Jump to content

Menu

Math help in public school during a pandemic?


SKL
 Share

Recommended Posts

My kid needs help.  She is trying hard to keep up, but she isn't able to finish her [online] algebra tests, which are a huge % of the grade.

When I enrolled her into her new school for 9th grade, the counselor assured me they'd test her and give her the help she would need.  But that was before Covid.

All 9th graders are required to take Algebra (or something harder).  Also, our state just made a law that says you can't graduate at all unless you pass an Algebra I competency test.

In the past, my kid has tested "average" in math, but that was a very low reasoning score offset by an above-average computation score.  The result was that she was never formally entitled to accommodations or help, but her previous school did provide some. 

I have spent many hours with her in the past, and some this year, helping with math ... but she needs and deserves help from the school.  Neither she nor I want to spend all that extra time together on algebra, and it doesn't seem like a good time to hire a tutor.

I would also add that she has (a) activities, which take up time but are really needed for her mental health and (b) OCD, which slows things down a lot.  Also, I work full-time and am trying to reasonably keep up with 2 kids' online school + sports etc.  So we really don't have a lot of time to dedicate to math practice outside of school.

I just sent an email to the teacher asking what he suggests.  But what do you all think?  What would you do?  Assume homeschooling is not an option.

Edited by SKL
  • Like 1
  • Sad 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Algebra is easy to tutor online.

I am tutoring in person as well. We work outside or inside with masks on -  windows open and air purifier running. 

And if algebra is required and tested at such a level,  you will need to make a priority for her to study it during her 'best' hours - usually first thing in the am, but not always so for teens.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a 9th grader doing Algebra but she is homeschooled so her situation is a little different. She doesn’t want us to help her. 
 

She works a problem and then immediately checks it with the answer key and only goes on to the next one if she the previous one right. Sometimes she reworks it and still doesn’t understand how to get the right answer. 
 

In those cases, she uses the “Photomath” app it tells her the answer, which she already knows from the key. Then it shows her how to work the problem. 
 

This has been working well for her because when I test her, she is really understanding the concepts and procedures. 
 

My oldest has a math disability and we always had to have an outside tutor for her. Her worst semester was when her math class was online because she would get a correct but in a form that wasn’t in the exact form that the computer wanted. 
 

The main reason I became a homeschooler was because I couldn’t imagine trying to get appropriate services from the public school. 
 

Good luck. I know it isn’t easy. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ask if your school has a co-taught algebra class, meaning there are two teachers, and one is an intervention teacher. Depending on the policies of your school, she probably does not need an IEP to be in a co-taught class, but she would get extra help.

Bringing the concerns up to the teacher is the right first step. You could copy (or forward) your message to the guidance counselor, as well. If the school does not come up with a solution, you can make a request for the school to run evaluations (I forget whether you have done this before at this school). Even if they have refused in the past, you can say there are new issues to look into.

Algebra can be a barrier in math for some students, because students have trouble applying what they have learned in prealgebra to harder problems, due to difficulty with perceptual reasoning/ understanding the concepts and how to build on them. I have child who is older than yours, but who has some similar issues (I think I have said this to you in the past). If she has had educational testing in the past, look at the WISC scores in particular; certain kinds of scoring on the WISC can indicate a learning disability that is often under diagnosed and can affect math. You can PM me for more details, if you would like.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Ask if your school has a co-taught algebra class, meaning there are two teachers, and one is an intervention teacher. Depending on the policies of your school, she probably does not need an IEP to be in a co-taught class, but she would get extra help.

Bringing the concerns up to the teacher is the right first step. You could copy (or forward) your message to the guidance counselor, as well. If the school does not come up with a solution, you can make a request for the school to run evaluations (I forget whether you have done this before at this school). Even if they have refused in the past, you can say there are new issues to look into.

