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12 hours ago, MEmama said:

And that is why Australia is winning and COVID in America has been labeled a humanitarian crisis. 

To be honest I’m not feeling it today.  People queued for six hours today.  Apparently people were using the street as a bathroom because they didn’t want to leave the queue (these are not high socioeconomic areas either).  Tomorrow is going to be mid 30s and high 30s the day after.  You’d be at risk of picking it up while waiting.

Its fabulous that so many people are seeking testing but I hope they get the facility in place to process them more efficiently soon.  Part of the problem may be people in the areas not having access to vehicles to drive to other less busy testing sites as well.

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My mother in law died of covid related stuff this afternoon. 

Thank you.   I wish I had a good update to give.  Michelle's family made the decision to discontinue life support today.  Her lungs were sustaining damage while on the ventilator, but were not he

Another uncle of mine has died of covid. That's three for our family. They did not live near each other. 😞

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53 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

My friend Michelle is not doing well.

Her husband updated that the prognosis is very poor. She is on 100% oxygen, but is only able to maintain 87% oxygen saturation. Most recent imaging shows her lungs have severe scarring and are unlikely to heal any further. She is having trouble moving CO2 out of her body.  When they have tried to decrease her sedation, her bp shoots up to 230 (sorry, I don't know the diastolic value).  On top of this, she has a bacterial pneumonia. Because of this combination of issues, she is not a good candidate for the ECMO. 

The doctor said that he's seen people come back from this situation, but not often.  She has been declining a little each day for the last several days.  Her kids and husband are going to be allowed to see her briefly tomorrow.  

If you have any prayers left, Michelle's family could use them. They need a miracle.  😢

Oh no, I’m so very sorry to hear this. I’ll be praying for a miracle for them 😢

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7 hours ago, MissLemon said:

 

Yep! It's just a waiting game now. I expect that by this time next year, most adults in the US will have been offered the vaccine.  I don't know exactly where the trials are at for kids, though. I think Pfizer has a trial going for kids 12-16 right now, but I'm not sure.  

I have questions about how we get undocumented people vaccinated, too.  We can't simply shrug and act like it's not our problem.   

I wonder about how everyone will be included too. Almost everyone in the UK has an NHS GP so there's already a system to offer flu jabs to people most at risk, for example. How will the US organise this? Genuine question. 

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6 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

I wonder about how everyone will be included too. Almost everyone in the UK has an NHS GP so there's already a system to offer flu jabs to people most at risk, for example. How will the US organise this? Genuine question. 

I would assume that they would organize it the way that they organize all other vaccinations.  That people could choose to get them from their regular primary care doctors or from pharmacies.  Insurance companies cover vaccines from both. 

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37 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I would assume that they would organize it the way that they organize all other vaccinations.  That people could choose to get them from their regular primary care doctors or from pharmacies.  Insurance companies cover vaccines from both. 

I was thinking about staging: if there are limited supplies, would the pharmacies/doctors check individually whether a person was in a high-risk category, or would it be first-come-first-served?  I've also often heard on this board about people not being registered with a primary care doctor - is that a common thing?

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8 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

I've also often heard on this board about people not being registered with a primary care doctor - is that a common thing?

We don't have a primary care doctor, specifically. We're usually (knock on wood) stupid healthy. When we ARE sick, our old primary doctors would usually have a day or two delay before we could make an appointment. So we just started going to the nearby Urgent Care Center for those sinus or ear infections, flu symptoms, etc that would pop up occasionally.

DH and I are starting to look for a regular doctor,though. There are some routine tests we should start having done now that we're getting up there in years... 😄 And urgent care doesn't do those... lol

A lot of vaccines are often given at pharmacies or even in drive-through car lines here - no routine doctor needed!

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51 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

So how will limited vaccine supplies be dealt with, I'm wondering?

I remember the distribution of H1N1 vaccine. I was working in a primary care office within a hospital at the time. As an employee, I got mine in the first batch our office received. We sent postcards to priority patients of the practice (based on age, and diagnosis) in rounds as batches of the vaccine arrived. Also for anyone who came in for an already scheduled office visit, if they met the requirements, they were offered the vaccine on the spot. I recall having to help manage the vaccine frig. We could only store a certain amount at a time, so it had to be staggered carefully. 

