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The Vaccine Thread


JennyD

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4 hours ago, SKL said:

There's a big space between demanding a vax proof card and "let it rip."

But if it makes you happy, then please go and patronize all of the places that demand a vax card.

Sadly, I don't have that luxury in the rural Midwest. Because of the political views of my state legislature, my workplace is not permitted to have this extra layer of protection for its students and faculty. I am grateful my kids study and work at institutions that are not required to appease politicians who only care about appealing to their anti- vaxx/anti- mask/Covid-is-a-hoax base.

Edited by regentrude
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On 9/4/2021 at 4:50 PM, Corraleno said:

50% efficacy is the absolute minimum standard for approval of a vaccine — it's just an arbitrary figure selected as the cut-off for a bureaucratic licensing process. It basically means "better than nothing." If there are no other options, then 50% efficacy is indeed better than nothing, but when there are options that can increase efficacy to 80-90%, there is no reason to settle for something that is only 50% effective.

Under what other circumstances would medical professionals purposely recommend a treatment that is only 50% effective when there is a much more effective option with little to no increased risk?

Logically, if 50% is the absolute minimum standard for vaccine approval, then a vaccine efficiency dropping to below 50% after a certain time would meet the latter threshold (since that would enable the counter-optic of "the booster is enabling the vaccine to be as effective as advertised to the FDA, and most likely every country will need to follow suit in about the same timeframe").

In the NHS, 50% frequently gets recommended over 90% in treatments if the latter is vastly more expensive or comes with other significant caveats - which may be a problem for Pfizer if it is concluded boosters are necessary, as it is much more expensive than OxfordAstrazeneca. 3 doses of Pfizer is the same price to the NHS as 90 doses of OxfordAstrazeneca, and apparently protection with the latter lasts longer (at least the way the NHS did it). And no, one cannot in that case go private to get a medicine rejected on value-for-money grounds (hence why you sometimes hear of British people going to the USA for treatment).

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On 9/4/2021 at 9:42 PM, Corraleno said:

Seriously concerning study on waning immunity from Qatar...

They found that Pfizer's efficacy against infection (including asymptomatic infection) peaked at 72% in the first 5 weeks after the 2nd dose, gradually declined to around 30% in weeks 15-19, and fell to 0% (yes ZERO) after 20 weeks.

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.08.25.21262584v1.full.pdf+html

I wonder why Qatar never got the efficiency peak that the UK and USA got? (Starting 20 percentage points lower means they effectively know what happens in the Pfizer dose's future for the UK and USA). To put this into perspective, the UK figure for Pfizer effectiveness at 6 months was 74% - slightly above what Qatar had at peak. Which certainly supports boosters at 9-10 months for the UK and USA for people who had that vaccine - plus more research into the different experiences.

  

13 hours ago, SKL said:

I am not really familiar with what a vax passport looks like, since I have never needed to prove anything so far.  But ... when are they going to admit that having had Covid is actually better protection against Delta than having had the vax?  Also, I really don't see the point any more with the rather quickly diminishing returns of the mRNA vaxes.

Given that current research suggests the vax is better than having COVID in terms of preventing illness (95% peak for vaccines vs 83% peak for infection), protection endurance (6-10 months for vaccine vs 4-6 months for infection), transmission risk (reduced by 60% vs reduced by 0%) and severity of illness (hardly any hospitalisations vs quite a few hospitalisations and deaths), don't expect science to claim natural infection is better until the facts change.

 

Edited by ieta_cassiopeia
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1 hour ago, ieta_cassiopeia said:

I wonder why Qatar never got the efficiency peak that the UK and USA got? (Starting 20 percentage points lower means they effectively know what happens in the Pfizer dose's future for the UK and USA). To put this into perspective, the UK figure for Pfizer effectiveness at 6 months was 74% - slightly above what Qatar had at peak. Which certainly supports boosters at 9-10 months for the UK and USA for people who had that vaccine - plus more research into the different experiences.

