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Book a Week 2020 - BW35: Ladies of Fiction - Sarah Dunant


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Happy Sunday, my lovelies.  Welcome to September and our celebration of Library Card sign up monthBe Kind to Writers and Editors MonthClassical Music Month, and Hispanic Heritage Month.  Don't forget to Be Late for Something Day (9/5), Read a Book Day (9/6), or help someone to read on International literacy Day (9/8).   Remember the fallen on 9/11, honor your grandparents on 9/13, appreciate being a citizen of the U.S. and read the constitution on 9/17. Talk like a pirate on 9/19, celebrate the equinox and think like a hobbit on 9/22, and read a banned or challenged book during Banned Book Week starting September 27th.  Wow, busy month. 


We are also celebrating the writings of our Ladies of Fiction Bookology author, Sarah Dunant, writer of thrillers and historical fiction set during the renaissance.  The British writer recently turned 70 and currently splits her time between London and Florence.  


There are a number of ways to complete the bookology challenge, including but not limited to:

 

  • Spell out the author's name - one book per letter from the title on the cover.
  • Read one or more books written by the author.
  • Read a book written in the country or time period of the author.


Learn more about Sarah through history you can see and smell, The answers history gives us depend on the questions we ask it’ and fashion and fiction.


~Cheers and happy reading! 

 

Link to week 34

Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers  around the globe.

 

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Sarah Dunant's Sacred Heart is up next on my nightstand.

"1570 in the Italian city of Ferrara. Sixteen-year-old Serafina is fipped by her family from an illicit love affair and forced into the convent of Santa Caterina, renowned for its superb music. Serafina’s one weapon is her glorious voice, but she refuses to sing. Madonna Chiara, an abbess as fluent in politics as she is in prayer, finds her new charge has unleashed a power play – rebellion, ecstasies and hysterias – within the convent. However, watching over Serafina is Zuana, the sister in charge of the infirmary, who understands and might even challenge her incarceration."

I opted for fluffy reads the past couple weeks and embraced contemporary romance with Kylie Scott's Stage Dive and Dive Bar series.  Funny and sweet as well as hot. 

We watched the 2nd transformer movie last night - Revenge of the Fallen which was intense and action packed. One of those movies that leaves you in a puddle of sweat by the end. 

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I'm enjoying my library pile. I started with the YA novel, Genesis Begins Again. Genesis is a 13 year old black girl in Detroit who hates that she is too dark and has an alcoholic father who doesn't pay the rent, forcing them to move often. She learns about painful family history and explores harmful ways to lighten her skin and relax her hair on her way to growing up a bit and discovering some good things about herself with the help of some good new friends. This was an easy read and a good "back to school" book for me. Then I started The Bear and the Nightingale and I'm enjoying that one very much too--put the sequel on hold. Still have Catch and Kill and Spinning Silver to get to next.

I start going back to work this week--just Tuesday and Wednesday for meetings and training, plus whatever extra time I work. Then back for good next Wednesday. We're online for the foreseeable future.

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I read The Menopause Book - 3 Stars - This book is a quick and easy read. The more informed we are, the better the quality of our lives as we face the post-menopausal years. I’m in my early 50’s and only just realized that according to the definition, I'm post-menopausal. Once you have no longer had your period for twelve consecutive months, you’re post-menopausal. I'm usually very organized and do my research. I did it before entering puberty and before pregnancy. Menopause has sadly been the exception and I have been ill-prepared for this part of my life. I was happy to remember that I’ve had this book sitting on my shelf for a while.

Here are some interesting facts and helpful tips:

BONE HEALTH

“As you get older, you lose bone in your spine. This process begins about 18 months before your last period. Over the next eight years, your spinal bone density will decrease by more than 10 percent, followed by a slower pace of age-related bone thinning that can go on for the rest of your life. This bone loss can lead to the ‘dowager’s hump’ seen in some elderly women.”

“One of the simplest ways to get enough vitamin D is to just walk around in the sunshine. Ultraviolet rays from the sun trigger the skin to make its own vitamin D. But with our heightened consciousness of the dangers of skin cancer, most of us slather on sunscreen to keep out the rays. So consider a sensible compromise. If you have light skin, get about 5 to 15 minutes of sun exposure to your face, arms, hands, or back, at least twice a week (without sunscreen) during warm weather. If you have darker skin, you should add a few more minutes. But don’t overdo it. Watch the time, and when you’ve had enough, slap on sunscreen of at least 15 SPF.”

