Jump to content

Menu

Book a Week 2020 - BW37: In the Grass by Hamlin Garland


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 140
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Welcome.  I am back in the classroom again after 15 years of homeschooling.  I chose to be. A parapro this year vs applying for a classroom.  Covid craziness would not have been a good year to return

I hope there’s room for one more participant on this thread! I’m an old boardie whose children went to school after a decade of homeschooling.  I am also working full time as a teacher again, so I don

Welcome! There is definitely room for one more. Regards, Kareni

Posted Images

14 hours ago, Penguin said:

@mumto2I have a couple of gripes about Goodreads, but they are small things. I wish there was a better way to differentiate translations and editions. I don't use it to help me find things to read, so I don't care about that. The most useful GR thing for me is seeing the ratings and updates of my WTM friends. So, like Matryoshka, I would only migrate if the herd migrated!

I don't have my GR account connected to my amazon account, but I don't know if that really matters. I actually find keeping my TBRs on amazon wish lists to be a better system than multiple TBR shelves on GR. I like that I can make comments on the wish list. 

Glad to have you here, @hopeistheword and best of luck with your teaching year. 

@Violet Crown I have been around here long enough to have a sense of your reading choices. But I am now curious - is deceased author a normal requisite? What was it about Fr. Anthony Cekada's book that tempted you to venture so close to completing a book by a living author?

@Little Green Leaves Bread and Wine looks intriguing, and I see that it is #2 in a trilogy. Had you previously read #1 (Fontamara)?

I hadn't read anything by Silone before, no! But Bread and Wine absolutely stands on its own.

According to Amazon, at least, Silone thought the 3rd book in the series was the best and it has the same hero as Bread and Wine, so I'd like to read that one day.

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today only, free for Kindle readers ~

That Affair Next Door by Anna Katharine Green

"This classic whodunit by the nineteenth-century author of The Leavenworth Case introduces the original spinster sleuth: Amelia Butterworth.

Living alone in the moneyed Manhattan neighborhood of Gramercy Park, Amelia Butterworth is happy to keep to herself. But awakened one night by the sound of a horse-drawn cab outside her mansion, she spies a curious couple entering a home she knows to be empty. When only the man emerges, Amelia calls the police—and is suddenly the sole witness to a murder.

But Amelia intends to do more than simply be interrogated, much to the chagrin of Det. Ebenezer Gryce. She has questions of her own, and soon the police detective and amateur sleuth are in a race to see who can solve the crime first.

“First published in 1897, this cleverly plotted mystery . . . featuring the first woman sleuth in a series, is a must for genre buffs.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review"

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished a Miss Read book (Thrush Green #8), which was a lovely palate cleanser. 

The book I really want to talk about is Lisbon Poets (bilingual edition). It profiles five Lisbon poets. Two have big, international reputations: Luis de Camoes wrote Portugal's big epic poem, The Luciads, in the 1500s. My understanding is that nearly everyone in Portugal reads this in high school. Fernando Pessoa is a Modernist poet. What is interesting to me about him is that he wrote under well-developed, alternative personalities (heteronyms). It is easy to find English translations of both Luis de Camoes and Fernando Pessoa, and I hope to read more of each.

The other three (Cesario Verde, Mario De Sa-Carneiro, and Florabela Espanca) do not seem to have much translated into English. Florabela Espanca is the one and only female in the book. She was not taken very seriously in her lifetime, but is being revisited. She was dismissed as too emotive. Too concerned with love from the POV of a young woman to be considered IMPORTANT. And she used exclamation points! Oh the horror! I am not shocked that a young woman writer who died in 1930 was deemed trivial. She committed suicide on her 36th birthday.

Even though I do not know Portuguese, it is pretty obvious that the translations did not attempt to keep the rhyme schemes that I see on the Portuguese side of the pages. So I had a grand time listening to some of these poems being read in Portuguese on YouTube. I've added a version of "Amar!" by Florabela Espanca. Maybe, like me, you will just enjoy listening to a bit of Portuguese poetry even if you do not understand it. 

Here's my book's translation of the first stanza of "Amar!" :

To Love!

I want to love - love madly!

Love just to love - here...there...and beyond...

Him over there, and him right there, and everybody...

Love! Love! And not love anyone!

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Penguin said:

I finished a Miss Read book (Thrush Green #8), which was a lovely palate cleanser. 

The book I really want to talk about is Lisbon Poets (bilingual edition). It profiles five Lisbon poets. Two have big, international reputations: Luis de Camoes wrote Portugal's big epic poem, The Luciads, in the 1500s. My understanding is that nearly everyone in Portugal reads this in high school. Fernando Pessoa is a Modernist poet. What is interesting to me about him is that he wrote under well-developed, alternative personalities (heteronyms). It is easy to find English translations of both Luis de Camoes and Fernando Pessoa, and I hope to read more of each.

The other three (Cesario Verde, Mario De Sa-Carneiro, and Florabela Espanca) do not seem to have much translated into English. Florabela Espanca is the one and only female in the book. She was not taken very seriously in her lifetime, but is being revisited. She was dismissed as too emotive. Too concerned with love from the POV of a young woman to be considered IMPORTANT. And she used exclamation points! Oh the horror! I am not shocked that a young woman writer who died in 1930 was deemed trivial. She committed suicide on her 36th birthday.