Algebra can be a barrier in math for some students, because students have trouble applying what they have learned in prealgebra to harder problems, due to difficulty with perceptual reasoning/ understanding the concepts and how to build on them. I have child who is older than yours, but who has some similar issues (I think I have said this to you in the past). If she has had educational testing in the past, look at the WISC scores in particular; certain kinds of scoring on the WISC can indicate a learning disability that is often under diagnosed and can affect math. You can PM me for more details, if you would like.

Also ask if there is double period math for kids who are struggling. Both my nieces did this at one time. They took math over two periods instead of one, so they could get lots of extra help. One only needed it for Algebra and then switched to a one period flipped classroom where they watched video lectures for HW and then the majority of class time was spent working on problems and getting help. They also had some problems assigned for HW. The parents also paid for a tutor for the one who struggled the most and much of it was done remotely due to different locations in the country.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first step is to send that same email to her Counselor at her high school. If she is unable to finish her timed test, then, she needs to be tested by the school and then given accommodations based on the outcome of the evaluation. She will be participating in high-stakes testing in the coming years in her high school and you need to pave the way for extra time for testing in 9th grade so that your entire family can handle the high school years with lesser stress.

As for her math struggles, both Review Tests and Workbooks for Algebra (I assume that she is in Alg 1?) are easily available on the internet and amazon. A good strategy would be to check the school calendar and allocate a few hours of review for the upcoming chapter test on the weekend before the test: you could have her review the chapter that will be tested using a Workbook (for e.g. test on Linear Equations for Tuesday) for 90 minutes on Saturday and 90 minutes on Sunday. That level of focused review will make sure that she gains automaticity when solving a particular type of problem and hence can increase her speed during a test.

Another strategy is to attend Extra Hours with the math teacher every day on the week of the test. Most math teachers that I know of give out sample test problems, worksheets and packets that resemble the actual test in rigor to all the struggling students during office hours on test week.

A third strategy would be to ask the Counselor if the school has Peer Tutoring by seniors for math. Most high schools in my area have some form of this program and it actually works well on Zoom.

Please ask if you need pointers to Review Tests. And also please cross post on the high school board where many people ask this kind of question and you might get a lot of answers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mastery of Algebra 1 is critical.  If the Instructor will not (or cannot) help her, hopefully the School District has one or more "Math Coaches".  Normally I believe they teach the Math teachers how to improve their teaching skills.  When she was in TTUISD, at least one semester, the Math Instructor my DD had was a "Math Coach" in the Lubbock ISD.  Hopefully your school district also has them. Call your school district and ask if they can connect you to a Math Coach. Good luck to your DD!

Also, I assume that if my DD had an issue trying to understand something, that she went to Khan Academy or another web site (YouTube ?) for a different explanation. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The teacher called me.  His solution is to tell my daughter to stay after class and ask for help, or send an email and request extra help before or after school.  (This is all remote of course.)  He also says she should use a calculator on tests, as some of her mistakes are simple computation errors.

He says he has had a number of parents contact him with the same concern, all of whom are coming from other schools that didn't end 8th grade math in the same place as this school did.

Didn't sound very sympathetic, but the point is, how do we fix this ... I appreciate the suggestions above.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as the OCD accommodation, I don't know.  When she got the diagnosis, I asked the school about accommodations and they were like, what do you want us to do?  If she proves unable to do something as a result of the OCD, then come back and tell us and we'll look into a 504 then.  Again, this was all before Covid and assumed she'd be in school.  😞

I did ask our chiro (our wellness professional) about this, and he did say extra time is a reasonable accommodation for OCD.  But how to prove it?  She has specific OCD issues with numbers ... certain numbers are "not good," and she needs to do certain actions (in school and out) over and over until they feel right.  In fact, using the calculator is one of the times she has this issue.  She has to hit the keys over and over and over.  😞

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you stated about OCD should qualify your child to receive accommodations (504).  Your school may need psychiatrist's letter or some other documentation - it has been long enough since we went through the accommodations process that I don't remember all the details.

