpos62/engaging_and_interesting_nonfiction_books_about/

 

A book that is like a comforting cup of hot chocolate on a silent, cold night.

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/l04v98/a_book_that_is_like_a_comforting_cup_of_hot/?sort=qa

 

Urban fantasy/magic police/private detective/agent that is not romance

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/l01q3y/urban_fantasymagic_policeprivate_detectiveagent/

 

Looking for history books but with a twist. Something about the not often discussed aspects of history. The drama/personal lives of historical figures, how people of certain times experienced daily life, etc instead of just the usual matter of fact history books.

https://www.reddit.com/r/suggestmeabook/comments/kxmqhg/looking_for_history_books_but_with_a_twist/

 

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I might join in on the CMC read - it's a great story!

Haven't finished anything since last week. I did start Killers of the Flower Moon today and am hooked.

@Dicentra A dear friend sent me this coloring book for my birthday earlier this month and I'm looking forward to listening and coloring. 🙂

Happy Sunday everyone! Enjoy the coming week 🌻

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Mothersweets said:

I might join in on the CMC read - it's a great story!

Haven't finished anything since last week. I did start Killers of the Flower Moon today and am hooked.@Dicentra  🌻

A friend just suggested Killers of the Flower Moon so that is my next audio book.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know nothing—NOTHING—about CMC but I just put it on my list to find later at the bookstore (I have a gift card burning in my wallet. Isn’t that the best feeling?) 

This weekend I read The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. The cover art is lovely and the story kept my attention. As I was reading I found myself judging the characters pretty harshly. (“Why doesn’t he just...” “That’s an unwise move...” “Ugh. Not again...”)  Now that a couple of days have passed, I’ve softened toward them. (Personal growth? Perhaps. 🙂)

And I’m still making my way through You're Not Listening: What You're Missing and Why it Matters by Kate Murphy. Great content. 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey all, just wanted to let you know that I just came across The Divine Comedy (John Ciardi translation) for $1.99 on Kindle today.  I don't know if this is a permanent price or for today only. I have the actual book somewhere in a box, but for chunksters I find the Kindle so much better. This is the translation I studied in college; I do not know if it is considered the best.

https://www.amazon.com/Divine-Comedy-Inferno-Purgatorio-Paradiso-ebook/dp/B08TRPVYW8/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1611586509&sr=8-12-spons

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Hyacinth said:

This weekend I read The Dutch House by Ann Patchett. The cover art is lovely and the story kept my attention. As I was reading I found myself judging the characters pretty harshly. (“Why doesn’t he just...” “That’s an unwise move...” “Ugh. Not again...”)  Now that a couple of days have passed, I’ve softened toward them. (Personal growth? Perhaps. 🙂)

I'll be starting this in a few days for my old book group (which now meets on Zoom). I'll be interested to see if my thoughts are similar to yours, Hyacinth.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Robin what’s the due date for our first CMC “assignment”? LOL

Who? What? Where? Why? When? How?  Nor forget the 5 senses or 6 if you include proprioception.   I expect a full report analyzing Edmond from the moment he....  LOL!

Aim to finish the chapters by the end of the week and since the read officially begins next week, that would be Saturday 2/6/21

😘

Edited by Robin M
  • Like 5
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Kareni said:

Coloring sounds like a fun way to multitask, Dicentra. Do you care to share what you're coloring?

 

I mostly colour mandalas and florals.  I cannot draw AT ALL 🙂 so I buy books to colour out of.  Because I prefer markers, I need books with thick, smooth paper so there isn't any bleeding.  I've found that the Mandals to Color books by ColorIt are great for marker colouring:

https://www.amazon.ca/ColorIt-Mandalas-Original-Drawings-Anti-Stress/dp/0996511210/ref=sr_1_34?dchild=1&keywords=mandala+color+it&qid=1611608389&sr=8-34

I have zero artist/colour training so I'm basically trying to learn about colours and colour matching right now. 🙂  I've attached a few recent ones I've done (one is still unfinished).  I like the intricate ones with tiny spaces to colour.  I use mostly Copic or Winsor & Newton brush markers.

