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Book a Week 2020 - BW37: In the Grass by Hamlin Garland


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27 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

What is 2nd person formal in Portuguese? In Spanish it's Usted, and which is a mispronounced contraction of the medieval 'vuestra merced' which is also conjugated in the third person.

It is voce,and I know it's also a contraction of a much longer honorific but I forget what.

 

@Penguina language thread sounds wonderful. 

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Welcome.  I am back in the classroom again after 15 years of homeschooling.  I chose to be. A parapro this year vs applying for a classroom.  Covid craziness would not have been a good year to return

I hope there’s room for one more participant on this thread! I’m an old boardie whose children went to school after a decade of homeschooling.  I am also working full time as a teacher again, so I don

Welcome! There is definitely room for one more. Regards, Kareni

1 hour ago, Matryoshka said:

I guess that's why I was having a hard time remembering which it was, lol! Guess I was listening well, though!

In Spanish the posessive adjectives agree in number but not gender - except for nuestro/a/s and vuestro/a/s.  But it's just su or sus in third person.

I think Galician also uses something like filo/a insted of hijo/a for son/daughter.  Have no idea of spelling!

So cool that you are learning Galician. I love hearing these tidbits.

 

There is some weird linguistic closeness between f and h, right? In Romance languages I mean. Your examples of "filo" vs "hijo" make me think of it. Like in Spanish both "fierro" and "hierro" mean iron. And I think there are other examples which I can't rembember... 

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1 hour ago, Matryoshka said:

What is 2nd person formal in Portuguese? In Spanish it's Usted, and which is a mispronounced contraction of the medieval 'vuestra merced' which is also conjugated in the third person.

 

Voce / voces   with circumflex accent over the e and the second syllable emphasized vocally.   

 Like voh-seyh’  (The accented e is like Between a short e like in Seth and long a like in say in American English) 

Portuguese is supposed to be closer to Latin than Spanish is. 

 

Idk about contraction, I assume it derives from vos in Latin. 

Vos (mainly as plural of tu) all have accents I can’t readily do on my cell - same word as in Latin- was used for you in Portuguese in some places but was already gone where I lived and is probably mostly gone entirely now afaik. You may come to it in books or poetry and maybe it was more in Portugal.  Idk. 

 

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4 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Faulkner is on my favorite author list, but admittedly it’s been a while since I’ve read his work. I should dust some off and reread. Maybe reading a couple of chapters at a time and participating in a book discussion group would help? Kind of dissect it in pieces? 

On 9/14/2020 at 1:23 PM, mumto2 said:

Thanks. I am looking for resources for just that. I stumbled upon the spark notes and it was nice to see if I what I thought the story in Absalom Absalom was truly the story. I was questioning it that much and that part was quite unsettling. But I did feel better when I stumbled upon this.

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/04/26/books-advice-for-reading-william-faulkner

Apparently it is quite normal for people to have difficulty in reading Faulkner. I have not given up yet, but setting him aside for now.

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Loved reading about everyone's experiences with languages. 

@Penguin would love a language thread. 

I second @Junie's experience of reading the bible in various languages improving it tremendously. I cheat and read the ones where English is on one side and the language is on the side. But it helps me in comprehension. Also the Lord's prayer in different languages and psalms I memorized helps in comprehension for me.

While I also second @Matryoshka's experience in subtitles, one caution would be the increase in abundance of swear words vocabulary in a multitude of languages. Ask me how I know, for some reason those stick to memory more than actual vocabulary increase. 😊

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32 minutes ago, Pen said:

Voce / voces   with circumflex accent over the e and the second syllable emphasized vocally. 

 Like voh-seyh’  (The accented e is like Between a short e like in Seth and long a like in say in American English) 

Portuguese is supposed to be closer to Latin than Spanish is. 

 

Idk about contraction, I assume it derives from vos in Latin. 

Vos (mainly as plural of tu) all have accents I can’t readily do on my cell - same word as in Latin- was used for you in Portuguese in some places but was already gone where I lived and is probably mostly gone entirely now afaik. You may come to it in books or poetry and maybe it was more in Portugal.  Idk. 

2nd person plural in Spanish (informal) is vosotros; in Galician it's vos (apparently also like Portuguese!), but in Latin America they've dropped the 2nd person plural informal and only use ustedes, and then in some parts (but not all) of Latin America they use vos as the 2nd person informal singular (instead of tú) like everywhere else. Usted/es is used exclusively in the plural and to varying amounts in the singular in LatinAm, and pretty much not at all (singlular or plural) in Spain anymore - like in super-super-formal occasions only.  2nd person in Spanish is a mess! Lol.

