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Book a Week 2020 - BW48: Ladies of Fiction Bookology - Rumer Godden


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Happy Sunday, my lovelies. For the month of December we honor those who died on December 7, 1941 in Pearl Harbor, celebrate St Nicolas Day on the 6th, the beginning of Winter on the 21st, as well as Festivus, the all important Christmas book flood Jólabókaflóð, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and Boxing day.

We also are celebrating our Ladies of Fiction Bookology author of the month, Rumer Godden, writer of literary fiction novels, children's books, short stories, and poetry. Several of her books including Black Narcissus have been made into films and Television.  She resided and worked in both England and India and moved to Scotland the last years of her life to live with her daughter. Her last novel was published in 1998 before she passed away on November 8, 1998.

There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.

Read one or more books written by the author.

Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.

 

Learn more about Rumer through Rosie Thomas: rereading the India novels by Rumer Godden,  Reviving Rumer Godden’s classicsBritish Summer Reads For Catholic Kids: Rumer Godden, and Publisher Weekly's compilation of reviews .

~Cheers and happy reading! 

 

Have you given any more thought to authors or genres you'd like to see highlighted for 2021?  Attached is the 52 Books Bingo for next year as well as a proposed reading plan for Count of Monte Cristo with a breakdown for fast, average, and take your time readers. 

 

Link to week 47

 

Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers  around the globe.

2021 52 books bingo.pdf 2021 Count of Monte Cristo read page breakdown.pdf

Edited by Robin M
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Well I am beyond excited today for a reason only book people will understand. "My" branch of our county library system was in the middle of moving to a new, larger building when everything shut d

Thank you so much, Melissa. You're so kind and sweet.  If you (or anyone else here) is interested, here's a link to my Good Reads page, although I believe that we are already friends there. 

Happy Sunday, my lovelies. For the month of December we honor those who died on December 7, 1941 in Pearl Harbor, celebrate St Nicolas Day on the 6th, the beginning of Winter on the 21st, as well as F

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We watched yet another reboot of Spiderman last night with Andrew Garfield.  Excellent, excellent movie and imho Garfield is the best spidey and told the story much more convincingly, versus the other two guys.  Had more plot and science.

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I finally finished Lab Girl by Hope Jahren. I don't know why it took me so long to finish; I liked the book. I made myself finish it before beginning my next Terry Pratchett book, Wyrd Sisters.

Current reads: Twelve Days of Christmas by Debbie Macomber - audiobook; Wyrd Sisters -Terry Pratchett, print

I'm also working on setting up my new Commit30 journal and working on my reading strategy. I've gotta have a strategy in 2021 although my reading for 2020 has been wonderful; not like 2018 when I had few 4 & 5 star reads.

 

I do have two questions(one is probably annoying and has an answer somewhere that I cannot find the other a long shot).

For the Book Bingo - is there a place where the explanations are for the categories?

Long shot - years ago, someone on this thread recommended a book she reads every Christmas/New Year. It was about a couple of children going on an adventure. I remember reading it, loving it, and thinking I would never forget it. Well, I forgot the title. I want to read it again this year and would love it if someone here could remind me of the title or author.

I only began keeping a reading log and using Goodreads in 2017 so any library or borrowed books I read prior to that are lost in time. 

--

Edit: I think I answered my own question. The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper.

Edit #2: I read it on Christmas 2017 and it is the last book entered in my journal for that year.

Edited by The Accidental Coach
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I read Tell Me Everything by Cambria Brockman.  Has anyone read this?  What did you think?

For homeschooling we are reading the Anne of Green Gables series and loving it.  We are presently reading Rilla of Ingleside.  💕We are also reading Savvy by Ingrid Law. I really think the author is a talented writer and it is a very well put-together book.  I highly recommend it for all ages. Now, I’m just seeing that she has written other books. 😄
 

 

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I finished The Evening and the Morning by Follett https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49239093-the-evening-and-the-morning and am still having a bit of a book hangover......it was wonderful.  I loved it on audio and plan to continue on with the rest of the Kingsbridge series on audio in the new year.

I am almost done with Death of a Maiden which is the last book in the Mistress of Death serie by Ariana Franklin which has been a favorite of mine.  This book is written by her daughter and really hasn’t completely caught my interest.  Sort of a finish for the knowledge I read them all as opposed to a page turner. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/37868557-death-and-the-maiden It will fill spots in two of my 10x10’s so that is a bonus!

Listening to Nicola Upson’s Two for Sorrow https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10465494-two-for-sorrow?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=M3ZT1Dw8ob&rank=1  She is an author I have used for U’s in the past and need an U author for my A to Z by author.  The writing is good, the story compelling but grim!  That is why I only listen to then on an as needed basis.  Baby farming in forties London.  Blech!🤮

 

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3 hours ago, theelfqueen said:

I've read In This House of Brede (everyone read this, it's wonderful) and Black Narcissus (sort of disturbing) by Rumer Godden.

Thanks! I plan to read THoB next and save Black Narcissus for next year.

3 hours ago, Penguin said:

In This House of Brede looks great for my 10x10 Good Catholic/Bad Catholic category. I saw the movie Black Narcissus and it was quite disturbing.

Another excellent literary novel with a nun as the main character is Mariette in Ecstasy by Ron Hansen. 

Great! Mariette in Ecstasy looks good. Added it to my virtual stacks for my 10x10 Get thee to a Nunnery category.  Is there a big difference between the book and the movie? I like 1947 dramas and other movies made during that era, They are so much more intense.

3 hours ago, The Accidental Coach said:

I finally finished Lab Girl by Hope Jahren. I don't know why it took me so long to finish; I liked the book. I made myself finish it before beginning my next Terry Pratchett book, Wyrd Sisters.

Current reads: Twelve Days of Christmas by Debbie Macomber - audiobook; Wyrd Sisters -Terry Pratchett, print

I'm also working on setting up my new Commit30 journal and working on my reading strategy. I've gotta have a strategy in 2021 although my reading for 2020 has been wonderful; not like 2018 when I had few 4 & 5 star reads.