18 hours ago, Mothersweets said:

I might join in on the CMC read - it's a great story!

Haven't finished anything since last week. I did start Killers of the Flower Moon today and am hooked.

@Dicentra A dear friend sent me this coloring book for my birthday earlier this month and I'm looking forward to listening and coloring. 🙂

Happy Sunday everyone! Enjoy the coming week 🌻

I love the Johanna Basford books!  I find that I can't use markers in them or it bleeds so I need to get out the coloured pencils for those. 🙂

18 hours ago, Ottakee said:

A friend just suggested Killers of the Flower Moon so that is my next audio book.

I'm also reading Killers of the Flower Moon (not listening so I can't colour during ;)).  An astounding episode in recent history that I knew nothing about.

20210125_135135.jpg

20210125_135300.jpg

20210125_135317.jpg

20210125_135335.jpg

20210125_135350.jpg

20210125_135410.jpg

20210125_135423.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally finished two books

 

image.png.6203dfd9346774ae31d62cdbd3067a51.png

image.png.f7e35513f04e992de8b28a10e83ad1d2.png

Immigration is a hot topic for the past few years and as an immigrant myself I have wanted to educate myself about it because all stories are not created equal. One of the ways I have always approached hot topics or even history is because I shy away from the sting of knowing true stories and somehow wrapping horrible stories in the veneer of fiction makes it more palatable for me because it did not happen to a real person. But the older I have grown, I have realized that true stories though they have the effect of a punch in the gut are something I need to read more of about the issues I care about. To that end, non-fiction is something I have been embracing more of.

The two books I read, one a fiction and the other a non-fiction deals with undocumented immigration. The fiction is by the author of White Tiger, a book about poverty and two versions of India. It is fiction, but a powerful book and it deals with issues that leaves the reader squirming and thinking deeply about. Aravind Adiga the writer, is a journalist and as such an excellent researcher and he writes with heart. So when I saw he wrote a book about undocumented immigrant who is also a refugee, I knew I had to read it. Aravind himself was an immigrant to Australia as a child, but a documented one and this book is set there. 

The second book is a non-fiction book written by an undocumented immigrant who was one of the first to graduate from Harvard. Both books talk about immigrants who work hard, for lesser pay, lesser than their abilities, who have to scale down their ambition, who use clothes to disguise themselves and the fear, the constant fear they live with. But while the fiction book also deals with the same issues, it does not land with a punch in the gut like the book titled Undocumented Immigrants because these are real people with real stories and real lives. It is really hard to look away and pretend that they do not exist. The author has a powerful voice and uses it absolutely to effect because this was her reality.

That brings me to the difference between fiction and non-fiction which deals with the same issues which I first encountered during reading American Dirt and Enrique's Journey in Spanish. While both types of book deal with the same issues and bring up similar issues, research however thorough and well-intentioned cannot replicate the unique voice of a lived experience. It has an authenticity that is so loud and clear and makes the reader to look at the issues square in the face because you cannot hide as it is happening to a real person vs an imaginary one in fiction. I really need to read more non-fiction and this book has re-iterated that. But the fiction book also taught me the need for such stories. Not everyone has a voice and can tell their own stories. But people who can tell stories with empathy can tell the hard stories wrapped in fiction so that the impact is still there though less.

Highly recommended. 

I also recommend White Tiger on Netflix based on the book of the same title by Aravind Adhiga

 

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Dicentra, your pictures are lovely! Thank you for sharing them.

I have a book of Johanna Basford postcards which I've been mailing out (uncolored) to friends and family. The detail is so fine that I'm admittedly daunted to attempt coloring them. Fortunately, I think they're wonderful even in black and white.