FLAVONOLS

“Chocolate contains flavonols, which are also found in apples, onions, and green tea. Flavonols helps to relax blood vessels, improve blood flow, and decrease blood clotting. They have also been shown to reduce inflammation. Researchers think that someday cocoa flavonols may be used to treat diabetes, stroke, and a kind of dementia.

Of course, there’s a catch! Flavonol is the reason chocolate is bitter. Not so great for those of us with a serious sweet tooth. Your best bet is to choose a dark chocolate (like a semisweet or bittersweet) that is high in cacao and lower in fat and sugar. … Limit yourself to no more than an ounce a few tunes a week.”

Menopause is about far more than just hot flashes and the usual symptoms. Our bodies start aging when we lose estrogen. This book is a good jumping-off point to get started on the research, but I don’t think it’s essential. I’ve just started watching Menopause Taylor on You Tube. She’s a knowledgeable retired ob-gyn and boy, does she know her stuff. The only thing that she asks is that her videos be watched in order. I’ve recently started on those. She also has a book, but I’m not sure if I’ll be getting it any time soon. I highly recommend her channel to all pre- and post-menopausal women. I wish that I’d known about her sooner.

41xir9xyrNL._SY346_.jpg

MY RATING SYSTEM

5 Stars

The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine.

4 Stars

Really Good

3 Stars

Enjoyable

2 Stars

Just Okay – nothing to write home about

1 Star

Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.

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This has been a good reading week for me. 

I started and finished The Vanishing Half by Britt Bennett. Interesting book which I'm still thinking about. Just as a novel, it was entertaining and well-written. But there's more to it than that. Twin sisters, black but very light skinned (a point of pride in their tiny Louisiana town), leave home together to make a new life. One twin eventually builds a completely different life by passing as white. The story is told over decades, from the 1950s - late '80s. Racial and gender identity are explored in an interesting way.

That book derailed some other reading slightly, as I had to finish it in a hurry (one-week $1 rental from the library, a mistake on my part but a happy one). I continued with How Much of These Hills is Gold which has a very dreamy style of writing and is still difficult for me but that I'm pressing on with, and The Widows of Malabar Hill which I'm liking more and more. 

I also spent some time playing with books at home, going through our book inventory lists, moving some things into boxes and rediscovering some things to get out of boxes and on to shelves.  Trying to get rid of some but I live with 3 book hoarders so that is a losing battle. I was once a book hoarder but I'm finding it easier lately to let go of possessions (though books are the hardest other than photos). 

Edited by marbel
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I am still firmly entrenched in my routine:

Daniel Silva's "Moscow Rules"  Since Overdrive "forced" me to read one of the later Gabriel Allon books first, I now need to read a bit about earlier events so I can piece it together.

Victoria Thompson's "Murder at Marble Row" These were a happy find for my Audiobook collection. Falls into the "cozy mystery" category.

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Some bookish posts ~

On the Wings of Inspiration by Leanna Renee Hieber

https://www.tor.com/2020/07/31/on-the-wings-of-inspiration/

7 Best Mystery Books (According to Mystery Experts)

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/specialfeatures/7-best-mystery-books-according-to-mystery-experts/

Top Ten Tuesday ~ Top 20 Books I Want To Reread!!

http://captivatedreader.blogspot.com/2018/02/top-ten-tuesday-top-20-books-i-want-to.html?showComment=1519763870518#c5107883999471523910

TOP TEN TUESDAY: FAVOURITE BOOKS I READ IN 2019!

https://lifewithallthebooks.com/2019/12/31/top-ten-tuesday-favourite-books-i-read-in-2019/

Regards,

Kareni

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Until Robin’s post today I completely forgot my spelling challenge from last month and had my few days where I ruthlessly abandoned many books in the stack.......after looking at my Goodreads I am happy to report I faired far better than expected and just need to read a Kate Daniel’s urban fantasy that I still have in the stack to finish spelling Nalini Singh.

One of my 10 x 10’s for this year was originally titled “Henry and His Kin” and was expected to be several books set in Tudor times.  I have several books that I have picked up sitting in England and I was planning to tackle that stack this summer.......silly, unsuspecting me.  Plans are in flux due to Covid.😂. One of my most anticipated was a book on Bess of Hardwick, a legendary Tudor if you live in my area.  
 

