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Are you doing anything interesting with your Bible reading?


PeterPan
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The last couple years I've done One Year Bibles (regular and now chronological), so I've been looking for a non chunked NLT version. That sort of led into youtube reviews and finding things like this girl with her homeschool style, totally decked out Bible reading, prayer cart!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIoLrY1x8JA

So that has gotten me to thinking about what I haven't tried or am not doing that might be good! What are y'all up to? Do you journal or notebook? Do you use a cart or put a pillow on your lap like the girl in the video? Do you keep canisters of gel pens or use nifty notebooks? Run topical studies in parallel with your regular reading? Do scripture memory with some book or system just for yourself, not your kids?

Anything you're excited about doing with your Bible reading/study for the coming year? 

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Her method looks exhausting.....gratitude journal and prayer journal and personal journal and her scriptures which are part art and her other scriptures and concordances. That is a lot of moving pieces to keep track of.

I stop and ask myself about every six months or so what I am hoping to accomplish from my scripture study. Then I ask what would be the best method for accomplishing that. For the past six months, I have been trying to put some context around the scriptures. I know the stories well. I am not trying to build emotional connection. I am trying to dig into deeper meaning but looking at context...and pulling apart relationships and motivations. So....in that context, keeping a gratitude journal or doing art wouldn’t help me accomplish a goal.

This next six months...I am really interested in creating some beautiful word art. I am going to be looking for scriptures that really touch my heart and dd and I are going to work on our calligraphy and drawing skills together. I am also helping her build a relationship, iykwim. I have been picking up brush pens and other art supplies and a good stack of paper.

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36 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

The last couple years I've done One Year Bibles (regular and now chronological), so I've been looking for a non chunked NLT version. That sort of led into youtube reviews and finding things like this girl with her homeschool style, totally decked out Bible reading, prayer cart!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIoLrY1x8JA

So that has gotten me to thinking about what I haven't tried or am not doing that might be good! What are y'all up to? Do you journal or notebook? Do you use a cart or put a pillow on your lap like the girl in the video? Do you keep canisters of gel pens or use nifty notebooks? Run topical studies in parallel with your regular reading? Do scripture memory with some book or system just for yourself, not your kids?

Anything you're excited about doing with your Bible reading/study for the coming year? 

The most exciting thing I am trying to do currently is I got Accordance Bible Software for Christmas and I have started using that to read the scriptures on my ipad with a few tools at my fingertips.  I am hoping very hard to get the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Notes for it for Christmas. (if not I'll probably spend Christmas money on it--on Accordance I can use it alongside my preferred Bible version instead of only the three versions it is available in print form) So I can read with that open on the second screen.

 

I have an Advent set of scriptures we are using as a family for daily devotions and in the new year I am going to be trying to read through the Bible in a year with a plan our almost-Interim Pastor (Business meeting to officially vote him in is Dec 6 -- was derailed by our Church Moderator getting COVID before the planned date) recommended.  It's been a while since I read through the Bible and so its time.

 

Edited by vonfirmath
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I have been doing the Digging Deep Bible study for several years now.  It’s a monthly study with a video podcast that goes over the month’s study with a couple smaller audio podcasts.  It’s very “meaty”.  Each year starts in September, but you can start anytime.  If you download the study instead of buying the book, it’s free.  
https://thecolleyhouse.org/digging-deep-introduction-video

 

Edited by athena1277
Forgot to add the link.
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I haven't figured out everything that I'm doing next year.

I have decided that I want to read through the Proverbs in every month that has 31 days.

I have also decided to work through the Psalms on the other months.  I just recently discovered that the Psalms are broken up into 5 groups and labeled after the 5 books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy.  Some days will require reading more than one Psalm.