P.S. If you send me a personal message with your mailing address, I'll send one your way. You, too, @Mothersweets.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

We are in the process of replacing almost all the carpet in the house with laminate flooring.   We've gotten two bedrooms, and 51 feet of hallway complete.  Next is the kitchen. 🤞we'll finish up this week.  So I've simply been listening to a repeat of the In Death audiobook series when it's quiet enough.  Somehow I don't think I ever read Ceremony in Death!  How could I miss a book?   

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Dicentra said:

Because I prefer markers, I need books with thick, smooth paper so there isn't any bleeding. 

@Dicentra Your colored pictures are lovely!  I have some of those Mandala coloring books, but have been using our "leftover from Homeschooling Days" colored pencils.  They are quality pencils, but now, having seen your pictures, I'm thinking markers are the way to go. Which markers do you use?

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't updated my reading in a few weeks:

I'm still reading through the Harry Potter series.  I finished The Chamber of Secrets and The Prisoner of Azkaban.

I'm also reading through Judy Blume's Fudge books.  So far I've read Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing and Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great.  I had not read these in a very long time.

A few more re-reads for dd16's literature class: Spoon River Anthology and Our Town.

And I read a book called Hudson Taylor's Spiritual Secret.  It was a very interesting read about one of the first Christian missionaries to China.  

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2021 at 8:26 PM, Mothersweets said:

I might join in on the CMC read - it's a great story!

Haven't finished anything since last week. I did start Killers of the Flower Moon today and am hooked.

@Dicentra A dear friend sent me this coloring book for my birthday earlier this month and I'm looking forward to listening and coloring. 🙂

Happy Sunday everyone! Enjoy the coming week 🌻

 

On 1/24/2021 at 8:55 PM, Ottakee said:

A friend just suggested Killers of the Flower Moon so that is my next audio book.

As an a member of the Osage Nation, Killers of the Flower Moon is a story close to me.  My mother remembers her grandmother telling her about various people in the story and she even regularly waited on one regularly in the grocery store where she worked.  My eldest sister's grandpa was one of the teens who discovered the first body.  I'll be curious to hear what your thoughts are after reading.  I can ask family members for more in depth information if you are interested.  They all have said that the book is accurate.  I just hope the soon-to-be movie is as well.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I discovered that Dick Francis' son (I think, same last name) has continued the tradition of horse-racing-related mysteries. I love a good horse story, but while these may start off at a race course or a stable they don't stay there very long. One was the story of a "crisis manager" who solves a stable-related mystery (Crisis) and the other of an insurance actuary who was a former amateur jockey whose wife was murdered (Guilty, Not Guilty). They were OK; I remember Dick Francis' novels as moving a bit faster and smelling a bit more of the stable, tied more tightly to the horse world. I'd read more of them, though, and I notice they've republished Dick Francis novels with forewords by Felix.

Now I've moved on to a *real* horse story -- non-fiction -- The Perfect Horse by Elizabeth Letts, about how the horses of the Spanish Riding School survived WWII. Thank you, Marguerite Henry, for introducing me and my kids to the Lipizzaners! In fact, as a kid I devoured every one of her books and there are a couple I still re-read periodically. I was always a horse fan, though, not a rider (unlike my oldest, who is having horse withdrawals since moving up here and is looking for a stable where she can volunteer).

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2021 at 4:37 PM, Kareni said:

This was a book my father recommended when I was a teen and I in turn recommended to my daughter... a three generation favorite. Are you aware of the sequels, Maus? My daughter so liked the book that she read at least half a dozen of them. You can see a list here.

 

I didn't know there were so many! I read "El Dorado" years ago, and I'm just finishing "I will repay."

I find it funny every time she describes her heroines as having "tiny" hands. Even though I am a short woman, I have to buy gloves in the men's department to get them to fit.