She built Chatsworth and Hardwick Hall.  She was the Queen Elizabeth ‘s bestie and entrusted with her husband to be Mary’s jailer.  She started life as a bankrupt farmer’s daughter and managed to claw her way up through society(and several marriages) to the position of Duchess to the richest Duke(actually person) in England.  She fascinates me.......I couldn’t find my book which was purchased at Hardwick but stumbled into a book by Virginia Henley (yep, the bodice ripper specialist) and decided to give it a try since Overdrive was happy to deliver it.  Woman of Passion https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/834249.A_Woman_of_Passion was actually a good solid retelling of the basic outline of the first part of her life with some adult scenes thrown in.  The modern language bothered me but it achieved an amazing amount of accuracy......Virginia Henley lives in the general area and probably loves Bess as much as I do!  I decided to use her for my Femme Fatale Bingo square because she obviously was........btw this was a page turner that kept me reading until 4 am!  I can’t believe I couldn’t put it down because it really was just telling a story I already knew.

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I love this list of days, especially "be late for something." Totally in my wheelhouse...

I just started reading the Old Man and the Sea. @Dreamergal I understand why you called Hemingway a magical realist. It does feel like something magical is lurking just beneath. And the writing is so gorgeously paced too.

I also have a book of essays by Emmanuel Mounier, the only book by him in my whole library system apparently. His analysis of Camus, Sartre, Malraux. We'll see how much of it I read, but it's nice to have it around.

 

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Happy September !

This month is fall, officially my most favorite season of the year and I carefully chose a location to settle in which does not have winter. But I can totally do fall. Fall also means more reading somehow except there is a distinct possibility that I may lose my voice thanks to this board. I have always been a mother that read aloud to her kids, but during bed time. Now this board has introduced me to the concept of poetry teas and read alouds which in my house means mamma reads for hours. 😬

My little girl and even my teenager love being read to and now my poor voice needs a break. It came as part of a deal though, my little girl will read "baby books" aka picture books which are really the Asterix, Tin Tin, Manga, Amar Chitra Katha kind in return to an hour of being read to. I foresee a future subscription to audible. 

All this rambling to say, my reading time has dwindled. So I am surrounding myself with comforting reading of all kinds with a smorgasbord of manga, webtoons, fanfiction, twaddle re-reads. I just have not figured out what. 

But because I always have something I have to read specifically, my plan is to read this book. 

image.png.74897584631e9cfc01cb1e765e2fe66f.png

I know about good old Genghis of course. You cannot come from my part of the world without having heard of him or him eyeing the country with conquest in mind. But surprise, surprise he did not come. The various reasons I have heard being he landed in a desert part called Rajastan, decided it was too hot and left. Also there was a brutal invader called Allaudin Khilji who was the sultan (ruler) of Delhi and who defeated the mongols. I do not know if they were contemporaries, I have my dates mixed up but I do remember some connection between Genghis or one of his descendants trying to invade and being pushed ruthlessly back by Khilji who was no less a person himself, just that he did not have gargantuan ambitions like Genghis Khan, just huge. Also, he did not obliterate cultures he invaded like Genghis is said to have done, so Khilji is said to have preserved Indian culture. This is what I know from history class, I want to read how Genghis made the world because he is one of those people who strode through history and whose actions have reverberations even now. 

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39 minutes ago, Little Green Leaves said:

I just started reading the Old Man and the Sea. @Dreamergal I understand why you called Hemingway a magical realist. It does feel like something magical is lurking just beneath. And the writing is so gorgeously paced too.

 

Thanks. But I must set the record straight. I just repeated what I read/heard. Other, more erudite people have. Glad you find Hemingway a magical realist as well.

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Yesterday I finished Midshipman's Hope (The Seafort Saga Book 1) by David Feintuch; this is a military science fiction novel. It is by no means a perfect story; however, it definitely kept my interest and I talked a lot about it with my husband. I would happily read on. (Incidentally, this book is currently on sale for $1.99 for Kindle readers.)