Even though I do not know Portuguese, it is pretty obvious that the translations did not attempt to keep the rhyme schemes that I see on the Portuguese side of the pages. So I had a grand time listening to some of these poems being read in Portuguese on YouTube. I've added a version of "Amar!" by Florabela Espanca. Maybe, like me, you will just enjoy listening to a bit of Portuguese poetry even if you do not understand it. 

Here's my book's translation of the first stanza of "Amar!" :

To Love!

I want to love - love madly!

Love just to love - here...there...and beyond...

Him over there, and him right there, and everybody...

Love! Love! And not love anyone!

 

I didn't understand all of it (plus, it's poetry, so no telling if I would "understand" it even if it were in English), but I know enough Spanish that I was able to pick out some of it, especially with her emotions.

Thanks for sharing!

(Portuguese is on my list of languages to learn if I live long enough...)

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Halfway through The Goblin Emperor, I just had to pop in here to say that dissecting the language of the honorifics and names of the characters and their families would make an excellent assignment for a student of linguistics. If it were earlier in the pandemic and I had more free time, I’d be charting on a white board. So in case any of you have high schoolers that need additional work...
 

<returns nose to novel>

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, I finished Felix and the Prince by Lucy Lennox -- Felix, a graduate student studying stained glass, meets Lio unaware that he is a prince about to ascend the throne. (Lio's father is about to 'retire' ... not abdicate?) Lio, gay and closeted, sees this as a last chance for a fling; however, the two men soon establish an emotional connection. There is a nice supporting cast of family, friends, and staff. I enjoyed this. (Significant adult content)

Here's the official book blurb:

"Felix

Things I expect to find at Gadleigh Castle:
- Rare stained glass, the subject of my dissertation.
- Peace and quiet, to finish said dissertation.
- An escape from the paparazzi swarming around my starlet mother’s latest blockbuster release.

Things I don’t expect to find:
- A hidden door leading to a secret room.
- The most gorgeous man I’ve ever set eyes on.
- Love.

Lio

Things I know are expected of me in life:
- One day soon I will become the King of Liorland.
- I will marry a nice woman who will become queen.
- I will provide heirs to my family’s monarchy.

Reasons that might be difficult
- I’m gay.
- I’m falling in love with Felix Wilde.
- He has no idea I’m royal."

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Junie said:

 

(Portuguese is on my list of languages to learn if I live long enough...)

Same. What is on your wishlist? Beyond the three  that currently get attention (Danish, Dutch, and Latin), I’d like to add Portuguese and a Slavic language.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Halfway through The Goblin Emperor, I just had to pop in here to say that dissecting the language of the honorifics and names of the characters and their families would make an excellent assignment for a student of linguistics....

I'm curious. Are you reading a paper book or an e-book? I first read a paper version and was surprised to find some helpful additional material at the end of the book. My e-book, however, has that material located before the start of the story.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Penguin said:

Same. What is on your wishlist? Beyond the three  that currently get attention (Danish, Dutch, and Latin), I’d like to add Portuguese and a Slavic language.

Spanish (currently learning)

American Sign Language (currently learning)

French -- I had two years in high school and haven't done much with it since.

Italian and/or Portuguese

 

I think that sticking with the Romance languages (other than ASL) is the direction that I want to go.

 

 

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Penguin said:

Even though I do not know Portuguese, it is pretty obvious that the translations did not attempt to keep the rhyme schemes that I see on the Portuguese side of the pages. So I had a grand time listening to some of these poems being read in Portuguese on YouTube. I've added a version of "Amar!" by Florabela Espanca. Maybe, like me, you will just enjoy listening to a bit of Portuguese poetry even if you do not understand it. 

 

Thanks for this. I love listening to poetry in languages I do not understand or barely understand rather than reading them in translation because the essence is lost in the languages I know. It was lovely listening to it. Like @Junie I know enough Spanish to pick some of it barely.

59 minutes ago, Junie said:

Spanish (currently learning)

French -- I had two years in high school and haven't done much with it since.

I am learning Spanish too and I know French like you from school and college and haven't done much with it. In both cases, I have found one of the quickest and surprising ways to increase my vocabulary and make reading consistent is English-Spanish bible and English-French Bibles. 

59 minutes ago, Junie said:

American Sign Language (currently learning)

 

I would like more information as to where you are learning please as in books or videos or courses. Thanks

In my native country, we use BSL (British Sign Language). This is one of my goals because of the situation in my native country.

Most of the hearing impaired community does not know English and only native languages. Each of those has it's own script and many are uneducated. In this environment the whole sign language for each native language is barely there and people are working on it. Some are looking at ASL in addition to BSL for inspiration so I may be able to contribute hopefully a little if I know a bit. 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dreamergal said:

Thanks for this. I love listening to poetry in languages I do not understand or barely understand rather than reading them in translation because the essence is lost in the languages I know. It was lovely listening to it. Like @Junie I know enough Spanish to pick some of it barely.

I am learning Spanish too and I know French like you from school and college and haven't done much with it. In both cases, I have found one of the quickest and surprising ways to increase my vocabulary and make reading consistent is English-Spanish bible and English-French Bibles. 

I would like more information as to where you are learning please as in books or videos or courses. Thanks

In my native country, we use BSL (British Sign Language). This is one of my goals because of the situation in my native country.