  

Given that current research suggests the vax is better than having COVID in terms of preventing illness (95% peak for vaccines vs 83% peak for infection), protection endurance (6-10 months for vaccine vs 4-6 months for infection), transmission risk (reduced by 60% vs reduced by 0%) and severity of illness (hardly any hospitalisations vs quite a few hospitalisations and deaths), don't expect science to claim natural infection is better until the facts change.

 

I did not say it is better to have COVID, but that people who have had COVID are less likely to catch and spread Delta than people who had a vax only.  Also, since one jab of J&J also counts as fully vaxed, we should use  the worst results among the 3 US vaxes when discussing whether previous COVID infection should be taken into account re immunity status.

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12 hours ago, SKL said:

 

As for the hospital overload, to the extent reports are not exaggerated or invented for political reasons, these are not happening in most places, at least not so far.  Also, how about requiring proof that the person doesn't have RSV, the other (often main) reason for hospital overload?

You have got to be kidding. This comment makes me so angry. My mom spent 9 hours in a crazy ER this weekend. Sent home with reports of cancer all over her body. She will call tomorrow to see if they can schedule the tests she needs. They were so overwhelmed when my sis calked, they put her on hold for an hour. We went up there and the couldn’t find my mom . ( She had just been released)

 

My husband’s friends tgat are practicing are no longer doing elective surgery because their wards are being turned into Covid wards.  Now the stats still show available beds, but tgat is because these extra wards that should be holding regular patients  are now Covid wards. 

I am not thinking nice thoughts about you.  Off to pray. How dare you !!  You are heartless. You are mean. 

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13 hours ago, SKL said:

 

As for the hospital overload, to the extent reports are not exaggerated or invented for political reasons, these are not happening in most places, at least not so far.  Also, how about requiring proof that the person doesn't have RSV, the other (often main) reason for hospital overload?

This is a really disgusting post. Just gross!

Do the medical world a big favor since you think millions of healthcare workers are all lying, don't seek medical attention for anything. Stay the hell away from HCW's.

Just wow!

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2 hours ago, ieta_cassiopeia said:

I wonder why Qatar never got the efficiency peak that the UK and USA got? ... To put this into perspective, the UK figure for Pfizer effectiveness at 6 months was 74% - slightly above what Qatar had at peak. 

The dominant variant in Qatar when vaccination began was Beta (South Africa), which has mutations similar to Delta that help the virus evade antibodies. In the UK the dominant variant when vaccines rolled out was Alpha, which does not have the same ability to evade antibodies. For comparison, Astra Zeneca's efficacy was 66% against Alpha but only 10% against Beta. So Qatar's vaccination program began with a variant against which vaccines are much less effective.

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1 hour ago, Corraleno said:

The dominant variant in Qatar when vaccination began was Beta (South Africa), which has mutations similar to Delta that help the virus evade antibodies. In the UK the dominant variant when vaccines rolled out was Alpha, which does not have the same ability to evade antibodies. For comparison, Astra Zeneca's efficacy was 66% against Alpha but only 10% against Beta. So Qatar's vaccination program began with a variant against which vaccines are much less effective.

Thanks so much for sharing the depth of your reading and understanding with the Hive, @Corraleno! With uncanny frequency your posts answer questions that have crossed my mind when I just haven't had the bandwidth to suss it out myself.

Just wanted to express my gratitude for the way your posts so often help me understand what's happening with the pandemic and make better decisions for my family. 

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2 hours ago, Corraleno said:

The dominant variant in Qatar when vaccination began was Beta (South Africa), which has mutations similar to Delta that help the virus evade antibodies. In the UK the dominant variant when vaccines rolled out was Alpha, which does not have the same ability to evade antibodies. For comparison, Astra Zeneca's efficacy was 66% against Alpha but only 10% against Beta. So Qatar's vaccination program began with a variant against which vaccines are much less effective.

