Jump to content

Menu

All about spelling or Spelling you see?


Recommended Posts

I am researching a spelling curriculum the two I am most interested in are All About Spelling and Spelling you see.  Anyone used both and can tell me the pros and cons? I like that spelling you see uses dictation and a workbook. I like that All about spelling is hands on and mastery based. What do you think?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am only familiar with All About Spelling (I loved it so I stuck with it and never used anything else).  I like that it teaches by concept, not random lists.  I actually like that it didn't use a workbook (my son did not like writing, but I could get him to write better on a lined dry erase board, so that made the written part of AAS eaiser).   All About Spelling is hands on (uses letter tiles in a tactile way) but honestly we don't do that much anymore, just a little when I'm first introducing a concept.   Keeping track of the tiles can be a pain, so I would consider that a minus, but I do like how it reinforces what are vowels and consonates and how those aspects play into thing (the colors help reinforce concepts "like vowel consonate e" because you can easily see the pattern.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto the above. We used a couple of other approaches previously (LOE, Words Their Way) but AAS has been *excellent* so I have no desire to look elsewhere. It’s been incredibly quick, flexible, & effective; my DS feels so much more confident in his spelling ability now! We’ve used levels 1-4 so far but plan to complete the whole series. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have used both. Here are my thoughts...

All About Spelling:

Expensive, but you feel like it is worth it. The hands on is there for those who need it, but if you don't want to you can modify it for those who don't like hands on. The lessons are laid out clearly and you can see exactly what you need to teach easily. It is pretty open and go. I appreciate this since I was not taught with phonics. I am amazed at how much my own spelling has improved with a clearer understanding from what I am teaching. It works for my dyslexics! That is a huge plus for me! The con is that it is teacher intensive. This is ok for me because that con is completely canceled out by the improvement in my kids and myself. It is worth the extra time. 

 

Spelling You See:

This one feels more like less value for the expense. It is essentially repeated copywork with dictation at the end. The phonographic chunking is weird and doesn't follow the standard phonemes. I however did find value in copying a paragraph multiple times to solidify spelling words by practice. This works for one of my kids. In fact, we used the Spelling You See book as extra spelling practice while doing All About Spelling together. We didn't complete the chunking exercises because they didn't match AAS and I didn't want to confuse things. I just had DS do the copywork and dictation. The repetition did help him to learn more words. So after the book was finished I decided to continue the idea, but rather than paying for it, I just let him choose a favorite book. He copies a paragraph for the week and then do the dictation at the end. Same idea...free. So no. I don't think Spelling You See is enough for most spellers on its own....maybe for ones who just get spelling through what they read and need a spelling program less. For ones who need to have clear phonics instruction to understand how to spell...you really need AAS. I think the practice method of Spelling You See is helpful in addition to AAS. For my son that extra practice broke through the problem of spelling in your head during spelling time, but not applying it when you write later. Now he does both more easily. 

 

*Please excuse any mistakes...typing on my phone without glasses. Lol. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bluemongoose said:

I have used both. Here are my thoughts...

All About Spelling:

Expensive, but you feel like it is worth it. The hands on is there for those who need it, but if you don't want to you can modify it for those who don't like hands on. The lessons are laid out clearly and you can see exactly what you need to teach easily. It is pretty open and go. I appreciate this since I was not taught with phonics. I am amazed at how much my own spelling has improved with a clearer understanding from what I am teaching. It works for my dyslexics! That is a huge plus for me! The con is that it is teacher intensive. This is ok for me because that con is completely canceled out by the improvement in my kids and myself. It is worth the extra time. 

 

Spelling You See:

This one feels more like less value for the expense. It is essentially repeated copywork with dictation at the end. The phonographic chunking is weird and doesn't follow the standard phonemes. I however did find value in copying a paragraph multiple times to solidify spelling words by practice. This works for one of my kids. In fact, we used the Spelling You See book as extra spelling practice while doing All About Spelling together. We didn't complete the chunking exercises because they didn't match AAS and I didn't want to confuse things. I just had DS do the copywork and dictation. The repetition did help him to learn more words. So after the book was finished I decided to continue the idea, but rather than paying for it, I just let him choose a favorite book. He copies a paragraph for the week and then do the dictation at the end. Same idea...free. So no. I don't think Spelling You See is enough for most spellers on its own....maybe for ones who just get spelling through what they read and need a spelling program less. For ones who need to have clear phonics instruction to understand how to spell...you really need AAS. I think the practice method of Spelling You See is helpful in addition to AAS. For my son that extra practice broke through the problem of spelling in your head during spelling time, but not applying it when you write later. Now he does both more easily. 