Jan -- Proverbs 1-31

Feb --  Psalms 1-41

Mar -- Proverbs 1-31

April -- Psalms 42-72

May -- Proverbs 1-31

June -- Psalms 73-89

July -- Proverbs 1-31

Aug -- Proverbs 1-31

Sept -- Psalms 90-106

Oct -- Psalms 107-150

Nov -- Proverbs 1-31

Dec -- Proverbs 1-31

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I teach Precept Inductive Bible Studies, so most of my spiritual growth surrounds that. In January 2021 we are studying Mark, then we will do a shorter study that I haven’t selected yet. In September 2021 we will start John, which will take us through May 2022. 

As part of my study, before I start teaching a book I hand write the book we are going to study, so this month I am hand writing Mark. I am also going through two Advent devotionals. I don’t often use devotionals, so it’s a change for me.  A friend recently introduced me to the Daily Office app from the Anglican Church and I am using that to focus and refocus my mind and to pray regularly throughout the day. I plan to use that throughout the year. 

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53 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

I am reading the French-English Bible and Spanish-English Bible once a week each as part of my daily read. This is mostly to improve fluency in both languages and I figured since I know the Bible quite well it should be easier to understand. Completely wrong about that. But it forces me to slow down to read to understand so that is a good thing, not sure about the fluency increasing though. 

I grew up in a family where memorizing Scripture was a big thing and I remember my grandparents at the end of their lives repeating the Psalms especially from memory. 

So I have an ambitious life goal of memorizing all the Psalms and Proverbs. Easier said than done with my swiss cheese brain. 😊 

I've always had a gratitude journal for a few years now off and on. Now keeping one during the pandemic diligently helps me be thankful though I am always woe is me. 

I can only write in cursive and love writing, so I write verses down. I am terrible in art so I color pages with scripture verses though they are not the version I want to memorize. 

We also read the Bible as part of family worship and communal worship over facetime and WhatsApp with my parents and inlaws. 

We are doing advent now and that is something that always brings it full circle to me.

I would love to hear more about your Scripture memory -- how do you choose what you're memorizing? And what do you do to get it in there? And how do you make it stay put?

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55 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

I memorized lots as a child

Well I am very partial to Psalms as I memorized many as a child and they have come in handy in so many times. We also have a tradition of singing the psalms in my language, so I sing them and so have memorized many.

The beatitudes.

The armor of God 

Healing verses

Verses on Faith

The love verses in Corinthians

Fruits of the spirit

Few I have chosen as life verses that have deep meaning to me that I repeat when needed.

I have a book that was given to me as a child with the 1000 names of God but with the original reference like El Shadai, Jehovah Rapha,Jehovah Shammah and the meaning in my language  . This is the closest I can find to what I mean.

http://www.tdharmon.com/assets/names-of-God.pdf

It is by far one of the best things I have ever memorized.

I like to memorize the psalms I know from memory in all the languages I know

I also like to memorize the Lord's prayer in all the languages I know plus as many others as I can even if that is the only thing I can say other than hallo and bye.

Hymns as many as I can

Carols

At this point in my life though mostly Psalms and Proverbs.

Staying put is by teaching it to my kids 😊

Dreamer, I feel like I want to be in your fan club! I love all of this. What all languages do you speak?? So far I've learned the Lord's Prayer in English, Spanish, French and German. I super dig languages and admire y'all with many.

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This year I did a 180 day overview study of the entire Bible reading it in English and then copying a key verse in English and Spanish each day.   Then I went to going through the psalms in English and writing in English and Spanish.  Tonight I finish that 

Then I need to find an advent thing for December.

I think January I will read through Mark in English and listen as I read in Spanish.  A friend suggested hand writing out the entire book very slowly so I might do that.   I chose Mark as I have a friend that is seeking and searching and I hope to challenge her to read through the book of Mark as she has no Biblical knowledge at all.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Wilma said:

I would love to hear more about your Scripture memory -- how do you choose what you're memorizing? And what do you do to get it in there? And how do you make it stay put?

I was confirmed in a strict sort of Lutheran as a teenager. To get confirmed we had to memorize at least one verse to answer every question in the small catechism. I hated it at the time but it's been wonderful as an adult.  I basically read them, closed my eyes and tried to recite, and looked again when I forgot.  Over and over until I had them down.