 

I do have two questions(one is probably annoying and has an answer somewhere that I cannot find the other a long shot).

For the Book Bingo - is there a place where the explanations are for the categories?

Long shot - years ago, someone on this thread recommended a book she reads every Christmas/New Year. It was about a couple of children going on an adventure. I remember reading it, loving it, and thinking I would never forget it. Well, I forgot the title. I want to read it again this year and would love it if someone here could remind me of the title or author.

I only began keeping a reading log and using Goodreads in 2017 so any library or borrowed books I read prior to that are lost in time. 

--

Edit: I think I answered my own question. The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper.

Edit #2: I read it on Christmas 2017 and it is the last book entered in my journal for that year.

Love Debbie Macomber's Angel series. This one looks good and will have to read soon.  

In regards to Bingo, I pretty much leave them open to interpretation.  When I highlight them throughout the year, will provide links to book lists and ideas.  But if you want to know more,  I can kind of tell you what was in my mind at the time.  Are there any specific ones you want to know? 

 

9 minutes ago, Teaching3bears said:

I read Tell Me Everything by Cambria Brockman.  Has anyone read this?  What did you think?

For homeschooling we are reading the Anne of Green Gables series and loving it.  We are presently reading Rilla of Ingleside.  💕We are also reading Savvy by Ingrid Law. I really think the author is a talented writer and it is a very well put-together book.  I highly recommend it for all ages. Now, I’m just seeing that she has written other books. 😄
 

 

Hmm, I haven't read Cambria Brockman's story but it does look interesting. I'll have to check out Ingrid Law. Her Guys Read series looks good. 

 

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8 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

I finished The Evening and the Morning by Follett https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49239093-the-evening-and-the-morning and am still having a bit of a book hangover......it was wonderful.  I loved it on audio and plan to continue on with the rest of the Kingsbridge series on audio in the new year.

I am almost done with Death of a Maiden which is the last book in the Mistress of Death serie by Ariana Franklin which has been a favorite of mine.  This book is written by her daughter and really hasn’t completely caught my interest.  Sort of a finish for the knowledge I read them all as opposed to a page turner. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/37868557-death-and-the-maiden It will fill spots in two of my 10x10’s so that is a bonus!

Listening to Nicola Upson’s Two for Sorrowhttps://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10465494-two-for-sorrow?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=M3ZT1Dw8ob&rank=1  She is an author I have used for U’s in the past and need an U author for my A to Z by author.  The writing is good, the story compelling but grim!  That is why I only listen to then on an as needed basis.  Baby farming in forties London.  Blech!🤮

 

Nuts, you ladies are totally tempting me today.  I love historical fiction set in the 1st century or earlier.  I'll add it to my wish list. Hubby loves buying me chunky books for Christmas.  Good thing I like reading them.  LOL! 

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Thanks as always for the thread and inspiration Robin! I've missed a week or two of posting but am always reading (and adding to my to-read list).

I've only ever read one Rumer Godden so far - a lovely Christmas storybook call The Story of Holly and Ivy. (Link is to Goodreads.) The illustrations are by one of my favorites, Barbara Cooney.  I read it to my kids every year for a long time. After a few years my son was "too old" for it but we would find him listening in even if he appeared not to be engaged with us. I don't know why I've never looked for more books by her.

Somehow I messed up quoting; this is related to Accidental Coach's post below. I am also working on my reading strategy/plans. I am reading too much fluff and not getting enough nourishment from my reading. I did read the Bible in full this year, and don't plan to do that next year (though I will read it, just not the whole thing), but mostly it was just random fiction. I did read some good books, but also some very mediocre ones and some I really could have done without. I'm also trying to think of a way to record my books and thoughts on them. I have been using Goodreads to track, which is fine, but I am not good at keeping a "commonplace book" in a notebook. I thought about just starting a word file but that seems kind of dull. I've thought about starting a private blog. Anyone know of a good place online, similar to Goodreads but more of a place for recording thoughts and such? 

For reading this week, I completed The Warden by Anthony Trollope for a book group. This is the first book in the Chronicles of Barsetshire series. I had previously read the next book, Barchester Towers; I had read somewhere that The Warden was dull and not to bother. Well, it was not dull and I'm glad I bothered. Anyway, I enjoyed it so much I just moved on to Barchester Towers for a re-read and anticipate completing the series.

I am detouring into Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger, as it just arrived via Overdrive and I've been waiting a long time for it. 

3 hours ago, The Accidental Coach said:

<snip>

I'm also working on setting up my new Commit30 journal and working on my reading strategy. I've gotta have a strategy in 2021 although my reading for 2020 has been wonderful; not like 2018 when I had few 4 & 5 star reads.

<snip>

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I have a few more books to get through my alphabet.  I still haven't found anything for J or X.  I did finish Grave Wars by Kalayna Price.  The reread prior to the release helped me out with the gap in publishing.  

As for Pearl Harbor, I have the interactive edition of the book Second to the Last to Leave that I have yet to read.  The kids and I watched the ceremony last year when Lauren Bruner was interred aboard the USS Arizona. 

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Some bookish posts ~

Reading list: 23 female TED speakers tell us about the books that shaped them

https://ideas.ted.com/reading-list-23-female-ted-speakers-tell-us-about-the-books-that-shaped-them/are

Rachel Hickman recommends the best Novels Set in Wild Places

https://fivebooks.com/best-books/wild-places/

The Best Narrative Nonfiction

https://fivebooks.com/best-books/catherine-manegold-narrative-non-fiction/

Regards,

Kareni

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Still reading the Rembrandt Affair by Silva. 

Listening to Murder at Chelsea by Thompson.

Rumer Godden sounds interesting. I have so little time to read that it's frustrating. Maybe I start with the Christmas story since we are nearly in December.

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The Kitchen Madonna is a sweet Rumer Godden story.

Miss Happiness and Miss Flower is a children's story about two dolls. This one was published in a ladies' magazine when my mother was younger; she saved the magazine pages because she liked the story so much. It has been republished recently.

