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The Vaccine Thread


JennyD

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9 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

The Covid Vaccine Is Free, but Not Everyone Believes That https://nyti.ms/3iccEf1

Screenshot_20210601-144947_NYTimes.jpg

Unsurprising, since they asked for insurance info at 2 of the 3 providers we used.  (The one that didn't was the university that set up a mass vax center.)  People who have deductibles may logically assume they will take a hit.  Messaging needs to be better.

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I have a question.  Maybe dumb, maybe previously asked but I missed it.

We know roughly 5% of the people who get mRNA vaxes will not receive immunity from Covid.

Is it logical to assume that if we experienced definite side effects (like fatigue for a day), we are not among that 5%?

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9 minutes ago, SKL said:

I have a question.  Maybe dumb, maybe previously asked but I missed it.

We know roughly 5% of the people who get mRNA vaxes will not receive immunity from Covid.

Is it logical to assume that if we experienced definite side effects (like fatigue for a day), we are not among that 5%?

Unscientific vocabulary: unfortunately not, as I understand it.  The side effects come from a kind of immediate bodily reaction, whereas the immunity comes through a different mechanism.

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2 hours ago, SKL said:

I have a question.  Maybe dumb, maybe previously asked but I missed it.

We know roughly 5% of the people who get mRNA vaxes will not receive immunity from Covid.

I don’t think it’s quite that straightforward. The 95% reduction in symptomatic cases is relative risk reduction. There could be other reasons other than lack of immunity that someone has a symptomatic breakthrough, like innate immune factors or viral dose. 
 

Since they say that they don’t even know what level of antibodies is protective yet, they can’t even look at antibody results and say for sure that the 5% is because there are 5% of people who did not respond to the vaccine. 

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Posted (edited)

More about myocarditis, from Israel.

https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-health-ministry-finds-some-myocarditis-cases-linked-to-vaccines-669835

Quote

After the ministry received reports on some cases diagnosed closely after a coronavirus vaccination, a committee of experts was appointed to look into the issue. The committee included public health experts specialized in epidemiology, members of the National Center for Disease Control and academics from the Tel Aviv University, Technion- Israel Institute of Technology and Haifa University.

The committee considered all the myocarditis cases between December, when the vaccination campaign started, and May.

Out of the 275 cases reported in the period, some 148 occurred in the aftermath of a dose of the coronavirus vaccine – 27 cases out of 5,401,150 recipients of the first dose and 121 within 30 days after the second dose (out of 5,049,424). Some 11 patients of the former and 60 of the latter suffered from pre-existing conditions.

Many of the cases were reported among men 16-30, and especially ages 16-19. In addition, most of the patients were discharged from the hospital in less than four days, and 95% of the cases were considered mild.

“There is a likelihood of a connection between receiving a second dose of vaccine and the onset of myocarditis in young men aged 16-30,” the group of experts concluded. “The connection is stronger in young people aged 16-19 compared to other ages and it decreases as age increases. In most cases, it is a mild illness that passes within a few days.”

According to the Health Ministry, a recommendation regarding the vaccination for children ages 12-15 will be formulated by the epidemiological team and will be communicated to the ministry’s director general.


More here https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/06/israel-reports-link-between-rare-cases-heart-inflammation-and-covid-19-vaccination

Quote

The COVID-19 vaccine made by Pfizer and BioNTech appears to put young men at elevated risk of developing a heart muscle inflammation called myocarditis, researchers in Israel say. In a report submitted today to the Israeli Ministry of Health, they conclude that between one in 3000 and one in 6000 men ages 16 to 24 who received the vaccine developed the rare condition. But most cases were mild and resolved within a few weeks, which is typical for myocarditis.

I would like to know what “most” means, and what are the outcomes of those that aren’t considered “mild.” Mild here means hospitalized four days or fewer. 🤔

Interesting that so many had preexisting conditions. 
 

