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Seen lots of dogs & cats living together happily. They seem to introduce better as kittens, but I've seen it go well with older cats, too.

We made a litter box out of a storage tote sort of like this. You can also buy something similar. Search for top entry litter box.

If Mrs Spy Car wants a kitten, I definitely suggest getting two together. Many rescues will let you know if they are "good with dogs." (Dd's TNR non-profit has a young adult cat who prefers large dogs to other cats. She's being fostered at a groomer's office & only has to be kenneled when another cat comes in. Most of the dogs do very well with her.)

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Remember this post? I've outsmarted myself. Just when I thought I was out of the woods with the cat thing, it has roared back to life. And now it is *the boy and the wife*. Tag team. Ge

I think the current votes are No: 1 Yes: Everyone else who knows Bill If you'd like a recount, you should take that up with the Supreme Court.  I'm sure they've got enough free time to fit

Am I the only one who's finding it hilarious that Bill is all "can't have a cat. nope, sounds like a lot of work" to "well, if we must get a cat it must be the most high-maintenance and weird breed I

Our cats and dogs have lived together fine, but I can’t really speak to breed specifics. Ours have been Rottie/Lab, GSD/Rottie, and a Chihuahua mix. Our cats have been pretty chill.

The Chi and 14yo cat currently play some psychological games with each other, but mostly avoid one another. The cat is about 3xs the dog’s size, lol.

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We've always had both dogs and cats. Our current pack is 11 dogs and 6 cats, all living in harmony. We have high prey drive breeds - a foxhound, a Catahoula, a pointer, Aussies - but they leave the cats alone, except to play. Most of the time, it's the cats egging the dogs on.🙂

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I've seen it go both ways. I had one cat that absolutely adored our dogs. We had other cats but I honestly think he identified as a dog. The dog tolerated the cat's affections. ETA that the dog in this case was a female German Shorthair Pointer mix. In my mind I associate these dogs with vizslas. Are the breeds related? There were really no problems. This dog was the runt of her litter and perhaps on the meek side.

Growing up, our dog (border collie mix) got along with our cats. 

My current situation is that my dog (Cairn terrier) and my cats hate each other. One cat occasionally seems to want to call a truce with the dog but for the most part, they just stay separate. 

My best advice is to get the cat. Get two actually. 

 

Edited by OH_Homeschooler
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9 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

You choose a confident cat. One that doesn’t cower in the corner. One that is curious and a bit adventurous. 

Right. Our cat was the kitten that climbed all over us, friendly and happy to meet new creatures. We didn’t choose the kitten that cowered under the bench and ran away when we tried to say hi. 

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It can work, even for dogs with a strong prey drive.  Make sure the cat has front claws to defend itself.    There are any number of videos on youtube where large dogs will not pass a cat in a hallway, or on the stairs.

I'm not a cat person (give me dogs, preferably a GSD) - but I have an aspie who has wanted a cat for a long time, so I caved and got him one.  My daughter brings her dogs over regularly.  Good socialization opportunities.   they're still in the getting used to each other stage.

 

You can do your initial introduction with the cat in a crate.  dog can sniff all it wants - but can't reach the cat.  if you want to put a small box inside where the cat can hide if it feels threatened, you can do that too.   we're in the stage of everyone is free to roam - but the cat will dash from under one piece of furniture to another.    

You may need to be creative about where the cat eats.   Dd's dogs will eat any leftover cat food as soon as they arrive.  (he's fed wet on a schedule, kibble is always available because he's a kitten.  I think he's starting a growth spurt as he's been wolfing down food the last two days.)

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We've had several dog/cat combinations, and have never had a problem.  Generally they'd first meet when quite young, under 2 or so.  But we have had older dogs get used to cats.  I think the hardest combo would be an older cat getting used to any age dog.  

During our last introduction, I was actually more concerned about the dog!  Cats can get feisty with their claws.  The dog learned his boundaries fast!  After that, they became friends.  (They were both a year or less.)

Generally the introduction happened over a couple weeks.  After that, they'd grow to slowly bond and even sleep together, or to mostly ignore each other (but peacefully).

Dog breeds we've had:  beagles, shepherd dogs (border collies, traditional collies), retrievers.

My brother has had vizslas and they always seemed pretty laid back to me.

