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Book a Week 2020 - BW34: Our Singing Strength


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46 minutes ago, Penguin said:

@marbel Your signature made me smile just now. I also have a son majoring in History, and likewise I could have predicted it when he was five. 

@Little Green Leaves The Dorothy Day books that I distinctly remember reading are Love is the Measure: A Biography of Dorothy Day by Jim Forest and The Long Loneliness, Dorothy Day's autobiography. I was deeply impacted by The Long Loneliness, but that was 20-some years ago so all I remember now is the feeling of loving the book. I also watched the movie Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story (1996) and feeling very moved by it. I don't dare recommend something that I haven't read or watched for 20-some years, but these are the primary pieces that set me on the path of learning about Dorothy Day. I'm definitely overdue for a revisit of her life and thoughts. 

Thank you!! I just realized that I actually saw Entertaining Angels recently -- it is either free or very cheap on Amazon Prime. I loved it. (I was also very impressed by Martin Sheen as Peter Maurin; I thought he did a wonderful job.) 

The biography that I'm reading now is good, but it is not WARM in the way that Entertaining Angels is. I just put a hold on the Long Loneliness. 

 

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22 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

Finished Midnight Sun by Stephanie Meyer, the EPOV...

I'm trying to figure out EPOV and am drawing a blank.

22 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

I don't read detective fiction, scifi , non-fiction a lot and you can only do so many pulpy romances....

I'm fortunate that I have yet to reach my limit of romances, pulpy or otherwise!

22 hours ago, Dreamergal said:

Reading this book was like visiting an old neighborhood. It does not feel the same, yet parts of it are familiar, your favorite parts stay the same and it puts a smile on your face. For all the criticisms about Twilight, it has always put a smile on my face and so did Midnight Sun. I don't think you can ask more of any book.

That's a lovely sentiment, Dreamergal; I'm glad you enjoyed the book.

Regards,

Kareni

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5 hours ago, marbel said:

So yesterday while picking  up a hold at the library, I inadvertently rented a book, $1 for one week, not renewable. I have it on my overdrive holds list at 2 libraries; it's got a long queue; and when I saw it on the shelf I just grabbed it. I never noticed the "rental" sticker on it or the sign on the shelf! ....

I'm envious that you can enter your library to select books while at the same time I'm grateful that my local library does not rent books. I recall that my daughter encountered that phenomenon when she did a study abroad in New Zealand. I'm wondering how many of us have a library that rents books.

I'll mention that I have a free (actually paid for by property taxes) membership at my local library while I pay a yearly fee (currently $130) to use the library in my neighboring city. So, I guess you could say that I'm renting those books.

Regards,

Kareni

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I recently finished a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.

My husband and I have been listening to the audio version of The Curse of Chalion  by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. We are almost finished and have both enjoyed it thus far. It's my husband's first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

Regards,

Kareni

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55 minutes ago, Kareni said:

I'm envious that you can enter your library to select books while at the same time I'm grateful that my local library does not rent books. I recall that my daughter encountered that phenomenon when she did a study abroad in New Zealand. I'm wondering how many of us have a library that rents books.

I'll mention that I have a free (actually paid for by property taxes) membership at my local library while I pay a yearly fee (currently $130) to use the library in my neighboring city. So, I guess you could say that I'm renting those books.

Regards,

Kareni

Within our library system there are a few branches that offer book rentals. I suppose it's to offset the cost of buying some extra copies of popular books, though I don't really know. It's a small number of books overall!

I guess we who have taxpayer-funded free libraries are all renting in a way. 🙂  I have access to my county library and the Philadelphia Free library system, by virtue of being a PA resident. I use my Philly card almost exclusively for e- and audiobooks, as going into the city for actual books is never really convenient for me, especially so now! 

It was so nice to be in a library; they  have recently opened here with limited hours and limited browsing time. It was my first time in one since March. My own township library (branch of the county system) was in the midst of moving into a new building when Covid brought everything to a stop in March. I still have books out from that branch; they have just opened up the book drop in the new building. No word  yet on when they will open. I can't wait!  

 

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We no longer have to have an appointment to pick up our books curbside. That is a welcome change as appointments are often three days out.

We are not being charged fines at the moment. That is lovely, but I guess there is little incentive to return physical books on time. For one book, I have been #2 on the waiting list for a reaaallly long time. 

I am most eager for ILL to restart. 

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1 hour ago, Kareni said:

I'm trying to figure out EPOV and am drawing a blank.