Vuestra merced (origin of usted and ustedes) literally meant 'your mercy'. 

PS. Accents should be easy on your phone? On mine, if I press and hold a letter, all the accented variations pop up, just choose the right one. 

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9 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

Loved reading about everyone's experiences with languages. 

@Penguin would love a language thread. 

While I also second @Matryoshka's experience in subtitles, one caution would be the increase in abundance of swear words vocabulary in a multitude of languages. Ask me how I know, for some reason those stick to memory more than actual vocabulary increase. 😊

My dd and I watched a teen-oriented Spanish show in the vain hope it would reignite her interest in Spanish. .. Yeah, she remembers the swears! 🙄

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@Pen, you're really making me think I should try more Portuguese.  Languages are fun, and there are lots of great Portuguese authors.  Maybe it's time to break out the Duolingo!

If you can handle gritty crime drama, check out Bitter Daisies on Netflix - Galician really does seem like it's halfway or more to Portuguese!  Only 6 episodes.

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24 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

2nd person plural in Spanish (informal) is vosotros; in Galician it's vos (apparently also like Portuguese!), but in Latin America they've dropped the 2nd person plural informal and only use ustedes, and then in some parts (but not all) of Latin America they use vos as the 2nd person informal singular (instead of tú) like everywhere else. Usted/es is used exclusively in the plural and to varying amounts in the singular in LatinAm, and pretty much not at all (singlular or plural) in Spain anymore - like in super-super-formal occasions only.  2nd person in Spanish is a mess! Lol.

Vuestra merced (origin of usted and ustedes) literally meant 'your mercy'. 

PS. Accents should be easy on your phone? On mine, if I press and hold a letter, all the accented variations pop up, just choose the right one. 

I love this.

In Chile they use both tu and vos, but the vos is only used for very informal moments. They kind of swallow the s at the end and they don't conjugate the verb the same way that Argentinians and Uruguayans do.

So instead of saying "vos tenés," like in Argentina, they say "vos tení".

Instead of como estás, como estai...

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Little Green Leaves said:

I love this.

In Chile they use both tu and vos, but the vos is only used for very informal moments. They kind of swallow the s at the end and they don't conjugate the verb the same way that Argentinians and Uruguayans do.

So instead of saying "vos tenés," like in Argentina, they say "vos tení".

Instead of como estás, como estai...

Oh, man, I thought I had all the combinations down! Sigh, lol.  I have a Spanish textbook from somewhere in Europe that is under the very wrong assumption that all Latin American speakers consistently use vos for tú and even include the conjugations (a la Argentina) to learn.

Although I could swear I have heard como estai... 

I've read a lot of Chilean literature (okay, mostly Allende but also at least a few others), and I can't remember that variation coming up in the written word the way vos does in Argentinian lit... I learned vos first by reading lots of Mafalda. 😁

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32 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

2nd person plural in Spanish (informal) is vosotros; in Galician it's vos (apparently also like Portuguese!), but in Latin America they've dropped the 2nd person plural informal and only use ustedes, and then in some parts (but not all) of Latin America they use vos as the 2nd person informal singular (instead of tú) like everywhere else. Usted/es is used exclusively in the plural and to varying amounts in the singular in LatinAm, and pretty much not at all (singlular or plural) in Spain anymore - like in super-super-formal occasions only.  2nd person in Spanish is a mess! Lol.

Vuestra merced (origin of usted and ustedes) literally meant 'your mercy'. 

PS. Accents should be easy on your phone? On mine, if I press and hold a letter, all the accented variations pop up, just choose the right one. 

 

 

There are probably a number of variations in different parts of Brazil, as well as Portugal, and perhaps elsewhere like Azores, etc.   

 

 

Accents Test

 

você

 

Yay !  Thanks! 👍

 

 

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1 hour ago, Little Green Leaves said:

So cool that you are learning Galician. I love hearing these tidbits.

 

There is some weird linguistic closeness between f and h, right? In Romance languages I mean. Your examples of "filo" vs "hijo" make me think of it. Like in Spanish both "fierro" and "hierro" mean iron. And I think there are other examples which I can't rembember... 

