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I just learned that most schools have nurses.


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13 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

@bolt.—how do they handle high medical needs children? I am talking of children who need to be tube fed, have iv medications administered, or have suction given to preserve airways during the school day. This is part of their daily life. In earlier decades, they likely would’ve been in a children’s nursing home rather than in a school.

I think those kids would have an aide, or they would be at a designated school equipped for their needs.

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First Aid is just a part of what school nurses do. School nurses aren't giving physicals, diagnosing illnesses, etc. They don't replace the doctor's office. There have always been several kids in the schools I've worked in that got daily medication or are diabetic & get their blood sugar levels checked 1-2 times at school. They care for sick children while waiting for the parents to pick them up as well. 

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14 hours ago, bolt. said:

I don't want to speak for all of Canada -- but nurses have never been in schools in my area, in my memory.

I think it would be redundant: if a child needs medical care (beyond first aid) they would just be sent to a clinic or a hospital. Either a parent would come and take them, or, if needed, an ambulance would be called.

I think this is because of universal healthcare. There isn't a sense that children need health services through a school to ensure accessibility of care because all children have normal everyday access to all the healthcare they might ever need.

(We do have public health nurses for immunizations that are sometimes offered through schools.)

I am curious, are the kids allowed to carry their own regular meds throughout the day?  Such as say, ADHD meds, epi pens, or maybe NSAIDS if they get a headache or something?

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On 9/9/2020 at 11:14 PM, happi duck said:

In old movies they sometimes show nurses on staff at factories etc.  Was that true?  If so does that still happen?  More nurses seems like a good idea!

My DH's employer has a clinic onsite.  The's one nurse practitioner and then a couple of CNAs.  Though ironically, they aren't "open" during covid.  They are still there, managing all the temp check data, the PPE supplies that the company provides and if someone is injured they are able to provide the same care they would have.  But they aren't providing any of the non urgent services they used to.  

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55 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I am curious, are the kids allowed to carry their own regular meds throughout the day?  Such as say, ADHD meds, epi pens, or maybe NSAIDS if they get a headache or something?

Usually not. There are sometimes excemptions for epipens and inhalers, but everything else is under lock and key. Taking meds, even a Tylenol, during school is often a violation. Giving your friend one because she has cramps or a headache can lead to being disciplined for distributing drugs. 

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

I am curious, are the kids allowed to carry their own regular meds throughout the day?  Such as say, ADHD meds, epi pens, or maybe NSAIDS if they get a headache or something?

No the only exceptions I've heard of are an emergency inhaler or epi-pen.  Everything else comes from a nurse.   Zero tolerance on drugs includes things like aspirin you don't have permission and get it from the nurse 

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13 minutes ago, dmmetler said:

Usually not. There are sometimes excemptions for epipens and inhalers, but everything else is under lock and key. Taking meds, even a Tylenol, during school is often a violation. Giving your friend one because she has cramps or a headache can lead to being disciplined for distributing drugs. 

 

7 minutes ago, rebcoola said:

No the only exceptions I've heard of are an emergency inhaler or epi-pen.  Everything else comes from a nurse.   Zero tolerance on drugs includes things like aspirin you don't have permission and get it from the nurse 

Well, yeah, that's always how it's been in the schools I know of, all of which have nurses.  But bolt was referring to schools in her area never having nurses and how medical care would be handled through a medical clinic or whatever.  So if schools in that area don't have nurses and students needing medical care are sent to a clinic or whatever, I was wondering how the schools in those situations handle those sorts of low level things.

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3 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

 

Well, yeah, that's always how it's been in the schools I know of, all of which have nurses.  But bolt was referring to schools in her area never having nurses and how medical care would be handled through a medical clinic or whatever.  So if schools in that area don't have nurses and students needing medical care are sent to a clinic or whatever, I was wondering how the schools in those situations handle those sorts of low level things.

Educational aide who handles health or a school secretary for things like giving a kid their ADHD meds, or blood sugar testing. Usually multiple people will be trained for emergency meds and if the student does not self-carry, there will be stocks around the school and one of those people would be expected to administer. I was one of them, which was terrifying. There was always someone with an EpiPen on breakfast and lunch duty. 

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1 hour ago, happysmileylady said:

I am curious, are the kids allowed to carry their own regular meds throughout the day?  Such as say, ADHD meds, epi pens, or maybe NSAIDS if they get a headache or something?

No. Not even in high school. 

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The public school I attended in France had a school nurse.

I think the elementary school I spent a few months at in Virginia had one.

I can't remember one anywhere else.

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My mother was a school nurse during her second career (she was a teacher first, then went to nursing school later). When I was in elementary school, there always seemed to be a nurse in the office when I needed to go there for stomach aches or if I fell ill while at school. My mom later worked for two different school districts, and by that time, she served as the nurse for the entire district and had to travel among all of the elementary, middle, and high schools. She was responsible for making sure each child's immunizations were up to date but not in charge of giving any immunizations. She had to do lice checks, if there was an outbreak. She administered or helped arrange vision and hearing checks and gave out little cups of flouride treatments. Keeping up to date on all of these things meant that she spent a lot more time doing paperwork than interacting with sick children. If she was not in a building when a child felt ill, the school secretaries would hand out things like ibuprofen. She never talked about having children with chronic medical needs under her care or having to deal with feeding tubes, etc., so either she didn't have medically fragile children, or they must have had other aides assigned to them.

If children were sick during the day, she wouldn't do anything to treat them, other than offering a place for them to lay down or handing out simple OTC meds or their prescribed meds that the family had turned in to the office. She would call parents to take them home, and if the kids needed more care, they had to go to their own doctor. She didn't function in any kind of diagnostic way but would just refer kids to get treatment from their own physician, if needed.

My children's public school now has one district nurse. But, interestingly, there is a team of athletic trainers.

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21 hours ago, QueenCat said:

I grew up in the county you live in. We had fulltime nurses in the 70s and 80s. 

Well, yeah, because it’s a city. 😬

5 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

I am curious, are the kids allowed to carry their own regular meds throughout the day?  Such as say, ADHD meds, epi pens, or maybe NSAIDS if they get a headache or something?

When I was in school, your mom just put any medicine you needed to take in your lunchbox and you took it at lunch. We were allowed to carry our own ibuprofen at school and give our friend a midol. 
 

I knew school nurses existed. I just didn’t realize EVERYONE but me had them.  If you needed first aid, you were sent to whomever coached some sort of sport or a gym teacher. If you were sick you put your head down until someone picked you up early. 
 

I once drove my daughter around the block to give her something for cramps because handing her the pills in the school building involved paperwork. 

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