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40 minutes ago, TCB said:

@Lanny Have a look at the information about the AstraZeneca vaccine @Laura Corin posted earlier. It seems to show very good protection against serious illness and hospitalization.

It's worth noting that the UK started vaccination with the very oldest people plus health care workers, so the concerns that AstraZenica didn't include enough over-65s in their trials may no longer be an issue, as these data must cover them.

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I’m getting the Pfizer vaccine on Monday! I’m prepping myself for some side effects, so am glad I’ll have a few days to recover before Christmas.

My health care provider called me today and said my turn has come to get the vaccine and I'd be able to get my first shot of Moderna on Monday. I literally broke into tears of joy.  Bill

My dd works at a grocery store and people have actually shared their positive test results as she's bagging their groceries, as in, "I tested positive 3 days ago." More than once.

On 2/15/2021 at 1:18 AM, mathnerd said:

3 of my friends in Austin got their shots last week (under 50 years of age) and they do not have health risks. Apparently, there is not much demand for vaccines over there and it was available to them.

That's--strange. I live in the Austin area and everyone I know of trying to get a shot is signing up everywhere, trying to get in. There is a lot of frustration at the lack of access.

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Anyone know if the Moderna shot has an effect on sugar for diabetics?  I think I read that is the case for Pfizer.

My dad had the 1st dose of the Moderna shot in late January.  The next time he went to the doctor, his sugar level had shot up to almost 500 (way, way higher than it had ever been).  So they changed his medication and put him on a very restricted diet.

He is due to have the 2nd dose of the vax very shortly.  Should we expect more problems?

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12 minutes ago, SKL said:

Anyone know if the Moderna shot has an effect on sugar for diabetics?  I think I read that is the case for Pfizer.

My dad had the 1st dose of the Moderna shot in late January.  The next time he went to the doctor, his sugar level had shot up to almost 500 (way, way higher than it had ever been).  So they changed his medication and put him on a very restricted diet.

He is due to have the 2nd dose of the vax very shortly.  Should we expect more problems?

Anything that activates the immune system makes my blood sugar levels go wonky, and I know the app I use has a place to flag for illness, etc. I'll have to see what mine do after Friday. I know a friend of mine had her only side effect being that her Apple watch reported a spike in heart rates about 24 hours after each shot. 

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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

My kid had to write an essay about whether or not kids / teens should get the Covid vax, and I was reviewing it for her.  We found the following article, which suggests that maybe vaccines developed for adults are not ideal for kids.  Thoughts?

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200923/children-have-better-covid-immune-response

I think it would definitely be interesting for them to try developing a vaccine that works in that way and test how it works. I didn’t see anything in that article suggesting that this meant the vaccines we have at this point aren’t ideal for kids, though. It only mentioned that their innate immune response seems to work differently than adults and that this might be something to study in case it could lead to better vaccines. Which again, I think would be interesting and valuable to study. I actually took it to mean that it would be valuable to study in case those vaccines would be a way to help adults’ immune systems respond more like kids do to the virus. But they might also have just meant in general.

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59 minutes ago, SKL said:

My kid had to write an essay about whether or not kids / teens should get the Covid vax, and I was reviewing it for her.  We found the following article, which suggests that maybe vaccines developed for adults are not ideal for kids.  Thoughts?

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200923/children-have-better-covid-immune-response

Interesting article, but I agree with kand that their point is not that vaccines designed for adults are not ideal for kids, but rather that looking at how kids' immune systems respond might help us design better vaccines for adults. They seem to be suggesting that instead of focusing just on generating antibodies, we should look at ways to boost adult levels of interleukin and interferon gamma, since children have better immune responses in part because they have higher levels of those.

Edited by Corraleno
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4 hours ago, Corraleno said:

Interesting article, but I agree with kand that their point is not that vaccines designed for adults are not ideal for kids, but rather that looking at how kids' immune systems respond might help us design better vaccines for adults. They seem to be suggesting that instead of focusing just on generating antibodies, we should look at ways to boost adult levels of interleukin and interferon gamma, since children have better immune responses in part because they have higher levels of those.