 

*Please excuse any mistakes...typing on my phone without glasses. Lol. 

 

this is a wonderful breakdown! Thank you for putting the time into this reply.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, goldenecho said:

I am only familiar with All About Spelling (I loved it so I stuck with it and never used anything else).  I like that it teaches by concept, not random lists.  I actually like that it didn't use a workbook (my son did not like writing, but I could get him to write better on a lined dry erase board, so that made the written part of AAS eaiser).   All About Spelling is hands on (uses letter tiles in a tactile way) but honestly we don't do that much anymore, just a little when I'm first introducing a concept.   Keeping track of the tiles can be a pain, so I would consider that a minus, but I do like how it reinforces what are vowels and consonates and how those aspects play into thing (the colors help reinforce concepts "like vowel consonate e" because you can easily see the pattern.

 

 

13 hours ago, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

Ditto the above. We used a couple of other approaches previously (LOE, Words Their Way) but AAS has been *excellent* so I have no desire to look elsewhere. It’s been incredibly quick, flexible, & effective; my DS feels so much more confident in his spelling ability now! We’ve used levels 1-4 so far but plan to complete the whole series. 

Thank you both! that is very helpful to know that you like it so much!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just adding to what has been written, AAS also has dictation. It is based on the phonetics being learned, but has worked for us to integrate what was being learned.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve used AAS with 3 kids now, and agree with all of the points in its favor posted above🙂  I think the primary drawback for me would be the cumbersome nature of keeping track of all of the tiles, but downloading the AAS app completely eradicated this issue.   I initially balked at the price, but honestly it was so worth the one-time $20 investment!  I don’t think I would have stuck with AAS otherwise, but I’m very glad I did. 

Edited by maptime
Words
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto pp about AAS. For my DS10 for whom spelling is not intuitive, it has been a godsend. It's the first program we've tried that we've made any spelling progress in. I like that there is no busy work, like in many traditional spelling programs. We like that there isn't a workbook. Sometimes DS writes the words/dictation on a white board.  I also looked at SYS (and even bought a level), but it's just more copywork in the end. Repeat the same copywork for 4 days and then do dictation. Yes, there is chunking, but that could be done with any program. As we use ELTL, which includes copywork, (and we love it) for our other language work, I didn't think SYS would be the best choice for us. 

As for the tiles, I made it clear to everyone in this house that they were only to be touched by DS or myself during his spelling time. If they want letter magnets to play with, we have tons of regular alphabet ones. And they must have believed I was serious, because one year later, I don't think we've lost any! That being said, from time to time I think about trying the app. For various reasons, I don't think that would be quite as effective for DS10, so I haven't gone there yet. But for many people, I think investing in the app would be a fabulous option.

DD8 is very different from DS10, and has up until now used a different program. She is an intuitive, natural speller. Frankly, I could probably never do another spelling lesson with her and she'd be more than adequate at spelling as an adult. I am thinking of switching her to AAS anyway. That's how much I like it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shoes+Ships+SealingWax said:

Oh, another note - since AAS has been around FOREVER & is so widely used, I’ve found it very easy to get the textbooks second-hand, then you can get the student materials from Rainbow Resource. 

Very good point!

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, barnwife said:

Ditto pp about AAS. For my DS10 for whom spelling is not intuitive, it has been a godsend. It's the first program we've tried that we've made any spelling progress in. I like that there is no busy work, like in many traditional spelling programs. We like that there isn't a workbook. Sometimes DS writes the words/dictation on a white board.  I also looked at SYS (and even bought a level), but it's just more copywork in the end. Repeat the same copywork for 4 days and then do dictation. Yes, there is chunking, but that could be done with any program. As we use ELTL, which includes copywork, (and we love it) for our other language work, I didn't think SYS would be the best choice for us. 

As for the tiles, I made it clear to everyone in this house that they were only to be touched by DS or myself during his spelling time. If they want letter magnets to play with, we have tons of regular alphabet ones. And they must have believed I was serious, because one year later, I don't think we've lost any! That being said, from time to time I think about trying the app. For various reasons, I don't think that would be quite as effective for DS10, so I haven't gone there yet. But for many people, I think investing in the app would be a fabulous option.

DD8 is very different from DS10, and has up until now used a different program. She is an intuitive, natural speller. Frankly, I could probably never do another spelling lesson with her and she'd be more than adequate at spelling as an adult. I am thinking of switching her to AAS anyway. That's how much I like it.