Edited by Penelope
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47 minutes ago, Penelope said:

More about myocarditis, from Israel.

https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-health-ministry-finds-some-myocarditis-cases-linked-to-vaccines-669835


More here https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/06/israel-reports-link-between-rare-cases-heart-inflammation-and-covid-19-vaccination

I would like to know what “most” means, and what are the outcomes of those that aren’t considered “mild.” Mild here means hospitalized four days or fewer. 🤔

Interesting that so many had preexisting conditions. 
 

I wonder if younger people with pre-existing conditions, and therefore possibly more risk from Covid, might have been more likely to get vaccinated as soon as possible. If myocarditis is more likely in that population, it would be interesting to compare the risk to them of getting myocarditis to the risk to them if they got Covid.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, SKL said:

I have a question.  Maybe dumb, maybe previously asked but I missed it.

We know roughly 5% of the people who get mRNA vaxes will not receive immunity from Covid.

Is it logical to assume that if we experienced definite side effects (like fatigue for a day), we are not among that 5%?


no

 

having a reaction to vaccine does not guarantee immunity  - having no reaction to vaccine does not mean no immunity

 

ALso

 

“relative risk reduction” was calculated as being around 95%  (what was looked at for reduction of what risk in trials I looked at was very specifically defined — basically was reduced risk of having a severe case — Not Immunity  . Absolute Risk Reduction “ was roughly only around    1%    for the various main vaccines I was following.

 

The 95% was not based on “immunity”  - though perhaps some will have immunity .

And in general a 95% Relative Risk Reduction does not mean what most people think it means. Does not mean 95% of people who take vaccine are now Immune . It’s a  mathematical formula to compare treatment group with control group, or sometimes to compare several treatments to each other - and comparison is based on the trial protocol.  (Some trial could have been looking at immunity, but the ones I read were not.)

 

I recommend spending a while reading about “Absolute Risk Reduction” versus “Relative Risk Reduction.”     I posted a few articles on that some time in past. But I don’t know on what thread . 

 

If you want help finding information about absolute versus relative risk reduction let me know and maybe I can help. I think it is very important to understand.

 

 

 

Edited by Pen
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1 hour ago, Penelope said:

More about myocarditis, from Israel.

https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-health-ministry-finds-some-myocarditis-cases-linked-to-vaccines-669835


More here https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/06/israel-reports-link-between-rare-cases-heart-inflammation-and-covid-19-vaccination

I would like to know what “most” means, and what are the outcomes of those that aren’t considered “mild.” Mild here means hospitalized four days or fewer. 🤔

Interesting that so many had preexisting conditions. 
 

It seems that almost half of the cases were not linked to the vaccine? If it is almost even in vaccinated and not, are we jumping the gun to think it is related to the vaccine. 

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This article is about vaccine misinformation as the biggest hurdle to vaccination, and addresses some of the common ones:

 

Misinformation remains the biggest hurdle as vaccination effort turns to cash incentives

Many of the vaccine reluctant have expressed vague concerns that, perhaps, the trials have simply failed to identify dangerous side effects that will suddenly appear round about the time that most of the population is fully vaccinated.

Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, called those assertions highly unlikely. In the history of vaccines, he noted, side effects have always appeared within two months of administration.

“There are no long-term effects where you find that one year, two years, later your child or you develop some problem that wasn’t picked up initially,” Offit said. “It has never happened.”

That’s not to say that clinical trials, even those with many thousands of participants, will necessarily spot every rare complication. 

As was the case with a very small number of blood clots among the recipients of the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine, it is possible for indications to crop up only when a very wide swath of the general population has been inoculated.

But, especially where the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines — available for longer than Johnson & Johnson doses — are concerned, we’re now way past the point where even very, very rare side effects should be visible.

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3 hours ago, Pen said:


no

 

having a reaction to vaccine does not guarantee immunity  - having no reaction to vaccine does not mean no immunity

 

ALso

 

“relative risk reduction” was calculated as being around 95%  (what was looked at for reduction of what risk in trials I looked at was very specifically defined — basically was reduced risk of having a severe case — Not Immunity  . Absolute Risk Reduction “ was roughly only around    1%    for the various main vaccines I was following.