I also remember getting a card from my child's pediatrician, telling us to show up for a specific week-end vaccine clinic, or to call if that did not work for our schedule.

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6 hours ago, MissLemon said:

My friend Michelle is not doing well.

Her husband updated that the prognosis is very poor. She is on 100% oxygen, but is only able to maintain 87% oxygen saturation. Most recent imaging shows her lungs have severe scarring and are unlikely to heal any further. She is having trouble moving CO2 out of her body.  When they have tried to decrease her sedation, her bp shoots up to 230 (sorry, I don't know the diastolic value).  On top of this, she has a bacterial pneumonia. Because of this combination of issues, she is not a good candidate for the ECMO. 

The doctor said that he's seen people come back from this situation, but not often.  She has been declining a little each day for the last several days.  Her kids and husband are going to be allowed to see her briefly tomorrow.  

If you have any prayers left, Michelle's family could use them. They need a miracle.  😢

Oh no 😞 . I am so sorry to hear that. Sending all the positive energy.

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Miss Lemon, prayers for Michelle.

Here Walgreens and CVS are making preparations for the vaccine — I think this has to do with refrigeration.  I’m not sure about details.  They have both advertised (?) they are making preparations but I am so vague on details. (Maybe I read this in the newspaper or heard it?  I don’t know how I know, but this is what I have in my mind.) 
 

My family has gotten flu shots at Walgreens, Target, and Wal-Mart.  We have also gotten them from a flu clinic and in a doctors office.  We have gotten most of our flu shots at Wal-Mart though — we lived several years in a place where the only nearby place to go was a Wal-Mart.  
 

CVS doesn’t take our insurance for flu shots.  Today, right now, I picture us going to the same Walgreens where we got flu shots this year to get the coronavirus vaccine someday.  

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8 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

I was thinking about staging: if there are limited supplies, would the pharmacies/doctors check individually whether a person was in a high-risk category, or would it be first-come-first-served?  I've also often heard on this board about people not being registered with a primary care doctor - is that a common thing?

I don’t know. But my doctor told me that I am definitely considered high risk. I don’t know if they will be able to determine that for patients and ration it out. I assume that vaccines will first go to seniors in nursing homes though. 

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I wonder if having family members die will make you high risk according to the vaccine protocol.

 I have a risk factor but honestly, because my sister has had a mild case I'm slightly less worried about it. There is obviously some genetic factor that puts you at risk and the local immunologist says he has seen many of the same family in the ICU together. It seems, from my clueless internet educated self, that if you have had multiple family members get a severe version or die from it, that even if you are younger and healthier you could be at risk for severe illness and permanent damage (heart, lung, brain)  if not death and should be allowed a vaccine before the general public.

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13 minutes ago, frogger said:

I wonder if having family members die will make you high risk according to the vaccine protocol.

 I have a risk factor but honestly, because my sister has had a mild case I'm slightly less worried about it. There is obviously some genetic factor that puts you at risk and the local immunologist says he has seen many of the same family in the ICU together. It seems, from my clueless internet educated self, that if you have had multiple family members get a severe version or die from it, that even if you are younger and healthier you could be at risk for severe illness and permanent damage (heart, lung, brain)  if not death and should be allowed a vaccine before the general public.

There’s obviously a factor that puts you at risk. Is there evidence that it’s genetic, though?

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Well, there is only observations of what is happening around us. One of my closest friends has a friend in California. 6 family members have gotten Covid, 4 have died and they didn't all live together.  Meanwhile, other families get it or some get it and others in the same house don't and no one dies. Often just a loss of taste and smell or maybe some cold symptoms. Obviously, the majority of cases are mild so I'm not sure the average person needs to be in fear but if I had a family member who had died from it or if my husband had a family member who died from it, it would be really hard not to get paranoid and I might go back to wiping down groceries as they came inside the house because deaths seem very clustered and often within families or communities with similar background. Since my sister hardly noticed being sick, I'm more worried about accidently spreading it without knowing then I am getting it. So that is more my reason for restricting activities and wearing masks that fit well, etc. 

 

I realize they have looked at specific genes, blood types, and a number of other factors. I don't know that there is strong evidence for any one thing but I think it's obvious enough to pay attention to.