But the mobs in the street don't sound as foreign as they did when I first read her books 25 years ago. This line from "I will repay" sounded a little too real: "One word from Déroulède now would have caused an open riot, and in those days of self defence against the mob was construed into enmity against the people."

Edited by Maus
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Maus said:

I didn't know there were so many!

I was frankly amazed as, growing up, I'd only known of The Scarlet Pimpernel.

23 minutes ago, Maus said:

I find it funny every time she describes her heroines as having "tiny" hands. Even though I am a short woman, I have to buy gloves in the men's department to get them to fit.

One of my grandmothers was under five feet (likely due to world war one era deprivations growing up in Hungary); I recall her wearing size four shoes. I bet she wore small gloves, too, while my hands are more like yours, Maus.

26 minutes ago, Maus said:

But the mobs in the street don't sound as foreign as they did when I first read her books 25 years ago. This line from "I will repay" sounded a little too real: "One word from Déroulède now would have caused an open riot, and in those days of self defence against the mob was construed into enmity against the people."

I hear you.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Excelsior! Academy said:

 

As an a member of the Osage Nation, Killers of the Flower Moon is a story close to me.  My mother remembers her grandmother telling her about various people in the story and she even regularly waited on one regularly in the grocery store where she worked.  My eldest sister's grandpa was one of the teens who discovered the first body.  I'll be curious to hear what your thoughts are after reading.  I can ask family members for more in depth information if you are interested.  They all have said that the book is accurate.  I just hope the soon-to-be movie is as well.

I would love to hear more! I'm about halfway through and am feeling both outrage and despair. I didn't know a movie is on the way.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, VickiMNE said:

@Dicentra Your colored pictures are lovely!  I have some of those Mandala coloring books, but have been using our "leftover from Homeschooling Days" colored pencils.  They are quality pencils, but now, having seen your pictures, I'm thinking markers are the way to go. Which markers do you use?

Thank you!  I use mostly Copic or Winsor & Newton brush markers.  They are pricey but the ink goes on incredibly smoothly with absolutely no streaking (i.e. you can't see the "colouring marks" you can usually see with markers).

Staedtler markers are also good and not as pricey but you'll still see some streaking.  When you're colouring really tiny areas, that won't matter much but you'll see it on larger areas.

The Winsor & Newton markers are made in the UK and either their brush markers or their Promarker line are amazing.  They're both alcohol-based, permanent markers (as are the Copic ones) so be aware that getting marker on your table or on clothes is going to be harder to clean up than other markers.  I find rubbing alcohol is helpful. 🙂  You can buy ink refills for the Copic markers which is nice as it's less expensive than buying a new marker every time one runs out.  Both Winsor & Newton and Copic sell their markers individually and in sets which is nice, too.  Prismacolor also has good alcohol-based brush markers that don't streak.  I buy most of my markers or coloured pencils from Dick Blick - best price around. 🙂

https://www.dickblick.com/categories/drawing/markers/brush/

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/25/2021 at 6:06 PM, Kareni said:

@Dicentra, your pictures are lovely! Thank you for sharing them.

I have a book of Johanna Basford postcards which I've been mailing out (uncolored) to friends and family. The detail is so fine that I'm admittedly daunted to attempt coloring them. Fortunately, I think they're wonderful even in black and white.

P.S. If you send me a personal message with your mailing address, I'll send one your way. You, too, @Mothersweets.

Regards,

Kareni

That's so kind, Kareni!  Right now, though, the post from the US to Canada is HORRIBLY slow and everything that comes through seems to get quite banged up during the journey.  I have no idea what's going on.  I would hate for the lovely postcard to suffer such treatment so I encourage you to send one on to @VickiMNE in my stead. 🙂

Thank you again for the offer and happy colouring, everyone!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Dicentra said:

the post from the US to Canada is HORRIBLY slow and everything that comes through seems to get quite banged up during the journey.  I have no idea what's going on.  I would hate for the lovely postcard to suffer such treatment so I encourage you to send one on to @VickiMNE in my stead. 🙂

The post from the US to South Korea is also slow these days; a letter we sent to our daughter arrived after a month and was rather damp. (We're doing better than her though as her mail to the US is being returned to her.)