Most of the hearing impaired community does not know English and only native languages. Each of those has it's own script and many are uneducated. In this environment the whole sign language for each native language is barely there and people are working on it. Some are looking at ASL in addition to BSL for inspiration so I may be able to contribute hopefully a little if I know a bit. 

I took some informal ASL classes many, many years ago.  Right now I am using youtube. :)

These are the youtube channels I'm using to learn sign language:

https://www.youtube.com/c/billvicars/playlists -- My oldest three children and I did ASL 1, ASL2, ASL 3, and ASL 4.  I'm getting ready to do the sequence again with dd13 for her high school language courses.  He is Deaf and is a university ASL professor.  These courses are the equivalent of four semesters of ASL.  I think that these courses are excellent!

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/SilentWordNE/playlists -- I love this channel.  Jim Bracelin is a missionary to the deaf with many Bible lessons on his youtube channel.  He is not deaf and signs well, but not super quickly.  He also voices while he signs.  I enjoy the Bible lessons and am picking up many ASL signs at the same time.  So far I have listened to People of the Old Testament, Acts, and James.  Those three sets of lessons are almost 100 lessons.  (I just finished the last lesson in James this afternoon.)  I am going to start a new series tomorrow, but this time I'm going to try to watch the lessons on mute to see how much ASL I can read.  I have a friend who is an ASL interpreter, but (especially now) I don't really have a lot of opportunities to spend time with her.

 

https://www.youtube.com/c/OurSignedWorld/videos -- On this channel I just watch random videos once in a while.  It is a Deaf/hearing couple (he's Deaf, she's hearing) and their newborn baby.  They sign really fast and I usually watch once without subtitles, and then turn them on and watch again.  I miss most of what they say without subtitles.  It's something for me to work toward. :)

Edited by Junie
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Penguin said:

Latin

Tell about your Latin studies. I'm working on my own Latin (with some guidance from Middle Girl, who is an excellent Latin tutor).

ETA: It's annoying that Wee Girl learns new vocabulary by writing it down once, while my middle-aged brain needs multiple exposures and memory techniques.

Edited by Violet Crown
  • Like 7
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Violet Crown I will send you a PM tomorrow about Latin. Hope that is OK. I'll tell you about the online class I'm taking, and about my self-study. ETA, I don't mind talking about the self-study on the forum, I just don't want to discuss the class publicly.

By the way, when my LoA Faulkner arrived, it came without the dust jacket. Now, I don’t really care about having the jacket, but it was a tad surprising to unbox a naked LoA book. I don’t think I’d ever seen an LoA volume sans the black-and-white jacket, lol.

Edited by Penguin
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today only, free for Kindle readers ~

Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things by Lafcadio Hearn

"A classic book of ghost stories from one of the world’s leading nineteenth-century writers, the author of In Ghostly Japan and Japanese Fairy Tales.
 
Published just months before Lafcadio Hearn’s death in 1904, Kwaidan features several stories and a brief nonfiction study on insects: butterflies, mosquitoes, and ants. The tales included are reworkings of both written and oral Japanese traditions, including folk tales, legends, and superstitions.
 
“At age thirty-nine, Hearn travelled on a magazine assignment to Japan, and never came back. At a moment when that country, under Emperor Meiji, was weathering the shock and upheaval of forced economic modernization, Hearn fell deeply in love with the nation’s past. He wrote fourteen books on all manner of Japanese subjects but was especially infatuated with the customs and culture preserved in Japanese folktales—particularly the ghost-story genre known as kaidan. . . . He died in 1904, and, by the time his ‘Japanese tales’ were translated into Japanese, in the nineteen-twenties, the country’s transformation was so complete that Hearn was hailed as a kind of guardian of tradition; his kaidan collections are still part of the curriculum in many Japanese schools.” —The New Yorker

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Penguin said:

I finished a Miss Read book (Thrush Green #8), which was a lovely palate cleanser. 

The book I really want to talk about is Lisbon Poets (bilingual edition). It profiles five Lisbon poets. Two have big, international reputations: Luis de Camoes wrote Portugal's big epic poem, The Luciads, in the 1500s. My understanding is that nearly everyone in Portugal reads this in high school. Fernando Pessoa is a Modernist poet. What is interesting to me about him is that he wrote under well-developed, alternative personalities (heteronyms). It is easy to find English translations of both Luis de Camoes and Fernando Pessoa, and I hope to read more of each.

The other three (Cesario Verde, Mario De Sa-Carneiro, and Florabela Espanca) do not seem to have much translated into English. Florabela Espanca is the one and only female in the book. She was not taken very seriously in her lifetime, but is being revisited. She was dismissed as too emotive. Too concerned with love from the POV of a young woman to be considered IMPORTANT. And she used exclamation points! Oh the horror! I am not shocked that a young woman writer who died in 1930 was deemed trivial. She committed suicide on her 36th birthday.

Even though I do not know Portuguese, it is pretty obvious that the translations did not attempt to keep the rhyme schemes that I see on the Portuguese side of the pages. So I had a grand time listening to some of these poems being read in Portuguese on YouTube. I've added a version of "Amar!" by Florabela Espanca. Maybe, like me, you will just enjoy listening to a bit of Portuguese poetry even if you do not understand it. 

Here's my book's translation of the first stanza of "Amar!" :

To Love!

