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Tinker or Eureka crates


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I am thinking of asking my mom to get a subscription to one of these for DS10 for Christmas.  I'd love to hear some reviews.  

I'm also wondering about which level to get.  DS10 is a pretty typical in many ways, but he's pretty passionate about building and making, and I wonder if going up to the Eureka makes more sense.  I watched the video on making the automaton on the website, and it seemed like a pretty short project.  He might like something more complicated.   Does anyone have thoughts or experience?  

Or other ideas?  My mom is very generous, but only when she thinks something is educational.  Last year she got him a giant lego robotics kit which he is still enjoying.

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1 minute ago, BaseballandHockey said:

Are they running the sale today?  Thank you for letting me know about this!

Yes.

Promo code MERRY is valid through November 30, 2020 11:59PM PST or while supplies last. Monthly subscription starts at $9.95, 3 month subscription starts at $39.95 ($13.33 per month), 6 month subscriptions start at $79.95 ($13.33 per month), and 12 month subscriptions start at $159.95  ($13.33 per month). Savings based on $19.95 monthly prices. Additional cost for Eureka Crate and Maker Crate. Offer valid cannot be applied to prior purchases, KiwiCo Store, or gift cards. Discounted subscription prices exclude Deluxe add-on and international shipping. Store prices as marked and only available for US Shipping. Quantities are limited. Offer valid on in-stock items only and cannot be applied to prior purchases, books, subscriptions or gift cards.

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My kids have been getting both crates for the last three months.

Tinker and Eureka are certainly different levels; another big difference I have seen is that most of the Eureka projects actually build something useful/usable, while the Tinker projects are cool for half an hour and then just clutter up the house until I toss them.

The Tinker crate seems to be the perfect level for the my 7 year old. My 5 year old enjoys helping, but needs help reading the instructions and completing some of the more fiddly steps. My 9 year old will occasionally help, but really most of the project is interlocking pieces together and sticking on stickers. There have been a couple zip ties and things of that nature, but nothing particularly challenging for a 9 year old. If he were to complete the Tinker crate independently, it would only take him 20-30 minutes.

The Eureka crates are much better for my 9 and 11 year olds. The 7 year old helps, but much of it is too difficult for him. The older two can work largely independently, but do occasionally need help to understand the instructions or complete a more difficult step. With them working together, the projects typically take a couple hours split into several sessions. For our first Eureka project, the boys made a full-size, real Ukulele. It is awesome. Their latest project was a big, fully articulated desk lamp that clamps onto a work surface and can be moved and positioned however you want. Again, much more practically useful than our Tinker projects which are fun to play with for a while, but then just garbage.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

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16 minutes ago, wendyroo said:

My kids have been getting both crates for the last three months.

Tinker and Eureka are certainly different levels; another big difference I have seen is that most of the Eureka projects actually build something useful/usable, while the Tinker projects are cool for half an hour and then just clutter up the house until I toss them.

The Tinker crate seems to be the perfect level for the my 7 year old. My 5 year old enjoys helping, but needs help reading the instructions and completing some of the more fiddly steps. My 9 year old will occasionally help, but really most of the project is interlocking pieces together and sticking on stickers. There have been a couple zip ties and things of that nature, but nothing particularly challenging for a 9 year old. If he were to complete the Tinker crate independently, it would only take him 20-30 minutes.

The Eureka crates are much better for my 9 and 11 year olds. The 7 year old helps, but much of it is too difficult for him. The older two can work largely independently, but do occasionally need help to understand the instructions or complete a more difficult step. With them working together, the projects typically take a couple hours split into several sessions. For our first Eureka project, the boys made a full-size, real Ukulele. It is awesome. Their latest project was a big, fully articulated desk lamp that clamps onto a work surface and can be moved and positioned however you want. Again, much more practically useful than our Tinker projects which are fun to play with for a while, but then just garbage.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Thanks this is helpful.  I'm not sure my 10 year old is as advanced as your kids, but this is definitely an area of strength for him, so maybe we'll try Eureka.

 

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8 minutes ago, BaseballandHockey said:

Thanks this is helpful.  I'm not sure my 10 year old is as advanced as your kids, but this is definitely an area of strength for him, so maybe we'll try Eureka.

 

My kids are not advanced in building skills at all. I chose the crates particularly to practice direction following, executive function and fine motor skills because those are all weaknesses of theirs.

I find the Kiwi age ranges very skewed. My MIL got my youngest a Kiwi crate (ages 5-8) last Christmas when she had just turned 4 and if was ridiculously easy for her. We are currently getting Doodle crates (ages 9-16+) for all my kids, and while the 5 year old definitely needs help, the 7 year old has had no issues. I kind of feel like the stated age ranges are for kids who have never had life experiences like building Lego sets, helping assemble Ikea furniture, stringing beads, etc.

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2 minutes ago, wendyroo said:

My kids are not advanced in building skills at all. I chose the crates particularly to practice direction following, executive function and fine motor skills because those are all weaknesses of theirs.

