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I'm in my early sixties, and have been way too sedentary and heavy the past few years. I just quit my job though, and as I establish new habits, it's very important to me that I get moving and into better shape. For one thing, I want to be healthier. For another, my dh is a runner, and I'd like to be able to do more active (NOT running) activities with him, like some hiking, kayaking, etc.

I'm a creature of habit, so once I get going, I'm pretty good at maintaining a habit. It's the getting started that is a problem. We had talked about getting a treadmill; my mom used hers until in her late 80s, and I have liked using them before. However, when a rowing machine was mentioned on here the other day, I was thinking that might be a lot better, because I have some shoulder muscles that need to be worked regularly (one of them tenses up and causes pain if I don't exercise it), and my arms are fat. I don't like ellipticals at all, so I know I wouldn't use one of those. Would a rower be good for someone like me, and that I could start on at my own pace? Is it rough on a part of the body that older people need to be careful of? TIA

ETA: Due to a tailbone injury in my childhood, I can't ride stationary bikes for long. Would this be a problem on a rower? It looks like the positioning of the seat is different, so it doesn't seem to me like it would, but I thought I would ask.

Edited by Jaybee
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Maybe you could join a local gym for a short time (or even pay to be a Visitor!), to try out their rowing machine(s) & other equipment before buying one for yourself.
(I commented on the WTM Rowing thread you referred to, about my dh who has rowed daily for 30+ years.)

He likes it because it's low impact, but the seat is hard (which I'm sure can be replaced).
And I'll again recommend buying USED exercise equipment--it's fairly easy to find locally.

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Rowing can be pretty vigorous. You might want to try it before you buy. The treadmill sounds like a much more solid bet for you. Then just add in some weights a few times a week to tone up your arms and you'll be good. I've been liking Erin Stern lately. She's meticuous on form.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHrBLjd-i4M just dumbells.

Also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uz--Xb9nrZM

Or go with just bodyweight like yoga/pilates. Again, you can find videos for this on youtube. Don't do something unnatural or way beyond where you are. Find something that looks within reach and do it 2X a week plus your walking.

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I will say the #1 thing I did this year was to REALLY gear up to walk/hike outdoors - long parka, studded boots, walking poles.  It has really transformed my winter outlook. This was going to be the winter of join the gym but zero desire during covid to do that.  I have also met a few people for socially distanced outdoor stuff.  

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1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

Good for you!

fwiw, if you have tailbone issues, you might want to look at stand up paddle boarding (SUP) as an alternative to kayaking. 

Lol, I am not coordinated enough to stand up on a moving board. In my limited kayaking experience, the tailbone hasn't been a problem. The only time it has been a problem has been with a bicycle seat. I agree that paddle boarding looks like a fun and relaxing activity. But not if I'm constantly having to crawl back up on the board.😝

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1 hour ago, Beth S said:

Maybe you could join a local gym for a short time (or even pay to be a Visitor!), to try out their rowing machine(s) & other equipment before buying one for yourself.
(I commented on the WTM Rowing thread you referred to, about my dh who has rowed daily for 30+ years.)

He likes it because it's low impact, but the seat is hard (which I'm sure can be replaced).
And I'll again recommend buying USED exercise equipment--it's fairly easy to find locally.

I like the low impact. I have plenty of personal padding, as long as the pressure point isn't in the tailbone area. I've looked at the used available here, and haven't seen any good quality rowing equipment yet, but I'll keep looking. But you are right, I may need to visit a gym for awhile and see what I think.

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I'm in pretty much the same condition and age range as you and, when I can convince myself to exercise, the rowing machine wins almost every time. I hate the treadmill. The rowing machine doesn't have to be intense, but can be if that's what you want. Also, the rowing machine has the advantage of arm exercise and aerobic exercise at the same time.

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Leslie Sansone has DVDs that use walking and strength training.  I used them regularly years ago and got in decent shape, then got out of the habit due to long work hours.  They are a great way to get started, even if you move on to other things.  They work a lot of muscle groups!

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6 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I'm in pretty much the same condition and age range as you and, when I can convince myself to exercise, the rowing machine wins almost every time. I hate the treadmill. The rowing machine doesn't have to be intense, but can be if that's what you want. Also, the rowing machine has the advantage of arm exercise and aerobic exercise at the same time.

It just seems very efficient. 

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I have never tried a rowing machine so can't comment.

What has worked for me though is DDPY yoga and lots of walking and hiking.  I also kayak and some friends buy cushions for the kayak seats and that helps them 

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I am a bit younger than you and I am in no way an exercise expert.