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Hello! Since I last listed books read, I’ve reached a total of 212. Oh, and I submitted the video of my reading for the Moby-Dick marathon I mentioned last week! (Link here.) I am currently reading Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Ruth Klüger’s Still Alive, “an unforgiving memoir of growing up Jewish in Nazi-occupied Vienna and escaping death in a concentration camp.” (NYT, October 16, 2020) 

 Lakewood (Megan Giddings; 2020. Fiction.)
Terrific premise; lackluster prose. Review here.

 Disappearing Earth (Julia Phillips; 2019. Fiction.) 
This, on the other hand, was gorgeously told. Review here.

 Parable of the Sower (Octavia Butler; 1993. Fiction.) 
Ordered the sequel after only three chapters. Related article about this prescient novel here.

 On Immunity: An Inoculation (Eula Biss; 2014. Non-fiction.) 
The following passage (Chicago Tribune; September 1, 2020) prompted me to pick up some of Biss’ work:

To read Eula Biss is to remind yourself that you are relatively illiterate, have never had a clear thought in your life, can’t compose a decent sentence if you tried and should probably just shut up and go into marketing already. Or so I’ve heard. Is this the smartest writer in the Chicago area right now, on this day, in the late summer of 2020? Years ago, before Aleksandar Hemon left Chicago to teach at Princeton University, there may have been an argument. This is a parlor game, after all. But still, who else in the Chicago area, sentence for sentence, thought for thought, writes with more confidence, accessibility and provocation than Eula Biss?

For a number of (perhaps obvious) reasons, I began with On Immunity. She’s remarkable. Review here; interview here.

 Theory of Bastards (Audrey Schulman; 2014. Fiction.) 
Review here. No question, one of the most memorable books I’ve read this year.

 Devolution (Max Brooks; 2020. Fiction.) 
Well, it’s no World War Z, but it was a pleasant enough evening of reading. Review here.

 New Boy (Tracy Chevalier; 2017. Fiction.) 
Part of the Hogarth Shakespeare series, this retelling of Othello is set in an elementary school. While some may think the premise strains credulity , I think it works well, almost too well.

 Miracle Creek (Angie Kim; 2019. Fiction.) 
This appeared on a number of best-of lists last year. While I thought it was an engaging courtroom drama, I’m not sure it reached the heights its appearance on those lists suggests.

 Class Trip (Emmanuel Carrère; 1999. Fiction.) 
The last time I was this unsettled by a work of fiction was on rereading Turn of the Screw.

 Fen (Caryl Churchill; 1983. Drama.) 
Read to prepare for the third “Theatre & Thought” series presented by the Court Theatre and the University of Chicago, Caryl Churchill’s Fen and the Dramaturgical Process.


Postscript: After reviewing last week’s thread, I wanted to know if anyone has heard from Negin. As always, I appreciate Robin’s efforts on behalf of this longtime group of readers, but I also know that even a well-worded, well-intentioned request can feel like a reproach. So virtual hugs to Negin and to Robin and to all BaWers.

Edited by Melissa M
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On 11/29/2020 at 2:25 PM, Robin M said:

 

 

 

 a proposed reading plan for Count of Monte Cristo with a breakdown for fast, average, and take your time readers. 

 

2021 Count of Monte Cristo read page breakdown.pdf 124.63 kB · 6 downloads

I know I missed a lot of the threads this entire year but is there a readalong planned for The Count of Monte Cristo? I love that book and was contemplating a reread. I'd love to join in if we're planning to read it together.

 

20 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I finished The Evening and the Morning by Follett https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49239093-the-evening-and-the-morning and am still having a bit of a book hangover......it was wonderful.  I loved it on audio and plan to continue on with the rest of the Kingsbridge series on audio in the new year.

 

Follett is hit or miss for me but this one sounds really interesting so I added it to my Want to Read on GR. It must be quite popular. My library has 52 print copies, 4 audio book copies, and 9 ebook copies. All copies in all formats are checked out! It's the same for the out of state library I pay to belong to. They have 32 audio book and 55 ebook copies all checked out! They don't list print copies for people who have an e-card because we can only check out ebooks and audio books, but I'd be willing to bet their print copies are also all checked out. I'm guessing it's because it was only released a few months ago but it still caught me by surprise to see a wait list for so many copies in all editions.

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I've been reading a lot but not finishing much besides audio books.

I recently finished the audio book edition of Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How it Changed the World. I highly recommend it even if you don't really want to read pandemic type books. It was a really good mix of science, history, and sociology and if you want to know what we're doing right and what we're doing wrong with Covid-19, just read this. We've already done all the right and wrong things. It also discusses future pandemics though mostly that means flu pandemics. This was published in 2017 so it refers to the Ebola epidemic of 2014 but of course Covid wasn't even on the author's radar. 

Before that I listened to George, Nicholas, and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I - I read this thanks to @Dreamergalwho talked about it a while back. I enjoyed it and while the narration was good, there were times I had to go back and re-listen. The narrator with her perfectly posh RP accent could sometimes drone on and on. I would suddenly realize I missed a big chunk of the current chapter and had to go back and start over. That means it took me longer than it should have to finish it, but I still enjoyed it. (It was a library audio book and actually went back once. Fortunately no one had a hold on it so I could check it right back out).

Because I wasn't finishing anything besides audio books I decided to read a play just to be able to have finished something that wasn't on audio. I read Oscar Wilde's A Woman of No Importance. I also finished Shakespeare's The Rape of Lucrece. I actually had almost finished it and put it aside because poetry, especially in Elizabethan English, really isn't my thing. Apparently I started reading it in January 2019! I'm glad I didn't do a Goodreads goal for 2020 because now I don't have to feel bad about adding to my numbers with something I read mostly last year.

I am STILL reading The Romanovs, but we're at Nicholas II now so there's light at the end of the book tunnel. I'm also still reading Can You Forgive Her?, the first of Trollope's Palliser novels, and a reread of Mansfield Park. My current audio book is Our Mutual Friend by Dickens. This is one of his that I not only haven't read, but didn't know anything about the storyline going in. I'm enjoying it very much especially as it's read by one of my favorite narrators, Simon Vance.