Edward point of view. 😊. It is something that was frequently used in fan fiction especially and this book is the Edward point of view though the title is Midnight Sun 

1 hour ago, Kareni said:

I'm fortunate that I have yet to reach my limit of romances, pulpy or otherwise!

I am a terribly picky reader, so I return more than I read. The only thing I read through is mostly is poetry though even there I am picky, three strikes rule. I cannot write to save my life, but I am a terribly picky reader. 😒

1 hour ago, Kareni said:

That's a lovely sentiment, Dreamergal; I'm glad you enjoyed the book.

Thanks ! 

1 hour ago, Kareni said:

Regards,

Kareni

I love this signature of yours. 

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Finished 

image.png.f40dca329807fb1d68edeb6463f2a44f.png

I don't read non-fiction a lot because I am terribly opinionated and I do not want to spend money or time on authors or subjects I prefer reading in newspaper columns of which I read a lot. I never shy away from difficult topics like race, colonization, slavery, historical injustices, war, brutality of the human condition but I always like them wrapped in fiction because it insulates you in a layer a non-fiction does not and the honest truth is I do not like to feel like I am scrapped raw or scooped out when I read a book. 

Once in a blue moon though there comes a book that smacks you in the face and forces you to read it whether you like to or not. I did not choose to read this book, was not even on my radar, I have a TBR list a mile high, it came to me in the most indirect way possible way through the erudite @Robin M. One of the tasks that were suggested by her on a previous thread was choose a book by it's cover and so I wandered in Amazon and was stopped in my tracks by this book. It was not the pretty cover, it was stark looking.  it had words like Pulitzer and Oprah on the cover, both familiar but still not compelling. The word that made me choose this book and send it to the immediate read list was one word, Caste. 

It's a word that is very familiar to me as I have a life time of experiences to draw from in my native country. It defines every day life for a lot of people and important parts of my life growing up. But I was one of the lucky ones. There is a certain segment of society in my native country that are called untouchables where touching them would make the higher caste person "unclean" and they could not enter a place of worship. Even though it was abolished decades ago it still exists in a hundred different ways where a domestic help from a lower caste uses a different entrance to enter the house to villages where they have to build houses outside the periphery. 

But America was supposed to be different, at least in my thinking. I did not grow up here nor do I come with great knowledge of American history. But even to my limited American history knowledge, the author weaves through the Indian caste system which I was very familiar with and contrasts it with America. Even more unsettling she weaves it with Nazi society. It talks about everything from Martin Luther King Jr to current politics and tries to explain some of it. It is one of the most unsettling books I have ever read 

It flipped the idea of caste that I thought I knew up close and personal for I had experienced very much that those things exist even in so called equal societies and unseen does not mean non existent.  It forced me to take a look at my life and recognize the privilege I had. It is also one of the most important books I have ever read and say easily among the top 5 books I have ever read of any genre. Highly, highly recommended.

 

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The past couple of days have been hard on my Overdrive stack as nothing seemed to please me.  I ended up buying myself the next book for me in the Acton and Doyle series (Murder in Shadow) and am finally able to settle down and read again!  
 

Yes, Kareni I have finally started that series up again. 😉

Libraries........my library had one week “hot” books pre Covid but did not charge a rental fee.  The late fee on the “hot” books was expensive, think $1 a day.  You were only allowed 2 hot books at a time.  My library still is not busy from passing the parking lot, no appointments after the first couple of weeks.  They are still doing curbside.

My UK library still has not reopened in the village.  Apparently some sort of curbside can be arranged with the Central Branch but no one is entering the smaller branches so the choice is going to be extremely limited as the collection is spread rather randomly system wide.  For those who weren’t here a few years age this is a huge system with about 20 libraries left staffed almost entirely by volunteers.......I think there are still around a dozen paid staff system wide.  I served on our local board during the forced transition.......none of us could have ever guessed what having an elderly “staff” would do to the system.

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I finished Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice. It wasnt what I'd expected but it was really good. 

It's a slightly impersonal book and I never felt that I was really getting to know Dorothy. It doesn't try to imagine her inner life. It's much more interested in describing her community-- the people who supported her and kept her going, the books she read, the trips she went on. It does a great job at that. I also liked the way it described the changes to American society over her lifetime.

Her relationship with her daughter was heartbreaking. I appreciated that the book didn't sweep that under the rug but also didn't judge.