I find the Kiwi age ranges very skewed. My MIL got my youngest a Kiwi crate (ages 5-8) last Christmas when she had just turned 4 and if was ridiculously easy for her. We are currently getting Doodle crates (ages 9-16+) for all my kids, and while the 5 year old definitely needs help, the 7 year old has had no issues. I kind of feel like the stated age ranges are for kids who have never had life experiences like building Lego sets, helping assemble Ikea furniture, stringing beads, etc.

I think my 10 year old is maybe the opposite of yours.  He's got great fine motor and executive functioning, and pretty average academics.

When you do something all together, do you get each kid their own crate?  Or one to share?  Do you like the Doodle crates?  

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1 minute ago, The Accidental Coach said:

My DGD receives the Doodle Crate and she loves it. The crafts are (mostly) things she can do on her own. I have thought about switching to tinker Crate but she loves Doodle.

My baby DGD receives the Panda Crates and I love the quality of the toys. 

I highly recommend KiwiCo.

How old is your DGD?

I have nieces who really like crafty things.  Maybe I'll look into crates for them. 

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5 minutes ago, BaseballandHockey said:

I think my 10 year old is maybe the opposite of yours.  He's got great fine motor and executive functioning, and pretty average academics.

When you do something all together, do you get each kid their own crate?  Or one to share?  Do you like the Doodle crates?  

Doodle crates really cant' be shared as they only send enough supplies for one craft. For instance, the first month was a felt succulent garden. It was really neat for DGD to assemble but it was a 6X4 (approx) sized project and definitely not something she could have done with another child andstill have had enough to do to make it worthwhile. I think the kits are designed for one project - one child per box.

DGD (9yo)  =is fairly independent with her crates and doesn't need much supervision. Things don't always turn out picture perfect but she is crafting and learning to follow directions and to  be patient.

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10 minutes ago, BaseballandHockey said:

I think my 10 year old is maybe the opposite of yours.  He's got great fine motor and executive functioning, and pretty average academics.

When you do something all together, do you get each kid their own crate?  Or one to share?  Do you like the Doodle crates?  

My kids each get their own Doodle crate - as the previous poster mentioned, they kind of have to due to supplies. We have really enjoyed Doodle crate. Our first month was pour paintings while turned out really well. The second month each kid sewed themselves slippers. This month was spool knitting stuffed animals, and all my boys have gone nuts over spool knitting.

We only get one Tinker and one Eureka crate. One of my goals was to work on cooperation, turn taking, and working as a group. Normally, I have the 5 and 7 year olds work together on the Tinker crate. Since the 7 year old has two older brothers, he often follows their lead during play. I like to give him a chance to practice being a project leader. The 9 and 11 year olds work together on Eureka. They are both autistic and need practice communicating and working together (with only one set of supplies) rather than in parallel which is how they play with Lego and other toys that they have a surplus of.

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12 minutes ago, The Accidental Coach said:

Doodle crates really can't be shared as they only send enough supplies for one craft. For instance, the first month was a felt succulent garden. It was really neat for DGD to assemble but it was a 6X4 (approx) sized project and definitely not something she could have done with another child and still have had enough to do to make it worthwhile. I think the kits are designed for one project - one child per box.

DGD (9yo) is fairly independent with her crates and doesn't need much supervision. Things don't always turn out picture perfect but she is crafting and learning to follow directions and to  be patient.

 

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My ds#2 has done Tinker, Doodle, & Eureka crates for years. I thought he would like the Doodle ones because he's crafty but he didn't. He liked the Tinker ones but they got discarded after making them. He's been doing Eureka's since he was 8? 9? He has the ukulele, pencil sharpener, working over the ear headphones, desk lamp, lamp/flashlight, coin sorter, calendar, & several others. Some are bigger hits than others. He does them 100% on his own. We get a 3 month subscription for his birthday and/or Christmas so he gets 3-6 a year. Highlight of his month when they come.

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My 13yo LOVES her crates.  We got Tinker for 2 or 3 years and switched to Eureka around her 13th birthday.

For a 10yo, I think Tinker is still a great gift.  I would choose Tinker for now, and switch to Eureka when he seems to find Tinker too easy.  I do think the age guides the company gives are fairly good, give or take a year or so.

They will allow you to cancel / change your subscription in the middle if you find that it really doesn't suit your child.

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Just now, BaseballandHockey said:

What is rakuten?

A cash back site.  So if you go through their portal you will get 22.5% cash back on your kiwico purchase.  Do you need a link for Rakuten?  I can give you one that I think will still give you $40 after you make a $40 purchase.  Plus get you the cash back. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Their Black Friday Sale is back on.  Up to 4 months free when you buy 12 months

Promo code MERRY is valid through December 9, 2020 11:59PM PST or while supplies last. Monthly subscription starts at $9.95, 3 month subscription starts at $39.95 ($13.33 per month), 6 month subscriptions start at $79.95 ($13.33 per month), and 12 month subscriptions start at $159.95 ($13.33 per month). Savings based on $19.95 monthly prices. Additional cost for Eureka Crate and Maker Crate. Discounted subscription prices exclude Deluxe add-on and international shipping. Quantities are limited. Offer valid cannot be applied to prior purchases, KiwiCo Store, or gift cards. Discounted subscription prices exclude Deluxe add-on and international shipping.