I've been working on a few goals to finish out 2020 and starting on my 2021 reading goals. 

I've missed you all in these threads! 2020 has been quite a year. I hope to get back to posting regularly now, and definitely in 2021.

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30 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

I know I missed a lot of the threads this entire year but is there a readalong planned for The Count of Monte Cristo? I love that book and was contemplating a reread. I'd love to join in if we're planning to read it together.

Yeah and waving hi and happy to see you. Was about to send out the posse. 😁  There are a few people who have expressed interest. so yes, we plan to read together and start the first week in February.  We'll figure out waypoints to discuss depending on how fast we read. If the 12 week plan is too daunting, can go with the 24. 

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18 hours ago, melmichigan said:

I have a few more books to get through my alphabet.  I still haven't found anything for J or X.  I did finish Grave Wars by Kalayna Price.  The reread prior to the release helped me out with the gap in publishing.  

As for Pearl Harbor, I have the interactive edition of the book Second to the Last to Leave that I have yet to read.  The kids and I watched the ceremony last year when Lauren Bruner was interred aboard the USS Arizona. 

Ideas for J authors - J.R. Ward, J.D. Robb, Jessie Mihalik.   X - Qui Xiaolong who writes chinese detective mystery which are really good. 

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1 hour ago, Lady Florida. said:

Follett is hit or miss for me but this one sounds really interesting so I added it to my Want to Read on GR. It must be quite popular. My library has 52 print copies, 4 audio book copies, and 9 ebook copies. All copies in all formats are checked out! It's the same for the out of state library I pay to belong to. They have 32 audio book and 55 ebook copies all checked out! They don't list print copies for people who have an e-card because we can only check out ebooks and audio books, but I'd be willing to bet their print copies are also all checked out. I'm guessing it's because it was only released a few months ago but it still caught me by surprise to see a wait list for so many copies in all editions.

For me I think Evening and the Morning might be the best one of the bunch.  As you know I love British History and this book made a rather unexplored by many time period really come alive. I am really having a hard time resisting the urge to jump into Pillars which I read years ago.  I really need to finish my 2020 challenges as I actually think I can, if I don’t get sidetracked!  

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1 hour ago, Penguin said:

@Melissa MI really want to thank you for introducing me to Theater of War productions. I think I have participated three times now. They do stellar work.

I’ll have to check out Court Theater. Fen looks interesting.

Oh, how wonderful! I’m glad you’re enjoying Theater of War (ToW). What wonderful work they do!
 

That said, the Court Theatre is setting the standard for producing excellent and topical content that works in virtual settings. I have enjoyed the first two Thought & Theatre programs greatly. In fact, given how much you’ve enjoyed ToW, let me suggest you check out the program on Euripides’ The Bacchae. In my opinion? The reading they gave in the third meeting actually outdoes ToW. (I believe one can purchase the archived programs.)

The Deep Dive on Tom Stoppard’s newest play was also terrific. Hey, and since I’m on the topic of the Court (so, by extension, UChicago), I just RSVPed (I know, not a verb) to the free first Friday lecture on modern retellings of the Iliad. This may also interest you: https://grahamschool.uchicago.edu/events/basic-program-liberal-education-adults/first-friday-lecture-modern-retellings-iliad/dec-4-2020

Edited by Melissa M
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21 hours ago, marbel said:

Somehow I messed up quoting; this is related to Accidental Coach's post below. I am also working on my reading strategy/plans. I am reading too much fluff and not getting enough nourishment from my reading. I did read the Bible in full this year, and don't plan to do that next year (though I will read it, just not the whole thing), but mostly it was just random fiction. I did read some good books, but also some very mediocre ones and some I really could have done without. I'm also trying to think of a way to record my books and thoughts on them. I have been using Goodreads to track, which is fine, but I am not good at keeping a "commonplace book" in a notebook. I thought about just starting a word file but that seems kind of dull. I've thought about starting a private blog. Anyone know of a good place online, similar to Goodreads but more of a place for recording thoughts and such? 

My reading plans went by the way side as well and I ended up reading too much fluff too.  Getting back into the deeper stuff now.  I keep lists of books on my shelf want to read and books read on my personal blog at www.mytwoblessings.com.    I share with my son who likes to do comic reviews which really helps when I don't have time to post.   Blogger is easy and free and you can keep private if you choose. Plus keep notes or reviews. 

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On 11/29/2020 at 5:02 PM, Penguin said:

@Robin MI never read Black Narcissus, only saw the movie, so I don’t know. I’ll be interested to see what other nunnery books you choose!

I'm including nuns, priests, and monks, So far I in my stacks I have Jane Christmas's And Then There were Nuns, Sarah Dunant's Sacred Hearts,  Black Narcissus, The Monk, Ellis Peters, One Corpse too Many, Stendhal's the Red and the Black, and Aimee Thurlo's Bad Faith , Mariette in Ecstasy and  Macomber's Twelve Days of Christmas .

19 hours ago, Liz CA said:

Rumer Godden sounds interesting. I have so little time to read that it's frustrating. Maybe I start with the Christmas story since we are nearly in December.

I hope more reading time opens up for you, especially during Christmas holidays and beyond. 

10 hours ago, LAS in LA said:

The Kitchen Madonna is a sweet Rumer Godden story.

Miss Happiness and Miss Flower is a children's story about two dolls. This one was published in a ladies' magazine when my mother was younger; she saved the magazine pages because she liked the story so much. It has been republished recently.

Welcome and glad you dropped in. Sweet story about your mother. Will have to check out the story. 

6 hours ago, Melissa M said:

Postscript: After reviewing last week’s thread, I wanted to know if anyone has heard from Negin. As always, I appreciate Robin’s efforts on behalf of this longtime group of readers, but I also know that even a well-worded, well-intentioned request can feel like a reproach. So virtual hugs to Negin and to Robin and to all BaWers.