This is useful information. It also means that a possible factor is the amount of work a protection type (vaccine or natural) has had to do since it happened. At which point, it becomes a lot harder to predict the point at which a given group of people will need boosters, since that's not only going to vary according to the country, but by local and individual risk profile.

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Hmm. Waning immunity vs. Delta ruins everything. This guys comes down strongly in favor of the latter and says we need to slow down re: boosters because of it:

Quote

It is now clear to me that the surge in breakthrough Covid-19 cases in the United States is almost entirely a result of the Delta variant, and not an indication of waning immunity. Yes, measured antibody levels in vaccine recipients are now lower than they were right after vaccination. But that does not necessarily have clinical meaning, nor is it unexpected. By analogy, someone standing in three feet of water is not “nearly drowning” just because that person was previously standing in two feet of water; nor are they necessarily destined to soon be standing in eight feet of water.

Quote

the data from New York show that breakthrough cases rose in all age groups at the same time and right as Delta took over in the region. The absence of an age-specific sequence—in which older people succumbed first—virtually eliminates the waning immunity theory as the driver of the breakthrough surge. If anything, it appears that breakthrough infections increased among the younger population somewhat before older adults. Another very recent study that includes data from 13 states reports that breakthrough hospitalizations rose in all age groups simultaneously, both this spring and this summer. That makes no sense if this is all just waning immunity.

https://insidemedicine.bulletin.com/537599687311876/?fbclid=IwAR3R_-gM-WatKZGMtCWIhD8P0CjDMeVEWyy5Bclq54LAMqUZA1b32_ce428

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I apologize if someone posted this, and I missed it, but here's a little vaccine levity: 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/08/27/most-everyone-gets-coronavirus-vaccine-arm-butt-this-brazilian-city-is-shooting-lower/?utm_campaign=wp_to_your_health&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_tyh&wpmk=1&pwapi_token=eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJjb29raWVuYW1lIjoid3BfY3J0aWQiLCJpc3MiOiJDYXJ0YSIsImNvb2tpZXZhbHVlIjoiNWZlZjYzNzI5YmJjMGYyNTEyYmNmYzQyIiwidGFnIjoiNjEyOTM3ZDg5ZDJmZGEyZjQ3MGU0ZDY0IiwidXJsIjoiaHR0cHM6Ly93d3cud2FzaGluZ3RvbnBvc3QuY29tL3dvcmxkLzIwMjEvMDgvMjcvbW9zdC1ldmVyeW9uZS1nZXRzLWNvcm9uYXZpcnVzLXZhY2NpbmUtYXJtLWJ1dHQtdGhpcy1icmF6aWxpYW4tY2l0eS1pcy1zaG9vdGluZy1sb3dlci8_dXRtX2NhbXBhaWduPXdwX3RvX3lvdXJfaGVhbHRoJnV0bV9tZWRpdW09ZW1haWwmdXRtX3NvdXJjZT1uZXdzbGV0dGVyJndwaXNyYz1ubF90eWgmd3Btaz0xIn0.EFM_NzTDb74Gk3eFdGhlWyPhxvUE0wWtBbpbpQ4Yae0

Quote

“I didn’t understand why almost no one in Joinville was posting vaccine photos,” editorial assistant Ana Siedschlag said in a tweet that went viral. “Until I found out that almost everyone (including me) WAS TAKING THE VACCINE IN THE BUNDA.”

The article has some lighthearted puns in addition to the news. 

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3 hours ago, kokotg said:

Hmm. Waning immunity vs. Delta ruins everything. This guys comes down strongly in favor of the latter and says we need to slow down re: boosters because of it:

https://insidemedicine.bulletin.com/537599687311876/?fbclid=IwAR3R_-gM-WatKZGMtCWIhD8P0CjDMeVEWyy5Bclq54LAMqUZA1b32_ce428

It's an interesting perspective, but I think there's a bit of hubris in stating "with confidence" that waning immunity isn't a thing, based on data from a few selected states in the US. IMO he's making some fairly simplistic assumptions about very complex data. Even if he's correct that cases increased at a similar rate  in younger age groups as well as over 65s, that doesn't eliminate the possibility of waning immunity. For example, it's possible that cases increased in younger, more recently-vaccinated age groups primarily because of greater social interaction and riskier behavior + Delta, while increased cases in the elderly may be due to waning immunity + Delta, rather than an increase in riskier behavior. 