 "In the year 2194, seventeen-year-old Nicholas Seafort is assigned to the Hibernia as a lowly midshipman. Destination: the thriving colony of Hope Nation. But when a rescue attempt goes devastatingly wrong, Seafort is thrust into a leadership role he never anticipated. The other officers resent him, but Seafort must handle more dangerous problems, from a corrupted navigation computer to a deadly epidemic. Even Hope Nation has a nasty surprise in store. Seafort might be the crew’s only hope . . . This page-turning science fiction in the vein of Robert Heinlein and Orson Scott Card—with a dash of Horatio Hornblower—marks the captivating debut adventure in Feintuch’s hugely popular Seafort Saga."

Regards,

Kareni

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I finished three books this week:

El Llamada de la Mujer a la Oracion (A Woman's Call to Prayer) -- Elizabeth George -- I really appreciated reading this book right now during this challenging time.  I've read the English version, but it's been several years.  I enjoyed the encouragement to spend more time in prayer and to worship the Lord in prayer, not just give God my list of wants.  (Also, my Spanish skills are improving, which makes me happy.)

The Tale of Despereaux -- Kate DiCamillo  -- This is a cute story that is familiar yet fresh.  I did not appreciate the way one of the characters was abused (even though it turns out ok at the end).  I would recommend this book to children with caution.

Through Gates of Splendor -- Elisabeth Elliot -- I have tried to read this book several times and never made it past the first chapter.  It starts out a bit slow, I already knew how it ended, and so I moved on.  This time I made myself keep reading -- and I am so glad that I did.  This story is inspiring and thought-provoking.  If this had been my story, would I have reacted with the same grace?  And do I react with grace in the "story" that God has given me?

 

Llamado de La Mujer a la Oracin, El  The Tale of Despereaux  Through Gates of Splendor

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I took a reading hiatus but recently began again.

I read:

All the Light We Cannot See. By Anthony Doerr

Absence if Grace. By Ann Warner

For homeschooling we have been reading a lot if good books:

The Secret Commonwealth. By Philip Pullman

Journey to the Centre if the Earth by Jules Verne

The Children of Green Knowe and The River at Green Knowe. By Lucy M. Boston

The Star of Kazan by Eva Ibbotson

Anne of the Island and currently Anne of Windy Poplars by L.M. Montgomery

All good books!!!

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13 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

I took a reading hiatus but recently began again.

I read:

All the Light We Cannot See. By Anthony Doerr

Absence if Grace. By Ann Warner

For homeschooling we have been reading a lot if good books:

The Secret Commonwealth. By Philip Pullman

Journey to the Centre if the Earth by Jules Verne

The Children of Green Knowe and The River at Green Knowe. By Lucy M. Boston

The Star of Kazan by Eva Ibbotson

Anne of the Island and currently Anne of Windy Poplars by L.M. Montgomery

All good books!!!
 

Wow. That's a great list of books! We've got The Star of Kazan in John's bookshelf to try to read soon. 

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I just hit 52 books for the year but a substantial number really didn't count because they're shorter read alouds like Boxcar Children and MTH. For the statistics junkies I've put my breakdown below.

52 books (including short read alouds but not picture books)

19 X Audiobooks
20 X Brit Trips
12 X Read Alouds
9 X Books on the craft of writing

 

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@Negin I appreciate the menopause book discussion. Cancer treatment forced me into early meno at age 41, which is now 15 years ago. I am always trying to learn more about bone health. Fortunately, I started meno with a lot of bone strength in the bank, so to speak. And I have tried to be proactive. However, all of that was not still not enough to stave off the effects of chemo and five years of an aromatase inhibitor (anti-estrogen drug therapy). 

I'd like to recommend an excellent reference book to our BaW readers:

The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and The Vagina - Separating the Myth from the Medicine by Jen Gunter. I think it is a great book to have around the house. And I really think that it would be a great cover-to-cover read for much of the male half of the population.

I also enjoy Jen Gunter's Twitter account. I find her quite funny, personable, and informative. Her social media comes with a Very Strong Language warning, and she is also unabashedly political. 

Edited by Penguin
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1 minute ago, Penguin said:

@Negin I appreciate the menopause book discussion. Cancer treatment forced me into early meno at age 41, which is now 15 years ago. I am always trying to learn more about bone health. Fortunately, I started meno with a lot of bone strength in the bank, so to speak. And I have tried to be proactive. However, all of that was not still not enough to stave off the effects of chemo an aromatase inhibitor (anti-estrogen drug therapy). 

