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Were you familiar with this term last week?


Homeschool Mom in AZ
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Were you familiar with this term last week?   

251 members have voted

  1. 1. Before the last US Presidential Debate this week, were you familiar with the term "coyote" in reference to a human smuggler trafficker-slave trader? If you've lived in the US, what regions have you lived in. If you've never lived in the US, what countries have you lived in?

    • No, this is the first time I've ever heard that term used.
      19
    • No, I had never heard that term used before the debate.
      5
    • Yes, I had heard that term before the debate, but I've never personally used it in a conversation.
      127
    • Yes, I had heard that term before the debate and I've personally used it in conversation.
      103


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I am from California - I know this term and have heard it used. I used to be a TV watcher 20 years ago and was also deeply interested in immigration issues at one time. So, yes, I am familiar with it (along with phrases like "You messed with the wrong Hombre") etc.  

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I have heard coyote for crossing the US-Mexico border, and snakehead for bringing people from China.  
 

I’m from Oklahoma.  There are trafficked people along an Interstate here sometimes.  It will be in the news sometimes.  

Edited by Lecka
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I heard it more with human trafficking when I was younger.  I have also heard it for crossing the border since I have been older.

I don’t know exactly where the line is drawn between human trafficking and crossing the border, though.

When I was younger I do think it was human trafficking, people being kept in poor conditions and things like that.  
 

But I would hear of it from 18-wheelers being found with a lot of people in the back with no water, and things like that.   Edit:  and very shady working conditions where people might be stuck somewhere with no way to leave, working way too much, not getting paid properly, etc.  

Edited by Lecka
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I don't think I've used it just because human smuggling isn't a standard conversation topic, but I don't remember not knowing what it means.  My parents, in their 70s, know the term.  We're in Appalachia and have mostly lived in the southeast (we did live in NM for a while, but we knew it before we lived there and have heard it since we moved back).  

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Seen it in films, news stuff, maybe in books. I think I've probably used it before. Never lived near any US borders unless you count all those embassies I pass constantly. Someone on my feed posted something implying that she did not know it (something along the lines of "what in the world is he trying to say this time"). I couldn't decide if she was being disingenuous or what. He did use a lot of insidery language, but that didn't seem unusual.

Edited by Farrar
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Very familiar with the term. I think it is widely known and understood term here in Los Angeles.

In the main using "coyote" in this context as a human smuggler typically would be pronounced with a Spanish/Mexican inflection (as opposed to the Anglo/American pronunciation used to describe our local wild canines) .

Bill

 

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It's a pretty common term.  I've heard it in conversation but I can't honestly remember if I've used it or not.  It's not unusual but it's also not a topic of local conversation. I've never lived anywhere near the border (beyond a few months in San Angelo, TX) so I think it's in the realm of American common knowledge. I have no idea if it's a global term that applies elsewhere or not.

Edited by KungFuPanda
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PNW - yes, I already knew what it meant.  \

 we are an area affected by them, even though weren't not near the southern border.

 

and as for the four legged kind . . . . . they'd better get their scrawny behinds back here and feast on my rabbits!

 

Edited by gardenmom5
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I didn't listen to the debate (I never listen to politicians talk)  but know the term from watching lots of TV. I never used it myself bc I don't have immigration conversations with people - makes my blood pressure go up.

But I thought everyone knew what it means......the things I learn on this board 🙂

Edited by SereneHome
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I've always been interested in this issue of immigration*, so yes, I'm familiar with the term.

 

* While nearly everybody who supports immigration reform simply wants reform, I've increasingly moved leftwards over the past decade or so and now want the borders to be open to virtually everybody. Keep out violent criminals, let the rest in. Almost nobody wants that, no matter what the rightwing tries to claim, but I'm convinced by now that a labor tariff - which is what immigration controls are - is counterproductive.

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