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image.jpeg.ca1a49f7dba790d9c8cf9da04f5979f0.jpegImage of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
image.jpeg.7b324c25801babe1868667d8af6a0830.jpegImage of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
Image of vizsla with cats
 
 

Featured snippet from the web

Hungarian Vizsla and cats
Contrary to what one might expect, this hunting dog can absolutely get along with his feline counterparts. It is still advised that he grows up by the cat's side to fully consider it a part of his social group.
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Cats and dogs have gone great here.  Haven't had a Viszla but have had Huskies.  Cats are in charge dog may take a couple of swipes but they learn.  We have never had an injury.  At first they take turns being loose and caged/roomed so they can get the smell of each other.  Than pup on leash.   We like kitty to have a safe space.  Kitty has the whole run of the downstairs, kitty can come up but pup can't go down.  Kitty's food and litter are downstairs to which keeps puppy out of it.  Our kitty goes out they tend to take turns.

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We had three dogs and numerous indoor/outdoor cats when I was a kid. Everyone got along just fine, even newborn kittens. In fact, our Siberian Husky would move the kittens back to their cozy box upstairs if they happened to stumble down the stairs. He would put them in his mouth. Mama cat was fine with it. Amazingly.

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I used to be a dog person, but I converted to cat 8 years ago when we got Kendall. I still love dogs, but if I had to choose, I'd go with cat now. Sorry Bill, it may happen to you...

We have a strong-prey-drive yellow lab named Rowdy. He wanted to eat Kendall the kitty when we first introduced them. It took two months to change Rowdy's brain to think Kendall is in the pack and not to be eaten. But, it worked!

We kept them separated unless there was someone to supervise. We would put Rowdy in the dog crate in the middle of the living room and let the cat roam around freely (don't worry, we gave Rowdy plenty of play time and non-crate time). After a few weeks, my Dh would put Rowdy on the leash while Kendall roamed around. After a while, we could tell that Rowdy just thought of Kendall as part of the pack. Now they get along fine. We got a second cat and anticipated having to do the same thing, but Rowdy just accepted him as a new pack member. But if Rowdy sees a strange cat out the window, he goes nuts!

Our cats are indoor only because we have owls and coyotes nearby who would love to eat them.

My vote: get the cat! Maybe two!

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13 hours ago, Spy Car said:

Now my dog goes blind?

Ahhhhhhh!!!!!

I love Chester. No.

Bill

When we were at the vet's office on Monday, there was a dog in there to get the stitches removed from where they had to take out his eye. The cat did it.

I second a Maine Coon. They are the dogs of the cat world.

Not a snack:

 

01bba07ebdd07ecce80b304638de9da045d3fa0789.jpg

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1 hour ago, Spy Car said:

As "friends" or as "snacks?" :sad:  :biggrin:

Bill

Friends! Although never as friendly as he wanted them to be. He couldn't get enough love, whether it was from humans, another dog or a cat. Plus he was raised by a supremely confident male cat. He knew to respect the feline, or the hurt would be on him.

Seriously -- Once out of the kitten stage I'd worry much more about Chester than a cat. A fight between one dog (regardless of size) and one full grown, fully "armed" cat (regardless of size) -- my money is always on the cat.

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I have had several dogs that tolerated or enjoyed the company of cats, but when I was in high school my sister had a terrier Rottweiler mix that was safe around Adult cats but would kill kittens. She was never ever safe around kittens unless you were there every moment watching her, and then she would be shaking, trying so hard to be a good dog, but wanting so badly to kill the little furry thing.

 With our current dog, an English pointer who is death on wild rabbits, I made a big point of introducing the cat and hugging it and petting it and making sure she understood that it was part of the family. They snuggle up all the time now and are buddies, but if a strange cat comes into the yard, the dog is after it. But I still don’t know that she’s safe around tiny kittens, though once their eyes are open and they’re out and about she does fine with them.

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14 hours ago, Spy Car said:

People tell me this is a bad idea.

What do I know from cats??? I'm a dog guy. Cats??? 

Mrs Spy Car seems to be suffering for pre-empty-nest syndrome. Fine when she was talking a tortoise, but a cat?

And we have a dog. A bird dog. Vizsla. Strong prey drive. Sweet as can be, but a hunter.

This is a very bad idea right? Cats and dogs??? That can't work, right.

Oh dear. Oh dear.

Bill

 

I've always had cats and dogs together. Never an issue. Key is to have confident cats with claws - one swipe seems to to teach the dogs who is boss 🙂

Seriously though, timid cats are much harder with a dog. They run, and fluff up, and act more like prey. A confident cat will hold their ground and make it clear they are a household member, not a toy, thank you very much. 

