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Amalgam mercury fillings replaced-any experience?


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I am considering having this procedure done.

If you have any experience with this, I would be interested in knowing your reasons behind your decision.

I have brain degeneration in my family and am hoping to possibly circumvent that experience.  I do understand the evidence/conclusions are controversial.

Thank You!

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18 minutes ago, angelaguptathomas said:

I am considering having this procedure done.

If you have any experience with this, I would be interested in knowing your reasons behind your decision.

I have brain degeneration in my family and am hoping to possibly circumvent that experience.  I do understand the evidence/conclusions are controversial.

Thank You!


Would love to hear others' experiences.  We are considering having this done for me (3-4 root canals and many fillings) because of neurological connections.  We have zero idea what the price tag is going to look like. 

There are some minor studies on NIH about amalgam fillings, btw, like this one from 2011:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3025977/

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I had one redone years ago - only because there was more decay so I had to have something done. 
The dentist has recommended I have them all replaced (Air Force brat with several early cavities). 
I don't remember the cost, but with insurance it wasn't outrageous (but then again, I didn't have anything to compare it with)
It wasn't as expensive as the tooth removal + implant (very recent), but that was on a regular filling. 

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I have 2 experiences having mercury fillings removed.  One was at a holistic dentist and they were super careful and were wearing what looked like space suits.  One was at my regular dentist when she replaced a bridge and found a mercury filling under one of the crowns.  It was not a big deal there.  I had discussions with my regular dentist, who took over the business from her father, about safety procedures of removing mercury.  Her opinion was that since her father had worked with mercury for many, many, many years and had no ill effects that she didn't need to go overboard (like the holistic dentist) when removing it.

I have not noticed any health improvements because of removing the fillings, but I have a friend who says that her health improved after her mercury was removed.

P.S. My reasons behind my decision with the holistic dentist were health related.  It was in my search for alternatives to traditional glaucoma treatment.  I didn't know about the filling under the crown until it was replaced.  My regular dentist doesn't use mercury.

Edited by Sue in St Pete
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I had quite a few removed, probably 8, I forget. I think it was 8. No regrets. But I will tell you the dentist who did these a lot later died. (young) 

So you want to make sure you're on something to chelate out what you're getting exposed to, make sure they follow IAOMT protocol, etc. etc.

And no, I can't say I had a direct linear correlation of getting better. I did get better, but I can't say for sure that had a part. 

Edited by PeterPan
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I have had several mercury fillings replaced over the years, one by one as they failed. It wasn't that expensive, $50-$150 per filling maybe? I didn't notice any health changes.  The dentist didn't wear any special protective gear that I remember.

ETA: price was after insurance. 

Edited by TrixieB
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Total rabbit trail you didn't ask for, but since you're asking about amalgams and less toxic mattresses, I'll throw it out. The thing that helped me most with my chemical sensitivities was nutrition. I started with a nutritionist who had me toss red meat, anything hard to digest or that clogs the gut (hello, cheese), go off cows milk except for yogurt/kefir, eat plenty of fruit/veges daily, and food combine religiously. It was pretty miraculous. 

Ironically, later Florastor came out. Stupid stuff can heal your gut in a hot flash and might reverse your food sensitivities in just a few doses. It's at least worth a try.

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I was honestly a skeptic until a number of years ago when some decades-old fillings needed replacement. Coincidentally, at about the same time I figured I should have them done, I began to be troubled by itchy rashes on my lower legs. Another “coincidence,” about the same time a discussion about the topic popped up on this very forum! With a little googling, I found that my weird itchy rash could be counted a symptom of those old fillings. 
 

I ended up with a couple of root canals, two [ETA I meant to say *new*] fillings, and.... no more rashes. I wouldn’t go so far as to say I believe the rash and fillings were 100% connected, as there could have been other causes of the rash, but to this day, I wonder. I was scheduled to have my remaining oldies replaced this spring, but....ya know. 

Edited by Seasider too
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Whenever I've had them replaced it ended up being a crown & root canal.  I have a few more but am hesitant to go forth as I do not want more crowns/root canals.  If the fillings were shallow and needed replacing because of age then I would consider it again. 

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I had several replaced about 15 years ago.  I don't remember the cost, but insurance covered some of it.  The white replacements look good all these years later. I couldn't tell you which teeth had fillings and which did not.  I still have a few mercury fillings that I want to replace but I have not gotten around to it (never the right combination of money and time). 

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I thought they were being removed when I got crowns.  Nope.  Apparently, they just ground down the teeth a bit to fit under the crowns, but they left the mercury fillings in there.   I had no idea until a crown fell off.  The young dental assistant was surprised to see the filling, but the (retired sub) dentist wasn't.  Apparently, it was fairly common practice 25 years ago when the crowns were made. 

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I have had most of my childhood fillings replaced due to additional decay and/or failure of the filling. I did not have any concerns about the mercury, but the procedure was no more difficult than any filling, I have a couple left, but I will leave those until there is a need to have them redone. I too like the appearance of the tooth colored fillings rather than all the metal ones.

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I had a few older fillings replaced because they were beginning to crack. You'd want to make sure your dentist will do whatever is necessary to keep you safe during the procedure. Personally, I'd use a dentist who uses ozone in his/her practice as well.

You might also want to follow Dr. Lew Lim and the VieLight studies if you aren't already.

https://vielight.com/intranasal-photobiomodulation-effects-systemic-nature/

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I had many mercury fillings as a child in the 60's... (Everyone seemed to have cavities in those days!)  A dentist friend advised us to get them all changed out for the tune of several thousand dollars.  That was impossible for us at the time, and we decided to just continue our lifestyle of eating healthy foods and exercising, and don't regret it.  All of my dh's and my siblings have mercury cavities too, and they are all older than us (actually, our parents had mercury fillings too and all lived/are living in their 90's).  

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I haven't read the previous responses.

I have issues with chemical/metals screwing up my immune system, so this was my reason for getting the amalgams OUT.  I also had to take out my metal lower retainer following braces.

It wasn't a big deal to get these out.  Of course, It was only 2 of them.  Yes, I have 2 total cavities in my whole life.  But basically, they just got them out of there and replaced them with non-metallic fillings. 

I have had so little experience with dental work that this experience was difficult for me...but that is on me, not on the experience per se.  It wasn't really that dreadful.  :0)

 

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