Ditto all of this. Except 17-years-old and now 21 years ago! (My how the years fly by ...) The bone health is such a good reminder that I don't think of much!

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Today only, a free classic for Kindle readers ~

Up from Slavery by Booker T. Washington

 "Booker T. Washington’s classic memoir of enslavement, emancipation, and community advancement in the Reconstruction Era.
 
Born into slavery on a tobacco farm in nineteenth-century Virginia, Booker T. Washington became one of the most powerful intellectuals of the Reconstruction Era. As president of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, he advocated for the advancement of African Americans through education and entrepreneurship. In Up from Slavery, Washington speaks frankly and honestly about his enslavement and emancipation, struggle to receive an education, and life’s work as an educator.
 
In great detail, Washington describes establishing the Tuskegee Institute, from teaching its first classes in a hen house to building a prominent institution through community organization and a national fundraising campaign. He also addresses major issues of the era, such as the Jim Crow laws, Ku Klux Klan, and “false foundation” of Reconstruction policy.
 
Up From Slavery is based on biographical articles written for the Christian newspaper Outlook and includes the full text of Washington’s revolutionary Atlanta Exposition address. First published in 1901, this powerful autobiography remains a landmark of African American literature as well as an important firsthand account of post–Civil War American history. "

Regards,

Kareni

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@aggieamy As I am getting closer to actual bone density problems, I need to get caught up on the latest research. I had started doing that some months ago after a disappointing bone density screening, but then the pandemic pushed that research project aside.  I’m glad to have the reminder, too. Sending out fervent wishes that our diagnoses and their fall-out merely continue to fade into the rear-view mirror!
 

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Movie post! Get reading your classics, my friends, and get your subscription to the Criterion Channel, because in September they're releasing a boatload of great film adaptations, including adaptations of children's classics like The Phantom Tollbooth and Zazie Dans le Metro. The list:

The Count of Monte Cristo (Rowland V. Lee, 1934)
The 39 Steps (Alfred Hitchcock, 1935)
La bête humaine (Jean Renoir, 1938)
Of Mice and Men (Lewis Milestone, 1939)
Great Expectations (David Lean, 1946)
The Killers (Robert Siodmak, 1946)
Anna Karenina (Julien Duvivier, 1948)
Oliver Twist (David Lean, 1948)
The Heiress (William Wyler, 1949)
The Passionate Friends (David Lean, 1949)
The Idiot (Akira Kurosawa, 1951)
The Life of Oharu (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1952)
Robinson Crusoe (Luis Buñuel, 1954)
Senso (Luchino Visconti, 1954)
Pather Panchali (Satyajit Ray, 1955)
Aparajito (Satyajit Ray, 1956)
The Burmese Harp (Kon Ichikawa, 1956)
Apur Sansar (Satyajit Ray, 1959)
The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)
Purple Noon (René Clément, 1960)
Zazie dans le métro (Louis Malle, 1960)
Divorce Italian Style (Pietro Germi, 1961)
Lord of the Flies (Peter Brook, 1963)
Tom Jones (Tony Richardson, 1963)
Charulata (Satyajit Ray, 1964)
Woman in the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964)
Closely Watched Trains (Jirí Menzel, 1966)
War and Peace (Sergei Bondarchuk, 1966)
Memories of Underdevelopment (Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1968)
The Angel Levine (Ján Kadár, 1970)
Dodes’ka-den (Akira Kurosawa, 1970)
The Phantom Tollbooth (Chuck Jones, Abe Levitow, and Dave Monahan, 1970)
The Little Prince (Stanley Donen, 1974)
Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975)
The American Friend (Wim Wenders, 1977)
The Ascent (Larisa Shepitko, 1977)
The Getting Of Wisdom (Bruce Beresford, 1977)
Empire of Passion (Nagisa Oshima, 1978)
Watership Down (Martin Rosen, 1978)
My Brilliant Career (Gillian Armstrong, 1979)
Stalker (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979)
The Tin Drum (Volker Schlöndorff, 1979)
Wise Blood (John Huston, 1979)
You Are Not I (Sara Driver, 1981)
Under the Volcano (John Huston, 1984)
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (Paul Schrader, 1985)
My Life as a Dog (Lasse Hallström, 1985)
Betty Blue (Jean-Jacques Beineix, 1986)
An Angel at My Table (Jane Campion, 1990)
The Comfort of Strangers (Paul Schrader, 1990)
Europa Europa (Agnieszka Holland, 1990)
The Handmaid’s Tale (Volker Schlöndorff, 1990)
Wuthering Heights (Peter Kosminsky, 1992)
The Castle (Michael Haneke, 1997)
The Sweet Hereafter (Atom Egoyan, 1997)
The Virgin Suicides (Sofia Coppola, 1999)
The Piano Teacher (Michael Haneke, 2001)
The Hours (Stephen Daldry, 2002)
Gomorrah (Matteo Garrone, 2008)
Almayer’s Folly (Chantal Akerman, 2011)
45 Years (Andrew Haigh, 2015)
Certain Women (Kelly Reichardt, 2016)
Zama (Lucrecia Martel, 2017)