Thank you and yes, I have and still feel badly.  It's uncomfortable being stuck in the middle and trying to balance everyone's needs.  She's joined a non WTM private group and haven't mentioned whether she'll be returning.  I hope she does. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Robin M
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1 hour ago, Robin M said:

Thank you and yes, I have and still feel badly.  It's uncomfortable being stuck in the middle and trying to balance everyone's needs.  She's joined a non WTM private group and haven't mentioned whether she'll be returning.  I hope she does. 

 

 

 

 

 

*gingerly*

I’m disinclined to be perturbed by quoted passages from books others are reading. Isn’t the “no politics” policy meant to ensure that we don’t bait one another or campaign?

I just read Eula Biss’ remarkable exploration of the ongoing conversations surrounding vaccinations. I have no commonplace entries because nearly every sentence she pens is exquisite. But what if I had included some of the quotes regarding the individual’s responsibility to the community? In a program I attended this evening, one of Court Theatre’s dramaturgs spoke with Siân Adiseshiah, who wrote the scholarly work Churchill's Socialism: Political Resistance in the Plays of Caryl Churchill. If I include passages from it after reading it, do I risk offending someone? 

If a poster includes a passage from or link about a book that isn’t my cuppa, either ideologically or stylistically, I don’t become worried or offended; I just keep scrolling. I figured that’s what we all do. I didn’t see what quotes @negin included, but she’s a longtime contributor to BaW, so regardless of the content, it’s unlikely anything in her posts would inspire me to suggest that she delete them. Our ranks were diminished two three years ago over something similar, unless I’m misremembering. It would be a shame to lose anyone else.

 

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3 hours ago, Robin M said:

My reading plans went by the way side as well and I ended up reading too much fluff too.  Getting back into the deeper stuff now.  I keep lists of books on my shelf want to read and books read on my personal blog at www.mytwoblessings.com.    I share with my son who likes to do comic reviews which really helps when I don't have time to post.   Blogger is easy and free and you can keep private if you choose. Plus keep notes or reviews. 

Yes, I have thought about blogger. I have blogged there, and I don't know if I want to set up yet another google account for a new blog that is not "attached" so to speak. I'll have to look into that a bit more. 

There are also google docs but that seems so dull. 

I did order myself a nicer journal than I usually use. I have always just stuck to cheap composition books, which I cover in nice paper so they are prettier, but... so funny, I am not going anywhere these days but I want one that fits in my purse! The comp book is just too big and floppy. 

We'll see. I am just feeling strongly I need to focus on quality rather than quantity this year. Not that I am reading great quantities! It's my typical "end-of-year-what-can-I-do-better-next-year" mood. Since reading is one of my greatest sources of pleasure and destressing, seems appropriate to give it some thought to make it better! 

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I didn't see this until just now, so act quickly!


FREE using Tor link. You need to sign up for Tor’s Book Club if you haven’t already.
Free Tor books are Wayward Children (6 book series).
Book 1 is FREE today only, book 2 is free tomorrow only, book 3 the next day, then 4, and 5. Book 6 is a full price preorder.
Book 1:
Winner: 2017 Hugo Award
Winner: 2017 Alex Award
Winner: 2017 Locus Award
Winner: 2016 Nebula Award
Nominated: 2017 World Fantasy Award
Nominated: 2017 British Fantasy Award

Regards,

Kareni

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2 hours ago, Melissa M said:

*gingerly*

I’m disinclined to be perturbed by quoted passages from books others are reading. Isn’t the “no politics” policy meant to ensure that we don’t bait one another or campaign?

I just read Eula Biss’ remarkable exploration of the ongoing conversations surrounding vaccinations. I have no commonplace entries because nearly every sentence she pens is exquisite. But what if I had included some of the quotes regarding the individual’s responsibility to the community? In a program I attended this evening, one of Court Theatre’s dramaturgs spoke with Siân Adiseshiah, who wrote the scholarly work Churchill's Socialism: Political Resistance in the Plays of Caryl Churchill. If I include passages from it after reading it, do I risk offending someone? 

If a poster includes a passage from or link about a book that isn’t my cuppa, either ideologically or stylistically, I don’t become worried or offended; I just keep scrolling. I figured that’s what we all do. I didn’t see what quotes @negin included, but she’s a longtime contributor to BaW, so regardless of the content, it’s unlikely anything in her posts would inspire me to suggest that she delete them. Our ranks were diminished two three years ago over something similar, unless I’m misremembering. It would be a shame to lose anyone else.

 

Thank you, Melissa and appreciate all your comments. I don't want you to censor anything you say or post.  And don't want you to worry about offending anyone.  It's all a big misunderstanding.  Negin was a bit overenthusiastic with her extensive quotes and it triggered a great deal of discomfort.    I just typed up a long post and ended up losing everything I said which is probably for the best for the moment as I'm a bit peeved by letting myself be put in this position again. None of which is your fault. I'll explain more later. 

 

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I'm processing ladies, so please bear with me.  

If any of our newbies are wondering about 'what happened the last time' I'm going to borrow the words of another BAWer who very succinctly explained our previous schism: 

"There was (and is) a spectrum of opinion on the BaW forum, which of course comes through via the books people choose to read and their reviews. So there had to be a reasonable tolerance of cultural and political discussion once-removed.  One of the readers chose to start sharing her active involvement in progressive causes, including video of her participation in a protest. Objections were made; sides were taken; unfortunate things were said on both sides. Half the group withdrew to a private social group."  

We found our happy place again and have been contented reading away with, as our BAWer said with reasonable tolerance for cultural and political discussion once removed.  I love that.  I'll be using it more in the future, may even make it a quote. 

Recently you may have noticed we lost a few BAWer's.  Due to WTM privacy issues, the fear of an WTM implosion and the ever increasing divisiveness on the chat board which seems to be drawn along political lines, which they found they could no longer ignore or accept,  they found a new happy place to dwell.   I was sorry to see them go, but in turn, I noticed a few old faces reappearing here which kind of takes away the sting of the loss.  They invited me, but I chose to stay here because this is my happy place. 