He claims that waning antibody levels don't matter in terms of immunity, but if the "superantigen" theory is correct and Delta has the ability to evade T cells, then his claim that antibody levels don't matter goes out the window. 

I'm confused by the part where he says that we should "study whether a Delta-specific booster might perform better than either the original two-dose series, or better than a 3rd dose of the original vaccine. We have time to learn whether half or full doses of these boosters would provide all the protection we need but with fewer adverse events." Since that's exactly what the Pfizer and Moderna booster trials have done, I don't understand his point here. 

I don't know, on one side I see data showing that immunity against actual disease does seem to be waning, and data showing that boosters are highly effective in increasing antibody levels and would most likely also increase protection against disease, and on the other side I see people saying "meh, it might not be a big deal, we really don't know," and I feel like it makes more sense to come down on the side of being proactive (for once!) rather than waiting to see if things get much worse before deciding to do something about it.

 

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7 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

It's an interesting perspective, but I think there's a bit of hubris in stating "with confidence" that waning immunity isn't a thing, based on data from a few selected states in the US. IMO he's making some fairly simplistic assumptions about very complex data. Even if he's correct that cases increased at a similar rate  in younger age groups as well as over 65s, that doesn't eliminate the possibility of waning immunity. For example, it's possible that cases increased in younger, more recently-vaccinated age groups primarily because of greater social interaction and riskier behavior + Delta, while increased cases in the elderly may be due to waning immunity + Delta, rather than an increase in riskier behavior. 

He claims that waning antibody levels don't matter in terms of immunity, but if the "superantigen" theory is correct and Delta has the ability to evade T cells, then his claim that antibody levels don't matter goes out the window. 

I'm confused by the part where he says that we should "study whether a Delta-specific booster might perform better than either the original two-dose series, or better than a 3rd dose of the original vaccine. We have time to learn whether half or full doses of these boosters would provide all the protection we need but with fewer adverse events." Since that's exactly what the Pfizer and Moderna booster trials have done, I don't understand his point here. 

I don't know, on one side I see data showing that immunity against actual disease does seem to be waning, and data showing that boosters are highly effective in increasing antibody levels and would most likely also increase protection against disease, and on the other side I see people saying "meh, it might not be a big deal, we really don't know," and I feel like it makes more sense to come down on the side of being proactive (for once!) rather than waiting to see if things get much worse before deciding to do something about it.

 

Yeah, I've definitely been team boosters ASAP...but I also recognize that my personal perspective as someone who doesn't want to get covid (and who still has an unvaccinated kid) might be different from the public health perspective. I'm still lining up for a third dose as soon as I can, but since it's not clear that that will happen particularly soon (Moderna here), I do like that some people think I don't need to worry about it yet anyway. But I'm also not clear on what he sees as the downside of third doses sooner rather than later. Mostly I thought it was interesting...and I like to remind myself that there's still a ton that's up in the air about covid. 

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4 hours ago, bookbard said:

Oy!