 

The 95% was not based on “immunity”  - though perhaps some will have immunity .

And in general a 95% Relative Risk Reduction does not mean what most people think it means. Does not mean 95% of people who take vaccine are now Immune . It’s a  mathematical formula to compare treatment group with control group, or sometimes to compare several treatments to each other - and comparison is based on the trial protocol.  (Some trial could have been looking at immunity, but the ones I read were not.)

 

I recommend spending a while reading about “Absolute Risk Reduction” versus “Relative Risk Reduction.”     I posted a few articles on that some time in past. But I don’t know on what thread . 

 

If you want help finding information about absolute versus relative risk reduction let me know and maybe I can help. I think it is very important to understand.

 

 

 

A good article from BMJ summarizing relative risk reduction and absolute risk reduction.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Penelope said:

More about myocarditis, from Israel.

https://www.jpost.com/health-science/covid-health-ministry-finds-some-myocarditis-cases-linked-to-vaccines-669835


More here https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/06/israel-reports-link-between-rare-cases-heart-inflammation-and-covid-19-vaccination

I would like to know what “most” means, and what are the outcomes of those that aren’t considered “mild.” Mild here means hospitalized four days or fewer. 🤔

Interesting that so many had preexisting conditions. 
 

This is an especially good question as Israel has no set definition of "mild" (unlike the UK, whose definition boils down to "not outright preventing usual daily activities" and unlike Penelope's location, which defines it as "fewer than 5 days in hospital"). Thus it would be necessary to look at sciencemag.org's source to find the definition of "mild" they're talking about.

* - Israel does have a largely-set definition of "severe", primarily based on natural oxygenation level of below 90%, but some people in hospital with COVID don't meet that definition, so it doesn't give us much of a clue about how "mild" would be defined.

Edited by ieta_cassiopeia
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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, ieta_cassiopeia said:

This is an especially good question as Israel has no set definition of "mild" (unlike the UK, whose definition boils down to "not outright preventing usual daily activities" and unlike Penelope's location, which defines it as "fewer than 5 days in hospital"). Thus it would be necessary to look at sciencemag.org's source to find the definition of "mild" they're talking about.

* - Israel does have a largely-set definition of "severe", primarily based on natural oxygenation level of below 90%, but some people in hospital with COVID don't meet that definition, so it doesn't give us much of a clue about how "mild" would be defined.

To clarify, it isn’t my location that defines mild that way. When I said “here, mild means...,”  I meant “here” as in the articles I linked, as well as a couple of others. 
 

The articles keep saying the cases are mild while at the same time saying they spend no more than four days in the hospital. 
 

Maybe that is considered “mild” for myocarditis, because the affected people get better. But most of us probably don’t think of something that lands a young person in the hospital as “mild.” 
It sounds like what they mean for myocarditis is that the heart isn’t (probably?) permanently damaged.
ETA now I’m looking at your post again and I’m confused. At the beginning I think you are talking about myocarditis, but then in the second paragraph you are talking about mild Covid. I think that mild will have a different definition depending on the condition and who is defining it.

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, ktgrok said:

It seems that almost half of the cases were not linked to the vaccine? If it is almost even in vaccinated and not, are we jumping the gun to think it is related to the vaccine. 

There will always be some myocarditis. They are saying that when they compare the numbers, the association with the vaccine seems to indicate a causal link. Even if they released all the numbers you’d need to do the analysis, it is complicated.

There is also the fact that the clustering is within a few days of the second dose, and that CDC says they do not see any association of cases after the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. 

Edited by Penelope
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Posted (edited)

Another article on the Israeli study.   

22 minutes ago, Penelope said:

But most of us probably don’t think of something that lands a young person in the hospital as “mild.” 

True, but my purely anecdotal impression is that the standard for hospital admission in Israel is considerably lower than that in the US.  So it's sort of apples and oranges.

My teens are due for their second shots tomorrow and I plan to quiz the doctor on exactly what to watch out for in the coming days. 