Obviously, start with dog in the kennel or on leash, and areas for cat to hide (under furniture, etc). Put up a gate to give kitty a room to be safe in as well and put litter box there I guess...but seriously, never had an issue. My dogs will chase OTHER cats, but not "their" cats. They know the difference. 

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2 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

  There are any number of videos on youtube where large dogs will not pass a cat in a hallway, or on the stairs.

 

Ha! that' reminds me of the time my rescue weimaraner escaped (again....she could unlock the windows and open them), and I was out searching for her. All of a sudden I hear hissing. I'm now running into a stranger's backyard, terrified my 77 pound hunting breed is chasing a cat. Nope. My big beast of a dog was cornered BY a cat! Literally stuck in the corner of the yard, fence on either side, stuck due to an unhappy cat who wouldn't let the dog past. I had to chase the cat off myself, lol. 

 

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We currently have only cats but for most of my life I've had both. Sometimes  they became best friends, sometimes they agreed to live and let live but I've never had a situation where they didn't get along. 

I don't understand the claim that cats and dogs don't like each other. Its not been my experience nor that of anyone I know. 

Let Mrs. Spycar have her way. 🙂

 

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2 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

It can work, even for dogs with a strong prey drive.  Make sure the cat has front claws to defend itself.    There are any number of videos on youtube where large dogs will not pass a cat in a hallway, or on the stairs.

Snip

That reminds me of lab/golden retriever we pet sitted for once.  The cat startled the dog right next to the back door and the dog refused to go out the back door after that.  We walked it out through the front and around to the back yard for the rest of the weekend.  We didn't really try to fix the situation since it was only for the weekend.

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37 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Ha! that' reminds me of the time my rescue weimaraner escaped (again....she could unlock the windows and open them), and I was out searching for her. All of a sudden I hear hissing. I'm now running into a stranger's backyard, terrified my 77 pound hunting breed is chasing a cat. Nope. My big beast of a dog was cornered BY a cat! Literally stuck in the corner of the yard, fence on either side, stuck due to an unhappy cat who wouldn't let the dog past. I had to chase the cat off myself, lol. 

 

This is just one of many of this type of video.  If a cat will do this - dogs are nothing to them.

I had a neighbor growing up who had a cat.  She'd sit in an open basement window, dogs would walk right up to her . . . They learned the hard way to keep their distance.

sil had a cat they once spotting chasing  a couple of dogs down the street.  my bil would play tug-o-war with it.

 

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53 minutes ago, stephanier.1765 said:

When we were at the vet's office on Monday, there was a dog in there to get the stitches removed from where they had to take out his eye. The cat did it.

 

Injuries both ways can definitely happen. It is not a joke.

And I don’t know of a cat who became actual dog snack in same domesticated animals family with well fed dog, but a dog with prey drive killing a cat can certainly happen. 

 

Edited by Pen
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1 hour ago, stephanier.1765 said:

When we were at the vet's office on Monday, there was a dog in there to get the stitches removed from where they had to take out his eye. The cat did it.

I second a Maine Coon. They are the dogs of the cat world.

Not a snack:

 

01bba07ebdd07ecce80b304638de9da045d3fa0789.jpg

And cats get on  the beds?

And Chester will be blinded. Oh dear.

Keep these valuable posts coming  :tongue:

Bill

 

 

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I found this - it might be helpful:

https://www.lovelypuppies.online/ideas/vizslas-get-along-with-cats/

It gives you a step by step plan.  I like plans.  They make me happy. 🙂

I also have dogs and cats but am more of a cat person than a dog person.  I also have horses.  Just remember - dogs and horses are domesticated.  Cats are... not.  No matter what anyone tells you.  Cats would like us to believe they are domesticated - it's all a facade. 😜

This is one of our Great Pyrs with one of our outdoor barn cats.  They are best friends.

 

IMG_1594.JPG

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1 hour ago, Spy Car said:

And cats get on  the beds?

And Chester will be blinded. Oh dear.

Keep these valuable posts coming  :tongue:

Bill

 

 

Cats on beds? In my house, the bed seems to be a free for all. I'll always have something easy to wash covering it because I have had to clean my fair share of cat puke off of it. Now you really want a cat, don't you?

 

 

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Read the first page, skimmed the second, a few things that I didn't see mentioned:

Ideally, you have one litterbox per cat (or floor, whichever is the higher number). Although in principle the person who wanted the cat should change the litterbox, pregnant people should NOT change the box because of the risk of exposure to toxoplasmosis, which can harm the fetus. I don't think this is likely to be a problem for you at this point, but it's better you should know anyway.