If you wanted to start with something a bit easier, there are scripture memory card systems. I had a pastor in a big nondenominational church encourage us to get one when I was in my young 20's.  He'd keep them in his pocket and every time he had a minute to wait on something he'd work on reciting the verses on the cards in his pocket.  After a day or two he'd put them in a box in his office and flip through them every few days to make sure he still had them down.  I just checked Amazon and there are dozens of options, some topical.

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40 minutes ago, Katy said:

I was confirmed in a strict sort of Lutheran as a teenager. To get confirmed we had to memorize at least one verse to answer every question in the small catechism. I hated it at the time but it's been wonderful as an adult.  I basically read them, closed my eyes and tried to recite, and looked again when I forgot.  Over and over until I had them down.

If you wanted to start with something a bit easier, there are scripture memory card systems. I had a pastor in a big nondenominational church encourage us to get one when I was in my young 20's.  He'd keep them in his pocket and every time he had a minute to wait on something he'd work on reciting the verses on the cards in his pocket.  After a day or two he'd put them in a box in his office and flip through them every few days to make sure he still had them down.  I just checked Amazon and there are dozens of options, some topical.

That sounds great! I'm totally going to look into the card systems. I do like a good flashcard.

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Simply Charlotte Mason has a system for helping with memorization. https://www.google.com/amp/s/simplycharlottemason.com/timesavers/memorysys/%3famp

My DH prints bible verses on blank business cards, so he can store it in his wallet. Then, like above, you can pull it out when you're waiting or something and it's always there. (Though, in our digital age, I'm sure there's an app for that, lol, but we like paper.)

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18 hours ago, Junie said:

I haven't figured out everything that I'm doing next year.

I have decided that I want to read through the Proverbs in every month that has 31 days.

I have also decided to work through the Psalms on the other months.  I just recently discovered that the Psalms are broken up into 5 groups and labeled after the 5 books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy.  Some days will require reading more than one Psalm.

Jan -- Proverbs 1-31

Feb --  Psalms 1-41

Mar -- Proverbs 1-31

April -- Psalms 42-72

May -- Proverbs 1-31

June -- Psalms 73-89

July -- Proverbs 1-31

Aug -- Proverbs 1-31

Sept -- Psalms 90-106

Oct -- Psalms 107-150

Nov -- Proverbs 1-31

Dec -- Proverbs 1-31

Oh that's interesting. I've been reading a chronological this year, and while you'd think that integrating the psalms would put them in context, it only sorta does. And then you end up with these massive long stints of psalms or proverbs and nothing the rest of the year. That way of breaking them up across the year is totally amazing. 

 

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17 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

So I have an ambitious life goal of memorizing all the Psalms and Proverbs.

Oh that's interesting! If you committed to 1 chapter of Proverbs a year (totally doable), it would be just 31 years. Or maybe at 2 verses a week it would cut that in half? Still a project, but it could actually get done. That's kind of interesting. I'm 44, so I could make it 31 more years probably. :biggrin:

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I'm reading through the Psalter with a group of people during our Advent.  The Psalter is the Psalms broken down into reading/prayer sections by day(called a Kathisma) and then each day has 3 sections (called Stasis).   There are 20 Kathismas in total.  20 of us took one Kathisma and started Nov. 15th.  It means that each Kathisma is being prayed each day by someone.   We will go through the Psalter 2x.  What I do is I listen to them being read  by Alexander Scourby and mediate on them while he's reading.  

I'm also trying to go through an Advent devotional which follows our lectionary.  That way I am getting a Psalm, Epistle, and Gospel reading each day plus some meditative thoughts on the lectionary readings. 

 

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17 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

We are doing advent now and that is something that always brings it full circle to me.

Yes, I've struggled with how to connect ds with Scripture, given his significant language issues and autism. I finally realized I was trying too hard, that *short* is better for him. I found a list of 40 messianic prophecies in the OT and I'm just picking one each day to read and discuss with him. Super short. He actually seemed really engaged yesterday, looking up Bethlehem in videos, etc., so we'll see.