@VickiMNE, if you'd like a Johanna Basford postcard, please send me a personal message with your mailing address.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Kareni said:

The post from the US to South Korea is also slow these days; a letter we sent to our daughter arrived after a month and was rather damp. (We're doing better than her though as her mail to the US is being returned to her.)

@VickiMNE, if you'd like a Johanna Basford postcard, please send me a personal message with your mailing address.

Regards,

Kareni


 

I am afraid to say this as I have a quilt in transit to the U.K. and may jinx myself but the mail between the US and U.K. has improved vastly in the past three weeks or so.  It’s taking slightly over a week currently.  All the Christmas cards etc finally reached their destinations first week in January and that seemed to free things up.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Excelsior! Academy said:

 

As an a member of the Osage Nation, Killers of the Flower Moon is a story close to me.  My mother remembers her grandmother telling her about various people in the story and she even regularly waited on one regularly in the grocery store where she worked.  My eldest sister's grandpa was one of the teens who discovered the first body.  I'll be curious to hear what your thoughts are after reading.  I can ask family members for more in depth information if you are interested.  They all have said that the book is accurate.  I just hope the soon-to-be movie is as well.

Thanks.  I will try to circle back to this after I read the book.   I am Cherokee by birth but spent the past 28 years mostly in the Ottawa Chippewa band/community.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Kareni said:

The post from the US to South Korea is also slow these days; a letter we sent to our daughter arrived after a month and was rather damp. (We're doing better than her though as her mail to the US is being returned to her.)

@VickiMNE, if you'd like a Johanna Basford postcard, please send me a personal message with your mailing address.

Regards,

Kareni

@Kareni This is so kind of you.  But, I really am in MNE (Montenegro).  I don't know how well a postcard would fare getting all the way over here (nor the cost or time frame for delivery). So, if you want to rethink your offer, not knowing what would be involved, I understand.  

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Dicentra said:

Thank you!  I use mostly Copic or Winsor & Newton brush markers.  They are pricey but the ink goes on incredibly smoothly with absolutely no streaking (i.e. you can't see the "colouring marks" you can usually see with markers).

Staedtler markers are also good and not as pricey but you'll still see some streaking.  When you're colouring really tiny areas, that won't matter much but you'll see it on larger areas.

The Winsor & Newton markers are made in the UK and either their brush markers or their Promarker line are amazing.  They're both alcohol-based, permanent markers (as are the Copic ones) so be aware that getting marker on your table or on clothes is going to be harder to clean up than other markers.  I find rubbing alcohol is helpful. 🙂  You can buy ink refills for the Copic markers which is nice as it's less expensive than buying a new marker every time one runs out.  Both Winsor & Newton and Copic sell their markers individually and in sets which is nice, too.  Prismacolor also has good alcohol-based brush markers that don't streak.  I buy most of my markers or coloured pencils from Dick Blick - best price around. 🙂

https://www.dickblick.com/categories/drawing/markers/brush/

Thank you for this info!  I will look around accordingly--Staedtler items are available here  (MNE=Montenegro) in general.  On the other hand, I just had a friend return from the UK and am expecting some more English folks to come by in spring.  I might see if they could carry over a set of the Winsor ones--the dual tips look so handy!

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, VickiMNE said:

@Kareni This is so kind of you.  But, I really am in MNE (Montenegro).  I don't know how well a postcard would fare getting all the way over here (nor the cost or time frame for delivery). So, if you want to rethink your offer, not knowing what would be involved, I understand.  

I'm happy to give it a try, Vicki. So, yes, do send a personal message with your address.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll post my book update next but I wanted to give a bit of a personal update first, since many of us have been together on these threads for a number of years. 