 
 
 
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21 hours ago, Kareni said:

I recently finished a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.

My husband and I have been listening to the audio version of The Curse of Chalion  by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. We are almost finished and have both enjoyed it thus far. It's my husband's first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

Regards,

Kareni

I'm always on the lookout for good narrators ... that's an author and a narrator I've been wanting to try out. Now I'll just have to see where I can get my hands on a copy!

 

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FINISHED:

Avalanche (Sheriff Bo Tully #2) by Patrick McManus -- I have two ratings for this book. Because I'm super opinionated that even my opinions have opinions! Well ... let's just get into it.

5 star book -- Excellent narrator and side characters and mystery. Everything tied up so well. It's just what you want when you're looking for a cozy mystery with a fun setting. After years of being the outdoors-man's Dave Barry McManus knows how to do humor and a modern "wild west" setting better than anyone. 

2 star book - Tully's interactions with women were so weird and unrealistic. Every woman was in love with him. They hounded him. They tried to kiss him and lure him away alone. He was repeatedly turning down offers to hook up with them. It might have been intended as a running joke but the joke didn't work for me. In fact it started to annoy me and take away from everything I did enjoy about the book. It read as author wish fulfillment/fantasy and ... I'll just leave it as weird. 

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23 hours ago, aggieamy said:

FINISHED:

Avalanche (Sheriff Bo Tully #2) by Patrick McManus -- I have two ratings for this book. Because I'm super opinionated that even my opinions have opinions! Well ... let's just get into it.

5 star book -- Excellent narrator and side characters and mystery. Everything tied up so well. It's just what you want when you're looking for a cozy mystery with a fun setting. After years of being the outdoors-man's Dave Barry McManus knows how to do humor and a modern "wild west" setting better than anyone. 

2 star book - Tully's interactions with women were so weird and unrealistic. Every woman was in love with him. They hounded him. They tried to kiss him and lure him away alone. He was repeatedly turning down offers to hook up with them. It might have been intended as a running joke but the joke didn't work for me. In fact it started to annoy me and take away from everything I did enjoy about the book. It read as author wish fulfillment/fantasy and ... I'll just leave it as weird. 

 

https://www.pbs.org/video/an-evening-with-pat-mcmanus-mzzbkn/

 

 

Interviews with PM and clips from a one man show of his work with actor Tim Behrens

 

(he talks about difficulty writing humor)

 

ETA - he says at one point that to have a character be funny it has to be a “type” character and I think that may relate to the 2 star issue ...  Bo Tully had to be developed as a “type” (and with exaggeration) for humor. Or at least that is my guess. 

Edited by Pen
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Today only, a free classic for Kindle readers ~

Oscar Wilde's Lady Windermere's Fan: A Play About a Good Woman

 "The classic satirical play of gossip gone horribly and hilariously wrong from a master dramatist.
 
“My own business always bores me to death; I prefer other people’s.”
 
Lady Windermere has a happy marriage—or she believes she does, until one of London society’s gossips, the Duchess of Berwick, arrives with her daughter to voice her suspicions about an affair Lord Windermere appears to be having. And the duchess’s testimony is not the only evidence either. Lord Windermere’s private bank book shows that he has been giving large—and frequent—sums of money to a “Mrs. Erlynne,” and he even admits to seeing much of the woman. To add insult to injury, Lord Windermere insists that Mrs. Erlynne be invited to the ball being held for Lady Windermere’s birthday.
 
Employing the witty dialogue, social satire, and outrageous paradox for which he is still remembered today, Oscar Wilde’s classic play shines a light on the destructiveness of gossip and superficial judgment. Lady Windermere’s Fan examines the ambiguous sexual morality and gender politics at the heart of the British ruling class, while simultaneously challenging our perceptions of what constitutes a “good woman.”"

Regards,

Kareni

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13 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

Oh man, I checked that out from our campus student church's library back in the day. How long it's been.

When I was looking it up for @Little Green Leaves I saw that Daniel Berrigan did the intro for the current edition. I have an older edition with a picture of Young Dorothy on it, and I wonder if he did the intro. Alas it is trapped in a storage box several states away, and I am not in the mood for the research. Just for the whine about my far-away books 🙂 

BUT! Daniel Berrigan is here and he is inching closer the top of the TBR pile. I should stop putting things on hold at the library. They come in and throw off my plans! I’ll have to read the play (Trial of the Catonsville Nine) online.

 

 

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