17 hours ago, TechWife said:

I teach Precept Inductive Bible Studies

Oh that's interesting. I remember JW (mom of SWB) saying she does these. I had been going to a church that used RBP sunday school materials, so I'd use the study book for the quarter to supplement my daily reading, which was nice. But you're right, I totally lost that with this church we're attending now. It's funny, but they're not as passionate about the Word. They're more focused on "the church" and "worship" and whatnot. I think they're in a stage honestly, making changes to their polity.

So yes, I'll definitely look into that. Might be just what I was looking for. But if I do that, instead of getting a wide margin NLT (which had been my plan), maybe I should go for NASB/ESV. The church preaches from ESV but my previous Bible was NASB. I just find I understand things so much better with NLT. I think it's my brain, lol. Or maybe just go with the NLT and not worry about it? Just googling here, it looks like Precepts sells some inductive study versions. I think I saw those once in a store. Do you use one of those or a wide margin or something different?

Ooo, the samples on the inductive version are kind of snazzy. I like how each version starts on a new line but it's still the single column. That's good for studying. (vs. literature style reading vs...)

16 hours ago, Patty Joanna said:

One of the first assignments given to our seminarians is handwriting the Psalms.

That's a little more doable, one at a time, hehe.

15 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

I have a book that was given to me as a child with the 1000 names of God but with the original reference like El Shadai, Jehovah Rapha,Jehovah Shammah and the meaning in my language  . This is the closest I can find to what I mean.

http://www.tdharmon.com/assets/names-of-God.pdf

It is by far one of the best things I have ever memorized.

Wow, that's quite the list!!

12 hours ago, Katy said:

I was confirmed in a strict sort of Lutheran as a teenager. To get confirmed we had to memorize at least one verse to answer every question in the small catechism.

That sounds useful for my ds!

 

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14 hours ago, Ottakee said:

This year I did a 180 day overview study of the entire Bible reading it in English and then copying a key verse in English and Spanish each day.   Then I went to going through the psalms in English and writing in English and Spanish.  Tonight I finish that 

Then I need to find an advent thing for December.

I think January I will read through Mark in English and listen as I read in Spanish.  A friend suggested hand writing out the entire book very slowly so I might do that.   I chose Mark as I have a friend that is seeking and searching and I hope to challenge her to read through the book of Mark as she has no Biblical knowledge at all.

 

 

I have a friend who does this, reading through the bible chronologically each year very quickly and then finishing out the year with other studies. She's totally the woman, lol. I think I got bogged down in the chronological thing. Too much (⅔ of the year, oy) spent in the problems of Israel, oh my. So what did you do for your 180 day overview?

I hope your Mark study with/for your friend goes well!

Edited by PeterPan
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30 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

So yes, I'll definitely look into that. Might be just what I was looking for. But if I do that, instead of getting a wide margin NLT (which had been my plan), maybe I should go for NASB/ESV. The church preaches from ESV but my previous Bible was NASB. I just find I understand things so much better with NLT. I think it's my brain, lol. Or maybe just go with the NLT and not worry about it? Just googling here, it looks like Precepts sells some inductive study versions. I think I saw those once in a store. Do you use one of those or a wide margin or something different?

Ooo, the samples on the inductive version are kind of snazzy. I like how each version starts on a new line but it's still the single column. That's good for studying. (vs. literature style reading vs...)

KJV/NASB/ESV are my favorite translations, in general.  (Really NASB is my favorite. ESV is the one our family has standardized on. I grew up KJV and still find it the easiest to memorize from)

However, you may not be imagining that the NLT is easier for you to understand.

 

There is a continuum of translations of the Bible from Word to Word translation to Thought for Thought. All of my favorites are more word for word. But the NLT is a thought for thought translation and they do have their places in helping understanding  (I think CEV is the one I use for reading alongside word for word types sometimes.)  They tend to read more like a story.