I thought that might be a possible interpretation of one of the sentences, but I also think that the article as a whole indicates a different approach is appropriate for kids.

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3 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

We’ll Have Herd Immunity by April - WSJ

What do you guys think of this? 

 

From his lips to God's ear! 

I believe it is more wishful thinking than anything else, but the combination of Spring and the vaccine will hopefully continue the decline in cases we're seeing. I know my area has gone from being in the 90's on that Kinsa tool to being in the 50's, which is awesome. I don't think we will be able to reach herd immunity by April because a big chunk of the population cannot be vaccinated at all because they are below age 16, so even if all adults are able to get the vaccine in March/April if they want it, and we get to herd immunity percentages there, it can still spread among kids and keep circling-even if it is less likely to be severe. 

 

If a couple of the trials in kids pan out, hopefully we can get vaccine for everyone who wants it by Fall, and let school start in September with a lot fewer concerns about social distancing. Although I hope the "keep your child home if they have symptoms" and the flexibility for jobs that can be done at home to have the option to be done at home at least sometimes stays. And I am thinking that I will probably continue masking to teach during cold and flu season and running an air purifier in my studio, because honestly, I've been healthier this year than in any prior year! 

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, SKL said:

My kid had to write an essay about whether or not kids / teens should get the Covid vax, and I was reviewing it for her.  We found the following article, which suggests that maybe vaccines developed for adults are not ideal for kids.  Thoughts?

https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200923/children-have-better-covid-immune-response

True. This is why under-16s aren't getting vaccinated yet - 12-16 is deemed to require separate tests, then 6-12 is allowed to have separate tests start, then under-6s, and the correct protocol is assumed to be potentially different in all three cases compared to adults. (Incidentally, it's also why people who are pregnant can't be vaccinated in the UK yet in most cases - pregnant women have to be tested separately too due to unborn babies reacting differently to people who have already been born).

 

It is also why the UK hasn't yet approved OxfordAstraZeneca for the 16/17-year-old crowd. Pfizer included enough people of those ages in their Phase III tests, OxfordAstraZeneca did not.

 

Testing is happening, but it will be some time before we know if, and how much, modification is needed to give children protection. This is important because I think the endgame for this will be having a childhood injection (perhaps with a booster), followed by a recommendation of up-to-date boosters just before going to countries where COVID-19 is still a thing (similar to rabies) or a compulsory vaccination against whichever variants happen to be extant in the locality to which someone wishes to travel (similar to yellow fever).

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A thought inspired by another thread:

If it's advisable to get only 1 shot after you've had actual Covid, is anyone testing people to see if they've had Covid before administering the shot?  Seems that is something they should do.  Like maybe perform a Covid antibody test right before giving the first jab.  Then if they have antibodies, cancel the appointment for the second jab.

I also hear people saying it is stupid to get the vax when you have Covid, but is anyone doing a rapid Covid test before giving the jab? 

Considering how common it is for people of all ages to have mild or no symptoms with Covid, it would seem logical to do this, unless there is some information I am missing.

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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

A thought inspired by another thread:

If it's advisable to get only 1 shot after you've had actual Covid, is anyone testing people to see if they've had Covid before administering the shot?  Seems that is something they should do.  Like maybe perform a Covid antibody test right before giving the first jab.  Then if they have antibodies, cancel the appointment for the second jab.

I also hear people saying it is stupid to get the vax when you have Covid, but is anyone doing a rapid Covid test before giving the jab? 

Considering how common it is for people of all ages to have mild or no symptoms with Covid, it would seem logical to do this, unless there is some information I am missing.

No. That would slow the process down. (And the antibody test is pretty involved)

They are asking if you have had COVID -- so relying on if you know.