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8 hours ago, slackermom said:

I remember the distribution of H1N1 vaccine. I was working in a primary care office within a hospital at the time. As an employee, I got mine in the first batch our office received. We sent postcards to priority patients of the practice (based on age, and diagnosis) in rounds as batches of the vaccine arrived. Also for anyone who came in for an already scheduled office visit, if they met the requirements, they were offered the vaccine on the spot. I recall having to help manage the vaccine frig. We could only store a certain amount at a time, so it had to be staggered carefully. 

I also remember getting a card from my child's pediatrician, telling us to show up for a specific week-end vaccine clinic, or to call if that did not work for our schedule.

I got the H1N1 vaccine from the county health department. IIRC, the county health department had it before it was available in doctor's offices and you had to be higher risk to be get. I qualified because I was pregnant. 

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25 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

There’s obviously a factor that puts you at risk. Is there evidence that it’s genetic, though?

Isn't there some speculation that there are slightly different strains? So a family might have more serious cases, not because of a genetic factor, but because the strain that they were exposed to is more dangerous? 

I read something months ago about that family in New Jersey that got it very early and had several deaths. There's some horse racing connection too. Anyone remember this? 

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5 minutes ago, frogger said:

Well, there is only observations of what is happening around us. One of my closest friends has a friend in California. 6 family members have gotten Covid, 4 have died and they didn't all live together.  Meanwhile, other families get it or some get it and others in the same house don't and no one dies. Often just a loss of taste and smell or maybe some cold symptoms. Obviously, the majority of cases are mild so I'm not sure the average person needs to be in fear but if I had a family member who had died from it or if my husband had a family member who died from it, it would be really hard not to get paranoid and I might go back to wiping down groceries as they came inside the house because deaths seem very clustered and often within families or communities with similar background. Since my sister hardly noticed being sick, I'm more worried about accidently spreading it without knowing then I am getting it. So that is more my reason for restricting activities and wearing masks that fit well, etc. 

 

I realize they have looked at specific genes, blood types, and a number of other factors. I don't know that there is strong evidence for any one thing but I think it's obvious enough to pay attention to.

I wonder if you’re right that it’s genetic. Did the family members that all got very sick live nearby and spend time together or no?

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1 minute ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

Isn't there some speculation that there are slightly different strains? So a family might have more serious cases, not because of a genetic factor, but because the strain that they were exposed to is more dangerous? 

I read something months ago about that family in New Jersey that got it very early and had several deaths. There's some horse racing connection too. Anyone remember this? 

I’ve seen the speculation about strains, yes. Also, speculation that exposure to “common cold” coronaviruses might help. 

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27 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

I wonder if you’re right that it’s genetic. Did the family members that all got very sick live nearby and spend time together or no?

Well,  4 of them got it early summer. 2 of them got it much later and since they were adults, they were living separately but I suppose they could have just got the same strain but there are so many stories of it taking out a large number of one family that it would make me nervous if it were me in that situation.

I had read some genetic studies about people unable to fight off covid but I would have to find them again.

 

That being said, even adults that lived together when younger could have been exposed to something that created a similar immune response.

Not arguing for that, just thinking out loud. 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, MEmama said:

This is a fascinating discussion! Is anyone aware of whether having had H1N1 might potentially affect COVID symptoms, or are they in no way related? 

I would expect them to be unrelated, since one is a flu and one is a coronavirus. I think they are quite different viruses. 

You'd probably never know if you had a common cold coronavirus, since I don't think they present differently from the many, many rhinoviruses. At least I think so... correct me if I'm wrong. 

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1 minute ago, Not_a_Number said:

I would expect them to be unrelated, since one is a flu and one is a coronavirus. I think they are quite different viruses. 

You'd probably never know if you had a common cold coronavirus, since I don't think they present differently from the many, many rhinoviruses. At least I think so... correct me if I'm wrong. 

Thanks! Not a rabbit trail I will attempt to search out, then. 🙂 

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On 11/16/2020 at 1:46 PM, Melissa in Australia said:

A very interesting attitude. 

 

Here if one family member has it, every single member will be tested, and most probably everyone in the street and everyone who has ever had anything to do with anyone in the family will be rushing to be tested as well. 