 

https://www.apbrown2.net/web/TranslationComparisonChart.htm

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3 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

All of my favorites are more word for word. But the NLT is a thought for thought translation and they do have their places in helping understanding 

I know, and it has made a HUGE difference. I've been too lazy/busy/whatever to go back and compare word for word. Sometimes I worry that they're leading into meanings that aren't there or something. But I don't think that's it. I think I'm not so hot at inferencing and that it just leaps over that and says fine, this is what it meant and was trying to get you too. 

I also really like the parallel structures in the NLT. They translate things very *consistently* so you can see patterns and repetition. Of course it also makes it repetitive in a one year chronological, because you're literally reading the same thing OVER AND OVER, lol. But it's really helpful.

I use an ipad at church and will pull up the versions in parallel. I guess I could do this with the Precepts samples and see if using the NLT would make a difference. I don't really know how loose it is. I took the plunge and didn't look back or question too hard, lol. 

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10 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

Ok, I'm looking through those samples and it's obvious why it's working for me. The main words are there, but they made it so much more CONVERSATIONAL. That's how people really talk. And since the Bible was originally written in the colloquial, everyday form of the language, I'm not sure why we're slogging on people translations that aren't getting it down to that. NOBODY says "shall". Is that even in our legalese now?? Seriously. 

I know what the words mean, because I grew up on the KJV and then read the NASB for years. But I really like having a version that says it like it was meant to read, right where I understand it, the way I would say it. I understand things now I missed for so many years. It's astonishing.

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5 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

I know, and it has made a HUGE difference. I've been too lazy/busy/whatever to go back and compare word for word. Sometimes I worry that they're leading into meanings that aren't there or something. But I don't think that's it. I think I'm not so hot at inferencing and that it just leaps over that and says fine, this is what it meant and was trying to get you too. 

I also really like the parallel structures in the NLT. They translate things very *consistently* so you can see patterns and repetition. Of course it also makes it repetitive in a one year chronological, because you're literally reading the same thing OVER AND OVER, lol. But it's really helpful.

I use an ipad at church and will pull up the versions in parallel. I guess I could do this with the Precepts samples and see if using the NLT would make a difference. I don't really know how loose it is. I took the plunge and didn't look back or question too hard, lol. 

The Thought for Thought I'd be the most careful with is The Message -- and it is the one that reads the most like a book anyway.

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3 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

The Thought for Thought I'd be the most careful with is The Message -- and it is the one that reads the most like a book anyway.

Yup! And looking at those samples, I'm feeling good about the NLT. It's very clear why it's working for me. I keep the NASB and ESV on my ipad, both ipads, so it's super easy to pull up if I want that more tight, word for word. But for just reading, my pea brain needs something that gets me there. I cannot do so much mental gymnastics. 

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3 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

Yup! And looking at those samples, I'm feeling good about the NLT. It's very clear why it's working for me. I keep the NASB and ESV on my ipad, both ipads, so it's super easy to pull up if I want that more tight, word for word. But for just reading, my pea brain needs something that gets me there. I cannot do so much mental gymnastics. 

Don't downplay your brain. You're doing fine. I was not intending to make you feel bad about the translation! Especially since you are occasionally comparing them, you should use what speaks to you best!

 

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3 hours ago, Slache said:

I've been spending a lot of time in bed so I'm considering The Bible in 90 Days again. It was a great experience. I just read 13 chapters a day, nothing special.

Wow that is a lot to me.  I am hoping to make my year time frame. I am so close and if my parents accident had not happened I would be done in time easily. 

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39 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

Wow that is a lot to me.  I am hoping to make my year time frame. I am so close and if my parents accident had not happened I would be done in time easily. 

It took me an hour and a half each day. I did it back when I injured my back about 5 years ago. I didn't understand what was going on at the time, but due to a bone injury I was stuck in a perpetual spasm. You know that incredibly intense pain you have when you have a back spasm? I had that for four months straight, so I spent most of that time in bed. It was either read the Bible or watch Buffy, so...

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