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Do these mean the same thing to you?


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11 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Noooooo. Read Fowler, or sumpin' :tongue:

Sound the alarms! Vandals are at the gates.

Fight to the last man (or woman, as the case may be) <--or non-binary.

Bill (who's afraid he's picked the losing side)

 

 

Maybe it was regional variations and linguistic drift that did in the Roman Empire. All those different dialects of Latin moving further and further apart and turning into French and Italian and Spanish and...😁

Perhaps if we resurrect Caesar's Latin and teach everyone to speak it the great empire will arise again?

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Totally   

I've recently read and heard several people use the expression "pot plant" to mean "a plant in a pot."  It's startling and very confusing to me, because where I grew up "pot plant" always meant a mari

I've never heard of a pot plant being anything other than marijuana (which is sometimes in a pot, but that's not what makes it a pot plant). A plant in a pot is always a potted plant. 

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3 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

 

Those books are ignorant. People who believe them are even more ignorant. You'd be better served investing in a good linguistics textbook rather than continuing to wallow in your own ignorance. Language doesn't exist independent of its speakers. Ergo, whatever a speech community understands and says is correct. Language is consensus reality.

Edit: Ignorant is a bit of a strong word. Accurate, but strong. It's more correct to say that these books attempt - often badly and counterproductively - to emphasize prestigious speech norms. Their claims about what is and isn't "correct" are really about what is and isn't prestigious - the speech of the upper class. (They often manage to badly flub even that small goal, but what do you expect from people so infested with Dunning-Kreuger that they don't even understand that they are conflating prestige and correctness?)

Just a piece of advice - don't go into contract law.  Nuance matters.

I could care less- which people often say in mistake for "I could NOT care less" - means something completely different.

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37 minutes ago, gardenmom5 said:

Just a piece of advice - don't go into contract law.  Nuance matters.

I could care less- which people often say in mistake for "I could NOT care less" - means something completely different.

Legal terms must be strictly defined. 

Fortunately ordinary folks don't go around speaking legalese; I wouldn't want to live in a society where every sentence had to pass a legal-contract-worthiness test 🤣

In regular ol' everyday speech "I could care less" as a phrase means exactly the same as "I couldn't care less". As evidenced by the fact that you recognize the meaning and intent as well as I do. 

I personally find such linguistic quirks delightful.

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1 hour ago, maize said:

Maybe it was regional variations and linguistic drift that did in the Roman Empire. All those different dialects of Latin moving further and further apart and turning into French and Italian and Spanish and...😁

Perhaps if we resurrect Caesar's Latin and teach everyone to speak it the great empire will arise again?

Now you're talking!

Forget what I said earlier :tongue:

Bill

 

 

 

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On 9/20/2020 at 5:16 PM, MEmama said:

Apparently here it is common for people to say “it’s hotting up” instead of “heating up”. I’d never heard the phrase anywhere else.

I love regional language. 🙂 

I've not heard "hotting up."  Neat

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On 9/18/2020 at 10:45 PM, klmama said:

I've recently read and heard several people use the expression "pot plant" to mean "a plant in a pot."  It's startling and very confusing to me, because where I grew up "pot plant" always meant a marijuana plant, while a plant in a pot was a "potted plant."  Is the use of "pot plant" to mean "plant in a pot" a regional usage?  If so, where?   

 

 

 

 

A pot plant is marijuana.  A potted plant is a plant in a pot.

Calling a potted plant a pot plant is just lazy or ignorant use of language.

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12 minutes ago, Amy in NH said:

A pot plant is marijuana.  A potted plant is a plant in a pot.

Calling a potted plant a pot plant is just lazy or ignorant use of language.

I would not consider usage that is in the dictionary lazy or ignorant.  https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pot planthttps://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/pot-plant

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51 minutes ago, Amy in NH said:

A pot plant is marijuana.  A potted plant is a plant in a pot.

Calling a potted plant a pot plant is just lazy or ignorant use of language.

Well, that's made my day. Lazy or ignorant like insulting another person's dialect without checking a dictionary first?

Edited by Laura Corin
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On 9/22/2020 at 3:10 PM, Amy in NH said:

A pot plant is marijuana.  A potted plant is a plant in a pot.

Calling a potted plant a pot plant is just lazy or ignorant use of language.

Well I'll take my PhD and ignorant self and go home then. 😂

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