Edited by JennyD
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2 hours ago, Penelope said:

To clarify, it isn’t my location that defines mild that way. When I said “here, mild means...,”  I meant “here” as in the articles I linked, as well as a couple of others. 
 

The articles keep saying the cases are mild while at the same time saying they spend no more than four days in the hospital. 
 

Maybe that is considered “mild” for myocarditis, because the affected people get better. But most of us probably don’t think of something that lands a young person in the hospital as “mild.” 
It sounds like what they mean for myocarditis is that the heart isn’t (probably?) permanently damaged.
ETA now I’m looking at your post again and I’m confused. At the beginning I think you are talking about myocarditis, but then in the second paragraph you are talking about mild Covid. I think that mild will have a different definition depending on the condition and who is defining it.

I agree — the word “mild” and the phrase “up to 5 days in the hospital” are not synonymous to me. I don’t think “mild” symptoms should require ANY hospitalization!

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2 hours ago, Penelope said: 
 

The articles keep saying the cases are mild while at the same time saying they spend no more than four days in the hospital 

If the definition is no more than 4 days does that mean they were all hospitalized for at least 1 day or could it be 0 days for some, and if so, how many had 0 days?

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16 hours ago, ktgrok said:

It seems that almost half of the cases were not linked to the vaccine? If it is almost even in vaccinated and not, are we jumping the gun to think it is related to the vaccine. 

Within the young men subgroup it is 5 to 25 times the background rate.  That is pretty strong evidence.  It is diminished to the background rate when you look at the whole group of all vaccinated people because the bulk of those vaccinated are older.  For the young men it's 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 6,000.  If we go off cdc reports of 3 thousandish of the 3 millions kids who were infected with covid developed misc and covid rates remain at their current low levels (less than 5 per 100k per day by me) this is really looking like we shouldn't be going to get that second shot for my ds in that age group.

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Syllieann said:

Within the young men subgroup it is 5 to 25 times the background rate.  That is pretty strong evidence.  It is diminished to the background rate when you look at the whole group of all vaccinated people because the bulk of those vaccinated are older.  For the young men it's 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 6,000.  If we go off cdc reports of 3 thousandish of the 3 millions kids who were infected with covid developed misc and covid rates remain at their current low levels (less than 5 per 100k per day by me) this is really looking like we shouldn't be going to get that second shot for my ds in that age group.

Ok, that makes more sense. 

That said, I'd want to know what the rates of myocarditis is in those infected with Covid, not just MISC, which is a whole other thing. 

This small study found 15% of athletes infected with Covid had myocarditis - a much higher rate than from the vaccine. https://www.bvhealthsystem.org/expert-health-articles/covid-19-and-myocarditis-a-risk-for-athletes

Other link https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/comment/myocarditis-covid-19/

 

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Myocarditis was my biggest reason for getting DS21 vaccinated - his father died from heart failure caused by a virus. Knowing this new info, I'm still glad he got the vaccine. 

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17 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Myocarditis was my biggest reason for getting DS21 vaccinated - his father died from heart failure caused by a virus. Knowing this new info, I'm still glad he got the vaccine. 

I’m so sorry. 🙁 

I can understand seeing it that way, too. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Penelope said:

I’m so sorry. 🙁 

I can understand seeing it that way, too. 

 

Thank you. HIs aunt, his father's sister, is now a heart transplant survivor - she also had heart failure but in her instance they claim it was from untreated thyroid issues. 

Personally, I'm very suspicious that two siblings (only siblings in the family) had heart failure for totally unrelated reaons and it is just a coincidence. But she has never wanted to pursue any genetic testing, and ex DH died before he could. 

DS has been screened by a cardiologist, but will need to continue to be screened every few years for life, in the (likely) event this is a genetic susceptibility. 

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Posted (edited)
57 minutes ago, TCB said:

If the definition is no more than 4 days does that mean they were all hospitalized for at least 1 day or could it be 0 days for some, and if so, how many had 0 days?

Good question! There just isn’t enough information about any of it. 