Remember 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon.  We're all interconnected by our reads, no matter what we read and everything runs smoothly when everyone has that 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon tolerance for political and cultural ideals.  Remember, we're allowed to like what we like and no one is ever wrong.  Aunt Fanny may love erotica, while cousin June may love Horror, while nephew Bobby may only read political theory and it's fun to share what each one learns, while not necessarily reading the same thing.  But sometimes there's TMI and when there's TMI, it upset some sensibilities. 

Negin was a bit overenthusiastic in the eyes of some and over shared,  which made them want to overshare and if they refrained from oversharing, they thought it was only fair, that others follow the same rule.  They put me in the role of mediator which didn't go well.  Which is where we are today and which brings me to the point. 

I don't want any of you to change how you post, what you post, or what you post about. 

Just keep it in mind, Fanny or Junie or Bobby would love to go into great detail and tell you everything there is about Erotica, horror, or political theory, but it would be so overwhelming, we'd all be running around with our fingers in our ears singing la la la.  Please don't put that image in my head.  So my dears, if you have an issue, take it up with that person.  I may host this wonderful group, but I'm by no means a moderator, a censor, or the messenger.  We're all adults and given that we're homeschoolers and have spend years trying to teach our children to communicate, we should be able to communicate effectively with each other rather than going through me.  Next time, I'll just tell you to handle it yourself.  I'm removing myself from the role of mediator. 

With many hugs, love, and appreciation! 

Robin

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On 11/30/2020 at 3:26 PM, Melissa M said:

Postscript: After reviewing last week’s thread, I wanted to know if anyone has heard from Negin. As always, I appreciate Robin’s efforts on behalf of this longtime group of readers, but I also know that even a well-worded, well-intentioned request can feel like a reproach. So virtual hugs to Negin and to Robin and to all BaWers.

Thank you so much, Melissa. You're so kind and sweet. 

If you (or anyone else here) is interested, here's a link to my Good Reads page, although I believe that we are already friends there. 

 

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9 hours ago, Robin M said:

I'm processing ladies, so please bear with me.  

If any of our newbies are wondering about 'what happened the last time' I'm going to borrow the words of another BAWer who very succinctly explained our previous schism: 

"There was (and is) a spectrum of opinion on the BaW forum, which of course comes through via the books people choose to read and their reviews. So there had to be a reasonable tolerance of cultural and political discussion once-removed.  One of the readers chose to start sharing her active involvement in progressive causes, including video of her participation in a protest. Objections were made; sides were taken; unfortunate things were said on both sides. Half the group withdrew to a private social group."  

We found our happy place again and have been contented reading away with, as our BAWer said with reasonable tolerance for cultural and political discussion once removed.  I love that.  I'll be using it more in the future, may even make it a quote. 

Recently you may have noticed we lost a few BAWer's.  Due to WTM privacy issues, the fear of an WTM implosion and the ever increasing divisiveness on the chat board which seems to be drawn along political lines, which they found they could no longer ignore or accept,  they found a new happy place to dwell.   I was sorry to see them go, but in turn, I noticed a few old faces reappearing here which kind of takes away the sting of the loss.  They invited me, but I chose to stay here because this is my happy place. 

Remember 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon.  We're all interconnected by our reads, no matter what we read and everything runs smoothly when everyone has that 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon tolerance for political and cultural ideals.  Remember, we're allowed to like what we like and no one is ever wrong.  Aunt Fanny may love erotica, while cousin June may love Horror, while nephew Bobby may only read political theory and it's fun to share what each one learns, while not necessarily reading the same thing.  But sometimes there's TMI and when there's TMI, it upset some sensibilities. 

Negin was a bit overenthusiastic in the eyes of some and over shared,  which made them want to overshare and if they refrained from oversharing, they thought it was only fair, that others follow the same rule.  They put me in the role of mediator which didn't go well.  Which is where we are today and which brings me to the point. 

I don't want any of you to change how you post, what you post, or what you post about. 

Just keep it in mind, Fanny or Junie or Bobby would love to go into great detail and tell you everything there is about Erotica, horror, or political theory, but it would be so overwhelming, we'd all be running around with our fingers in our ears singing la la la.  Please don't put that image in my head.  So my dears, if you have an issue, take it up with that person.  I may host this wonderful group, but I'm by no means a moderator, a censor, or the messenger.  We're all adults and given that we're homeschoolers and have spend years trying to teach our children to communicate, we should be able to communicate effectively with each other rather than going through me.  Next time, I'll just tell you to handle it yourself.  I'm removing myself from the role of mediator. 

With many hugs, love, and appreciation! 

Robin

As a now only occasional poster, I’ve missed the most recent drama in the larger WTM community, but given that I’ve been active on the boards since 2003, I can imagine. *wry grin* 

On the BaW threads, I tend to focus on the places where interests intersect and to largely ignore the places in which they don’t, an approach of both myriad benefits and potentially grievous limitations, I know. To use your analogy, when I visit Fannie or Bob or June and have a moment to scan their bookcases, I am first just grateful they have bookcases. Isn’t that wonderful? I think. Then I look for books or authors or topics that match books, authors, and topics on my own shelves. So maybe we’re not going to have a meeting of minds over the Left Behind series or Harlequin romances, but we could chat about the Agatha Christie novels or the copy of Kristin Lavransdatter or War and Peace or that wonderful volume of poetry or ... you get the idea.

Because it would never occur to me to ask Bob to cull his romances, the idea that BaW participants would request for posts, even the overly enthusiastic, to be edited or removed continues to startle me. The quotes, the links, the reviews, the personal reflections on how reading has shaped us, how it moves us to act... my conviction has been that a community of readers (and, by extension, thinkers? learners?) can handle views that challenge or conflict with their own. It’s not so much that I’m wrong to think that; it’s more that the issue is far too complex for such a genial approach.

(An aside: What’s sort of humorous about this go-round is that the content this time, I suspect, was the exact political opposite of the content in question three years ago. Funnier still? Well, if reading is, as they say, a political act, our very reading lists tip our hands, don’t they? It’s pretty clear where I fall on spectrum, isn’t it?)