Excuse me, I have to go do a few hundred hours of preparatory reading now.

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4 hours ago, Penguin said:

@aggieamy As I am getting closer to actual bone density problems, I need to get caught up on the latest research. I had started doing that some months ago after a disappointing bone density screening, but then the pandemic pushed that research project aside.  I’m glad to have the reminder, too. Sending out fervent wishes that our diagnoses and their fall-out merely continue to fade into the rear-view mirror!
 

I really need to get on this.  I'm sure my bone density is bad.  Maybe really bad.

When I was working toward a Rheumatoid Arthritis diagnosis 14 years ago, a doctor cursed when he saw my x-ray and said that I had the bone density of an 80-year-old woman.  I wasn't 40 yet!  I was diagnosed with osteopenia (the precursor to osteoporosis).

Sigh.  Time to start reading about bone density and menopause, I suppose.

I'd rather read Lord of the Flies.

I hated Lord of the Flies.

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So we finished another Boxcar Children (it doesn't matter which one but it was one of the original 19 actually written by Warner at least). John loved it so much that he immediately bought it on Audible so he could listen to it again. (Never mind my annoyance that I've discussed WITH EVERYONE IN MY HOUSE NOT TO BUY AUDIBLE BOOKS THROUGH THE ALEXA. You see the Alexa always buys them with a credit when sometimes it's only a $4 book which is so much cheaper than a credit. *rant over*) But it was sweet and I was reminded of why I suffer through these books. There's something classic about these "kids going on adventures and solving mysteries" that just appeals to young children. And they love to hear the same story over and over. So my deal with him right now is that every third read aloud we do can be a Boxcar Children book. But MTH books have been moved to the "books to read to yourself" category. This mama has her limits. 

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4 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

Purple Noon (René Clément, 1960)

I looked this up, never having heard of a book of this name. It's a French film version of Patricia Highsmith's The Talented Mr Ripley, which I've been intending to read. Turns out the book is based on Henry James's The Ambassadors. So now I have to re-read that, read the Highsmith, and then see the movie.

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I just finished Murder in St. Giles: A Regency Mystery (Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries Book 13) by Ashley Gardner which I enjoyed. I'd recommend reading this series in order.

(I haven't read this series in a couple of years, and I have to admit to confusing it for a time with the John Pickett series by Sheri Cobb South ... oops!)

If you're interested in trying this series, the first book is free for Kindle readers: The Hanover Square Affair (Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries Book 1)

Regards,

Kareni

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17 hours ago, Penguin said:

@Negin I appreciate the menopause book discussion. Cancer treatment forced me into early meno at age 41, which is now 15 years ago. I am always trying to learn more about bone health. Fortunately, I started meno with a lot of bone strength in the bank, so to speak. And I have tried to be proactive. However, all of that was not still not enough to stave off the effects of chemo and five years of an aromatase inhibitor (anti-estrogen drug therapy). 

I'd like to recommend an excellent reference book to our BaW readers:

The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and The Vagina - Separating the Myth from the Medicine by Jen Gunter. I think it is a great book to have around the house. And I really think that it would be a great cover-to-cover read for much of the male half of the population.

I also enjoy Jen Gunter's Twitter account. I find her quite funny, personable, and informative. Her social media comes with a Very Strong Language warning, and she is also unabashedly political. 

Menopause Taylor's YouTube channel talks about early meno from chemo. I haven't gotten to that video yet. For bone health, I'm going to probably order a weighted vest next time I place an order to be shipped here. I'll use it when doing my indoor walking workouts. I've read that it shouldn't be weigh more than 10% of your body weight max. 