I want to love - love madly!

Love just to love - here...there...and beyond...

Him over there, and him right there, and everybody...

Love! Love! And not love anyone!

 

 

👍

 

 

Portuguese was a first language for me, but much lost due to non use.

 

here Is an English translation of a poem by a favorite Brazilian poet:

 

Souvenir Of The Ancient World

Poem By Carlos Drummond de Andrade

 

Clara strolled in the garden with the children. 
The sky was green over the grass, 
the water was golden under the bridges, 
other elements were blue and rose and orange, 
a policeman smiled, bicycles passed, 
a girl stepped onto the lawn to catch a bird, 
the whole world--Germany, China-- 
all was quiet around Clara. 

The children looked at the sky: it was not forbidden. 
Mouth, nose, eyes were open. There was no danger. 
What Clara feared were the flu, the heat, the insects. 
Clara feared missing the eleven o'clock trolley: 
She waited for letters slow to arrive, 
She couldn't always wear a new dress. But she strolled in the garden, 
in the morning! 
They had gardens, they had mornings in those days.

 

 

Link to Portuguese 

https://jornalggn.com.br/literatura/lembranca-do-mundo-antigo-por-carlos-drummond-de-andrade/

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Knight and the Necromancer: Book One: The Capital by A. H. Lee -- I bought this in May, long enough ago to forget hearing the book ends abruptly. Be warned! I quite enjoyed this fantasy about Roland, brother of the Queen, who flirts with a man at a tavern only to he horrified to learn the next day that he kissed a necromancer. I definitely plan to read on. (Adult content)

Here is the book blurb:

"Prince Roland comes home from the war to bury his father and see his sister on the throne. He sneaks out to his favorite tavern for nostalgia’s sake. It’s the place where he kissed a man for the first time, the place where he used to carouse with the lover he buried on a battlefield.

Roland expects to enjoy some anonymity and perhaps flirt with a few strangers for old time’s sake. He does not expect to find a fascinating scholar from out of town—a lonely young man with beautiful eyes and an obvious longing to be touched, buried beneath a prickly demeanor. The man clearly has his secrets, but so does Roland, and their unexpected chemistry makes him feel alive for the first time in months.

Roland exerts all his knightly charm and is rewarded by the promise of a second date. He figures he’ll need something to look forward to tomorrow, since he must spend the day in council with his family’s sworn enemy—a necromancer whom his sister has rashly invited to consult about the war.

Sairis is a necromancer with a price on his head. He knows that he will have to bargain for his life tomorrow. He’s never been this far from his tower. He’s good with magic, not people. He’s frightened, although he doesn’t want to admit it.

Sairis knows he’s doing something foolish by visiting a tavern the evening before his meeting with the royals—a tavern that caters to men of certain tastes. But Sairis wants things. Things a hunted outlaw can never have.

He tells himself that he’ll just watch—see what ordinary people enjoy every day. Sairis is confident in his ability to intimidate anyone who comes too close.

He’s shocked when a dazzling mountain of a man is not intimidated in the slightest. Sairis knows a knight when he sees one. He has killed plenty of knights. But this knight is funny and kind. Sairis finds his defenses melting in spite of his best efforts. Maybe he could go on a second date with this person.

Of course, he’ll have to get through tomorrow first…when he must bargain with the hated royals who have persecuted him all his life."

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, @Pen I was not familiar with Carlos Drummond de Andrade, and I am always happy to find out about international poets. I see that there is a bilingual Portuguese/English edition of his poems - added to the TBR pile! 

P.S., the Lisbon poets are of course European Portuguese, but I believe that the YouTube video was a Brazilian Portuguese speaker.

Edited by Penguin
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was sad to hear about Rachel Caine's move to hospice. I imagine I will be spending some time with her books. Many of her series firsts are on sale for kindle.  

I'll update my reading list later today, but I have been better with Goodreads.   

Edited by melmichigan
  • Like 4
  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2020 at 5:09 PM, hopeistheword said:

<snip>

This week I finished The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett.  Though this story is a bit out of my comfort zone with regards to s3*ual situations, I found the plot very compelling.  It’s the story of identical twin sisters who leave their all-Black community in Louisiana as teens to expand their horizons.  One of the sisters makes an entirely new life for herself by “passing” as white.  The story is about all the familial repercussions of this. I gave it four out of five stars on Goodreads because I was disappointed in the ending. 
<snip>

 

 

Hey, welcome!

I read The Vanishing Half a few weeks ago, and I honestly can't remember much in the way of se*ual situations. I mean, I remember there were some, vaguely, but I am usually pretty sensitive to that (and still discard a book if it's too 'adult' for me) but... huh. Just don't remember! I did enjoy the book very much.  ETA: OK, I do remember a few disturbing moments. Still not too graphic. The book as a whole has some disturbing moments, se*ual and not. It's not a fun book, but good.

This week I finished The Widows of Malabar Hill. Mixed feelings on that one. The mystery wasn't very compelling, but the story of main character Perveen Mistry was. Learned a fair bit about the culture of India, particularly as it relates to women, in the early 20th century. 

Also read Such a Fun Age, about Emira, a young black woman, and her employer, Alix (pronounced uh-LEEKS, which she adopted something after high school; her real name is Alex), pretentious wealthy white woman.  Interesting story about race, growing into "real" adulthood, creating one's own reality, and a whole lot of manipulation.  