Thank you for your gracious reply here and upthread. I didn’t mean to belabor a point that had already cost you perhaps too much time and thought. My “Why can’t we all just get along?” attitude is naive at best and disingenuous at worst. Color me quiet on the subject.

Unrelated postscript: Thank you for the Dumas reading schedule! Excited!

 

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5 hours ago, Melissa M said:

Because it would never occur to me to ask Bob to cull his romances, the idea that BaW participants would request for posts, even the overly enthusiastic, to be edited or removed continues to startle me. The quotes, the links, the reviews, the personal reflections on how reading has shaped us, how it moves us to act... my conviction has been that a community of readers (and, by extension, thinkers? learners?) can handle views that challenge or conflict with their own. It’s not so much that I’m wrong to think that; it’s more that the issue is far too complex for such a genial approach.

This is why I love you and all my BAWer's.  When I need a thunk on the head, a shoulder, a partner, a listening board, y'all are there with words of wisdom.  This is what I needed to hear, what all need to hear.  We as a book community should be able to 'handle views that challenge or conflict" with our own view."  Although, I do tend to hide my erotica books in a drawer because they aren't exactly living room bookshelf material for all to see.   😉

Quote

An aside: What’s sort of humorous about this go-round is that the content this time, I suspect, was the exact political opposite of the content in question three years ago. Funnier still? Well, if reading is, as they say, a political act, our very reading lists tip our hands, don’t they? It’s pretty clear where I fall on spectrum, isn’t it?)

Yes, the contention this time seems to be the polar opposite.  And generally opposites attract and are never boring. 

Book wise, I think of you as well read and have read so many intriguing books, which expand my world view, and make me think.  You lead me to read literary fiction and actually like it, for which I'll always appreciate. 

 

Quote

Thank you for your gracious reply here and upthread. I didn’t mean to belabor a point that had already cost you perhaps too much time and thought. My “Why can’t we all just get along?” attitude is naive at best and disingenuous at worst. Color me quiet on the subject.

I appreciate everything you said and happen to agree with you on the 'why can't we all just get along' so don't think it's naïve at all.  Most of the time, I try to be Switzerland, but have my moments.  Thanks, doll! 😘

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10 hours ago, negin said:

Thank you so much, Melissa. You're so kind and sweet. 

If you (or anyone else here) is interested, here's a link to my Good Reads page, although I believe that we are already friends there. 

 

Negin, my sweet. Mea Culpa. I never meant for you to delete your review.  If you want to repost, please do. I screwed up and I'm so very sorry.  🙏😘

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Happy December! Today is 'eat a red apple day' which totally reminds of elementary school and giving apples to our teachers. Please join me in a virtual sangria in the garden. 

Apple-Sangria-430x287.jpg

If you subscribe to Blue Mountain, they are offering an online Advent Calendar Cotswold Blue Mountain or bookmark Project Gutenberg's Christmas reads Literary Calendar or make your own literary inspired advent calendar with a Charles Dickens Christmas.

 Five Hippie-ish SF Novels Inspired by Sixties Counterculturehttps://www.tor.com/2020/12/01/five-hippie-ish-sf-novels-inspired-by-sixties-counterculture/#more-623960

True Crime Stories from the Victorian Era

I love this website: Great British Book Club  @mumto2 @aggieamy  Have you seen it? 

Sad:  Ben Bova passed away  Have a few of his books on my shelves. Time to read Orion

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Robin M said:

Happy December! Today is 'eat a red apple day' which totally reminds of elementary school and giving apples to our teachers. 

 

 

Oh, we actually have red apples in the house.  Maybe I'll serve them with dinner if I can find the caramel. :)

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Happy December !

I want to say once again how much I appreciate you having this thread @Robin M

I got my mojo back and I got it by listening to

image.png.598ef673e89c0df7e15d7746b56f2be5.png

I do not have much to say about the content, it is reviewed by people who do that for a living.  I will say was not a big fan of audio books because audio to me is music mostly and I have very little bandwidth for anything else. I was very rigid as in I listen to music, read books and watch movies. But this is the third book that has made me relent a little on that because there is something about listening to someone read a memoir or an account of a portion of their life in their own words that feels more personal than reading their words on a page. The inflection of their voice, their pauses make me get more out of it or I am possibly jumping to conclusions. 🙄. So I will continue to read real books or ebooks but listen to memoirs I think going forward. 

Finished 11 books last week. 8 were re-reads of Julia Quinn Brigerton series

https://juliaquinn.com/series/bridgertons/

I had remnants of 3 books remaining

image.png.60a311d566621a49d14c85451784ca15.png

image.png.29b9829ebf31040270f66b9785853c97.png

image.png.48c1a02b378dcbffacdced0c7656fa25.png

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1 hour ago, Dreamergal said:

Happy December !

I want to say once again how much I appreciate you having this thread @Robin M

I got my mojo back and I got it by listening to

image.png.598ef673e89c0df7e15d7746b56f2be5.png

I do not have much to say about the content, it is reviewed by people who do that for a living.  I will say was not a big fan of audio books because audio to me is music mostly and I have very little bandwidth for anything else. I was very rigid as in I listen to music, read books and watch movies. But this is the third book that has made me relent a little on that because there is something about listening to someone read a memoir or an account of a portion of their life in their own words that feels more personal than reading their words on a page. The inflection of their voice, their pauses make me get more out of it or I am possibly jumping to conclusions. 🙄. So I will continue to read real books or ebooks but listen to memoirs I think going forward. 

RE bolded bit: Well, and the narrator is a master of the well-placed and meaningful pause, no? This memoir was part of my “Jólabókaflóð arrived early this year” haul. I made myself a promise to finish the Mantel trilogy first, though.