I believe the idea is, (for adults) if your infection was so mild you didn't even realize you were sick, then you need the vaccination anyway.

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13 minutes ago, SKL said:

If it's advisable to get only 1 shot after you've had actual Covid, is anyone testing people to see if they've had Covid before administering the shot?  Seems that is something they should do.  Like maybe perform a Covid antibody test right before giving the first jab.  Then if they have antibodies, cancel the appointment for the second jab.

That is exactly what was being recommended by an infectious disease doc on this podcast (which is worth listening to, btw) -- give everyone a first shot, then run a quick antibody test during the 15 minute wait.  If it comes back positive you're done, no need for a second appointment.  According to him, at least, the technology exists to do this.

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16 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

No. That would slow the process down. (And the antibody test is pretty involved)

They are asking if you have had COVID -- so relying on if you know.

I believe the idea is, (for adults) if your infection was so mild you didn't even realize you were sick, then you need the vaccination anyway.

The science is changing on this, though - experts were initially advising covid recovered people to still get both shots, but recently changed to advising only 1. Our friend is both a health care researcher and a convalescent plasma donor who still has antibodies 7 months later, and kinda suspects the advice will change again. 

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Pfizer and Moderna pledge a massive vaccine surge - The Washington Post

Vaccine makers Pfizer and Moderna pledge massive boost to U.S. supply after sluggish rollout

Drug companies told lawmakers Tuesday that they project a major increase in vaccine deliveries that will result in 140 million more doses over the next five weeks, saying they have solved manufacturing challenges and are in a position to overcome scarcity that has hampered the nation’s fight against the coronavirus.

“Because of the dire need to vaccinate more people, we have ramped up production of doses,” John Young, Pfizer’s chief business officer, told the House Energy and Commerce oversight and investigations subcommittee in prepared testimony.

But achieving a surge on that scale remains daunting. Pfizer and Moderna, the companies with the only authorized vaccines so far, will need to increase their combined deliveries to date of 75 million doses to reach their promised target of 220 million shots by March 31.

That’s a goal of 28 million doses each week on average, far greater than their performance so far. The Biden administration said last week that doses allotted to states would grow from 11 million to 13.5 million per week, and it also directed 2 million doses to pharmacies, part of allocations that are expected to increase modestly again this week.

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5 hours ago, JennyD said:

That is exactly what was being recommended by an infectious disease doc on this podcast (which is worth listening to, btw) -- give everyone a first shot, then run a quick antibody test during the 15 minute wait.  If it comes back positive you're done, no need for a second appointment.  According to him, at least, the technology exists to do this.

One of the advantages of using vaccines that specifically target the spike protein is that you can distinguish an immune reaction to the vaccine from an immune reaction to the actual virus, by testing for a different protein (N protein) that the body produces in response to viral infection.

This is also one of the ways researchers are looking to measure post-vaccine transmission rates, by testing pre- and post-vaccine blood samples for the presence of the N protein.

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3 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I never knew! I have been so busy reading about the South African variant and how ineffectual the vaccines are against it that I had not been paying any attention to this one. I am getting the feeling that this variant is all over the country by now if it is so entrenched in CA.

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3 minutes ago, mathnerd said:

I never knew! I have been so busy reading about the South African variant and how ineffectual the vaccines are against it that I had not been paying any attention to this one. I am getting the feeling that this variant is all over the country by now if it is so entrenched in CA.

Well, given the way it spread like wildfire through California and that rates in the rest of the country are going down, I suspect it is NOT in fact spread through the rest of the country yet.  But I think it's inevitable that it will.  

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3 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

Pfizer and Moderna pledge a massive vaccine surge - The Washington Post

Vaccine makers Pfizer and Moderna pledge massive boost to U.S. supply after sluggish rollout

Drug companies told lawmakers Tuesday that they project a major increase in vaccine deliveries that will result in 140 million more doses over the next five weeks, saying they have solved manufacturing challenges and are in a position to overcome scarcity that has hampered the nation’s fight against the coronavirus.