 

6 hours ago, maptime said:

I’ve used AAS with 3 kids now, and agree with all of the points in its favor posted above🙂  I think the primary drawback for me would be the cumbersome nature of keeping track of all of the tiles, but downloading the AAS app completely eradicated this issue.   I initially balked at the price, but honestly it was so worth the one-time $20 investment!  I don’t think I would have stuck with AAS otherwise, but I’m very glad I did. 

 

6 hours ago, maptime said:

I’ve used AAS with 3 kids now, and agree with all of the points in its favor posted above🙂  I think the primary drawback for me would be the cumbersome nature of keeping track of all of the tiles, but downloading the AAS app completely eradicated this issue.   I initially balked at the price, but honestly it was so worth the one-time $20 investment!  I don’t think I would have stuck with AAS otherwise, but I’m very glad I did. 

 

Do you guys think it would help reinforce reading skills? I'm thinking for younger kids in 2nd grade or so.

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Renai said:

Just adding to what has been written, AAS also has dictation. It is based on the phonetics being learned, but has worked for us to integrate what was being learned.

Renai, you are correct, AAS does have dictation. I think the difference in the way the dictation was done in SYS vs AAS worked better for my kid. The difference is SYS uses a paragraph chunk that can give more context to a child with dyslexia. That context helps with memory and comprehension. Then add in the fact that SYS has you repeat the same paragraph all week in copywork and then do the dictation of the paragraph at the end. I think this method solidified it more than the sentence dictation does in AAS. Don't get me wrong, we love AAS, but the dictation isn't the same. I would say SYS's dictation is closer to WWE's dictation, but with more repetition of the copywork before the dictation. That seemed to be key with my student. So while I love AAS for teaching the rules of spelling and I didn't love SYS's odd chunking to teach the phonemes, I did find a lot of value in SYS's method of repeated copywork/dictation passages. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bluemongoose said:

Renai, you are correct, AAS does have dictation. I think the difference in the way the dictation was done in SYS vs AAS worked better for my kid. The difference is SYS uses a paragraph chunk that can give more context to a child with dyslexia. That context helps with memory and comprehension. Then add in the fact that SYS has you repeat the same paragraph all week in copywork and then do the dictation of the paragraph at the end. I think this method solidified it more than the sentence dictation does in AAS. Don't get me wrong, we love AAS, but the dictation isn't the same. I would say SYS's dictation is closer to WWE's dictation, but with more repetition of the copywork before the dictation. That seemed to be key with my student. So while I love AAS for teaching the rules of spelling and I didn't love SYS's odd chunking to teach the phonemes, I did find a lot of value in SYS's method of repeated copywork/dictation passages. 

Oh, I wasn't saying it was better than others or not. I haven't used others. Both of my daughters are dyslexic with some comorbidities, the oldest (I graduated her a couple of years ago with a bilingual diploma) more severe than the younger. My oldest felt very successful with AAS, which I started when she was in about 5th grade (AAS didn't exist prior to that, lol!). It also helped her read more fluently. Surprisingly, regardless of how slow she read, she never had an issue with reading comprehension. She loved writing stories, so AAS was done apart from her other writing. The sentence dictation was enough for her. I think it was because she only had to concentrate on one or two things at a time, instead of several different aspects which is expected in a paragraph. She still talks about how it was annoying with the tiles after awhile (I did drop the tiles after initial teaching), but it really helped her. There was a great improvement in her general writing, so she integrated the information well. She will still recite a rule when she's trying to spell different things sometimes, and she's in her 20s. My youngest is very similar to my oldest, except she also is dealing with handwriting issues. So, sentences it will be for her too. 

As in all homeschooling - whatever works for the child in front of us. It's a great thing there are options for a variety of learning. (It also makes decisions a bit harder, lol!)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Renai said:

Oh, I wasn't saying it was better than others or not. I haven't used others. Both of my daughters are dyslexic with some comorbidities, the oldest (I graduated her a couple of years ago with a bilingual diploma) more severe than the younger. My oldest felt very successful with AAS, which I started when she was in about 5th grade (AAS didn't exist prior to that, lol!). It also helped her read more fluently. Surprisingly, regardless of how slow she read, she never had an issue with reading comprehension. She loved writing stories, so AAS was done apart from her other writing. The sentence dictation was enough for her. I think it was because she only had to concentrate on one or two things at a time, instead of several different aspects which is expected in a paragraph. She still talks about how it was annoying with the tiles after awhile (I did drop the tiles after initial teaching), but it really helped her. There was a great improvement in her general writing, so she integrated the information well. She will still recite a rule when she's trying to spell different things sometimes, and she's in her 20s. My youngest is very similar to my oldest, except she also is dealing with handwriting issues. So, sentences it will be for her too. 