Now I'm having trouble settling on anything, have discarded a few after a chapter or two. But no worries, my bookshelves, real and virtual, are full. 

ETA: I also don't get the notion that Goodreads is so hard to use. I find it super simple and useful. I don't use it for book discussion much, though. 

Edited by marbel
  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I finished Worth Searching For by Wendy Qualls which was an enjoyable contemporary romance. (Adult content)

"Disowned by his conservative Peruvian parents, Lito Apaza headed for gay-friendly Atlanta. Resilient, charismatic, and successful, he’s built a life on his terms—with a new family of friends and the unconditional love of his dog, Spot. Then his job forces him to relocate to tiny Black Lake, Alabama. Here, being fabulous isn’t exactly the town motto. However, Lito can’t help who he is any more than he can curb his feelings for a certain sexy ex-soldier.
 
A former dog handler in Afghanistan, Dave Schmidt now runs a volunteer K9 search-and-rescue team. . . .' 

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today only, a free classic for Kindle readers ~

The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson

"A spirited historical adventure set during the British Middle Ages, The Black Arrow was originally serialized in 1883. As England is torn apart by civil wars between the Houses of York and Lancaster, Richard “Dick” Shelton seeks justice for the murder of his father. Believing that the Black Arrow outlaws are responsible for his death, Dick embarks on a journey through Tunstall Forest, where a fugitive heiress will help him uncover a shocking betrayal, discover just where his loyalties lie, and steal his heart . . ."
 
“The plot moves at a snappy pace—there are outlaws, secret passages, battles, hairs-breadth escapes, storms at sea, and more as Richard battles to regain his rightful inheritance—to say nothing of the girl he loves.” —Vintage Novels

** 

This LGBT romance that I enjoyed is also free for several days. Adult content!

A Forbidden Rumspringa (Gay Amish Romance Book 1) by Keira Andrews

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today’s White House panel on teaching history got me interested in history again. I am thinking to reread some Howard Zinn and Lowenstein (Lies my teachers...) type books, and want a good more conservative history book also. Any recommendations for the latter?   Has anyone read Land of Hope: An Invitation to the Great American Story https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0796ZLQXJ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_zs9yFbECQDNVR ?   

Hoopla seems to have the audiobook, but my Hoopla account is messed up. Probably my library membership expired. 

 

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Pen said:

Today’s White House panel on teaching history got me interested in history again. I am thinking to reread some Howard Zinn and Lowenstein (Lies my teachers...) type books, and want a good more conservative history book also. Any recommendations for the latter?   Has anyone read Land of Hope: An Invitation to the Great American Story https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0796ZLQXJ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_zs9yFbECQDNVR ?   

Hoopla seems to have the audiobook, but my Hoopla account is messed up. Probably my library membership expired. 

 

We have conservative and progressive history now in the US ?? 🤫. I thought that applied only to Christianity. America confuses me so much sometimes. 😊

  • Like 6
  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished Absalom, Absalom by William Faulkner 

Reading this book was like how I feel sometimes during exercise. I grit my teeth and get on with it, looking forward to finishing. This was my second Faulkner and I was determined to finish when I abandoned The Sound and the Fury. It was certainly not because of the content or I should say what I understood of it. It seemed quite timely and relevant given current circumstances. 

I found myself with a lot of questions. Like, did the author really give out what seemed like the entire book summary in the beginning ? Was he on something when he wrote this ? Why is he lurching from event to person and back ? Is this what he is saying or did I understand it wrong ? Why can't I understand a book written in English as a middle aged woman when I read and understood Dickens and Austen even as teen though English is not my first language ? 

I've had the privilege of reading in it's original language some works that are from BC and first written on palm leaves. Some are just oral traditions handed down through the generations which are later written down  and published. I have also read works in translation by great poets and a noble laureate in the closest possible language that sounded like it I know and made me want to learn the original languages so I could read them in that.

Faulkner though is not like that for me. I liken it to Opera. I found even the singing a bit exaggerated and could not enjoy it appalling people. I lack something that I just do not get his writing which is a pity because what little I got was beautiful. 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

We have conservative and progressive history now in the US ?? 🤫. I thought that applied only to Christianity. America confuses me so much sometimes. 😊

 

It isn’t just “now” but as with many things seems more significant and polarized now.  I moved a lot during my own schooling and history already was taught with significant “slants” and biases depending on **where** I was at the time (or the exact Professor / teacher).  If I had grown up in just one place it would have been much less obvious.   

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished reading the latest in Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series this morning.  I really enjoyed it but doubt someone who did not already love the series would enjoy it.  It was very much a book that was carefully crafted to allow fans to catch up with all their favorite characters. 😉  The Lantern Men https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/52331359-the-lantern-men used an old story from the fenlands to create a pretty good murder mystery that even had me surprised by the conclusion.  The mysterious lights lure people to their deaths in the marshes.  
 