46 minutes ago, Syllieann said:

Within the young men subgroup it is 5 to 25 times the background rate.  That is pretty strong evidence.  It is diminished to the background rate when you look at the whole group of all vaccinated people because the bulk of those vaccinated are older.  For the young men it's 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 6,000.  If we go off cdc reports of 3 thousandish of the 3 millions kids who were infected with covid developed misc and covid rates remain at their current low levels (less than 5 per 100k per day by me) this is really looking like we shouldn't be going to get that second shot for my ds in that age group.

I want to hear from US surveillance people, too. 
 

The other thing that seems concerning is that the risk seems higher the younger you go, with the highest age 16-19. So what happens in 12-15 year olds? If it is something to do with the vaccine response, and we know that the immune response is even higher in the 12-15 year olds than in the 16-25 year olds, then could the younger teens have a higher risk? 
 

And then we consider that right now, the risk of coming across Covid is much lower than it was, so that the risks of any Covid-related outcome are not what they were a few months ago or a year ago. It seems reasonable to take some time to look at this better. 

40 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, that makes more sense. 

That said, I'd want to know what the rates of myocarditis is in those infected with Covid, not just MISC, which is a whole other thing. 

This small study found 15% of athletes infected with Covid had myocarditis - a much higher rate than from the vaccine. https://www.bvhealthsystem.org/expert-health-articles/covid-19-and-myocarditis-a-risk-for-athletes

Other link https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/comment/myocarditis-covid-19/

 

I think that article is outdated. There are studies suggesting it is no more common than with other viruses, linked somewhere at WTM last week in one or the other of these mammoth threads, I can’t keep track. Which means it certainly does happen, just not like often like they were thinking it might. Still could be higher than the risk due to the vaccine, though.

————

Another article. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/06/israel-detects-link-between-myocarditis-and-covid-vaccine.html

Edited by Penelope
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38 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ok, that makes more sense. 

That said, I'd want to know what the rates of myocarditis is in those infected with Covid, not just MISC, which is a whole other thing. 

This small study found 15% of athletes infected with Covid had myocarditis - a much higher rate than from the vaccine. https://www.bvhealthsystem.org/expert-health-articles/covid-19-and-myocarditis-a-risk-for-athletes

Other link https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/comment/myocarditis-covid-19/

 

Totally fair to compare myocarditis to myocarditis instead of mis-c, but the cases reported after vaccination are all symptomatic, while the studies are a sampling of people that may or may not have had symptoms. One might expect myocarditis rates in the young male subgroup to be higher if we sampled all vaccinated people in that group.  I don't think that's been done yet.  It looks that myocarditis is part of the mis-c buffet of symptoms, so I was kind of using it as a proxy for symptomatic cases in that group, but I agree that it's probably an under-representation of symptomatic  myocarditis from covid infection.

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9 hours ago, ktgrok said:

Thank you. HIs aunt, his father's sister, is now a heart transplant survivor - she also had heart failure but in her instance they claim it was from untreated thyroid issues. 

Personally, I'm very suspicious that two siblings (only siblings in the family) had heart failure for totally unrelated reaons and it is just a coincidence. But she has never wanted to pursue any genetic testing, and ex DH died before he could. 

DS has been screened by a cardiologist, but will need to continue to be screened every few years for life, in the (likely) event this is a genetic susceptibility. 

My friend whose husband got a heart transplant (Heart was damaged by a virus that went rapidly downhill) definitely feels there is a genetic element. His sister also has a heart disease and he lost a parent early to a heart attack.

 

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10 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

https://beta.isdscotland.org/media/9117/2021-06-02_sicsag_report.pdf

No intensive care admissions in Scotland at least 14 days after two jabs (Pfizer and AZ used).  The paragraph about this is on page 40 of the report.

That is wonderful. Our ICU admissions have all been unvaccinated people so far. It surprises me a bit how bummed out this makes me feel, but it is such a shame now there is a way of taming this horrendous virus.