Although I rarely talk about it here (here being WTM not just BaW) I have chronic back pain and have had it for many, many years. I've exhausted all of my non surgical options and medication options. I even had a spinal cord stimulator for a few years but it stopped being effective so I had it removed - mainly so I could get an MRI, not because it was causing any problems. I reached a point where surgery is my only real, best, chance for relief. 

So... I'm having back surgery on Friday. It's a fairly simple surgery known as a laminectomy without fusion. It's outpatient surgery and the doctor said I should be up and about a day or two after the surgery. In fact, since Bill works weekends I asked the doctor how many days he should take off work. He said just the day of my surgery unless I want to milk it. 😂 I'll have to wear a back brace for 6 weeks (though not 24/7) and will have limitations regarding bending and lifting but other than that I should be able to do normal things, with caution. They gave me the back brace at my Dec. appt., showed me how to use it, and told me to wear it a few times a week to get used to it. I have to bring it with me Friday or they won't let me leave until Bill goes back home to get it. 

The surgery has been 2 years in the making but something always got in the way. Originally most of the holdups have been doctor changes, insurance changes, or a combination of both. Then this time last year my doctor and I were looking at setting a date. He knew I'd be moving in April or May and we made the decision to wait so I wouldn't be recovering in the middle of a big whole house move. He suggested we schedule it for late spring or early summer. One month later we all know what happened to everyone's plans, not just mine. 😄 

At my December appointment he told me insurance approved the surgery so I thought it would be scheduled sometime in the next few months. Most elective surgeries are pretty well booked and don't happen right away. Two weeks ago they called me and said "Oh, you're scheduled for Jan. 29th". The time since that phone call has been a frenzy of getting bloodwork, tests and clearance from my PCP.

I won't know what time I have to be in or the time I'm scheduled for actual surgery until after 5pm tomorrow. Once the surgery center closes for the day they start making phone calls in an order that makes sense only to them.

I'm trying not to get too excited about it but I've heard of several people who had this surgery and felt relief almost immediately. Some said they felt the post surgical pain but noticed within days that their actual back pain was gone. The doctors though, are telling me it could take 6 months to a year to fully feel the effects of the procedure. Either way, I'm hoping this helps. 

Anyway, I wanted to let you all know. Please keep me in your thoughts on Friday. I'll update when I can, which probably won't be until Saturday. 

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Now for my reading update -

I'm 1 for 3 with my cute little tbr jar and its origami stars. My plan is to choose a fiction, nonfiction, and an Audible audio book each month (though the latter might be every other month). Right out of the gate I abandoned two of the three.


Fiction - I pulled out Light in August. I don't know why I keep trying Faulkner when it should be clear to me that I just don't like his writing style. This was the third time I tried to read this book and it will be the last time I try anything by him. I also attempted As I Lay Dying, Absalom Absalom, and The Sound and the Fury, so it's not like I didn't give him a chance. I didn't choose another fiction star because I still have enough to read and will wait until February.


Audio book - Back in April Audible quickly put together a short piece called Locked Together with several UK comedians talking about what it's like in lockdown. If I had listened to it very early in the pandemic until probably no later than June, I might have enjoyed it. But now it sounds so naive. It's from April, less than a year ago and already sounds so very outdated. I did choose another star for an audio book because I had nothing to listen to. That turned out to be Martin Chuzzlewit. It's not bad. There are some Dickens books I love, some (many) that make me uncomfortable due to anti-semitism even when I like the story, and some that are just okay. This one is just okay so far but I feel it's worth finishing. 


Nonfiction - This one was a winner. I pulled out Catch and Kill. I knew very little about Ronan Farrow and I'm not sure I even knew he was involved in breaking the Harvey Weinstein story. All I knew is that he's Dylan Farrow's brother and that he supports her in her accusations against their father. I didn't know he was Mia Farrow and Woody Allen's only biological child and I definitely had no idea he was an investigative journalist. At first I was switching between this book and Lady Chatterly's Lover but I reached a point where I could not put this book down. I gave it four stars. I rarely give a nonfiction book five stars but I'm considering adding this one to that small five star group.