 

They all have symptoms. Those symptoms all appeared within 2 days of each other. ,They all were exposed to the same person (her husband, their father). They know where he got it because of contact tracing at his work. Other than him at work, they have seen no one besides each other. They were doing curbside pickup for groceries and no contact delivery for restaurant food since March. The kids play in the wooden privacy fenced back yard. My niece has spoken to people at the health department where she and her husband were tested. They know about the kids. They told her what to do about quarantining everyone knowing the kids were not being tested. It's an unpleasant test for adults, let alone kids and toddlers. It's not as though they said "Oh well, we're all sick so we'll just quarantine ourselves". They were given specific instructions from a government health agency, with people at that agency knowing the entire family wasn't being tested. 

11 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I would assume that they would organize it the way that they organize all other vaccinations.  That people could choose to get them from their regular primary care doctors or from pharmacies.  Insurance companies cover vaccines from both. 

Or the health department. Ours usually gives flu shots so they might give the Covid vaccine as well. 

I'm excited about the Moderna vaccine. I just read this morning that Dolly Parton helped fund the research (like a HUGE amount of money). I love her. ❤️ 

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11 hours ago, Lady Florida. said:

They all have symptoms. Those symptoms all appeared within 2 days of each other. ,They all were exposed to the same person (her husband, their father). They know where he got it because of contact tracing at his work. Other than him at work, they have seen no one besides each other. They were doing curbside pickup for groceries and no contact delivery for restaurant food since March. The kids play in the wooden privacy fenced back yard. My niece has spoken to people at the health department where she and her husband were tested. They know about the kids. They told her what to do about quarantining everyone knowing the kids were not being tested. It's an unpleasant test for adults, let alone kids and toddlers. It's not as though they said "Oh well, we're all sick so we'll just quarantine ourselves". They were given specific instructions from a government health agency, with people at that agency knowing the entire family wasn't being tested. 

Or the health department. Ours usually gives flu shots so they might give the Covid vaccine as well. 

I'm excited about the Moderna vaccine. I just read this morning that Dolly Parton helped fund the research (like a HUGE amount of money). I love her. ❤️ 

Or even certain job sites for certain essential services.  For example, my husband who works in healthcare has all of their (required) vaccines provided by his employer. 

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23 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

So how will limited vaccine supplies be dealt with, I'm wondering?

Gov. Cuomo gave a very impassioned speech the other day about the importance of assuring that poor people and communities of color, who often live in what he referred to as "healthcare deserts," would get the vaccine. His general theme was that we can't let those who are among the most vulnerable be the last to get access. He said he wants to work with community organizations, educational institutions, faith communities, etc. — local organizations that are trusted within their communities — to both encourage uptake and help with distribution.

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On 11/16/2020 at 10:38 PM, MissLemon said:

My friend Michelle is not doing well.

Her husband updated that the prognosis is very poor. She is on 100% oxygen, but is only able to maintain 87% oxygen saturation. Most recent imaging shows her lungs have severe scarring and are unlikely to heal any further. She is having trouble moving CO2 out of her body.  When they have tried to decrease her sedation, her bp shoots up to 230 (sorry, I don't know the diastolic value).  On top of this, she has a bacterial pneumonia. Because of this combination of issues, she is not a good candidate for the ECMO. 

The doctor said that he's seen people come back from this situation, but not often.  She has been declining a little each day for the last several days.  Her kids and husband are going to be allowed to see her briefly tomorrow.  

If you have any prayers left, Michelle's family could use them. They need a miracle.  😢

I am so sorry.  I am holding Michelle close in my heart and prayers.  

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I don't keep up with this thread very well.... It's so long!  But I check in from time to time.  @MissLemon, I'll say a prayer for Michelle.

My dd (who is going to graduate school abroad) was just diagnosed with Covid, as well as her boyfriend and another housemate who is a speech therapist at a long-term care facility.  Nearly everyone at the care facility has Covid now, and many have died.  My dd's symptoms began with a slight cough and feeling fatigued, and then 5 days later a fever with strange aches and pains.  Now she has lost all sense of smell and taste, and says her sinuses feel like they're burning.

My brother is a research scientist.  He said they're learning that fighting Covid (via vaccines) may not be so much about building up antibodies, but something else... like helping the body actually change the way it fights it.  Similar to the body's response to a measles vaccine, maybe?  Certainly I'm not explaining this well!