I have just started exercising daily this last two months (encouraged by someone here on this board). I like walking, but as I am not leaving my house/property --due mostly to the fact that people do not were masks here--I have been using low impact exercise videos from you tube.

I really like Lucy Wyndhamhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCag7XoiJLutjBTsM0tAzUzg because she demonstrates every move before I have to do it.  I would like to find more exercise instructors like her.  I would highly recommend her videos to anybody just starting. I have lost some weight but even more important to me, I have more energy, and I feel less blue, since I started exercising.

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3 hours ago, Jaybee said:

ETA: Due to a tailbone injury in my childhood, I can't ride stationary bikes for long. 

My dad is about 300 lbs and he and my mom bought Day 6 Comfort Bikes with electric motors (which he installed himself to save about $1000). They are semi-recumbent bikes, which means the seat is comfortable but you sit higher up than a recumbent bike. The electric motor lets them go on 20-30 mile bike rides because they can use the motor to assist when they get to hills. I've ridden my mom's bike a few times and it is soooooo much more comfortable than a regular bike.

I know they aren't cheap. However, I've read comments online where people said they started out using the motor most of the time on their e-bikes (of any brand) and as they got in better shape, they gradually used it less. Without the motor, some of them never would've tried biking.

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6 hours ago, Jaybee said:

ETA: Due to a tailbone injury in my childhood, I can't ride stationary bikes for long. Would this be a problem on a rower? It looks like the positioning of the seat is different, so it doesn't seem to me like it would, but I thought I would ask.

I am so sorry about your tailbone, I've heard that can be really painful.

Also, are you on the January Well-Trained Bodies group? They're a very supportive group of people. I'm actually doing more because of this group.

Wendy

Edited by Alicia64
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2 hours ago, JumpyTheFrog said:

My dad is about 300 lbs and he and my mom bought Day 6 Comfort Bikes with electric motors (which he installed himself to save about $1000). They are semi-recumbent bikes, which means the seat is comfortable but you sit higher up than a recumbent bike. The electric motor lets them go on 20-30 mile bike rides because they can use the motor to assist when they get to hills. I've ridden my mom's bike a few times and it is soooooo much more comfortable than a regular bike.

I know they aren't cheap. However, I've read comments online where people said they started out using the motor most of the time on their e-bikes (of any brand) and as they got in better shape, they gradually used it less. Without the motor, some of them never would've tried biking.

Yeah, those are way out of my price range. I'm also wanting something for inside, so I can't use weather as an excuse. If we lived in a place that was more bike-able (and they weren't so pricey), that looks like it would be a really nice alternative.

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7 hours ago, Jaybee said:

 

ETA: Due to a tailbone injury in my childhood, I can't ride stationary bikes for long. Would this be a problem on a rower? It looks like the positioning of the seat is different, so it doesn't seem to me like it would, but I thought I would ask.

Have you tried a recumbent bike? I can't ride a stationary bike or even an actual bicycle for very long because of my sciatic nerve issues but I can use a recumbent bike. It has you leaning back so you're not on your tailbone when using it. That's the bike they have me use when I go to physical therapy. 

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37 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

Have you tried a recumbent bike? I can't ride a stationary bike or even an actual bicycle for very long because of my sciatic nerve issues but I can use a recumbent bike. It has you leaning back so you're not on your tailbone when using it. That's the bike they have me use when I go to physical therapy. 

I've used one before but wasn't awed by it. Most don't have the arm option.

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16 hours ago, Tina said:

Leslie Sansone has DVDs that use walking and strength training.  I used them regularly years ago and got in decent shape, then got out of the habit due to long work hours.  They are a great way to get started, even if you move on to other things.  They work a lot of muscle groups!

All her videos are now on YouTube for free! There is also an app that will schedule walks for you and such, but it's the same videos as on YouTube so I didn't see much point in paying for the app. They were what I started with as I started back to exercise and still a staple. Just hard enough, but not overwhelming, and I can go back to walking if need be. Also, the energy of them is fantastic - very positive and encouraging. My DD does thm with me a lot, and yesterday while I was at the doctor's office my 8 yr old son suggested they do one together! (we have offered Steam gift certificates as an award for hitting his step goal consistently, lol)

They really are fantastic and the best part is you can start NOW! No need to wait for equipment to arrive. I like the Walk 15 ones the best. 15 minutes is just an easy amount to psyche yourself up for. 

And of course I'm doing a lot of DDP Yoga as well. But I'ved gone on and on about how amazing that is in other threads, lol. Won't bore you here. 

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