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  • 5 weeks later...
On 11/27/2020 at 10:54 AM, wendyroo said:

My kids have been getting both crates for the last three months.

Tinker and Eureka are certainly different levels; another big difference I have seen is that most of the Eureka projects actually build something useful/usable, while the Tinker projects are cool for half an hour and then just clutter up the house until I toss them.

The Tinker crate seems to be the perfect level for the my 7 year old. My 5 year old enjoys helping, but needs help reading the instructions and completing some of the more fiddly steps. My 9 year old will occasionally help, but really most of the project is interlocking pieces together and sticking on stickers. There have been a couple zip ties and things of that nature, but nothing particularly challenging for a 9 year old. If he were to complete the Tinker crate independently, it would only take him 20-30 minutes.

The Eureka crates are much better for my 9 and 11 year olds. The 7 year old helps, but much of it is too difficult for him. The older two can work largely independently, but do occasionally need help to understand the instructions or complete a more difficult step. With them working together, the projects typically take a couple hours split into several sessions. For our first Eureka project, the boys made a full-size, real Ukulele. It is awesome. Their latest project was a big, fully articulated desk lamp that clamps onto a work surface and can be moved and positioned however you want. Again, much more practically useful than our Tinker projects which are fun to play with for a while, but then just garbage.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

How long have you been getting the Eureka crates?  Do you remember all the projects they have gotten?  I wish that they let you pick which ones you were being sent.  There are few that look cool, like the desk lamp.  

We are on our second month

1. ukulele

2.  lock box

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22 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

How long have you been getting the Eureka crates?  Do you remember all the projects they have gotten?  I wish that they let you pick which ones you were being sent.  There are few that look cool, like the desk lamp.  

We are on our second month

1. ukulele

2.  lock box

We have gotten:

September - Ukulele

October - Perpetual Calendar

November - Articulated Desk Lamp

December - Lock Box

We are doing Eureka through a co-op, and I know others in the co-op have gotten different projects: electric pencil sharpener, headphones, mechanical globe, rivet press, and vending machine.

I like that most of the projects are actually useful in the long run. We mounted the desk lamp to my kids' computer desk. 

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1 minute ago, wendyroo said:

We have gotten:

September - Ukulele

October - Perpetual Calendar

November - Articulated Desk Lamp

December - Lock Box

We are doing Eureka through a co-op, and I know others in the co-op have gotten different projects: electric pencil sharpener, headphones, mechanical globe, rivet press, and vending machine.

I like that most of the projects are actually useful in the long run. We mounted the desk lamp to my kids' computer desk. 

Thanks for the info.  Ok I guess they don't do anything you could expect since you were getting different ones than people you know.  And it isn't the same project every month or something.   Yep, I do like that the projects are useful. 

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5 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

Thanks for the info.  Ok I guess they don't do anything you could expect since you were getting different ones than people you know.  And it isn't the same project every month or something.   Yep, I do like that the projects are useful. 

I just looked at our account, and we are getting the Pinball Machine for January.

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My review so far

I got the Eureka crates for my 3 oldest 14, 12, 10

The Tinker crate for my 8 year old

Kiwi crate for 5 year old

 

The kiwi crate is not something my 5 year old can do on her own.  She did love her first crate and spent about 3-4 hours the first day making it, playing with it, and then building more things because she loved the experience. 

Tinker Crate, so far is not something my 8 year old could do on her own.  Maybe as she gets more experience.  The project was a spin art machine.  After the supplies were gone it hasn't been picked up since.  Obviously we have supplies here that she could use, but just isn't wanting to do more. 

Eureka crate is something that my 10 year old can do on her own, but does need help at certain spots.  It is taking a lot of time for her to do it.  My 14 and 12 year old were really excited about the the first project and haven't picked it up since the day they put it together and played a few strings.   My 12 got his box yesterday (lock box) and was done in less than 30 mins, probably more like 15.   That is disappointing to me, because I would like it to be something that takes more time for them to do.  I think he may use it to store things in, but after that I don't see him using it really.   

Overall, I am not a huge fan.  Could just be my kids, but after the thing is put together and used for a day they won't do much with it.  I think they are learning things from it, that are different from month to month.   But it isn't something like Legos that are going to get used over and over everyday.  

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After my 2 youngest did their crates today, I am even less impressed.  They were done so fast and it really isn't anything that is going to get more than 5 or 10 minutes of play at all. The tinker crate some kids might get some play out of, but so far my kids don't.  A few minutes.  I honestly am regretting this purchase at this point.  I had seen so many good reviews on youtube.    I wish I would have just spent the money on more lego sets, they would get a lot more play.  So yeah, if you are looking for a project that takes  your kids 30 mins or less to do, that they probably won't use very much then go for it.  The only kid it takes a good bit of time for is my 10 year old that is doing the Eureka kit.   Now that I know how long it takes them and how much use they are getting out of it, I have a much more realistic view of this. 

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