I do think it is hard to tell exactly how it was transmitted. Here we see beach parties go on, and a tourist bus will pull up and 50 people spill out. That's just a covid outbreak waiting to happen. I think some of spread that looks like outdoor spread could be linked to transportation but also the shared bathroom spaces. When our state park day use areas have several hundred people during the day, those bathrooms are simply going to be swamped with covid droplets, and no one masks anymore making it exponentially worse. But it is also impossible to discount that the actually infection could have been from the actual outdoor activity. Back in summer 2020, there was an outbreak from a sandbar party at Torch Lake, and public restrooms was not the issue...multiple boats anchored out there bringing in all of those people was likely....pontoon boats that held 12-16 people and those don't have cabins that people spend time in. The whole point is being above deck. The party lasted many hours, and though the portapots on the boats might have been a contributing factor, from the pictures one can see this huge glob of humans practically shoulder to shoulder crammed onto that sandbar. At that time, Michigan was still only seeing cases of the Alpha strain which is exponentially less transmissible than Delta. My guess is we are going to see an explosion of cases in several days linked to all the Labor Day parties.

We launched our sailboat this weekend, just Mark and I alone on the water. The boys went hiking, no groups. Mostly we just look at groups of people as nothing more than ticking time bombs. 

In my county, less then 43% of eligible 12 year olds through adults are vaccinated. No masks. No social distancing. School is five days face on with no contact tracing, and they will not be informing parents of covid numbers nor student exposures. There are literally exactly ZERO precautions being taken, and no virtual school option being offered. It is prudent to assume that everyone around you is a super spreading covid petri dish. 

 

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Trigger warning: skip this post if upsetting Covid news is not what you need to hear at this moment.

 

I just got a call from my wife. Last week the special needs (autism) classroom she works in was shut down because a child in that class (who is too young to be vaccinated) came to school with Covid.

My wife just learned that that student's father, who was unvaccinated, died today of Covid.

That's the reality of this illness. Unfortunately.

My wife is in a state of shock. She knew the dad. Young guy. Very likeable I'm told. Gone.

Bill

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Trigger warning: skip this post if upsetting Covid news is not what you need to hear at this moment.

 

I just got a call from my wife. Last week the special needs (autism) classroom she works in was shut down because a child in that class (who is too young to be vaccinated) came to school with Covid.

My wife just learned that that student's father, who was unvaccinated, died today of Covid.

That's the reality of this illness. Unfortunately.

My wife is in a state of shock. She knew the dad. Young guy. Very likeable I'm told. Gone.

Bill

 

 

Bill, please convey my deepest sympathy to your wife. She is a hero to be working in these conditions with special needs children, and I fear, will spend a good deal of the year trying to comfort her students. I cannot imagine.

 

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33 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Trigger warning: skip this post if upsetting Covid news is not what you need to hear at this moment.

 

I just got a call from my wife. Last week the special needs (autism) classroom she works in was shut down because a child in that class (who is too young to be vaccinated) came to school with Covid.

My wife just learned that that student's father, who was unvaccinated, died today of Covid.

That's the reality of this illness. Unfortunately.

My wife is in a state of shock. She knew the dad. Young guy. Very likeable I'm told. Gone.

Bill

 

 

Oh, that is awful and so sad.  I'm sorry for everyone involved.  😞 

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@Spy Carthat is profoundly sad and feels like a senseless death. It is hard for your wife to see all this hurt and suffering.

That's the cost nobody talks about either...he hundreds of thousands in US and millions of children worldwide who have lost their parent or primary caregiver. That's trauma with long term consequences and for far too many poverty and diminished outcomes/opportunities.

Edited by calbear
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3 minutes ago, Faith-manor said:

Bill, please convey my deepest sympathy to your wife. She is a hero to be working in these conditions with special needs children, and I fear, will spend a good deal of the year trying to comfort her students. I cannot imagine.

 

Thank you. My wife is back home now and completely disconsolate.

She tells me this is the sweetest family. A very lovely wife who is  kind and supportive and she tells me the father who passed was also a great guy. The boy in the class--who has profound autism--is also really sweet and has a neurotypical older brother who totally looks out for him.

A heavy day in our household.

Bill

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2 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Thank you. My wife is back home now and completely disconsolate.

She tells me this is the sweetest family. A very lovely wife who is  kind and supportive and she tells me the father who passed was also a great guy. The boy in the class--who has profound autism--is also really sweet and has a neurotypical older brother who totally looks out for him.