As in all homeschooling - whatever works for the child in front of us. It's a great thing there are options for a variety of learning. (It also makes decisions a bit harder, lol!)

Renai, I am glad you found what works for your DD! I have 3 dyslexic sons, so I get it! Isn't it interesting how one thing can be problematic for someone with dyslexia and not for another with dyslexia? One of mine needs more context than a simple sentence to have comprehension. The other two do not have this problem. As you say, it does make decisions harder. And it is harder on the pocketbook lol! I have tried so many spelling options out there: SYS, AAS, SS, PR, and R&S, just to name a few! And it took a long time for me to figure out that AAS with the idea of the copywork/dictation from SYS was a great fit! I hear you on the handwriting too. My older DS has that and the paragraphs would be too much for him. So glad we can tweak things to fit what works for each kid!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fwiw, I only buy the AAS teachers guide and the tile app. I've found that I don't use the student packet hardly at all and for the rare time I would, I can easily fudge it. So it is pretty affordable at $20/level that I have used with 4 kids so far (dd5 just started!) 

And the tile app is complete worth it. I had the regular tiles and they were a nightmare. The tile app is less messy, doesn't take up room, won't get lost, and makes spelling more fun somehow for my kids.

We've been using it for years and dd12 is almost to level 6 (she has special needs so we've been going slow and steady.) It's easy for me and streamlined and effective and I've learned a ton, not to mention so have my kids. 

Edited by MeaganS
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MeaganS said:

Fwiw, I only buy the AAS teachers guide and the tile app. I've found that I don't use the student packet hardly at all and for the rare time I would, I can easily fudge it. So it is pretty affordable at $20/level that I have used with 4 kids so far (dd5 just started!) 

And the tile app is complete worth it. I had the regular tiles and they were a nightmare. The tile app is less messy, doesn't take up room, won't get lost, and makes spelling more fun somehow for my kids.

We've been using it for years and dd12 is almost to level 6 (she has special needs so we've been going slow and steady.) It's easy for me and streamlined and effective and I've learned a ton, not to mention so have my kids. 

This is something I'm very interested in! So you don't use the cards at all? Is it because you are doing AAR and its redundant or do you really not need them? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, seemesew said:

This is something I'm very interested in! So you don't use the cards at all? Is it because you are doing AAR and its redundant or do you really not need them? 

My three oldest kiddos have all used AAS (starting in level 1, now in levels 3, 4 and 6), and we have never used the cards...or the tiles. I did buy the student materials for the first couple levels, but they were just sitting there unused, so after a while I switched to just the teaching manuals.

I did use a cheap letter tile app with my oldest two kiddos when they were in AAS 1 because they were pencil-phobic and had fine motor delays. AAS had not come out with their app, so I just found a generic one with individual letters on tiles colored differently for vowels and consonants. It worked fine for level 1, and after that they both moved to just writing everything in a notebook. DS #3 came along and was fine writing in a notebook right from the beginning. We'll see which path DD takes next year, but either way, we won't use the physical tiles and we will switch to a notebook ASAP.

We have never used the cards because we are Anki snobs who are connoisseurs of spaced repetition. We just go through the AAS lessons, and I make notes of mistakes they make on review words (ones not related to the current lesson) in the dictation sentences. I put those specific words (and words they misspell in their other school writing that they should know) onto Anki cards...and let Anki figure out the optimal timing of repetition. Sometimes, if it is one spelling rule that is tripping a kiddo up across many words, then I will put that rule on the Anki card. But most of the rules they internalize pretty quickly, and most of the words they know how to spell, so I'm not willing to mess around with a squillion little unnecessary cards.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

we are using both.

 AAS in the mornings - we don't use the cards, but we do use the tiles

in the afternoon we use Spell you see . we use it as a reinforcement and somehow the twins respond well to writing words  in those boxes

Because of my boys disabilities, we move at a very slow pace. In AAS we only do 5 words per day.

 and we half the lessons in Spell you see

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, seemesew said:

This is something I'm very interested in! So you don't use the cards at all? Is it because you are doing AAR and its redundant or do you really not need them? 

Nope, don't have AAR.

What I do is the lesson 1 day, primary spelling words another day, "more words" the next, dictation over two days, and writing station the last day. I had the cards for the first two levels and didn't use them. I found the practice in the book to be sufficient.