I am currently listening to The Lies of Locke Lamora which is pretty consistently listed as one of the best fantasy series on most lists for the fantasy genre.  I have had it on hold for a very long time, super popular.  At this point I am halfway through and am somewhat ambivalent to a book that has a whole lot of 5* reviews on GR.  😂 The world building is excellent but .........I hope to love it by the end! https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29588376-the-lies-of-locke-lamora 

I also finished listening to the River of Teeth an alternate history set in Louisiana in the 1850’s.  The US decided to raise hippos as a source of meat in the area around the Mississippi.  In this book people ride tame hippos......you tame them by living and sleeping with them from birth.  The problem in this book are feral hippos which are possibly worse that crocodiles.  I will never look at hippos quite the same way.......I don’t plan to continue reading the series as the second book sounds boring.😂.             https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/31445891-river-of-teeth. 

Edited by mumto2
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

Finished Absalom, Absalom by William Faulkner 

Reading this book was like how I feel sometimes during exercise. I grit my teeth and get on with it, looking forward to finishing. This was my second Faulkner and I was determined to finish when I abandoned The Sound and the Fury. It was certainly not because of the content or I should say what I understood of it. It seemed quite timely and relevant given current circumstances. 

I found myself with a lot of questions. Like, did the author really give out what seemed like the entire book summary in the beginning ? Was he on something when he wrote this ? Why is he lurching from event to person and back ? Is this what he is saying or did I understand it wrong ? Why can't I understand a book written in English as a middle aged woman when I read and understood Dickens and Austen even as teen though English is not my first language ? 

I've had the privilege of reading in it's original language some works that are from BC and first written on palm leaves. Some are just oral traditions handed down through the generations which are later written down  and published. I have also read works in translation by great poets and a noble laureate in the closest possible language that sounded like it I know and made me want to learn the original languages so I could read them in that.

Faulkner though is not like that for me. I liken it to Opera. I found even the singing a bit exaggerated and could not enjoy it appalling people. I lack something that I just do not get his writing which is a pity because what little I got was beautiful. 

I'm so glad you posted about this! You're making me want to read Faulkner again. I remember being so excited by the language -- so dense and deliberate! I would not have compared him to opera but I can see what you mean.

I guess all of us have some writers we can't get into. I really didnt like Nabokov. I know people praise Nabokov's writing, but for me, it felt so flat and distant that I couldn't admire it...one day I'll try it again.

Edited by Little Green Leaves
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/15/2020 at 12:45 PM, Penguin said:

I finished a Miss Read book (Thrush Green #8), which was a lovely palate cleanser. 

The book I really want to talk about is Lisbon Poets (bilingual edition). It profiles five Lisbon poets. Two have big, international reputations: Luis de Camoes wrote Portugal's big epic poem, The Luciads, in the 1500s. My understanding is that nearly everyone in Portugal reads this in high school. Fernando Pessoa is a Modernist poet. What is interesting to me about him is that he wrote under well-developed, alternative personalities (heteronyms). It is easy to find English translations of both Luis de Camoes and Fernando Pessoa, and I hope to read more of each.

The other three (Cesario Verde, Mario De Sa-Carneiro, and Florabela Espanca) do not seem to have much translated into English. Florabela Espanca is the one and only female in the book. She was not taken very seriously in her lifetime, but is being revisited. She was dismissed as too emotive. Too concerned with love from the POV of a young woman to be considered IMPORTANT. And she used exclamation points! Oh the horror! I am not shocked that a young woman writer who died in 1930 was deemed trivial. She committed suicide on her 36th birthday.

Even though I do not know Portuguese, it is pretty obvious that the translations did not attempt to keep the rhyme schemes that I see on the Portuguese side of the pages. So I had a grand time listening to some of these poems being read in Portuguese on YouTube. I've added a version of "Amar!" by Florabela Espanca. Maybe, like me, you will just enjoy listening to a bit of Portuguese poetry even if you do not understand it. 

Here's my book's translation of the first stanza of "Amar!" :

To Love!

I want to love - love madly!

Love just to love - here...there...and beyond...

Him over there, and him right there, and everybody...

Love! Love! And not love anyone!

 

I did not know any of these poets before! I had fun reading about Pessoa and his heteronyms. It feels like something out of a Borges story. It gave me a lot to think about.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/16/2020 at 2:48 PM, marbel said:

Hey, welcome!

I read The Vanishing Half a few weeks ago, and I honestly can't remember much in the way of se*ual situations. I mean, I remember there were some, vaguely, but I am usually pretty sensitive to that (and still discard a book if it's too 'adult' for me) but... huh. Just don't remember! I did enjoy the book very much.  ETA: OK, I do remember a few disturbing moments. Still not too graphic. The book as a whole has some disturbing moments, se*ual and not. It's not a fun book, but good.

This week I finished The Widows of Malabar Hill. Mixed feelings on that one. The mystery wasn't very compelling, but the story of main character Perveen Mistry was. Learned a fair bit about the culture of India, particularly as it relates to women, in the early 20th century. 

Also read Such a Fun Age, about Emira, a young black woman, and her employer, Alix (pronounced uh-LEEKS, which she adopted something after high school; her real name is Alex), pretentious wealthy white woman.  Interesting story about race, growing into "real" adulthood, creating one's own reality, and a whole lot of manipulation.  

Now I'm having trouble settling on anything, have discarded a few after a chapter or two. But no worries, my bookshelves, real and virtual, are full. 

ETA: I also don't get the notion that Goodreads is so hard to use. I find it super simple and useful. I don't use it for book discussion much, though. 