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On 11/13/2020 at 8:11 PM, Toocrazy!! said:

Well, covid hit here dramatically this last week or so. I personally know 7 people who have active cases right now. At least 6 have loss of smell. Only one had a fever.

87 year old man, a fib, completely exhausted. Completely. But otherwise no complications at this point. He’s ok day 7 or 8 of symptoms we think. Hard to tell with fatigue. 

59 year old male, asymptomatic except for slight loss of smell 

54 year old female, history of cancer but good health now- Aches, headache, loss of smell, fatigue

54 female- same. 15 days out, still exhausted. 
 

59 male, diabetic, aches, headache, some sugar issues, but under control 

48 male, overweight, maybe obese, no other issues, loss of smell only so far. 
 

51 female, no health issues, aches, sore throat, very early on in symptoms 

It’s crazy here right now. Everyone seemed to get it all at once, so it’s hard to figure out any tracing on how it started. 

All my people are doing fairly well except 87 year old male. He had to be admitted to the hospital with low oxygen numbers. They slowly fell over the last week and today were too low for too long. If you pray, please pray for him. And all the other patients that are alone in the hospital. Such a terribly sad time for all the families facing this. 

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1 minute ago, Toocrazy!! said:

All my people are doing fairly well except 87 year old male. He had to be admitted to the hospital with low oxygen numbers. They slowly fell over the last week and today were too low for too long. If you pray, please pray for him. And all the other patients that are alone in the hospital. Such a terribly sad time for all the families facing this. 

Sending all the positive energy. I'm really sorry 😞 . 

Did other people on your list recover or do some still have symptoms? 

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7 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

Bump. How is everyone doing? @Amoret and @Frances, how are your families? 

@Mrs Tiggywinkle, I hope you have a happier update soon, too, but I'd love to hear your summary so far, just for the record. 

My SIL is out of quarantine and back to work. My brother is finally steadily improving. My mom’s care for non-covid related health issues continues to be greatly impacted by being in a hotspot. Right now she has another surgery scheduled for next week, but there is a pretty good chance it will be cancelled either because of the virus or because she won’t be ready to tolerate it. Rather than spend a week or so in the hospital due to her health risks, if she does have it, there will be no hospitalization at all. All of the pre and post op care and monitoring will be done on an outpatient basis. Fortunately, she is back in her senior apartment which would be walking distance from the hospital if she were healthy. And they are allowing family members in to help her. But the hospital and clinics are back to patients and staff only.

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1 minute ago, Frances said:

My SIL is out of quarantine and back to work. My brother is finally steadily improving. My mom’s care for non-covid related health issues continues to be greatly impacted by being in a hotspot. Right now she has another surgery scheduled for next week, but there is a pretty good chance it will be cancelled either because of the virus or because she won’t be ready to tolerate it. Rather than spend a week or so in the hospital due to her health risks, if she does have it, there will be no hospitalization at all. All of the pre and post op care and monitoring will be done on an outpatient basis. Fortunately, she is back in her senior apartment which would be walking distance from the hospital if she were healthy. And they are allowing family members in to help her. But the hospital and clinics are back to patients and staff only.

Ooof. I hope she manages to get her surgery and it goes well... keep us updated. 

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On 11/13/2020 at 10:40 AM, kbutton said:

I just got word that one of my parent's cousins has COVID, and his wife passed away from it overnight. I didn't know they were ill until now. Of the two of them, I would've thought he would be the most fragile health wise. He had a mild heart attack, was in the ICU, and is now in a regular room--taking food and alert. She became ill quite fast with pneumonia, GI issues, and some kind of bleeding (maybe internally?). 

They are snowbirds and became ill almost as soon as they arrived in their home in the south. 

So, my parent's cousin is not doing well. He has double-pneumonia, and his kidneys are failing. Obviously, people have this happen and go home weeks and months later, but he has long-standing kidney issues. I think I said elsewhere in the thread, but he is 85. 

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Just now, kbutton said:

So, my parent's cousin is not doing well. He has double-pneumonia, and his kidneys are failing. Obviously, people have this happen and go home weeks and months later, but he has long-standing kidney issues. I think I said elsewhere in the thread, but he is 85. 

I'm really sorry to hear that. 