“Because of the dire need to vaccinate more people, we have ramped up production of doses,” John Young, Pfizer’s chief business officer, told the House Energy and Commerce oversight and investigations subcommittee in prepared testimony.

But achieving a surge on that scale remains daunting. Pfizer and Moderna, the companies with the only authorized vaccines so far, will need to increase their combined deliveries to date of 75 million doses to reach their promised target of 220 million shots by March 31.

That’s a goal of 28 million doses each week on average, far greater than their performance so far. The Biden administration said last week that doses allotted to states would grow from 11 million to 13.5 million per week, and it also directed 2 million doses to pharmacies, part of allocations that are expected to increase modestly again this week.

One of the bottlenecks in vaccine production was actually a shortage of vials and syringes. Vaccine manufacturers overfill their vials in case of spillage or waste, so many healthcare providers were finding that they could often get 6 doses out of a Pfizer vial, even though the vial only "officially" contained 5. But in order to get 6 doses they needed a special syringe, and those were also in short supply. The current administration invoked the DPA to increase the supply of both vials and the special syringes, and they are now guaranteeing that the correct syringes will be shipped with vaccine vials. So now Pfizer is allowed to count each vial as 6 doses, and that is actually part of where the "increased supply" comes from — the ability to get more doses out of each vial.

Moderna uses larger vials, which I think officially include 10 doses, but may have another dose or two that can be extracted with the correct syringes. They don't fill their vials completely, though, and they have asked the FDA for permission to put 15 doses in each vial, saying that this could greatly speed up vaccine delivery. There are some concerns though about whether puncturing the seal that many times could cause issues as well as whether having that many doses in one vial may lead to more waste by increasing the number of "leftover" doses.

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FDA Says Johnson & Johnson's Covid Vaccine Has a 'Favorable Safety Profile' (msn.com)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration found that a Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine was 66.1% effective in preventing moderate to severe virus disease, and that it had a “favorable safety profile.”

 

Health authorities expect the initial supply of the J&J vaccine will help ease, though not eliminate, the frustration felt by people unable to sign up for shots because there aren’t enough doses available.

J&J has said it would deliver about 20 million doses for U.S. use by the end of March, which may be enough to boost the countrywide capacity for completed vaccinations by about 20%.

In the U.S. alone, the vaccine was 72% effective, J&J said. The shot wasn’t as effective in South Africa alone, where a new and more transmissible variant of the virus has emerged. There, the vaccine was 57% effective.

Those companies’ trial results, however, occurred largely before new variants are known to have emerged.

J&J has said it expects to ship 100 million doses throughout the U.S. by late June and to supply more than one billion doses world-wide during 2021.

Pfizer and Moderna have committed to supplying enough doses by the end of July to vaccinate 300 million people in the U.S.

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51 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

FDA Says Johnson & Johnson's Covid Vaccine Has a 'Favorable Safety Profile' (msn.com)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration found that a Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine was 66.1% effective in preventing moderate to severe virus disease, and that it had a “favorable safety profile.”

 

Health authorities expect the initial supply of the J&J vaccine will help ease, though not eliminate, the frustration felt by people unable to sign up for shots because there aren’t enough doses available.

J&J has said it would deliver about 20 million doses for U.S. use by the end of March, which may be enough to boost the countrywide capacity for completed vaccinations by about 20%.

In the U.S. alone, the vaccine was 72% effective, J&J said. The shot wasn’t as effective in South Africa alone, where a new and more transmissible variant of the virus has emerged. There, the vaccine was 57% effective.

Those companies’ trial results, however, occurred largely before new variants are known to have emerged.

J&J has said it expects to ship 100 million doses throughout the U.S. by late June and to supply more than one billion doses world-wide during 2021.

Pfizer and Moderna have committed to supplying enough doses by the end of July to vaccinate 300 million people in the U.S.