Yes, and falar (probably spelled wrong) vs hablar.  Knowing these common shifts makes learning other related languages easier!  Patterns are your friend. 🙂 

And lol, I wouldn't say I'm learning Galician, just can't help myself from listening and trying to figure out all these differences! 🤓  My guess is if I went to live there I'd pick it up in no time, but 6 episodes of a Netflix show isn't going to cut it, lol.  I also watched a show in Catalan with my kid, who did go to Barcelona and get fluent in Catalan in no time flat.  I'm told that Catalan has a lot of grammatical quirks that Spanish doesn't... I can also understand a lot, esp with Spanish subtitles turned on to double-check, but I think Galician is even a bit easier.  I think it's cool there are now shows being produced in these regional languages, after half a century of Franco trying to stamp them out...

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28 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

Yes, and falar (probably spelled wrong) vs hablar.  Knowing these common shifts makes learning other related languages easier!  Patterns are your friend. 🙂 

 

 

Falar is correct.

 Some differences are even closer like yo tengo/ eu tenho   for I have    

 

 

a few words are super confusing más / mas / mais /    Mas is “but” in Portuguese, not “more” - and then mais which means more in Portuguese (and sounds sort of like mice) is spelled like the French word for “but”.  ... 

 

It’s fun .  Maybe we should have a language learning thread! 

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Had to look up what Galician is. 😊. Never heard of it. Learned something new today.

43 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

And lol, I wouldn't say I'm learning Galician, just can't help myself from listening and trying to figure out all these differences! 🤓  My guess is if I went to live there I'd pick it up in no time, but 6 episodes of a Netflix show isn't going to cut it, lol.  I also watched a show in Catalan with my kid, who did go to Barcelona and get fluent in Catalan in no time flat.  I'm told that Catalan has a lot of grammatical quirks that Spanish doesn't... I can also understand a lot, esp with Spanish subtitles turned on to double-check, but I think Galician is even a bit easier.  I think it's cool there are now shows being produced in these regional languages, after half a century of Franco trying to stamp them out...

My excuse for watching K-Drama is immersion. 🤓.

Had to look up Catalan too. Apparently my knowledge of languages in Europe is seriously missing. 🙄

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13 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

Falar is correct.

 Some differences are even closer like yo tengo/ eu tenho   for I have    

a few words are super confusing más / mas / mais /    Mas is “but” in Portuguese, not “more” - and then mais which means more in Portuguese (and sounds sort of like mice) is spelled like the French word for “but”.  ... 

It’s fun .  Maybe we should have a language learning thread! 

Actually, mas does mean but, in the sense of 'except' in Spanish.  It's más that means 'more' - the accent changes the meaning of the word, even though they're pronounced the same.

Everyone came but Pepe - Todos vinieron mas Pepe.

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15 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

Had to look up what Galician is. 😊. Never heard of it. Learned something new today.

My excuse for watching K-Drama is immersion. 🤓.

Had to look up Catalan too. Apparently my knowledge of languages in Europe is seriously missing. 🙄

Catalan and Galician are considered either dialects of Spanish or languages in their own right depending on who you ask and partly their political stance.  Franco did try, quite brutally, to get rid of them during his reign.  Now many schools teach in the regional languages, especially Catalan and Basque (which is not a Spanish dialect at all - it's not even Indo-European).  I'm not sure of the state of Galician - when I saw there was a show in it, I had to watch...

Many Galicians (as you can guess by the name, related to Gallic/Gaelic) are Celtic peoples, and long ago used to speak a Celtic language, but apparently that has died out.

As they say - a language is a dialect with an army...

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8 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

Actually, mas does mean but, in the sense of 'except' in Spanish.  It's más that means 'more' - the accent changes the meaning of the word, even though they're pronounced the same.

 

Interesting- I have known pero as “but” in Spanish or maybe sino.    In Portuguese mas is the commonly used word for “but” IME. 

Anyway Portuguese  mais ou menos   Equivalent to ~ Spanish  más o menos  — I think 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Pen said:

Interesting- I have known pero as “but” in Spanish or maybe sino.    In Portuguese mas is the commonly used word for “but” IME. 

Anyway Portuguese  mais ou menos   Equivalent to ~ Spanish  más o menos  — I think 

I'm pretty sure Galician uses mais too (pronounced like Portuguese, not French!).  You need to go watch this show and report back!

Yes, pero and sino are the ones taught in school, but mas also exists.  Apparently it's not that commonly used anymore.  I read too much, lol.  This is how I pick up odd vocab that sounds perfectly normal to me in English, too...

