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Help me read the cause of desth


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Thanks guys that is very helpful.  We had been told it was a heart attack, so I guess that was accurate.

Do you see  below that 'other significant conditions leading to death'?  Can you make that out?

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1 minute ago, City Mouse said:

I see 

Immediate cause: Acute something myocardial infarction massive - I think that mean heart attack

Due to: something cardiosomething

I think it might  be cardiovascular disease.

 

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Just now, Scarlett said:

Thanks guys that is very helpful.  We had been told it was a heart attack, so I guess that was accurate.

Do you see  below that 'other significant conditions leading to death'?  Can you make that out?

Diabetes mellitus

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6 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Can anyone identify that word after acute?  I think you guys figured the rest out.  Wow you guys are amazing.

I think it's post _____ septal

I can't figure out the part between those two!

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27 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Thanks guys that is very helpful.  We had been told it was a heart attack, so I guess that was accurate.

Do you see  below that 'other significant conditions leading to death'?  Can you make that out?

Diabetes Mellitus

Edited by hippymamato3
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So maybe----this?

Cause of Death----Acute  postischemic fatal   myocardial infarction—massive 

Due to  --------Arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease
Other causes---Diabetes mellitus
Edited by Scarlett
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9 minutes ago, prairiewindmomma said:

I was leaning towards acute posterior septal myocardial infarction on that line, fwiw...  I think the pen drags a tiny bit between the r in posterior before starting septal....

Hmmm...so you think it is septal not fatal?  I wonder which is more likely medically speaking.  I have zero medical terminology training.  Feels like I am reading Greek.

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Just now, Scarlett said:

Hmmm...so you think it is septal not fatal?  I wonder which is more likely medically speaking.  I have zero medical terminology training.  Feels like I am reading Greek.

Well, it was definitely fatal, but it seems weird to write that the cause of death was fatal.

 

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6 minutes ago, myblessings4 said:

Acute posterior septal myocardial infarction, massive

 

Arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease

 

Diabetes mellitus

Massive sudden back-inner wall heart lost function,

which was caused by the muscle dying due to lack of oxygen

caused by hardened inflexible or blocked arteries,

as a result of type 2 (sugar) diabetes.

Edited by Amy in NH
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28 minutes ago, myblessings4 said:

Acute posterior septal myocardial infarction, massive

 

Arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease

 

Diabetes mellitus

Yes,this exactly.

Interval between onset and death (box to the right of cause of death:   1)15h (or some other number of hours, hard to read) , 2) UNDET = undetermined

 

Edited by wathe
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3 hours ago, Scarlett said:

Can anyone identify that word after acute?  I think you guys figured the rest out.  Wow you guys are amazing.

I’m sure it starts with post.  My brain wants to see post temporal which doesn’t make sense but certainly pos or post something.

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Scarlett, almost always when people say "diabetes" they mean "diabetes mellitus". That just means there's sugar in the pee, because the pancreas doesn't function properly. The other diabetes is an utterly unrelated disease, diabetes insipidus. The pee tastes insipid, because the kidneys aren't functioning right. (Yes, I said tastes. That's how doctors used to roll, I guess!

It's a much less common condition than the other diabetes, and so normally the other one is just called "diabetes" and nobody says the mellitus part except if they're doctors, and then only on forms.

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23 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Scarlett, almost always when people say "diabetes" they mean "diabetes mellitus". That just means there's sugar in the pee, because the pancreas doesn't function properly. The other diabetes is an utterly unrelated disease, diabetes insipidus. The pee tastes insipid, because the kidneys aren't functioning right. (Yes, I said tastes. That's how doctors used to roll, I guess!

It's a much less common condition than the other diabetes, and so normally the other one is just called "diabetes" and nobody says the mellitus part except if they're doctors, and then only on forms.

Yes.  Both DM and DI historically presented with symptoms of polydipsia (excessive thirst) and polyuria (excessive urination). (They still do present this way, of course, but DM is often caught earlier now, before symptoms are florid).  In DM, the urine is sweet/sugary (mellitus=honey/sweet) and in DI, the urine is most definitely not sweet.  DM is common, and commonly refered to as simply diabetes.  DI is rare, and has a completely different pathophysiology.

MD's here tend to abbreviate diabetes mellitus to "DM", specifying DM1 or DM2 to differentiate type one (historically called juvenile diabetes, then insulin-dependent diabetes, now DM1) from type two (historically adult-onset diabetes, then insulin-independent diabetes, now DM2).

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