Welcome and thanks for the recommendation of Vanishing Half, I’ll hold it at the library. I have become a master at skimming over graphic scenes. I love intrigue and twisty plots and can’t always get that without the accompanying physical scenes, but really, I’ve learned to skim. I also enjoyed Such a Fun Age, like you I consider it a timely story and have recommended it to others, especially people who might not otherwise want to invest a lot of mental energy in thinking through racial issues. I always hope the power of story can perhaps prime their pumps, iykwim. 

 

 

On 9/13/2020 at 6:01 PM, Dreamergal said:

Happy Sunday ! 

My reading time has become smaller, but my reading list has grown. Ah ! the joys of a bibliophile.

Starting Absalom Absalom by William Faulkner. This was directly based on the recommendation of @Little Green Leaves and the discussion on the thread. I hope Faulkner does not rampage in my head in ways like Sound and Fury did

The American Consulate library in my native city that had a huge influence growing up gave me access to magazines and one of my favorite ones was Gourmet Magazine. I never imagined that food could have a magazine and I would thumb through it always. When I came here, one of the magazines I subscribed to was Gourmet. The last editor-in-chief of the magazine Ruth Reichl and she was a chef and a food critic. Though I am not a big fan of memoirs, this has been on my TBR pile for a long time.

image.png.c3288bf109251ae8c9139c1ab8125b8b.png

The last book I finished, Genghis Khan and the making of the modern World made me identify potential rabbit trails. The most obvious one is the Silk Road. Since I discovered this book while Robin sent us on an assignment to choose a book by it's cover, I am killing two birds with one stone.

image.png.cbf122f56d7014552af5daf9ba00e65b.png

Some may get covered in one week, others may take many due to my shrinking reading time. But that's the plan.

Happy reading everyone !

image.png

Faulkner is on my favorite author list, but admittedly it’s been a while since I’ve read his work. I should dust some off and reread. Maybe reading a couple of chapters at a time and participating in a book discussion group would help? Kind of dissect it in pieces? 

On 9/14/2020 at 1:23 PM, mumto2 said:

It basically said that the title wouldn’t get you the book you are looking for....well it does for me many times.  My book is almost always one of the choices on the drop down menu.

During Covid I have been reading though a box of really old (90’s) Harliquins.........many with similar names.  I add the author and it comes up.  I have been amazed. 
 

My GR email recommendations are rather bad but I find the ones to the right of my book ..........I think titled “readers also enjoyed”.........to be really useful.  Of couse people like many of us who read quite a variety of genres are going to send the occasional odd one into those but good overall.

I have been craving the Victoria Holt gothic romances I read as a teen. Sadly my library doesn’t have any of them! I might have to mask up and go troll the used book shop. 

On 9/15/2020 at 12:54 PM, Penguin said:

Same. What is on your wishlist? Beyond the three  that currently get attention (Danish, Dutch, and Latin), I’d like to add Portuguese and a Slavic language.

Portuguese is super easy to pick up if you’ve studied Spanish and/or French. There are a lot of direct assimilations from the former, and having spent time in northern Brazil, it comes out of my mouth like French feels (does that make sense? can’t think of a better way to describe it). 
 

What programs are you language learners using? I’d like to brush up on my French but believe conversational Spanish would be so much more useful. 

On 9/16/2020 at 1:49 PM, melmichigan said:

I was sad to hear about Rachel Caine's move to hospice. I imagine I will be spending some time with her books. Many of her series firsts are on sale for kindle.  

I'll update my reading list later today, but I have been better with Goodreads.   

This author is new to me, thanks for mentioning her. I looked at my library’s holdings and it appears she write both contemporary novels and fantasy? 
 

I think the quote feature is glitchy since the forum remodel, so please forgive me if this post is scrambled. This week I am continuing in The Goblin Emperor, which I am enjoying mostly because the kind heart of the new emperor has captured my interest. @KareniI didn’t even think to look for an appendix, I guess it’s been too long since I’ve read a fantasy! There is indeed one, and it has come in handy as more characters are introduced and the same individuals often referred to in varying ways. 
 

I am also reading The Scarlett Letter concurrently with dc and listening to Bob Goff’s Love Does on audiobook. 

  • Like 9
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Portuguese is super easy to pick up if you’ve studied Spanish and/or French. There are a lot of direct assimilations from the former, and having spent time in northern Brazil, it comes out of my mouth like French feels (does that make sense? can’t think of a better way to describe it). 

LOL, the first time I heard Portuguese I was so confused.  Thought it sounded kind of like French with a Russian accent.  Or vice versa.  (This was Portugal Portuguese - I think the Brazilian variety is a bit softer sounding?)  Now it just sounds like Portuguese, lol.

I've been watching a Netflix show in Galician (with Spanish subtitles).  It's like halfway to Portuguese.  I can understand most of it.  They say 'fala' instead of 'habla' and seu or sua (it's one of those!) instead of su.

  • Like 7
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

This week I am continuing in The Goblin Emperor, which I am enjoying mostly because the kind heart of the new emperor has captured my interest. @KareniI didn’t even think to look for an appendix, I guess it’s been too long since I’ve read a fantasy! There is indeed one, and it has come in handy as more characters are introduced and the same individuals often referred to in varying ways. 

LOL, this is one reason that even though I hear Goblin Emperor (also a favorite of mine) has a good audio version, to go for the print book, at least the first time through.  Appendices are helpful!  I didn't realize they were there at first, either, but I had a fun time parsing all the different language rules and how the words shifted depending on use and address.  My geeky language heart was happy.