The one thing I do remember is that my child first had a 504 but it was not sufficient accommodations.  Child had to fail high school classes before the school would get the IEP process started.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, ask for 504 if you have the needed paperwork from a mental health professional. School will require that. 

Is there a reason she can't ask for help from the teacher as was suggested? He seems to be offering a lot of times at which she could get extra help.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@SKL I am in the same state as you. My son with the math disability will not be able to pass the Algebra 1 end of course exam; schools can "exempt from the consequences" of not passing the end of course exams, so that the student can still graduate, but it is a process, and it probably requires an IEP to be in place.

My son took an algebra preparation class (it introduces the concepts of the higher level classes, to prepare students who aren't ready yet) last year in 9th grade. At our first parent-teacher conference in September, I said, "What happens to students who aren't ready for algebra by the end of this class?" and the teachers looked at each other and said, "Students just move on to algebra generally, unless they have to move down to the resource room math class (special ed), which we don't think will be needed." And at the next teacher's conference in February, they agreed that he actually needed to be in the resource room for 10th grade. Which was not a shocker to me; I understand his math disability and expected it. The point of this story is that teachers often don't know the students well enough at the beginning of the year to SEE the areas of disability. There are enough students who just squeak by without trying, or who don't care, or just have a lower math ability but can make progress, that teachers are used to some kids not doing well, and they won't necessarily connect an individual student's struggle to a disability.

In this case, the parent has to be the noisy wheel that brings attention to the root issues that the teachers don't recognize. (I'm not faulting teachers; they have a lot of students to pay attention to, but you only have two, so you can see what is happening in ways that they don't).

It's good to have your daughter try all of the extra help that the teacher is offering. He will see that she is making an effort. He will hopefully see the problem areas more clearly, when he is able to work with her more closely.

But please DO contact the guidance counselor and tell him/her exactly what you said in this thread -- that she can't keep up, because her OCD makes her think some numbers are bad.....etc. They will not know this, if you do not tell them specifically. She absolutely 100% SHOULD qualify for a 504 for extra time for this reason; this is exactly what 504s are for.

504s do not require the whole school evaluation process before being put into place; if you have the documentation, they can base the 504 on that. Don't let the teacher's comments be the decision -- move the question of a 504 up to the guidance counselor (or whomever you spoke with about it previously).

My other son has a 504 for anxiety, and his anxiety is a lot less of a barrier for him than OCD would be.

A 504 can get her extra time and other accommodations. It does not get her intervention. Be sure to ask the guidance counselor what to do if the 504 turns out to be not enough, because a 504 will not address her trouble with mastering concepts. While you are at it, tell the GC that you are worried about her passing the end of course exam, and ask what helps are available to ensure she will be able to earn her graduation requirements.

Edited by Storygirl
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really dislike the practice that some schools have of only offering algebra and up math classes in high school. There are some students who aren't ready for algebra yet, but can become ready with another year of help. When we were moving, we had to deliberately pick a district that had a prealgebra level classes for 9th grade, because not all do, and we knew DS would not be ready. I found it really frustrating, so I empathize with your situation.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In our school, we have lots of people available to help kids get through Algebra 1. I'm one of them. We have 2 Educational Assistants in each class this year. These are all Zoom classes. Students can chat to the teacher that they are confused and she will put them in a breakout room with one of us. We use Google Jamboards that have screenshots of the homework worksheets on them. These act like whiteboards where we can share our screen and demonstrate some homework problems while we leave others for them to do. We can also use these jamboards in 1-on-1 tutoring sessions--we have a couple of people in the school available for tutoring as part of their job. This is a hard year and our expectations are a bit lower than previous years--these kids also missed out on the last third of their prealgebra class last spring and have a weaker preparation. And it is so much easier to help someone in person where you can talk about the problems and more quickly assess where the difficulty is. I would see if your school has a tutoring center with an adult tutor who is good at tutoring math. I agree that the school should be providing more help (and we help anyone who needs it--those with IEP/504 plans and those without).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Storygirl said:

Ask if your school has a co-taught algebra class, meaning there are two teachers, and one is an intervention teacher. Depending on the policies of your school, she probably does not need an IEP to be in a co-taught class, but she would get extra help.