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OK, here it is: The foreign language lovers thread - September edition. Of course, everyone is welcome. I just tagged the posters who have been geeking out on languages with me this week. I hope I didn't forget anyone. @Seasider too

@Pen @Violet Crown @Junie @Matryoshka @Dreamergal @Little Green Leaves

 

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17 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

Oh, man, I thought I had all the combinations down! Sigh, lol.  I have a Spanish textbook from somewhere in Europe that is under the very wrong assumption that all Latin American speakers consistently use vos for tú and even include the conjugations (a la Argentina) to learn.

Although I could swear I have heard como estai... 

I've read a lot of Chilean literature (okay, mostly Allende but also at least a few others), and I can't remember that variation coming up in the written word the way vos does in Argentinian lit... I learned vos first by reading lots of Mafalda. 😁

I found this on the Chilean vos:

https://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/i.e.mackenzie/chiler.htm

I love Mafalda too!

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I finished Return of the Native. Big thanks to @Violet Crownfor mentioning that it has two endings, because my edition didn't include Hardy's footnote and I'd never have known otherwise. His original ending (without the wedding) is better -- his version of a happy ending is also not super convincing in my opinion.

I loved this book. I love Hardy's descriptions, the way he follows each idea through to its end; I was hooked from the first paragraph. As a novel, the book is strange and gave me the feeling of one of those ancient Greek dramas, where the outcome is inevitable and the figures are just struggling against the backdrop. I don't know how to put it better. The characters are complex but also doomed. Not like in Wuthering Heights, though. The characters here are more machine-like, with buttons that can be pressed to provoke things. Oh, I don't know. Probably I'll buy my own copy and reread this book later.

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Good morning!  We have blue skies for the first time in weeks. Not sure how long that will last but going to take advantage to wash the cars and hope they stay clean longer than ten minutes.

 

I'm currently reading James Rollins The Last Odyssey which is the latest in his Sigma Force series.  Mythology, pandemics, wars, historical monsters, etc and a society of folks trying to bring about the apocalypse  are all keeping me reading long into the night.

"For eons, the city of Troy—whose legendary fall was detailed in Homer’s Iliad—was believed to be myth, until archaeologists in the nineteenth century uncovered its ancient walls buried beneath the sands. If Troy was real, how much of Homer’s twin tales of gods and monsters, curses and miracles—The Iliad and The Odyssey—could also be true and awaiting discovery?

In the frozen tundra of Greenland, a group of modern-day researchers stumble on a shocking find: a medieval ship buried a half-mile below the ice. The ship’s hold contains a collection of even older artifacts—tools of war—dating back to the Bronze Age. Inside the captain’s cabin is a magnificent treasure that is as priceless as it is miraculous: a clockwork gold map imbedded with an intricate silver astrolabe. The mechanism was crafted by a group of Muslim inventors—the Banū Mūsā brothers—considered by many to be the Da Vincis of the Arab world—brilliant scientists who inspired Leonardo’s own work.

Once activated, the moving map traces the path of Odysseus’s famous ship as it sailed away from Troy. But the route detours as the map opens to reveal a fiery river leading to a hidden realm underneath the Mediterranean Sea. It is the subterranean world of Tartarus, the Greek name for Hell. In mythology, Tartarus was where the wicked were punished and the monstrous Titans of old, imprisoned.

When word of Tartarus spreads—and of the cache of miraculous weapons said to be hidden there—tensions explode in this volatile region where Turks battle Kurds, terrorists wage war, and civilians suffer untold horrors. The phantasmagoric horrors found in Homer’s tales are all too real—and could be unleashed upon the world. Whoever possesses them can use their awesome power to control the future of humanity.

Now, Sigma Force must go where humans fear to tread. To prevent a tyrant from igniting a global war, they must cross the very gates of Hell."

 

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Welcome @hopeistheword Glad you decided to join in. 

Congratulations @aggieamy on the new employee. Hopefully it will take some of the stress off you. 

@melmichigan I was sad to hear about Rachel Caine as well. She's amazing and trying to write one last book.  The first book in all her series are on sale.  Her Great Library series is awesome and will probably reread again soon. I'm still working my way slowly through her Weather Warden series and Stillhouse Lake.  She has a long book list so a little of something for everyone.  

 

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2 hours ago, Little Green Leaves said:

I found this on the Chilean vos:

https://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/i.e.mackenzie/chiler.htm

I love Mafalda too!

Okay, that is totally fascinating.  Interesting that in the imperative it ends up being the same as the tú form - as you likely know, in Argentinian vos, the imperative is the vosotros infinitive, minus the 'd', and keeps the accent on the final syllable, as it would if the 'd' were still there.