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

LOL, the first time I heard Portuguese I was so confused.  Thought it sounded kind of like French with a Russian accent.  Or vice versa.  (This was Portugal Portuguese - I think the Brazilian variety is a bit softer sounding?)  Now it just sounds like Portuguese, lol.

I've been watching a Netflix show in Galician (with Spanish subtitles).  It's like halfway to Portuguese.  I can understand most of it.  They say 'fala' instead of 'habla' and seu or sua (it's one of those!) instead of su.

Like American English (and so many other languages, heck, probably all of them), South American Portuguese varies greatly by geography. IME it’s more French sounding in the northeast (probably more like European Portuguese), and a bit harder and more Spanish sounding farther down the coast. The language-learning programs I used years ago featured speakers with that harder sound - typical of the Sao Paola region. I don’t know what the far southern tip sounds like, but the person I knew who grew up down there (southern tip) was very sweet and soft spoken, similar to the northeasterners. 
 

I wish I’d kept it up. It’s hard when one lacks a partner for regular conversation practice.  

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

 

Portuguese is super easy to pick up if you’ve studied Spanish and/or French. There are a lot of direct assimilations from the former, and having spent time in northern Brazil, it comes out of my mouth like French feels (does that make sense? can’t think of a better way to describe it). 
 

What programs are you language learners using? I’d like to brush up on my French but believe conversational Spanish would be so much more useful. 

 

Yes, I think Portuguese would be pretty easy to pick up once I get my Spanish up a little bit and my French up a lot. :)

 

I'm using duolingo for Spanish and I'll be using it for French next year.  Last year into this year I did the Spanish tree and this year I'm doing the reverse tree ("learning" English from Spanish).  

I'm also reading in Spanish.  I'm reading the New Testament and some children's chapter books.  (Currently I'm reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.) 

What is helping me the most, though, is church.  Our church has a Spanish service that I began attending last fall, only on Wednesday nights.  When Covid happened, Spanish church moved to zoom, so I have been able to attend (and interact a little bit) three times a week.  My comprehension has increased dramatically in just a year.  Speaking is still pretty hard, but the people are patient with me and let me make mistakes. :)

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Like American English (and so many other languages, heck, probably all of them), South American Portuguese varies greatly by geography. IME it’s more French sounding in the northeast (probably more like European Portuguese), and a bit harder and more Spanish sounding farther down the coast. The language-learning programs I used years ago featured speakers with that harder sound - typical of the Sao Paola region. I don’t know what the far southern tip sounds like, but the person I knew who grew up down there (southern tip) was very sweet and soft spoken, similar to the northeasterners. 
 

I wish I’d kept it up. It’s hard when one lacks a partner for regular conversation practice.  

It is hard - but never too late!  I do find reading helpful in at least keeping things active so my brain doesn't decide to put all of it in boxes in the back of the closet, lol.  Netflix has at least now come out with a ton of good Spanish stuff, and that helps too.  Don't know that there's a lot of Portuguese Netflix, though.  But there are a ton of good Portuguese writers!  

I can read basic Portuguese just from knowing Spanish, but not enough to read literature.  That would mean a lot more work... maybe someday...

Edited by Matryoshka
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1 hour ago, Matryoshka said:

seu or sua (it's one of those!) instead of su.

 

Both. 

Seu filho.  Sua madre.   His/her/your son.  His/her/your mother.  

3rd person possessive (including you in third person formal) agrees with number and gender of the object noun. 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Pen said:

Both. 

Seu filho.  Sua madre.   His/her/your son.  His/her/your mother.  

3rd person possessive (including you in third person formal) agrees with number and gender of the object noun. 

I guess that's why I was having a hard time remembering which it was, lol! Guess I was listening well, though!

In Spanish the posessive adjectives agree in number but not gender - except for nuestro/a/s and vuestro/a/s.  But it's just su or sus in third person.

I think Galician also uses something like filo/a insted of hijo/a for son/daughter.  Have no idea of spelling!

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Pen said:

Both. 

Seu filho.  Sua madre.   His/her/your son.  His/her/your mother.  

3rd person possessive (including you in third person formal) agrees with number and gender of the object noun. 

What is 2nd person formal in Portuguese? In Spanish it's Usted, and which is a mispronounced contraction of the medieval 'vuestra merced' which is also conjugated in the third person.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

FINISHED:

Um ... can I count last weeks BaW thread as read because that's about it these days. 

I think I only missed a week but things look different around here anyway. Life is good but busy. I'm falling into bed exhausted at night. DD is back in school (as in ... back in a building two days a week). DS is hanging out with mom. And we've also hired someone to help with the company. Which surprisingly cuts into my inter-netting time. I feel a little lazy jumping on here or Goodreads when my employee is ten feet away drafting. 

And I managed to delete two quotes but at least I remember them ... kinda.

@JunieI'm getting DD The Goblin Emperor for Christmas. I hope DD and your sister will enjoy it. I'm hoping my DD doesn't stumble across it in a library or on Kindle before she gets it as a present.

@mumto2Thanks for posting the cool cat book and the description. I have a friend that loves Murakami and is super hard to buy for. Now I know what book she's getting for Christmas.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...