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16 hours ago, vonfirmath said:

My friend whose husband got a heart transplant (Heart was damaged by a virus that went rapidly downhill) definitely feels there is a genetic element. His sister also has a heart disease and he lost a parent early to a heart attack.

 

Yes, my son's cardiologist feels it is genetic, but because they don't know enough about which genes, there is nothing he can do. He would have needed to have his father or aunt tested, to see waht genes they have, that match their clinical presentation, then see if DS has that gene. Otherwise it is a needle in a haystack. 

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Does anybody know of an article addressing ADE and the Covid vaccinations? I’m pretty sure I’ve seen one posted here but can’t find it in the thread.

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1 hour ago, TCB said:

Does anybody know of an article addressing ADE and the Covid vaccinations? I’m pretty sure I’ve seen one posted here but can’t find it in the thread.

This article is the best I've seen in terms of explaining very clearly what ADE is, how it works, and why it isn't an issue with the current covid vaccines. It also contains tons of direct links to scientific references:

https://davidson.weizmann.ac.il/en/online/reasonabledoubt/ade-and-corona-vaccines

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Putting this case series of myocarditis in adolescents, from the US, here. All had chest pain, some with fever, shortness of breath, all admitted to hospital for several days, doing okay with follow-up though follow-ups only mentioned to one week. 
 

Some commentary at the end, there’s more in the link.

Quote

We report 7 cases of clinical myocarditis or myopericarditis that developed in 14- to 19- year-old males within 4 days of receiving the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine with no evidence of acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and who did not fulfill criteria for MIS-C. Extensive diagnostic evaluation for other myocarditis etiologies was negative (Table 2), including respiratory pathogens from nasopharyngeal swabs, serum PCR tests, and infectious serologies. Additionally, all cardiac MRIs were diagnostic for myocarditis based on the modified
Lake Louise criteria rather than MIS-C characteristics described by Blondiaux et al (diffuse myocardial edema without evidence of late gadolinium enhancement)8,9. There was some suggestion of abnormal left ventricular myocardial echocardiographic strain corresponding to regions of myocardial necrosis on cardiac MRI (Patient 3).
All patients in this series had myocarditis or myopericarditis, which is the term for
diagnosis of both myocardial and pericardial inflammation. These terms are often used
interchangeably, which can make surveillance of these diseases challenging. Myocarditis and
pericarditis are rare diseases. The true baseline incidence of myocarditis is unknown and varies
by season, geography, and age: it has been reported to occur in 1.95/100,000 person- years in
children <15 years of age in Finland and in 2.16 cases per 100,000 US military service members
in a 30-day period10. It is more common in males, and among children demonstrates a bimodal
incidence pattern, with peaks at <2 years of age and in adolescence11. An evaluation for potential
viral causes is recommended, although a cause is usually not found12. There have been prior
reports of myocarditis following smallpox vaccination10. In patients with myocarditis, restriction
from competitive sports is recommended for at least 3 months until cleared by a cardiologist in
order to avoid sudden cardiac events while the heart muscle recovers13. Less is known about the
true incidence of pericarditis. Pericarditis can occur in the setting of a variety of infectious and non-infectious illnesses14. In a study of patients ≥16 years of age in Finland, the incidence rate of hospitalizations for acute pericarditis was 3.32/100,000 person-years, with males at higher risk than females15 and in 2007, the incidence of acute pericarditis in one study was 27.2 cases per 100,000 per year16. Treatment for myocarditis and pericarditis may vary considerably depending on the patient characteristics, clinical condition, underlying cause, and physician preference. Consistent with a known male preponderance of myocarditis and pericarditis, all seven of our cases were male10.