This is what the counselor described to me when we registered last winter.  And I do think that even the online classes (or at least some of them) have an additional teacher or aide.  When I got my kid's fall schedule, the algebra class was listed with the word "inclusion" in the title, which I hoped meant something like that.  I guess I just need to figure out how to get access to this help for my kid.

I honestly am largely in the dark about what goes on at "school."  When do I find the time and energy to go into their Chromebooks and read everything?  They are on the Chromebooks most of their at-home waking hours, and when they're asleep, I'm either needing to sleep or work.  😕

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, EKS said:

If she has OCD, perhaps she could get extended time accommodations?

I'm a ps teacher and I would run--not walk--to get her a 504. If she has a medical diagnosis, have her diagnosing physician write a letter stating that she has OCD and needs specific accommodations (and list them). Preferential seating, extra time to complete assignments and tests, tests taken in an alternate setting would be common accommodations. Extra time and alternate setting for standardized tests should be included as well.

Also ask if the school has any type of after school homework groups.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're still letting your kids do other activities, I don't see why hiring a tutor would be so different, but online tutors are readily available. 

20 hours ago, SKL said:

The teacher called me.  His solution is to tell my daughter to stay after class and ask for help, or send an email and request extra help before or after school.  (This is all remote of course.)  He also says she should use a calculator on tests, as some of her mistakes are simple computation errors.

He says he has had a number of parents contact him with the same concern, all of whom are coming from other schools that didn't end 8th grade math in the same place as this school did.

Didn't sound very sympathetic, but the point is, how do we fix this ... I appreciate the suggestions above.

 

That seems very reasonable and typical to me. 

20 hours ago, SKL said:

As far as the OCD accommodation, I don't know.  When she got the diagnosis, I asked the school about accommodations and they were like, what do you want us to do?  If she proves unable to do something as a result of the OCD, then come back and tell us and we'll look into a 504 then.  Again, this was all before Covid and assumed she'd be in school.  😞

I did ask our chiro (our wellness professional) about this, and he did say extra time is a reasonable accommodation for OCD.  But how to prove it?  She has specific OCD issues with numbers ... certain numbers are "not good," and she needs to do certain actions (in school and out) over and over until they feel right.  In fact, using the calculator is one of the times she has this issue.  She has to hit the keys over and over and over.  😞

I would speak with the healthcare professionals who are specifically treating the OCD before requesting accommodations. Accommodating rituals and compulsions is generally not recommended. Plus, the nature of OCD is such that extra time is not going to be helpful - it may just give her an hour and a half to obsess versus an hour. 

At least one other poster mentioned a public school that requires algebra in 9th-grade. How does that work? There are surely students at every school who cannot complete algebra as a freshman, and, if they have a 504 or IEP, I don't see how a school legally refuses to offer other options. Is it that they do have other classes, but you have to have the official 504 or IEP to opt out of algebra in 9th? I've never seen a public high school of any size that didn't offer bare bones algebra, extended time algebra, at least one kind of alternative, so that sounds so strange to me. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, katilac said:

If you're still letting your kids do other activities, I don't see why hiring a tutor would be so different, but online tutors are readily available. 

That seems very reasonable and typical to me. 

I would speak with the healthcare professionals who are specifically treating the OCD before requesting accommodations. Accommodating rituals and compulsions is generally not recommended. Plus, the nature of OCD is such that extra time is not going to be helpful - it may just give her an hour and a half to obsess versus an hour. 