And now I'm curious about the Argentinan vos conjugations past the present and imperative, as those are the only two I've really noticed in my reading - I'd kind of been assuming it reverted to the same as tú conjugations in, say, either of the past tenses or the subjunctive.  I hadn't noticed any difference in my reading.

Wonder if the fact that I haven't seen it in Chilean lit is due to the efforts of that grammarian to rub it out, or to its associations with the 'lower classes'?

and PS, have you read Inés del alma mía?  Allende's version of the founding of Chile - Latauro from your link is in it, of course.  I hadn't known anything about Chile's (colonial) start, so found it very interesting.

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I have read several books in Spanish this year, mostly children's novels (Charlotte's Web; The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe).

I would like to try a work that was originally written in Spanish.

I know that I'm not up to Don Quijote or anything similar.  But do any of you have recommendations of something that isn't too difficult?  Or any authors that I should look for?  Who are some children's authors that I might want to read?

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1 minute ago, Junie said:

I have read several books in Spanish this year, mostly children's novels (Charlotte's Web; The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe).

I would like to try a work that was originally written in Spanish.

I know that I'm not up to Don Quijote or anything similar.  But do any of you have recommendations of something that isn't too difficult?  Or any authors that I should look for?  Who are some children's authors that I might want to read?

I think Como agua para chocolate by Laura Esquivel was fairly straightforward to read?  I also loved El murmullo de las abejas by Sofía Segovia - both of those have some magical realism but it's limited and doesn't make the story confusing.

There is not a large quantity of children's literature in Spanish that I know of.  Isabel Allende wrote a YA series, but I honestly prefer her books for adults - especially the historical ones.  There's a famous children's series by Elena Fortún about a girl named Celia, but I'm not sure the language is particularly simple, as is true also of older English children's stories.  I think they're also hard to find - I did buy them on Amazon.

If you can get ahold of Mafalda comics, they are fun and will introduce you to vos. 😉 

I just finished a book that I thought was written fairly simply and has a straightforward story line - it's a story of Galicians emigrating to Argentina - Volveré a buscarte by Pilar Cernuda.

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23 hours ago, aggieamy said:

FINISHED:

Um ... can I count last weeks BaW thread as read because that's about it these days. 

I think I only missed a week but things look different around here anyway. Life is good but busy. I'm falling into bed exhausted at night. DD is back in school (as in ... back in a building two days a week). DS is hanging out with mom. And we've also hired someone to help with the company. Which surprisingly cuts into my inter-netting time. I feel a little lazy jumping on here or Goodreads when my employee is ten feet away drafting. 

Glad you're still showing up! Our internet was down for a couple of days and it feel like there are a zillion posts to read now. 

How does it feel being a Capitalist Oppressor, with an employee and all?

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The discussion about the different versions of Spanish.

I guess it never occurred to me to even consider it though I know of British and American English 😊. But as America has it's own things like lbs vs Kg, miles vs Km, mm/dd/yyyy vs dd/mm/yyyy I thought the spelling difference as one more different thing about America than the rest of the world.

Very interesting. My Spanish is at a baby level to even consider the differences, but my written French is better so I am going to look at the different versions in countries. 

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I am almost done with Ian Rankin’s Witch Hunt...  I had electric outages and smoke troubles etc that interrupted. So I have decided to start it over from beginning for longer lasting enjoyment.

 

And I have almost finished the whole Peter Diamond detective series. 

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Finished

image.png.78c85a274c9ee262e2ef9cfcf32da41b.png

Not a big fan of memoirs and the person has to really appeal to me to read one. 

This book appealed to me for several reasons, one because Ruth Reichl was the last editor of Gourmet Magazine. It was one of the magazines I thumbed through in the American library of my city and the idea that food could have a magazine was completely alien to me at that time. It was one of the magazines I subscribed when I established myself here as well.

I always love memoirs connected with food in some way because I always wonder how they became that way and the influences. In many cases, it begins in the home kitchen but in Ruth's case it was not and her mom is described as Queen of Mold. But water always finds it's level as they say and Ruth's life through all her experiences has made her the foodie she is. 