Some cats can go inside and outside, however, quite aside from the effect on the local songbird and small rodent population they are at a high risk of early death due to predators or cars, especially if they haven't been altered - and a surprising number of cats decide to move in with a second household, leaving the first one totally in the dark as to where Kitty has gone! A safer option to allow your cat outside access is either to walk them with a harness or to enclose a "catio" area for them.

Not to start the dog food wars again, but everybody agrees that cats really are obligate carnivores and they also are notorious for not drinking enough water. You should keep the water bowl apart from the food bowl (and many cats prefer a running water fountain), and you should definitely give wet food if you have the budget for it. I would not advise you to make your own cat food unless you know what you're doing - they have some specific dietary needs that can be hard to replicate. There are recipes online, but they're so full of woo and conspiracy theories that I'm hesitant to trust any of them.

Despite claims that cats are solitary, I've always found they do better in households of 2 - 4 cats. If you're certain you only want one cat be certain to adopt an adult that is noted as being "good with dogs".

American shorthair isn't really a breed. I mean it is, but it's also used as a catchall term for shorthaired randombred tabbies. Unless your wife plans to go to a breeder she's just getting a cat. Which means that it might have any personality! You can't make assumptions, not like you can with Siamese (chatty!) or Maine Coons (easygoing!) or Turkish Vans (love to go swimming!)

Of course cats go on beds, and if they like you they'll generously allow you to share. They also get on tables and counters. People say to use spray bottles, but let's be honest - they're all smart enough to only do it when you're not around once they figure out that you're the one who sprays them.

I'd strongly suggest you work with your dog now on understanding a. he cannot chase animals on your property and b. he cannot chase cats at all. But if he's as well-trained as it sounds like, it shouldn't be insurmountable.

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Oh, and one more thing: you should definitely never declaw a cat (especially if you're worried about the dog) but you *should* get into the habit of trimming the claws. It's best to start in kittenhood, but even an adult cat can learn to tolerate claw trimming time, and it's easier than handling dog toenails... though if you're hesitant, you can have the vet do it, which is what I do with my doggies.

And you *should* be brushing your cat's teeth every day, same as you do your dog's teeth. Nobody does this, but veterinary dental bills are no joke.

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3 hours ago, Pen said:

 

Injuries both ways can definitely happen. It is not a joke.

And I don’t know of a cat who became actual dog snack in same domesticated animals family with well fed dog, but a dog with prey drive killing a cat can certainly happen. 

 

Oh, yes. That reminds me, twice in my life I've known of kittens getting killed by wandering too close to the dog while he was eating. Once was in my own house, another was a neighbor of my grandmother's.

This is less likely to happen with fully-grown cats, but nevertheless, if there's any chance that your dog will react badly to a cat wandering close to the food dish you should be careful to either feed the dog in a closed-off room or isolate the cat during the dog's mealtimes or both.

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2 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

I'd strongly suggest you work with your dog now on understanding a. he cannot chase animals on your property and b. he cannot chase cats at all. But if he's as well-trained as it sounds like, it shouldn't be insurmountable.

Oh dear. Chester spends a good portion of his waking hours chasing animals on our property. We have very brave (foolish) squirrels.

I actually like the idea of making cat food. The ratios are the same as PMR dog food--with the added necessity of making sure there is enough taurine.

Bill

 

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37 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Oh, and one more thing: you should definitely never declaw a cat (especially if you're worried about the dog) but you *should* get into the habit of trimming the claws. It's best to start in kittenhood, but even an adult cat can learn to tolerate claw trimming time, and it's easier than handling dog toenails... though if you're hesitant, you can have the vet do it, which is what I do with my doggies.

And you *should* be brushing your cat's teeth every day, same as you do your dog's teeth. Nobody does this, but veterinary dental bills are no joke.

With dogs, I condition them for a dremmel for nail trimmings. Those work for cats or are clippers better?

Bill

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11 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

With dogs, I condition them for a dremmel for nail trimmings. Those work for cats or are clippers better?

Bill

No Dremels for cats! Not needed, and I for one wouldn't dare try a Dremel near a cat. Eek! The little scissors type clippers work wonderfully well. For smaller cats a human nail clipper can work fine. Clipping cat claws is way easier than doing dogs' nails. All you need to do is snip off the sharp tips regularly.

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15 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

With dogs, I condition them for a dremmel for nail trimmings. Those work for cats or are clippers better?