The only thing I miss sometimes are some of the lists that they are supposed to study and the "silent e book". I use a composition book for each level that my kids do all their practice in. I made my own version of the silent e book at the end and it was simple.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2021 at 8:04 PM, seemesew said:

 

 

 

Do you guys think it would help reinforce reading skills? I'm thinking for younger kids in 2nd grade or so.

Absolutely.  My youngest took off in reading well before we had finished a full phonics program.  I was able to let her loose to “just read books”, knowing we’d cover any phonics rules she may have missed via AAS.  Worked like a charm🙂

 

On 1/19/2021 at 6:01 PM, MeaganS said:

Fwiw, I only buy the AAS teachers guide and the tile app. I've found that I don't use the student packet hardly at all and for the rare time I would, I can easily fudge it. So it is pretty affordable at $20/level that I have used with 4 kids so far (dd5 just started!) 

And the tile app is complete worth it. I had the regular tiles and they were a nightmare. The tile app is less messy, doesn't take up room, won't get lost, and makes spelling more fun somehow for my kids.

We've been using it for years and dd12 is almost to level 6 (she has special needs so we've been going slow and steady.) It's easy for me and streamlined and effective and I've learned a ton, not to mention so have my kids. 

This is exactly how we have done it too.  Right down to the (almost) 12 yo in level 6!😂

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2021 at 8:48 PM, wendyroo said:

My three oldest kiddos have all used AAS (starting in level 1, now in levels 3, 4 and 6), and we have never used the cards...or the tiles. I did buy the student materials for the first couple levels, but they were just sitting there unused, so after a while I switched to just the teaching manuals.

I did use a cheap letter tile app with my oldest two kiddos when they were in AAS 1 because they were pencil-phobic and had fine motor delays. AAS had not come out with their app, so I just found a generic one with individual letters on tiles colored differently for vowels and consonants. It worked fine for level 1, and after that they both moved to just writing everything in a notebook. DS #3 came along and was fine writing in a notebook right from the beginning. We'll see which path DD takes next year, but either way, we won't use the physical tiles and we will switch to a notebook ASAP.

We have never used the cards because we are Anki snobs who are connoisseurs of spaced repetition. We just go through the AAS lessons, and I make notes of mistakes they make on review words (ones not related to the current lesson) in the dictation sentences. I put those specific words (and words they misspell in their other school writing that they should know) onto Anki cards...and let Anki figure out the optimal timing of repetition. Sometimes, if it is one spelling rule that is tripping a kiddo up across many words, then I will put that rule on the Anki card. But most of the rules they internalize pretty quickly, and most of the words they know how to spell, so I'm not willing to mess around with a squillion little unnecessary cards.

 

On 1/20/2021 at 7:52 AM, MeaganS said:

Nope, don't have AAR.

What I do is the lesson 1 day, primary spelling words another day, "more words" the next, dictation over two days, and writing station the last day. I had the cards for the first two levels and didn't use them. I found the practice in the book to be sufficient.

The only thing I miss sometimes are some of the lists that they are supposed to study and the "silent e book". I use a composition book for each level that my kids do all their practice in. I made my own version of the silent e book at the end and it was simple.

 

22 hours ago, AnneGG said:

This is what I do too. It hasn’t been a problem. 

 

5 hours ago, maptime said:

Absolutely.  My youngest took off in reading well before we had finished a full phonics program.  I was able to let her loose to “just read books”, knowing we’d cover any phonics rules she may have missed via AAS.  Worked like a charm🙂

 

This is exactly how we have done it too.  Right down to the (almost) 12 yo in level 6!😂

 

This is SO helpful! I really would like to use AAS but didn't want to spend $67 or so to get the whole kit. I am pleased that it will also help with reading (I figured it would but wanted reassurance I guess). 

AAS is definitely what we will do! We will try it without the cards and see if we can do it, if not I can always buy them later. Thank you!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2021 at 6:04 PM, seemesew said:

 

 

 

Do you guys think it would help reinforce reading skills? I'm thinking for younger kids in 2nd grade or so.

Absolutely.   Honestly, I wanted to buy All About Reading but my husband flipped at the price (it's really not that expensive for a Reading program but he had just lost his job), so I got All About Spelling after flipping through it and seeing that it could be reverse engineered to cover a lot of reading skills (no, I do not suggest doing that...it is so much easier/better to buy a reading curriculum, but if your kids are already reading yeah, it would reinforce reading skills and even could help you catch some phonics skills they might be missing.   

 

Edited by goldenecho
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...