At least one other poster mentioned a public school that requires algebra in 9th-grade. How does that work? There are surely students at every school who cannot complete algebra as a freshman, and, if they have a 504 or IEP, I don't see how a school legally refuses to offer other options. Is it that they do have other classes, but you have to have the official 504 or IEP to opt out of algebra in 9th? I've never seen a public high school of any size that didn't offer bare bones algebra, extended time algebra, at least one kind of alternative, so that sounds so strange to me. 

I was surprised by it, too (I am the other poster). We asked a lot of questions at the school that offered algebra as the lowest option for 9th graders, because my DS does have an IEP and a diagnosed math disability. That school only had algebra 1, and no option to spread algebra over two years. The next class down was the math special education classroom. They also said that they do not provide intervention help in the form of co-teachers in science and social studies classes (only in English and math classes), and that they phase out intervention for all kids in 11th and 12th grades, "because kids won't get extra intervention in college and need to be able to do things on their own."

We really pressed them on this (we were on a tour with the special education coordinator, not just a teacher or principal), because it definitely does not line up with what we needed or what we understand is legal under IDEA. They actually said that kids who can't do the academics in their school are put on pass/fail for their classes and/or are encouraged to go to vocational school.

We practically ran out of there once we reached the parking lot. This was a school that was supposed to be a good place for people who are dyslexic, because they have invested in having teachers at all levels trained in OG techniques. We have a daughter with dyslexia, and perhaps it would have been a good district for her, but for our son, who has multiple LDs,  it would have been a nightmare. It's as if they have blinders on and think that all kids in their classrooms are automatically college bound, and that those who are not, really don't deserve a place there. I was really upset by our tour.

Note -- my son is now in math special education in our high school, so I am not against that kind of placement. It's the idea that they blatantly just offered nothing on his level that shocked me. DS's special education classroom at our high school actually is working on algebra concepts at a slow pace and is not just a place to warehouse students who don't fit in (which unfortunately sometimes does often happen and has happened to a friend of mine whose kids are in a different district nearby).

These are schools that have a good reputation overall, so I was surprised by what I found when I asked more probing questions.

Just because a high school expects all students to be ready for algebra by 9th grade (or before) does not mean that all students will actually BE ready, and schools should provide an education for all of their students.

 

@SKL This is just a general rant and is not directed specifically at your school, which I know nothing about. I don't mean to take over your thread.

Working with the school to address issues can be really tough; we are going through a tough time right now regarding our school and DS's IEP, and we have decided to hire an advocate. You might find talking to a parent advocate in your area helpful, because they can help you know how to request things in a way to get the school administration to listen.

I respect the opinion about not accommodating the OCD with extra time, but it's a really sticky situation, because if your daughter fails without extra time but can succeed with extra time, I would think that the extra time should be given, so that she does not fail the class. And then the issues related to the OCD can be addressed in private therapy, because she will not learn how to deal with them just by having accommodations in the classroom. I think she has tried therapy and was released, because of lack of progress, but perhaps try a different therapist. (Sorry if you don't want me to share that on this thread; I will delete it, if you desire, but I thought it was important to mention. My DS also has trouble making progress in counseling, because he does not talk to the counselor much at all, and does not put into practice anything from his sessions, so I do absolutely understand some of the issues you face. We are currently in process of switching him to a different therapist, and I don't know if it will go better with someone else, but we will continue to try.)

Edited by Storygirl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What algebra curriculum are they using? It makes a big difference if the are using a program like CPM or MVP, which uses a discovery method where the steps aren't explicitly explained. If you miss how to do the problems or don't quite understand what you are trying to discover it is really hard to go back and figure it out.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Storygirl said:

I was surprised by it, too (I am the other poster). We asked a lot of questions at the school that offered algebra as the lowest option for 9th graders, because my DS does have an IEP and a diagnosed math disability. That school only had algebra 1, and no option to spread algebra over two years. The next class down was the math special education classroom. They also said that they do not provide intervention help in the form of co-teachers in science and social studies classes (only in English and math classes), and that they phase out intervention for all kids in 11th and 12th grades, "because kids won't get extra intervention in college and need to be able to do things on their own."