I saw that. 
i personally would decline this vaccine. Hopefully younger and healthier people wouldn’t mind it. 

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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

I saw that. 
i personally would decline this vaccine. Hopefully younger and healthier people wouldn’t mind it. 

I wonder how things will work with that?   Do they tell you when you get to the appointment which one you are getting?  Would they tell you before hand?   

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Coronavirus infection leads to immunity that's comparable to a COVID-19 vaccine (msn.com)

Among a group of hundreds of thousands of Americans who tested positive for a SARS-CoV-2 infection, the risk of developing a subsequent infection more than three months later was about 90% lower than for people who had not been previously infected and therefore had no immunity to the virus, according to researchers from the National Cancer Institute.

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1 hour ago, mommyoffive said:

I wonder how things will work with that?   Do they tell you when you get to the appointment which one you are getting?  Would they tell you before hand?   

I don’t know. 😞 

I will ask though. This simply isn’t enough protection. I know it’s better than nothing,  it i would rather wait for a better vaccine. 

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4 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

I don’t know. 😞 

I will ask though. This simply isn’t enough protection. I know it’s better than nothing,  it i would rather wait for a better vaccine. 

I don’t feel thrilled about it either, but I did feel a little better when I looked at the 28 day data. It’s quite a bit better than the 14 day data. I’m thinking it should be used for younger people with no comorbidities. They did have two people in the vaccine arm hospitalized for Covid, both of which had hypertension and obesity.

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5 minutes ago, kand said:

I don’t feel thrilled about it either, but I did feel a little better when I looked at the 28 day data. It’s quite a bit better than the 14 day data. I’m thinking it should be used for younger people with no comorbidities. They did have two people in the vaccine arm hospitalized for Covid, both of which had hypertension and obesity.

Hopefully when they approve it, they won’t approve it for people with certain medical conditions. 

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21 hours ago, Terabith said:

Well, given the way it spread like wildfire through California and that rates in the rest of the country are going down, I suspect it is NOT in fact spread through the rest of the country yet.  But I think it's inevitable that it will.  

And this is what is SO infuriating about people traveling for vacations,parties, etc around the country. By say, going on a trip to disneyland you risk bringing home a variant from there to your own hometown. Then someone visits your hometown for a family reunion or wedding, and they spread it to their hometown, etc. 

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4 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

FDA Says Johnson & Johnson's Covid Vaccine Has a 'Favorable Safety Profile' (msn.com)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration found that a Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine was 66.1% effective in preventing moderate to severe virus disease, and that it had a “favorable safety profile.”

This is the part that bothers me. That is not how all the other vaccines report efficacy. I want to see their data and know how many people in the vaccine arm had mild illnesses, since even mild illness can lead to long-term complications. And since most covid cases are mild, J&J's efficacy rate could be significantly lower than what they are reporting.

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The rollout has started here.  In the first week one doctor accidentally administered 4x the recommended dose to two patients which was picked up by the nurse practitioner.  Neither of them are suffering any extra side effects thankfully but it’s probably the last thing we need as public trust in the vaccine program is already quite low.

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6 hours ago, mommyoffive said:

I wonder how things will work with that?   Do they tell you when you get to the appointment which one you are getting?  Would they tell you before hand?   

 

4 hours ago, Roadrunner said:

I don’t know. 😞 

I will ask though. This simply isn’t enough protection. I know it’s better than nothing,  it i would rather wait for a better vaccine. 

In a press release from a county supersite by me, it stated that you are not given a choice (at least at that time, which about 2-3 weeks ago). I believe you are told after receiving it so that you are scheduled for the next in the series from that brand. They were using both Moderna and Pfizer and were eagerly looking to add the J&J vaccine.

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6 minutes ago, Elfknitter.# said:

 

In a press release from a county supersite by me, it stated that you are not given a choice (at least at that time, which about 2-3 weeks ago). I believe you are told after receiving it so that you are scheduled for the next in the series from that brand. They were using both Moderna and Pfizer and were eagerly looking to add the J&J vaccine.