I've been devouring the historical series, The Gaslight Mysteries, which take place in late 19th century NYC. I'm on my third or fourth one since the first of the year. I'm also reading Romantic Outlaws, a dual biography of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelly. The narrative switches between mother and daughter, giving a chapter to one and the next chapter to the other. I'm really enjoying it but it's over 800 pages so I expect to be reading it for a while. 

I started Wild Swans just after the new year but had to stop because of the awful editing/formatting issues in the Kindle copy I was reading. It's a library Overdrive copy and has odd symbols randomly thrown into the middle of a sentence and sometimes has a zero where the letter O should be. It also somehow decided I was finished and took me to the end several times, so I had to find my place again. I put a paperback copy on hold and just picked it up last week. I did let the library know about the Kindle copy issues. 

I'm looking forward to starting our group read of CMC next week. Although the doctor said I'll be able to get up and do things, and walking is actually recommended, I expect there will still be plenty of rest time too, giving me a lot of time for reading.

Edited by Lady Florida.
  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I'll post my book update next but I wanted to give a bit of a personal update first, since many of us have been together on these threads for a number of years. 

Although I rarely talk about it here (here being WTM not just BaW) I have chronic back pain and have had it for many, many years. I've exhausted all of my non surgical options and medication options. I even had a spinal cord stimulator for a few years but it stopped being effective so I had it removed - mainly so I could get an MRI, not because it was causing any problems. I reached a point where surgery is my only real, best, chance for relief. 

So... I'm having back surgery on Friday. It's a fairly simple surgery known as a laminectomy without fusion. It's outpatient surgery and the doctor said I should be up and about a day or two after the surgery. In fact, since Bill works weekends I asked the doctor how many days he should take off work. He said just the day of my surgery unless I want to milk it. 😂 I'll have to wear a back brace for 6 weeks (though not 24/7) and will have limitations regarding bending and lifting but other than that I should be able to do normal things, with caution. They gave me the back brace at my Dec. appt., showed me how to use it, and told me to wear it a few times a week to get used to it. I have to bring it with me Friday or they won't let me leave until Bill goes back home to get it. 

The surgery has been 2 years in the making but something always got in the way. Originally most of the holdups have been doctor changes, insurance changes, or a combination of both. Then this time last year my doctor and I were looking at setting a date. He knew I'd be moving in April or May and we made the decision to wait so I wouldn't be recovering in the middle of a big whole house move. He suggested we schedule it for late spring or early summer. One month later we all know what happened to everyone's plans, not just mine. 😄 

At my December appointment he told me insurance approved the surgery so I thought it would be scheduled sometime in the next few months. Most elective surgeries are pretty well booked and don't happen right away. Two weeks ago they called me and said "Oh, you're scheduled for Jan. 29th". The time since that phone call has been a frenzy of getting bloodwork, tests and clearance from my PCP.

I won't know what time I have to be in or the time I'm scheduled for actual surgery until after 5pm tomorrow. Once the surgery center closes for the day they start making phone calls in an order that makes sense only to them.

I'm trying not to get too excited about it but I've heard of several people who had this surgery and felt relief almost immediately. Some said they felt the post surgical pain but noticed within days that their actual back pain was gone. The doctors though, are telling me it could take 6 months to a year to fully feel the effects of the procedure. Either way, I'm hoping this helps. 

Anyway, I wanted to let you all know. Please keep me in your thoughts on Friday. I'll update when I can, which probably won't be until Saturday. 

I will be thinking of you Friday! I hope it results in great relief for you. May your only lifting be good books. 😁

Please update us as soon as you feel able. 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...