Bill

Definitely not dremel. 1. they cat won't let you. 2. their claws are in layers, like an onion. They are much softer and totally different. You just trim them and they are blunted immediately. 

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27 minutes ago, ktgrok said:

Definitely not dremel. 1. they cat won't let you. 2. their claws are in layers, like an onion. They are much softer and totally different. You just trim them and they are blunted immediately. 

Had a feeling. What do I know? Thanks.

Bill

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29 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

No Dremels for cats! Not needed, and I for one wouldn't dare try a Dremel near a cat. Eek! The little scissors type clippers work wonderfully well. For smaller cats a human nail clipper can work fine. Clipping cat claws is way easier than doing dogs' nails. All you need to do is snip off the sharp tips regularly.

Thanks to you too.

Bill

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1 hour ago, Tanaqui said:

 

Some cats can go inside and outside, however, quite aside from the effect on the local songbird and small rodent population <snip>

 

Of course cats go on beds, and if they like you they'll generously allow you to share. They also get on tables and counters. People say to use spray bottles, but let's be honest - they're all smart enough to only do it when you're not around once they figure out that you're the one who sprays them.

 

That's why there are bells on collars. . . . . I can hear his tag bang against his bell.  it helps to locate him.

I was reading a forum on the spray bottles. . . . while some cats will learn to just avoid doing it when you're there, there were other cats who reportedly loved the spray bottle and would do things to demand the spray bottle.   either way, defeats the purpose.

 

I can't find it - but i loved the picture of the four dogs and one cat sitting on a couch.  They are 60lb dogs - they are pig piled on top of each other, careful to avoid the cat who is easily taking up 1 1/2 cushions by itself.

1 hour ago, Spy Car said:

With dogs, I condition them for a dremmel for nail trimmings. Those work for cats or are clippers better?

Bill

I use regular human toenail clippers for kitten.  works well (now at least).  I give him a high value treat as soon as I'm done, have done a few.

1 hour ago, Terabith said:

I've heard of people whose dogs don't get on the beds, but all the dogs we ever had always did.  

My GSD was trained quickly bed was a no-no.  (I got her off right after she jumped up when she was a puppy.  I think three times.  she never jumped on the bed again.)  only the living/dining room was carpeted at the time.  she was also trained to stay off of it.  she'd lay at the edge, and creep - but just saying her name in a low growl she'd move back.   She was a great dog.  I miss her.

When we'd pack the car to go on  a trip - she'd sit right there.  Wouldn't budge.  Then I'd say "car ride" - and she'd jump up and over the back of the hatchback to get in.  she'd also wait for the command to get out.

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19 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Can one teach cats to come (recall)?

Bill

If you shake their food dish, they will come a'running. Other than that, it's all about if they're in my the mood to pay attention to you.  If they are, they'll come. If they have better things to do ... not so much.

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And what about this whole inside/outside thing?

We have a huge nice yard, with some semi-wild aspects and oak trees. An animal paradise in my mind. Plus generally good weather.

And doors are often open.

Can a cat be in and out a little? Or once "out" will they just roam?

Bill 

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27 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Can one teach cats to come (recall)?

Bill

It depends on the cat.  Some cats are responsive to positive reinforcement training and some are not.  Obama knows his name and comes when we call if he's within hearing distance.  We do let Obama the cat go outside, because he's much more pleasant that way.  Over the years, I've had one other cat that came when he was called reliably and one who came sometimes/ when she was younger, but she didn't go outside, so it wasn't really tested.  

The other half of the cats we've had over the years did not come and really weren't trainable.  Obama actually kind of enjoys clicker training and learning to do tricks.  I think if I had more patience, he could learn to do a much wider assortment of commands.  He's pretty treat responsive and very smart.  

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8 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

If you shake their food dish, they will come a'running. Other than that, it's all about if they're in my the mood to pay attention to you.  If they are, they'll come. If they have better things to do ... not so much.

What if I had one of those triangular "dinner bells" like one sees in old western films? And I clanged the triangle and said: "Come and get it?"

Would that work?

Bill

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2 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

And what about this whole inside/outside thing?

We have a huge nice yard, with some semi-wild aspects and oak trees. An animal paradise in my mind. Plus generally good weather.

And doors are often open.

Can a cat be in and out a little? Or once "out" will they just roam?

Bill 

Depends on the cat, if they'll roam.  I suspect most will roam, although my mom had a pretty old cat that didn't roam much.  

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