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3 hours ago, kbutton said:

So, my parent's cousin is not doing well. He has double-pneumonia, and his kidneys are failing. Obviously, people have this happen and go home weeks and months later, but he has long-standing kidney issues. I think I said elsewhere in the thread, but he is 85. 

Oh no. 😞 I am hoping he pulls through!

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Friend’s dd is really struggling with exhaustion and full body aches. I haven’t pressed for more details.

Dh had another friend/work associate turn up positive. I don’t know what all of her activities have been, but she says she’s taken every precaution possible, specifically because her husband has cancer. Even continuing to disinfect groceries. But it got in somehow! No real details on her condition, just her complete shock over it.

Has anyone else lost count of how many people they know who’ve been affected? It’s wearing on me.

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2 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

Friend’s dd is really struggling with exhaustion and full body aches. I haven’t pressed for more details.

Dh had another friend/work associate turn up positive. I don’t know what all of her activities have been, but she says she’s taken every precaution possible, specifically because her husband has cancer. Even continuing to disinfect groceries. But it got in somehow! No real details on her condition, just her complete shock over it.

Has anyone else lost count of how many people they know who’ve been affected? It’s wearing on me.

We’ve long since stopped disinfecting groceries, but we don’t go inside anywhere... that seems to be how it spreads. 

And yes, I’ve lost track.

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33 minutes ago, Not_a_Number said:

We’ve long since stopped disinfecting groceries, but we don’t go inside anywhere... that seems to be how it spreads. 

And yes, I’ve lost track.

I don't think we know how it spreads totally yet. We've seen a few posts by people that they don't know where they got it, are only doing grocery pick up and no contact take out. Which makes me think maybe th groceries or food delivery?

And the spread by the pizza parlor worker in Australia - do we know if it was spread via the air and the person who got it was in the same vicinity, or could it have been from the food?

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On 11/15/2020 at 12:54 PM, teachermom2834 said:

My 22 yo ds called me this morning and informed me that he will be getting tested tomorrow. One of his housemates is positive with mild symptoms. He shares a small rental house with three other people. It is him, two friends and a girlfriend of one friend; all recent college grads. 

They have been pretty careful, just sticking to themselves socially. Three of the four work remotely from the house. The one who goes out to work is the one who got it. He is also the one with the live in girlfriend. So far the girlfriend has tested negative and the other two guys are getting tested in the morning. 

They all figure they are very exposed at this point. It's a small house and they do almost everything together. Instead of leaving and going to their parents' houses they are all just hunkering down in the house. They had each planned to go home for Thanksgiving but now they are planning their own holiday there together. 

I'm not terribly worried but of course I am some. It really felt like a matter of time before one of us got it.  I do feel a little vindicated in canceling my extended family Thanksgiving get together. I was willing to have my own adult children come home and risk exposure but I didn't want to expose anyone else to them and I didn't really want to expose my family to all the young adults coming in from all over. This is exactly the scenario I envisioned being dangerous and putting me at risk of hosting a superspreader event. 

So, we will wait and see. 

Quoting myself with results. My ds is positive. He has a mild cold but definitely has symptoms. He works remotely and is fine to take a Dayquil and forget about it. It isn't so bad as something that he would ever go to the doctor for. Mainly a cough and just feeling run down. 

The housemate that originally tested positive is feeling better. The girlfriend originally tested negative at the same time but has since been tested again and awaiting results. The other housemate is also awaiting results. They are all doing okay. They put up Christmas lights and decorated inside the house. All but one are able to keep working remotely. 

My best friend who lives about an hour away tested positive. Her husband got tested because he has symptoms. He was positive so she got tested and got a positive although she is totally asymptomatic. She's a high school teacher so has been in the classroom with it. Her school is careful but obviously it is still an issue. 

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Just now, ktgrok said:

I don't think we know how it spreads totally yet. We've seen a few posts by people that they don't know where they got it, are only doing grocery pick up and no contact take out. Which makes me think maybe th groceries or food delivery?

Maybe. People not going to doctor's offices or anywhere at all? Because we're pretty locked down, and we've still gone to the doctor. 

 

Just now, ktgrok said:

And the spread by the pizza parlor worker in Australia - do we know if it was spread via the air and the person who got it was in the same vicinity, or could it have been from the food?

I haven't heard about this -- let me look into it. 