We really pressed them on this (we were on a tour with the special education coordinator, not just a teacher or principal), because it definitely does not line up with what we needed or what we understand is legal under IDEA. They actually said that kids who can't do the academics in their school are put on pass/fail for their classes and/or are encouraged to go to vocational school.

We practically ran out of there once we reached the parking lot. This was a school that was supposed to be a good place for people who are dyslexic, because they have invested in having teachers at all levels trained in OG techniques. We have a daughter with dyslexia, and perhaps it would have been a good district for her, but for our son, who has multiple LDs,  it would have been a nightmare. It's as if they have blinders on and think that all kids in their classrooms are automatically college bound, and that those who are not, really don't deserve a place there. I was really upset by our tour.

Note -- my son is now in math special education in our high school, so I am not against that kind of placement. It's the idea that they blatantly just offered nothing on his level that shocked me. DS's special education classroom at our high school actually is working on algebra concepts at a slow pace and is not just a place to warehouse students who don't fit in (which unfortunately sometimes does often happen and has happened to a friend of mine whose kids are in a different district nearby).

These are schools that have a good reputation overall, so I was surprised by what I found when I asked more probing questions.

Just because a high school expects all students to be ready for algebra by 9th grade (or before) does not mean that all students will actually BE ready, and schools should provide an education for all of their students.

 

@SKL This is just a general rant and is not directed specifically at your school, which I know nothing about. I don't mean to take over your thread.

Working with the school to address issues can be really tough; we are going through a tough time right now regarding our school and DS's IEP, and we have decided to hire an advocate. You might find talking to a parent advocate in your area helpful, because they can help you know how to request things in a way to get the school administration to listen.

I respect the opinion about not accommodating the OCD with extra time, but it's a really sticky situation, because if your daughter fails without extra time but can succeed with extra time, I would think that the extra time should be given, so that she does not fail the class. And then the issues related to the OCD can be addressed in private therapy, because she will not learn how to deal with them just by having accommodations in the classroom. I think she has tried therapy and was released, because of lack of progress, but perhaps try a different therapist. (Sorry if you don't want me to share that on this thread; I will delete it, if you desire, but I thought it was important to mention. My DS also has trouble making progress in counseling, because he does not talk to the counselor much at all, and does not put into practice anything from his sessions, so I do absolutely understand some of the issues you face. We are currently in process of switching him to a different therapist, and I don't know if it will go better with someone else, but we will continue to try.)

You are right about the history with counseling.  From what I've heard, it seems my kid needs to decide to force herself to do the OCD therapy work, and it's not something I can control.  I wish it was.  The guy we worked with was supposed to be the best in the field.  Of course doing everything electronically might not have been ideal.

While OCD is probably a factor, I think she needs the extra time regardless of OCD.  However, if we can find an effective way of studying between tests, she could probably still get by.  It's just hard with everything being between her and a Chromebook.  Neither the teacher nor I really knows what's going on in this situation.  It's fine to say "let them self-advocate," but kids don't like to expose their weaknesses, especially not when they haven't developed any kind of trust relationship.

As far as the requirement that everyone pass Algebra ... I was surprised also.  I figured, OK, then non-honors Algebra must be designed to accommodate everyone in the "regular classroom."  And maybe it would be, if they had enough teacher-student interaction.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My older son has had times when he is in a group with a higher support level but HE doesn’t have it on an IEP.  
 

I think this is your daughter’s situation?  She needs extra help so she’s in the class, but she doesn’t specifically have an IEP.  
 

My son would not have qualified for an IEP.

 

Anyway — he was in-person and the teachers could see how he needed extra help and he could get extra help.  
 