Thank you for the book recommendation. I'm going to look into it. 

I don't have a Twitter account, although I probably should. I just haven't had time. 

17 hours ago, aggieamy said:

Ditto all of this. Except 17-years-old and now 21 years ago! (My how the years fly by ...) The bone health is such a good reminder that I don't think of much!

17 years old! 

Yes, bone health is a reminder to us all. 

9 hours ago, Junie said:

I really need to get on this.  I'm sure my bone density is bad.  Maybe really bad.

When I was working toward a Rheumatoid Arthritis diagnosis 14 years ago, a doctor cursed when he saw my x-ray and said that I had the bone density of an 80-year-old woman.  I wasn't 40 yet!  I was diagnosed with osteopenia (the precursor to osteoporosis).

Sigh.  Time to start reading about bone density and menopause, I suppose.

I'd rather read Lord of the Flies.

I hated Lord of the Flies.

I hear you. Reading about menopause is a pain, but believe it or not, it's becoming more interesting as time goes on. I'm enjoying her videos more and more. At first I thought she was annoying, but she's growing on me. Her content is great and she knows her stuff. You may wish to consider a weighted vest for bone health. I'm looking into all the options. 

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Some bookish posts ~

This is a fascinating article: JANE AUSTEN AND THE CLERGY: HOW THE SYSTEM WORKED by Elizabeth Hawksley

THE CRIME FICTION OF NEW ZEALAND

https://crimereads.com/the-crime-fiction-of-new-zealand/

5 Fantasy Novels Driven by Traumatic Family Bonds

https://www.tor.com/2020/08/10/5-fantasy-novels-driven-by-traumatic-family-bonds/

3 EMBARRASSING THINGS I’VE LEARNED FROM BOOKS

http://lydiaschoch.com/3-embarassing-things-ive-learned-from-books/

Regards,

Kareni

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On 8/30/2020 at 2:16 PM, Negin said:

I read The Menopause Book - 3 Stars - This book is a quick and easy read. The more informed we are, the better the quality of our lives as we face the post-menopausal years. I’m in my early 50’s and only just realized that according to the definition, I'm post-menopausal. Once you have no longer had your period for twelve consecutive months, you’re post-menopausal. I'm usually very organized and do my research. I did it before entering puberty and before pregnancy. Menopause has sadly been the exception and I have been ill-prepared for this part of my life. I was happy to remember that I’ve had this book sitting on my shelf for a while.

 

Thanks for this book review and recommendation. I did my research before pregnancy and it helped with a lot. Somehow I did not think to prepare for this though it is years away. But knowledge is power and so I am building a library of books like these. 

 

On 8/31/2020 at 7:30 AM, Negin said:

Bought these books too. Thanks for the heads up about the sale.

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I promised myself that I would finish a quilting project (or two, hopefully) this week.  One table quilt is now done....Dh wanted one in red, white, and blue, that could be used for both country’s holidays.  It leans towards the Stars and Stripes but I did my best! 😂 

So mainly audiobooks for me this week......I finished listening to the second to last book in The Hollows series by Kim Harrison.  The narrator for this series is so awesome I just gave up my place next up place on the hold’s list for the last book to listen to the audio in 3 months or so.  Her name is Margerite Gavin and her voices are wonderful........my library has many pages of her narrations and I plan to try some different series of hers.  She mainly does urban fantasy and cozy mysteries...........

I also went ahead and listened to The Two Towers in an abridged BBC version.  Very well done if you know the story but I suspect this one would be a disaster if you don’t.  Tree beard the Ent was extremely well done........❤️.

I also decided that I would listen to The Bromance Book Club because I kept running into positive reviews. It’s a story about a group of professional athletes use the knowledge they glean from reading romance novels (which they are somewhat addicted to) to improve their relationships with their wives.  It’s a cute book,  I would read the next but not wait anxiously for it! 😉 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/44019067-the-bromance-book-club

I started rereading/ listening to Ready Player One in order to be ready for Ready Player Two which I am looking forward to!

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If you follow me on Goodreads, I have decided to rate classics either five stars (yay) or two stars (nay). I kind of hate the idea of rating classics. I used to leave them unrated, but I recall that causing me some no-longer-remembered problem with my database.  