Ruth has been someone I have always connected at a personal level because of this book.

image.png.931c8559cbbd0fdca38cad5b4b56b6ab.png

I've always found in her a kindred spirit because food and cooking to me is more than just feeding people. I cook when I happy, sad, lonely and sometimes just for myself. Tender at the Bone made for comfort reading about someone I know, a topic close to my heart and a story told at a gentle pace especially since I read it while reading Absalom, Absalom and the rampaging words on a page of Faulkner.😊

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16 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

Finished

image.png.78c85a274c9ee262e2ef9cfcf32da41b.png

Not a big fan of memoirs and the person has to really appeal to me to read one. 

This book appealed to me for several reasons, one because Ruth Reichl was the last editor of Gourmet Magazine. It was one of the magazines I thumbed through in the American library of my city and the idea that food could have a magazine was completely alien to me at that time. It was one of the magazines I subscribed when I established myself here as well.

I always love memoirs connected with food in some way because I always wonder how they became that way and the influences. In many cases, it begins in the home kitchen but in Ruth's case it was not and her mom is described as Queen of Mold. But water always finds it's level as they say and Ruth's life through all her experiences has made her the foodie she is. 

Ruth has been someone I have always connected at a personal level because of this book.

image.png.931c8559cbbd0fdca38cad5b4b56b6ab.png

I've always found in her a kindred spirit because food and cooking to me is more than just feeding people. I cook when I happy, sad, lonely and sometimes just for myself. Tender at the Bone made for comfort reading about someone I know, a topic close to my heart and a story told at a gentle pace especially since I read it while reading Absalom, Absalom and the rampaging words on a page of Faulkner.😊

 

That looked interesting -

in looking it up on Amazon, I came to

 

  • An Elephant in My Kitchen: What the Herd Taught Me about Love, Courage and Survival 

 

which seems not to be about cooking despite title and coming up along with cooking memoirs, and is enticing me. 

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1 hour ago, Pen said:

 

That looked interesting -

in looking it up on Amazon, I came to

 

  • An Elephant in My Kitchen: What the Herd Taught Me about Love, Courage and Survival 

 

which seems not to be about cooking despite title and coming up along with cooking memoirs, and is enticing me. 

I don't know about the above book as I have not read it, but I recognized the author from the blurb as the wife of Lawrence Anthony, the man who rescued the Baghdad Zoo during the Iraq War. I have read two of his books and both highly recommended.

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This is the book about the Baghdad Zoo rescue

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5 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

I think Como agua para chocolate by Laura Esquivel was fairly straightforward to read?  I also loved El murmullo de las abejas by Sofía Segovia - both of those have some magical realism but it's limited and doesn't make the story confusing.

There is not a large quantity of children's literature in Spanish that I know of.  Isabel Allende wrote a YA series, but I honestly prefer her books for adults - especially the historical ones.  There's a famous children's series by Elena Fortún about a girl named Celia, but I'm not sure the language is particularly simple, as is true also of older English children's stories.  I think they're also hard to find - I did buy them on Amazon.

If you can get ahold of Mafalda comics, they are fun and will introduce you to vos. 😉 

I just finished a book that I thought was written fairly simply and has a straightforward story line - it's a story of Galicians emigrating to Argentina - Volveré a buscarte by Pilar Cernuda.

Thank you so much for the recommendations.

I put one of the Mafalda comics in my amazon cart and I'm looking through the others for my Christmas list. :)

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20 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

Okay, that is totally fascinating.  Interesting that in the imperative it ends up being the same as the tú form - as you likely know, in Argentinian vos, the imperative is the vosotros infinitive, minus the 'd', and keeps the accent on the final syllable, as it would if the 'd' were still there.

And now I'm curious about the Argentinan vos conjugations past the present and imperative, as those are the only two I've really noticed in my reading - I'd kind of been assuming it reverted to the same as tú conjugations in, say, either of the past tenses or the subjunctive.  I hadn't noticed any difference in my reading.

Wonder if the fact that I haven't seen it in Chilean lit is due to the efforts of that grammarian to rub it out, or to its associations with the 'lower classes'?

and PS, have you read Inés del alma mía?  Allende's version of the founding of Chile - Latauro from your link is in it, of course.  I hadn't known anything about Chile's (colonial) start, so found it very interesting.

I know, I find this absurdly fascinating. I've never seen the "vos" in Chilean literature although I'm sure writers have used it in dialogue. And it definitely shows up in folk songs and pop songs.

I can't say about Argentinian conjugations. I really only know their vos from hearing them speak, and for the life of me I can't remember what the past tense sounds like except that I think they tend to add an extra s to endings? The Argentinian lit I've read is mostly Borges and Cortazar which is super low on dialogue.

And you know, I've never read Allende. I should try. Thanks for the suggestion!

 

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