I think this is what is “supposed” to be happening for your daughter?  But they aren’t in-person to see what is going on with her.  
 

I think reach out and talk to them!  And be fast to say there are problems and be persistent, and escalate quickly (up the chain to counselor, administrator letter, etc) because they will be lacking being able to see her in class.  
 

My son had an IEP when he was younger but it wouldn’t have been for math — but he would be placed together with kids who did have IEPs so he could also get extra help.  He would not have qualified.  This is what they told me.  
 

You also might have to enforce your daughter reaching out if that is possible.  Sometimes my husband is able to enforce this.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would also want to know — was your daughter put in this class for this teacher to be able to form an opinion about her needing more help (like an IEP)?  What is the teacher looking for?  Can you provide information to the teacher?  Do you need to write a letter stating your concerns (you might need to).

Sorry this is a pain!

Especially if you are coming in with no paper trail — you have to advocate.  
 

I also think — you have a bit of a choice.

Do you want them to SEE she struggles and needs help?  Maybe don’t get a tutor.

Do you think she can make it through but she’s struggling?  Maybe do get a tutor.

These are two different situations.  If you do heroic measures to get her through, prepare for the school to see no need for help for her. And that might be worth it for your situation!  Or that might be digging a hole hard to get out of, or just not realistic.

If it’s something where you can get her a tutor and that will work — well, I think so that.

If that’s not realistic or is totally unsustainable — then I think do more to advocate.

Either way you can try to enforce things for your daughter but what direction to go could be different.

My husband has required my son to send emails to teachers about things sometimes.  He has been required to ask things at school. I am sure they have no idea he has been goaded into it with the threat of losing his electronics or else of his parents making an appointment (which he loathes).  He will do a lot to avoid either of these — it’s how he is.  
 

Edit:  we are actually not very on top of things, in case it sounds like we are.  This also happens in fits and starts, in-between things going well and things going poorly.  

Edited by Lecka
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Storygirl said:

I was surprised by it, too (I am the other poster). We asked a lot of questions at the school that offered algebra as the lowest option for 9th graders, because my DS does have an IEP and a diagnosed math disability. That school only had algebra 1, and no option to spread algebra over two years. The next class down was the math special education classroom. They also said that they do not provide intervention help in the form of co-teachers in science and social studies classes (only in English and math classes), and that they phase out intervention for all kids in 11th and 12th grades, "because kids won't get extra intervention in college and need to be able to do things on their own."

<snip>

Just because a high school expects all students to be ready for algebra by 9th grade (or before) does not mean that all students will actually BE ready, and schools should provide an education for all of their students.

<snip>

That just boggles me! It's a lawsuit in the making. 

And +1 about expecting students to be ready not equaling them actually being ready. 

2 hours ago, SKL said:

 While OCD is probably a factor, I think she needs the extra time regardless of OCD.  However, if we can find an effective way of studying between tests, she could probably still get by.  

If she can get the extra time without it being correlated to the OCD, that would be ideal.

One piece of advice that has helped a lot of students I've tutored over the years: look at how the tests are structured. Most teachers have a pattern, and that pattern often includes putting the newest and/or most difficult material first. Many teachers will even label it that way! Students get bogged down at the beginning, don't score many points on that section, and run out of time. Approach it like the ACT and look for problems you know how to solve. Kids tend to unconsciously assume they need to work problems in the order presented, and they can do much better if they proactively don't do that. 

If she says she can't tell how the teacher sets up the tests, tell her to simply try skipping the first third of questions. Do the last 2/3 of the test and then go back to the beginning. For my more absent-minded kids, I would tell them that the first thing they should do is write "go back!" after the last question, lol. 

In an ideal world, we would all be focused on getting students to truly understand the material. In the real world, we are sometimes just trying to get them to pass. Find a tutor who will look at her tests or study guides and try to shore up the skills that are most likely to get her a passing grade. 

Edited by katilac
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...