I finished two classics this week. Both get the five stars.

Light in August by William Faulkner. This is definitely the most straightforward Faulkner I have read, but it does not lack depth of plot, style, or character. I'd say that pairing this book with Intruder in the Dust would be an enlightening and disturbing glimpse into the background of current injustices in the USA.

Norwegian Folktales by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe. The authors are the Norwegian version of the Grimm Brothers. I enjoyed the recurring character Ash Lad (Askeladden), the youngest brother who seems like an underachiever but always manages to complete the perilous deed. There were trolls, but not as many as I had hoped for or expected 🙂 My volume of Norwegian Folktales is part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library. I own a few volumes from this series, but always seek out the older covers as I do not like the new covers at all. The link goes to the new covers. Here is the old cover:

663318. sy475

Edited by Penguin
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2 hours ago, Penguin said:

If you follow me on Goodreads, I have decided to rate classics either five stars (yay) or two stars (nay). I kind of hate the idea of rating classics. I used to leave them unrated, but I recall that causing me some no-longer-remembered problem with my database.  

I finished two classics this week. Both get the five stars.

Light in August by William Faulkner. This is definitely the most straightforward Faulkner I have read, but it does not lack depth of plot, style, or character. I'd say that pairing this book with Intruder in the Dust would be an enlightening and disturbing glimpse into the background of current injustices in the USA.

Norwegian Folktales by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe. The authors are the Norwegian version of the Grimm Brothers. I enjoyed the recurring character Ash Lad (Askeladden), the youngest brother who seems like an underachiever but always manages to complete the perilous deed. There were trolls, but not as many as I had hoped for or expected 🙂 My volume of Norwegian Folktales is part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library. I own a few volumes from this series, but always seek out the older covers as I do not like the new covers at all. The link goes to the new covers. Here is the old cover:

663318. sy475

I didn't know about the Pantheon collection of folktales and it looks great. I remember that my kids were absolutely terrified of Norwegian myths when they were littler. It would be interesting to see what Norwegian folktales are like.

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3 hours ago, Penguin said:

Norwegian Folktales by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe. The authors are the Norwegian version of the Grimm Brothers. I enjoyed the recurring character Ash Lad (Askeladden), the youngest brother who seems like an underachiever but always manages to complete the perilous deed. There were trolls, but not as many as I had hoped for or expected 🙂 My volume of Norwegian Folktales is part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library. I own a few volumes from this series, but always seek out the older covers as I do not like the new covers at all. The link goes to the new covers. Here is the old cover:

 

Thanks for this. I would would love to introduce this book to my kids especially my little girl, but one note of concern is the what you mean by "Norwegian version of the Grimm brothers". The Grimm brothers are stuff of nightmares for me because they had a witch who liked to boil children in Hansel and Gretl, not very child friendly in my opinion. I had all sorts of nightmares because of that and  nursery rhymes like Wee willie winkie who rides round town checking if kids are asleep. Yeah, nothing reassuring to a child about a stranger peeping in on you to check if you are asleep . Also, the story of Abraham and God asking him to kill his son, so I was terrified God will ask my dad to kill me. 

 I kind of guard my kids until they are older because of that from all types of stories like that until they are older. Very helicoptery maybe, but I always ask or read a book before giving it to them and no nursery rhymes ! 😊

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6 hours ago, Little Green Leaves said:

I finished the Old Man and the Sea. The last 20 pages or so (shark attack) took me completely by surprise. All the rest was like a long daydream. I don't know when I've read a book with less narrative tension -- until the sharks. 

 

I love your reviews. You get straight to the point, give a very thorough review in a few words and don't ramble unlike me. 🙄

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5 minutes ago, Penguin said:

@Dreamergal Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe were the collectors of Norwegian tales, like the Grimm brothers. That's what I meant by that. But your comparison holds true as well. These are not gentle, sanitized tales.

Thanks. Would you be comfortable giving it to a 4 year old ? My daughter is like me, vivid imagination and even more visual than me. 

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4 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

Thanks. Would you be comfortable giving it to a 4 year old ? My daughter is like me, vivid imagination and even more visual than me. 

I'm never comfortable telling other parents what is appropriate for their children. Based on what you wrote previously about the Grimm brothers, I doubt that you will want to give it to your four year old. But the only way for you to really know is to do your own pre-read. 

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