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It looks like the pizza outbreak started with someone working there: 

https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/coronavirus/2020/11/19/south-australia-coronavirus-pizza/

They are asking people who ordered takeout to self-quarantine, but I don't think they've actually found cases this way yet. I don't remember New Zealand having much spread like this, last I looked at the data... not that it's impossible, but I've been assuming it's pretty rare. Although perhaps now that the numbers are going up in the Northeast, I should get more vigilant. 

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My father tested positive yesterday. My mother tested positive a few days ago. They are in Oregon. 

My sister, who is a physician (psychiatrist), says that the health systems are supposed to be monitoring outpatient COVID patients but that does not appear to be happening with my parents. For Oregon folks, my parents' PCP is affiliated with Providence. My suspicion is that the system is falling apart because so many people are testing positive now. 

My sister reached out to my aunt who is a gerontologist because she felt that the PCP's office was not monitoring my parents. My aunt called my parents and provided them with some good guidance about monitoring their oxygen saturation levels. Early in the pandemic, my sister recommended that all we have pulse oximeters at home so my parents have one. 

Initially my father had no symptoms but now he is extremely fatigued. They considered going to the ER the night before last because my father was so exhausted but my aunt recommended against it. She said extreme fatigue is a normal symptom of COVID and that the most important thing is to monitor their oxygen levels. 

Thankfully my parents' oxygen saturation levels continue to be good at 98%. My mother's symptoms are a stuffy nose and sore eyes. Although I am a thousand miles away and my parents always downplay any medical risks with their children. 

My sister and her husband were exposed at the same time as my parents and most likely have it although they have not been tested. My sister has no symptoms and my BIL has a persistent cough. 

They got it from my niece who continues to have no symptoms. 

The "faith not fear" and "celebrate Thanksgiving to own the libs!" folks have earned a FU from me forever. 

 

 

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I just found out that a business partner's parents had Corona some time ago.

I know they were being very careful, because they wanted to remain healthy in order to help care for a high risk graddaughter.

The wife had a very mild case.  The husband was in the hospital for a few days.  Both are fine now.

My business partner thinks her whole family had it, but I don't think they got tested; they just assumed because the timing was in line with the grandparents' cases.  They think maybe the youngest child got exposed playing sports, but who knows?  It hit the high-risk child worst, mainly because every time she gets sick with anything, she gets severe dizziness.  She has a pretty bad case of diabetes among other issues.  They are all well now, but continue to be careful in case they aren't immune.

It stinks that parents have to choose between what each of their kids needs to stay healthy.  But I know a lot of others are in the same boat.  One of my close relatives is a moderately high risk child, but her parents believe she would be harmed more by being locked away for months upon months.  Her mom literally has PTSD from worrying about her fragile health from her very traumatic birth to age 2.  They decided years ago that they wouldn't, couldn't live that way.  The child is super social, and also in need of various in-person interventions due to birth complications.  It's a tough decision but one I think we need to respect.

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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

It stinks that parents have to choose between what each of their kids needs to stay healthy.  But I know a lot of others are in the same boat.  One of my close relatives is a moderately high risk child, but her parents believe she would be harmed more by being locked away for months upon months.  Her mom literally has PTSD from worrying about her fragile health from her very traumatic birth to age 2.  They decided years ago that they wouldn't, couldn't live that way.  The child is super social, and also in need of various in-person interventions due to birth complications.  It's a tough decision but one I think we need to respect.

I can respect a variety of decisions. I haven’t had to do careful mental health balancing because my kids have been totally fine, and that’s lucky for me. Personally, I think I’d have tried to form a pod if that wasn’t the case. And I’d have avoided anyone who’s older.

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4 hours ago, Not_a_Number said:

@ktgrok: I don't seem to be able to find any information about the pizza bar thing. Any idea if they got delivery or were IN the restaurant? Because that would be good data. 

2 cases of surface contact spread. 

 Firstly the cleaner at a medihotel got it from a surface and spread it to a security guard. The security guard had another job working at a pizza shop. Someone bought a pizza there and got coronavirus. He was a security guard at a different medihotel. But through genome tracing. They know who the got it from and the only time their patches crossed was at the pizza shop. 

The rapid spread with surface contact happening at least twice was significant factors in the extremely hard lockdown of all of SA for just 30 cases. 

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