A heavy day in our household.

Bill

I am so very, very sorry. 

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DD says the university where she works has vaccination mandates for everyone, students, professors, and all staff. Everyone is to be masked unless in their own room or office. There isn't of course masking mandates off campus. They are testing on some rotation every couple of days and breakthrough delta cases are showing up. 

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4 hours ago, Spy Car said:

Trigger warning: skip this post if upsetting Covid news is not what you need to hear at this moment.

I just got a call from my wife. Last week the special needs (autism) classroom she works in was shut down because a child in that class (who is too young to be vaccinated) came to school with Covid.

My wife just learned that that student's father, who was unvaccinated, died today of Covid.

That's the reality of this illness. Unfortunately.

My wife is in a state of shock. She knew the dad. Young guy. Very likeable I'm told. Gone.

Bill

Oh, that is terrible 😞 . I'm so sorry. 

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5 hours ago, Spy Car said:

Trigger warning: skip this post if upsetting Covid news is not what you need to hear at this moment.

 

I just got a call from my wife. Last week the special needs (autism) classroom she works in was shut down because a child in that class (who is too young to be vaccinated) came to school with Covid.

My wife just learned that that student's father, who was unvaccinated, died today of Covid.

That's the reality of this illness. Unfortunately.

My wife is in a state of shock. She knew the dad. Young guy. Very likeable I'm told. Gone.

Bill

 

 

I'm so sorry. As the parent of a child (adult, actually) with severe autism, I really feel for this family.

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33 minutes ago, Longtime Lurker said:

I'm so sorry. As the parent of a child (adult, actually) with severe autism, I really feel for this family.

Me too. My wife has been sharing stories and photos she's taken of the little boy who lost his Dad today. 

The whole thing is so utterly tragic. 

Bill

 

 

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5 hours ago, Starr said:

DD says the university where she works has vaccination mandates for everyone, students, professors, and all staff. Everyone is to be masked unless in their own room or office. There isn't of course masking mandates off campus. They are testing on some rotation every couple of days and breakthrough delta cases are showing up. 

I guess the question is whether these breakthrough cases are spreading to others and causing any kind of outbreak in that setting. I have a kid in a university with similar measures (though I don't know about testing other than when they arrive), and I'm realizing that cases will inevitably happen because people do things off campus, go to work, visit family, etc. What will make the difference in how comfortable I (and my kid) feel will be whether those people who test positive are causing spread on campus. It does seem likely they might transmit to their roommate(s), but I'm hoping we'll find not usually to people just in classes or hallways or whatever.

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6 hours ago, Starr said:

DD says the university where she works has vaccination mandates for everyone, students, professors, and all staff. Everyone is to be masked unless in their own room or office. There isn't of course masking mandates off campus. They are testing on some rotation every couple of days and breakthrough delta cases are showing up. 

People eat unmasked generally. And, there’s always off-campus life. 

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10 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

People eat unmasked generally. And, there’s always off-campus life. 

Also, if a school has a music program, that's another potential source of spread. Masking for wind instruments is only partially effective because the player has to breathe in, not just out, and while you can use masks with holes and cover openings on the instruments, wind instrumentalists typically breathe in through the mouth unless they're circular breathing, which isn't standard. I'm particularly concerned about schools doing marching band this fall. 

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21 hours ago, Dmmetler said:

Also, if a school has a music program, that's another potential source of spread. Masking for wind instruments is only partially effective because the player has to breathe in, not just out, and while you can use masks with holes and cover openings on the instruments, wind instrumentalists typically breathe in through the mouth unless they're circular breathing, which isn't standard. I'm particularly concerned about schools doing marching band this fall. 

