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Tell me what you would do with an abundance of peaches


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2 minutes ago, MEmama said:

Idk but they are the envy of the neighbourhood. 
I tried to get a photo but the lighting is terrible and the peaches are still green so hard to see. I promise the teee is bursting with fruit.

0B4BC0B0-D0A2-4393-862A-A1B05D1B993B.jpeg

 

I can see the little peaches. I thought he had maybe a climate controlled area. The tree seems very happy too right out there in the open.

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4 hours ago, Lady Marmalade said:

In the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving there is a recipe for Peach Salsa that I make every year- SO good and is a necessity for us! We love it on tacos or just scooped up with chips.

Also from that same book I've made and enjoyed:

Cranberry Peach Conserve, Peach Almond Conserve, Hot and Sweet Chili Sauce, Peach Butter, and the Zesty Peach Barbecue Sauce.   I did not like the Summer Salsa at all. 

If you don't have that book and need the recipes I would be happy to get those typed up for you.  🙂

 CJzimmer and I figured it's not the Ball Book of Preserving we have.

Could you post /link the recipe for the peach salsa, please?   :biggrin:

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Thank you all for the lovely conversation over morning coffee! How lovely to sit and read a normal food-related thread!

Since I completely identify with the inherent risk of buying peaches, I just tried one that I bought two days ago (and paid over a dollar each for, I might add!). It was actually delicious! Which makes me envious of how delicious your abundance of peaches must be!

Have a wonderful day, everyone!

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True story: When I was just a little boy (say 4 years old) and my little brother was 2, we lived in about the hottest part of Los Angeles--where summer temps could soar above a hundred for days on end.

My parents mercifully put in AC later, but at that moment we had none. HOT!

But our local market sold cold watermelons right out of their chiller--if one knew to ask, and my beloved mother knew to do so.

But would my little brother and I eat those cold watermelons to beat the heat? No. At least not initially.

No together we'd use all our strength and roll those big watermelons out of the fridge and onto the floor and then we'd each wrap ourselves around these beautiful (semi)personal air conditioners. It was heaven!

Now am I suggesting that in the blazing heatwave CA has been going through that taking frozen bags of excess peach slices and stuffing them under one's shirt might be an option?

Perhaps I am :tongue:

Bill

Edited by Spy Car
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1 hour ago, Liz CA said:

 CJzimmer and I figured it's not the Ball Book of Preserving we have.

Could you post /link the recipe for the peach salsa, please?   :biggrin:

Here's the peach salsa!  If you don't like it spicy you can adjust the jalapeno peppers- use a bit more bell pepper instead of them.  If you like a spicier salsa, swap out more of the bell pepper for jalapeno.  I never use the cayenne at the very end of the recipe.   I suspect one could freeze this if you weren't interested in canning it.  I would follow the recipe right up until you put the hot salsa into jars.  Use freezer safe containers or jars. 

Peach Salsa

makes about eight 8-ounce jars

1/2 cup white vinegar

6 cups chopped pitted peeled peaches

1 1/4 cups chopped red onion

4 jalapeno peppers, finely chopped

1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped

1/2 cup loosely packed finely chopped cilantro

2 TBS liquid honey

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

1 1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

Directions:

Prepare canner, jars and lids.

In a large stainless steel saucepan, combine the vinegar and peaches.  Add onion, jalapeno peppers, red pepper, cilantro, honey, garlic, cumin and cayenne.   Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly.  Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring frequently, until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes.  Remove from heat.

Ladle hot salsa into jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace, if necessary, by adding hot salsa.  Wipe rim.  Center lid on jar.  Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip-tight.

Place jars in canner, ensuring they are completely covered with water.  Bring to a boil and process for 15 minutes.  Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then remove jars, cool and store.

Edited by Lady Marmalade
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35 minutes ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

I order peaches from the Amish. Some grow their own, but many have them shipped from the South. I think I paid 12/bushel last month. However, I think Pennsylvania peaches beat Georgia’s. They’re bigger and sweeter. It’s always exciting to see the “Peaches” signs pop up along the roads in the middle of the summer.

Do any of you have an aversion to touching the fuzz on a peach? My mother, Aunt, and one other relative literally will not touch one unless it’s peeled. I know my family is odd, just wonder if that’s a thing.