The Pfizer-BioNTech clinical trials demonstrated an increased systemic reactogenicity and immunogenicity in younger study participants following mRNA vaccine1. For example, 41.5% of adolescents developed chills after dose #2, compared to 35.1% of subjects 18-55 years of age1. In terms of immunogenicity, an analysis of SARS-CoV-2 50% neutralizing titers 1 month after dose #2 demonstrated higher geometric mean titer (GMT) in children 12-15 years of age (GMT = 1,239.5), compared to subjects 16-25 years of age (GMT = 705.1)1. Adverse events often occurred more frequently after dose #2 and within 2 days following vaccination and included injection site pain, fatigue, myalgia, chills, arthralgia, fever, injection site swelling or redness, nausea, malaise, and lymphadenopathy1. It is possible that myocarditis or myopericarditis may be an additional rare adverse event related to systemic reactogenicity, but currently no causal association has been established between this vaccine and myopericarditis.

 

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22 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

This article is the best I've seen in terms of explaining very clearly what ADE is, how it works, and why it isn't an issue with the current covid vaccines. It also contains tons of direct links to scientific references:

https://davidson.weizmann.ac.il/en/online/reasonabledoubt/ade-and-corona-vaccines

Thanks! That is a really good, clear explanation.

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@wathe do you know anything about so called studies in Canada showing the dangers of Covid vaccinations? Saw something about it on the dreaded FB but no details or links or anything.

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3 hours ago, TCB said:

@wathe do you know anything about so called studies in Canada showing the dangers of Covid vaccinations? Saw something about it on the dreaded FB but no details or links or anything.

Quoting myself to say that it was an interview with a Dr Byram Bridle apparently. He gave an interview saying that the spike protein produced from the mRNA vaccines would itself cause problems. I then read an article about the vaccine spike protein that seems to contradict that. Also found a few studies disputing some of the things he claimed.

https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2021/05/04/spike-protein-behavior

 

https://byrambridle.com/

 

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5 hours ago, TCB said:

@wathe do you know anything about so called studies in Canada showing the dangers of Covid vaccinations? Saw something about it on the dreaded FB but no details or links or anything.

Not until you mentioned it.  

It looks like Byron Bridle is a PhD who teaches at a veterinary college, with experience in vaccine research.

A quick google shows him mentioned on this topic recently in tabloid-y newspapers and christian websites - not the sorts of places I read.  The few interviews I looked at seemed somewhat sensational and lacking references.

I see a few mentions on David Fisman's twitter that debunk Bridle's claims (Fisman is an epidemiologist and actively practising infectious disease specialist who has been super-active in my province's covid response and on social media wrt covid.)

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I didn't believe it, but word is still not out to everyone that Covid vaccines in the US are completely free, no matter where you get them, even if you don't have insurance. [Family member expressed surprise yesterday that they were *free* at Walmart.]

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19 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

I didn't believe it, but word is still not out to everyone that Covid vaccines in the US are completely free, no matter where you get them, even if you don't have insurance. [Family member expressed surprise yesterday that they were *free* at Walmart.]

It's not surprising to me. As I've said on other threads, there's a lot of people out there that don't watch the news and are happily going about their life free from social media. Not everyone is so clued in on every aspect of the pandemic.

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25 minutes ago, Plum said:

It's not surprising to me. As I've said on other threads, there's a lot of people out there that don't watch the news and are happily going about their life free from social media. Not everyone is so clued in on every aspect of the pandemic.

It's really too bad. The gov't got it together to send everyone letters to explain the stimulus checks, couldn't they have sent everyone a 1-pager explaining the vaccines and that they're FREE? Ugh. 

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4 minutes ago, Kanin said:

It's really too bad. The gov't got it together to send everyone letters to explain the stimulus checks, couldn't they have sent everyone a 1-pager explaining the vaccines and that they're FREE? Ugh. 

Did you get your letter anytime near when you got your stimulus? We got ours months later. lol I can only imagine some people were terrified the IRS made a mistake. 😳

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Oh that reminds me someone on NextDoor asked where their 8 and 14 yo can get vaccinated. I have a feeling there's a lot that only read headlines and even then are only half paying attention.

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1 hour ago, Plum said:

Did you get your letter anytime near when you got your stimulus? We got ours months later. lol I can only imagine some people were terrified the IRS made a mistake. 😳

Ha, true.... it was so long after that I thought, Yay! Another check? But no. 