Ds's college is doing a half time show with no choreography except from the masked color guard. They form a huge line facing forward with about 12ft between players and percussion, masked, forming a second line. Masked director on a ladder very far away, and he also uses a face shield. Stadium is only 20% capacity, mandatory and strictly enforced masks required which has pissed off the locals. Sports participation required vaccines as did on campus housing. Masking on campus indoors except when eating and inside dorm room, financial penalties and disciplinary action for not complying. 73% of the student body and 80+% of faculty and staff are vaxed. So it seems okay. But in my mind, I am still very worried, and vaxed ds is not going to attend a single game.

All four of Ds's suite mates are vaxed, and he says they are champion maskers. Until it gets really cold out, they are meeting for dinner and eating outside. Their campus is beautiful, and on one of the hills, Great Lake views abound. So it is definitely pleasant. But when it gets really nasty out, he is going to start ordering his food to go from one of the dining halls and take it back to his room which means earing a lot of cold food all winter.

Individual wind instrument and singing lessons are being done with masked and face shield instructor, student behind a plexiglass three sided cove, and  Hepa filters the school bought last fall and unless the student has a medical exemption, the professor can refuse to give lessons inside to unvaxed students. I don't know what they are doing for voice.

The high schools are doing let it rip. Sigh. They are no even trying. The local band director quit and they couldn't get a new one, so I guess that is a default "protection".

Edited by Faith-manor
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36 minutes ago, Faith-manor said:

Ds's college is doing a half time show with no choreography except from the masked color guard. They form a huge line facing forward with about 12ft between players and percussion, masked, forming a second line. Masked director on a ladder very far away, and he also uses a face shield. Stadium is only 20% capacity, mandatory and strictly enforced masks required which has pissed off the locals. Sports participation required vaccines as did on campus housing. Masking on campus indoors except when eating and inside dorm room, financial penalties and disciplinary action for not complying. 73% of the student body and 80+% of faculty and staff are vaxed. So it seems okay. But in my mind, I am still very worried, and vaxed ds is not going to attend a single game.

All four of Ds's suite mates are vaxed, and he says they are champion maskers. Until it gets really cold out, they are meeting for dinner and eating outside. Their campus is beautiful, and on one of the hills, Great Lake views abound. So it is definitely pleasant. But when it gets really nasty out, he is going to start ordering his food to go from one of the dining halls and take it back to his room which means earing a lot of cold food all winter.

Individual wind instrument and singing lessons are being done with masked and face shield instructor, student behind a plexiglass three sided cove, and  Hepa filters the school bought last fall and unless the student has a medical exemption, the professor can refuse to give lessons inside to invaded students. I don't know what they are doing for voice.

The high schools are doing let it rip. Sigh. They are no even trying. The local band director quit and they couldn't get a new one, so I guess that is a default "protection".

the state U here is doing football like there's no COVID, except for masks in the stands being theoretically required (but if you have a drink or a hot dog in your hands, you're exempt). Full marching band with choreo, and lots of practice. 

 

Somehow, I feel like masks being required on campus isn't going to help those band kids much....

 

One of the local high school band directors died of COVID recently. His band played the show "in his honor" that weekend. 

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This happened over the weekend in my state. ☹️

Jefferson County Public Health executive director Dawn Comstock said medical staff working at a mobile vaccine clinic in neighboring Gilpin County, about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of Denver, were yelled at and threatened by people passing by, the Denver Post reported.

“Additional cars drove by screaming obscenities at vaccine staff and throwing garbage at them,” Comstock said. “I will not put the hard-working public health staff in harm’s way.”

Comstock said that a driver ran over and destroyed signs put up around the vaccine clinic’s tent. In a separate incident that day, someone threw an unidentified liquid at a nurse working a different mobile clinic in front of a restaurant.

https://www.outtherecolorado.com/news/colorado-county-covid-vaccine-workers-harassed-over-holiday/article_d38abefc-10e7-11ec-9a9c-c7c7beeb858f.html?fbclid=IwAR3D90XVnEN0x0_c3gXPkW9nXvR01ruoA7ZWmK_53EBadBFlRG3jbwZxy1E

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