Are you telling me if I show up they won’t tell me which one they are injecting me with? Well then I will decline until it’s commercially available. That’s crazy.

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When I went on to make an appointment, most of the places listed the vaccine name. I mean, they need that name for the second vaccines.

Does anybody know if, when a person who has had covid (diagnosed by testing + symptoms) goes to get a vaccine, are they told there is no need for a second one? I read that only one is needed here and elsewhere, but was wondering if that has become the practice everywhere? (Not asking for me, but for a friend.)

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7 minutes ago, Roadrunner said:

Are you telling me if I show up they won’t tell me which one they are injecting me with? Well then I will decline until it’s commercially available. That’s crazy.

I can only vouch for this particular site. As of 2 weeks ago, this is what they wrote:

Quote

Depending on when you’re vaccinated, you could get the J&J vaccine, or Pfizer or Moderna. 

 With limited supplies, you won’t be able to pick which one you get.

(Bolding is theirs.)

Based on that, if I had a preference, I'd wait to see my doctor's office or talk to a pharmacy.

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1 hour ago, Roadrunner said:

Are you telling me if I show up they won’t tell me which one they are injecting me with? Well then I will decline until it’s commercially available. That’s crazy.

You have to sign a consent form before they inject you and it will say which one.

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1 hour ago, Jaybee said:

When I went on to make an appointment, most of the places listed the vaccine name. I mean, they need that name for the second vaccines.

Does anybody know if, when a person who has had covid (diagnosed by testing + symptoms) goes to get a vaccine, are they told there is no need for a second one? I read that only one is needed here and elsewhere, but was wondering if that has become the practice everywhere? (Not asking for me, but for a friend.)

I got mine a week and a half ago, when I signed up it said I'd get Pfizer, but when I got there they said they had no Pfizer it was Moderna.  Which isn't a problem for me.  It is a problem for people I know with qualifying 16 and 17 year olds who have been turned away from scheduled appointments because the place said they had Pfizer but only had Moderna.  

I was asked if I'd had covid, I think, but since I said no, I can't tell you what they would have done if I'd said yes.

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On 2/23/2021 at 9:33 AM, Roadrunner said:

Today they announced a NY variant of the virus:  B.1.526

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.14.431043v2.article-info

 

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1 hour ago, mathnerd said:

Today they announced a NY variant of the virus:  B.1.526

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.14.431043v2.article-info

 

You know, a friend kept telling me all along - it’s not what states do and don’t do as much as which variant they all have. I have been moping about CA situation for a while. Now we know why it was so bad. 

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48 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

Just what NY needs, lol. Do they know much about it? 

Not yet. They just figured this out.

Most top medical research universities are working on this problem and it has taken so many months to identify that the reason an area has been afflicted so badly is due to a new mutation of the virus. Not to mention government agencies and private sector drug research companies that also have their own data to analyze. I am wondering how they can speed up the identification of these new strains and come up with modified vaccines in an efficient and timely manner.

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1 hour ago, Not_a_Number said:

Just what NY needs, lol. Do they know much about it? 

They know where the mutations are, the full preprint is here:
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.14.431043v2.full.pdf+html

The NY variant appears to have the same E484K mutation as all the other variants, and this is the mutation (or one of the mutations) that seems to enable the variants to evade antibodies. NYT has an excellent explanation of the mutations in the different variants and the effect of each one, although it doesn't include the NY variant yet: 
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/health/coronavirus-variant-tracker.html

One glimmer of hope is that Moderna has already developed an updated version of their vaccine to be more effective against the SA variant, and "A small amount of vaccine has been sent to the National Institutes of Health for a trial to determine whether boosting humans with the modified vaccine will stimulate a strong immune response." If that works agains the SA variant, maybe it will work against the other variants with the same E484K mutation? Story here:
 https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2021/02/24/coronavirus-covid-live-updates-us/

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