 

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On 6/2/2021 at 4:26 PM, Penelope said:

To clarify, it isn’t my location that defines mild that way. When I said “here, mild means...,”  I meant “here” as in the articles I linked, as well as a couple of others. 
 

The articles keep saying the cases are mild while at the same time saying they spend no more than four days in the hospital. 
 

Maybe that is considered “mild” for myocarditis, because the affected people get better. But most of us probably don’t think of something that lands a young person in the hospital as “mild.” 
It sounds like what they mean for myocarditis is that the heart isn’t (probably?) permanently damaged.
ETA now I’m looking at your post again and I’m confused. At the beginning I think you are talking about myocarditis, but then in the second paragraph you are talking about mild Covid. I think that mild will have a different definition depending on the condition and who is defining it.

The definition I was using for the UK's of "mild" covers any symptom believed to have been caused by a vaccine (on that system, myocarditis diagnosed as such requires a hospital visit long enough to get the diagnosis and is therefore automatically "severe"). I did not realise you or the articles to which you referred were defining degrees of myocarditis. Sorry for causing confusion.

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Preprint from the Cleveland Clinic saying people who had covid are unlikely to benefit from vaccination. Wow. I wish they would test those that had it for antibodies before giving them the vaccine. Feel free to pick it apart. Maybe we'll see more studies like this come out, maybe we won't. 

Quote

 

Conclusions Individuals who have had SARS-CoV-2 infection are unlikely to benefit from COVID-19 vaccination, and vaccines can be safely prioritized to those who have not been infected before.

Summary Cumulative incidence of COVID-19 was examined among 52238 employees in an American healthcare system. COVID-19 did not occur in anyone over the five months of the study among 2579 individuals previously infected with COVID-19, including 1359 who did not take the vaccine.

 

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.06.01.21258176v2

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1 hour ago, Plum said:

Preprint from the Cleveland Clinic saying people who had covid are unlikely to benefit from vaccination. Wow. I wish they would test those that had it for antibodies before giving them the vaccine. Feel free to pick it apart. Maybe we'll see more studies like this come out, maybe we won't. 

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.06.01.21258176v2

Every time I read one of these, I’m blown away by how well these vaccines are working:

Of the 2154 SARS-CoV-2 infections during the study period, 2139 (99.3%) occurred among those not previously infected who remained unvaccinated or were waiting to get vaccinated, and15 (0.7%) occurred among those not previously infected who were vaccinated.” !!

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When most people haven’t had corona, and when it takes time and money to test for antibodies, it seems like it’s probably more practical to have a policy of vaccinating everyone rather than testing for antibodies first.  Plus you don’t want people skipping the vaccine without proof of antibodies, but I think even more people would do so if they thought that their random nasty cold a year ago meant they didn’t need a vaccine. 
 

You could  test for antibodies only in people who had confirmed cases, but that wouldn’t speed things up in most of the world. In many countries, it’s pretty much accepted that confirmed cases are vastly below actual cases. In my current country, less than two percent of the population has had a confirmed case.

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1 hour ago, Amira said:

When most people haven’t had corona, and when it takes time and money to test for antibodies, it seems like it’s probably more practical to have a policy of vaccinating everyone rather than testing for antibodies first.  Plus you don’t want people skipping the vaccine without proof of antibodies, but I think even more people would do so if they thought that their random nasty cold a year ago meant they didn’t need a vaccine. 
 

You could  test for antibodies only in people who had confirmed cases, but that wouldn’t speed things up in most of the world. In many countries, it’s pretty much accepted that confirmed cases are vastly below actual cases. In my current country, less than two percent of the population has had a confirmed case.

Sure. In the beginning when vaccines were in short supply, wouldn’t it have made more sense to put people who had a positive covid test on a later tier? So many HCW already had it. It’s not a surprise to me many are waiting. That alone would have sped things up. 

Or offer it as an alternative to the vaccine and give them a stamp and ask them to come back in X months. As it is right now, it only counts if you get the vaccine and we don’t have true numbers of natural antibody immunity. 

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