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Some bookish posts ~

From the Word Wenches: What We Are Reading!

https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/11/what-we-are-reading.html

Eloisa James on Her Favourite Romance Novels

https://fivebooks.com/best-books/eloisa-james-on-romance-novels/

The best books on Learning Latin recommended by Harry Mount

https://fivebooks.com/best-books/learning-latin-harry-mount/

Regards,

Kareni

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I'm sorry to hear that some members won't be here anymore.  Everyone contributes in their own way, and I've picked up more than one book that I wouldn't have ever considered based on what I read here.

One of my favorite authors has a book on sale right now. Circle of the Moon by Faith Hunter is $0.99 for the ebook.  

@Robin M Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I'm doing A to Z based on book titles. So any of those you'd like to send my way I'd appreciate. (I actually already have those authors on the list.) 😊

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35 minutes ago, melmichigan said:

I'm sorry to hear that some members won't be here anymore.  Everyone contributes in their own way, and I've picked up more than one book that I wouldn't have ever considered based on what I read here.

One of my favorite authors has a book on sale right now. Circle of the Moon by Faith Hunter is $0.99 for the ebook.  

@Robin M Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I'm doing A to Z based on book titles. So any of those you'd like to send my way I'd appreciate. (I actually already have those authors on the list.) 😊

I think J and X are possibly the two hardest for titles as they are always on my scramble to find list at the end of the year.

I used XYZ: a detective story by Anna Katherine Green for this year's X.  It’s a novella and it was actually really enjoyable.  She be a freebie from somewhere.
 

My J was Jingle all the Way by Susan Mallery but I just glance through prior years notes and I used The Jane Auston Project one year and really liked it apparently.

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3 hours ago, melmichigan said:

I'm sorry to hear that some members won't be here anymore.  Everyone contributes in their own way, and I've picked up more than one book that I wouldn't have ever considered based on what I read here.

One of my favorite authors has a book on sale right now. Circle of the Moon by Faith Hunter is $0.99 for the ebook.  

@Robin M Maybe I'm doing it wrong, but I'm doing A to Z based on book titles. So any of those you'd like to send my way I'd appreciate. (I actually already have those authors on the list.) 😊

No, you aren’t doing it wrong. Some are doing by title and/or author.  I’ll see what I can come up with tomorrow and let you know. ❤️

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11 hours ago, Robin M said:

Happy December! Today is 'eat a red apple day'

Ha!  We ended up having red apples and didn't even know it was Red Apple Day.  Sometimes the stars align..... 🙂

In book news, I just finished The Traveling Cat Chronicles.  I'm thinking of gifting it to my young adults who love all things to do with cats and Japan.  My Goodreads Review:

Quote

A delightful, gentle read, not fluffy, but full of simple charm and thoughtful moments. The snarky cat narrator caught my attention (and laughter) from the opening chapter.

 

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So I did a thing yesterday...I downloaded Where The Red Fern Grows as my audiobook for driving. I needed a shorter book and went with what was available on Libby. Considering I am caring for an aging dog and have raging puppy fever my emotions were/are all over the place.  When I arrived at my destination and shared my new audiobook(they know I never drive that far without a book playing), DD looked at me and asked "Why would you do that to yourself?" DSIL has never read it and asked innocently "Where do the red ferns grow?" I couldn't answer right away as I was tearing up.  DGD wanted to know why DD (who is a sympathetic crier) and I were crying and asked if she could read it too. She just turned 9 and, like me, has puppy fever.

Oh, the woes and perils of knowing how the story ends.

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Well I am beyond excited today for a reason only book people will understand.

"My" branch of our county library system was in the middle of moving to a new, larger building when everything shut down. They were to open in May... well that got pushed back.  We have been able to keep ourselves in books via Overdrive and by requesting and picking up from another county library, which is open for short periods, but I miss "my" library and am anxious for it to open.  

Well, they just started opening for 30 minute browsing appointments. I am going today! 

I can't wait to see the new building. I can't wait to do a little browsing (though I do have a list of books I looked up and already know are on the shelves). I can't wait to see what is on the "featured" shelves and the new books shelf. 

The 30 minutes is going to fly by!

 

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On 11/29/2020 at 8:36 PM, marbel said:

Thanks as always for the thread and inspiration Robin! I've missed a week or two of posting but am always reading (and adding to my to-read list).

I've only ever read one Rumer Godden so far - a lovely Christmas storybook call The Story of Holly and Ivy. (Link is to Goodreads.) The illustrations are by one of my favorites, Barbara Cooney.  I read it to my kids every year for a long time. After a few years my son was "too old" for it but we would find him listening in even if he appeared not to be engaged with us. I don't know why I've never looked for more books by her.

Somehow I messed up quoting; this is related to Accidental Coach's post below. I am also working on my reading strategy/plans. I am reading too much fluff and not getting enough nourishment from my reading. I did read the Bible in full this year, and don't plan to do that next year (though I will read it, just not the whole thing), but mostly it was just random fiction. I did read some good books, but also some very mediocre ones and some I really could have done without. I'm also trying to think of a way to record my books and thoughts on them. I have been using Goodreads to track, which is fine, but I am not good at keeping a "commonplace book" in a notebook. I thought about just starting a word file but that seems kind of dull. I've thought about starting a private blog. Anyone know of a good place online, similar to Goodreads but more of a place for recording thoughts and such? 

For reading this week, I completed The Warden by Anthony Trollope for a book group. This is the first book in the Chronicles of Barsetshire series. I had previously read the next book, Barchester Towers; I had read somewhere that The Warden was dull and not to bother. Well, it was not dull and I'm glad I bothered. Anyway, I enjoyed it so much I just moved on to Barchester Towers for a re-read and anticipate completing the series.

I am detouring into Iron Lake by William Kent Krueger, as it just arrived via Overdrive and I've been waiting a long time for it. 

Did you read his This Tender Land? I really liked it!!

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On 11/30/2020 at 4:49 PM, Robin M said:

Yeah and waving hi and happy to see you. Was about to send out the posse. 😁  There are a few people who have expressed interest. so yes, we plan to read together and start the first week in February.  We'll figure out waypoints to discuss depending on how fast we read. If the 12 week plan is too daunting, can go with the 24. 

Robin, please keep me in mind!!! I really want to join this one!!

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