My mom is the exact same way! I never even had a fresh peach growing up.  She wouldn't buy them because she couldn't touch the fuzz. (And definitely can't eat one with the fuzz intact.) We had canned peaches or she bought nectarines.

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I used to live in Fresno (read 100+ for 30+ day stretches). We had a LOT of peaches. I peeled, sliced, and froze them on cookie sheets. Once they are frozen, pick them off the sheets and put them in gallon ziploc bags in the freezer. Then freeze the next batch. THEN, when it's winter and you are happy to stand over the stove, find a simple recipe for peach jam. Also peach cobbler in the winter is heavenly. You can make that with frozen peaches. Also use frozen peaches for smoothies. In other words, eat all you want fresh, and slice and freeze the rest. You will be glad you did!

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1 hour ago, Spy Car said:

True story: When I was just a little boy (say 4 years old) and my little brother was 2, we lived in about the hottest part of Los Angeles--where summer temps could soar above a hundred for days on end.

My parents mercifully put in AC later, but at that moment we had none. HOT!

But our local market sold cold watermelons right out of their chiller--if one knew to ask, and my beloved mother knew to do so.

But would my little brother and I eat those cold watermelons to beat the heat? No. At least not initially.

No together we'd use all our strength and roll those big watermelons out of the fridge and onto the floor and then we'd each wrap ourselves around these beautiful (semi)personal air conditioners. It was heaven!

Now am I suggesting that in the blazing heatwave CA has been going through that taking frozen bags of excess peach slices and stuffing them under one's shirt might be an option?

Perhaps I am :tongue:

Bill

 

Any port in a (heat) storm. I would not be adverse to rolling myself over a chilled watermelon either. However, the only one we have in the fridge right now is half eaten and does not roll anymore.  :biggrin:

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1 minute ago, Liz CA said:

 

Any port in a (heat) storm. I would not be adverse to rolling myself over a chilled watermelon either. However, the only one we have in the fridge right now is half eaten and does not roll anymore.  :biggrin:

I swear this is true--just seconds after I posted--I heard my wife call from the other room Bill, would you like some watermelon?

I had a good laugh. I didn't even know we had a watermelon.

Bill (who was really in the mood for a peach)

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

I order peaches from the Amish. Some grow their own, but many have them shipped from the South. I think I paid 12/bushel last month. However, I think Pennsylvania peaches beat Georgia’s. They’re bigger and sweeter. It’s always exciting to see the “Peaches” signs pop up along the roads in the middle of the summer.

Do any of you have an aversion to touching the fuzz on a peach? My mother, Aunt, and one other relative literally will not touch one unless it’s peeled. I know my family is odd, just wonder if that’s a thing.

 

Dh does not like to eat the skin. He grew up with peaches from a can 😏. MIL is not culinarily inclined. :)  I have chopped them so small (psst with the skin on) that he will never know, especially not in a cobbler.

1 hour ago, Lady Marmalade said:

My mom is the exact same way! I never even had a fresh peach growing up.  She wouldn't buy them because she couldn't touch the fuzz. (And definitely can't eat one with the fuzz intact.) We had canned peaches or she bought nectarines.

 

Dh will touch them but does not want to eat the fuzz. I eat them straight off the tree. Don't know what the fuss is about the fuzz.

28 minutes ago, mum said:

I used to live in Fresno (read 100+ for 30+ day stretches). We had a LOT of peaches. I peeled, sliced, and froze them on cookie sheets. Once they are frozen, pick them off the sheets and put them in gallon ziploc bags in the freezer. Then freeze the next batch. THEN, when it's winter and you are happy to stand over the stove, find a simple recipe for peach jam. Also peach cobbler in the winter is heavenly. You can make that with frozen peaches. Also use frozen peaches for smoothies. In other words, eat all you want fresh, and slice and freeze the rest. You will be glad you did!

 

Wow, that area gets even hotter longer than us, I think. Even though this year we are probably even.

Edited by Liz CA
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So I actually started canning a few little jars...and here is my question. When I took them out of the water canner, 2 of the jars' lids popped and I figured they needed to be refrigerated and eaten soon. Two minutes or thereabouts later, they did not pop anymore and the middle of the lid was firmly down. Are they okay now or once popped, always "bad?"

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I need this thread to stop popping up. It's making this pregnant person really, really want a good peach. But, I only buy peaches from one specific stand (it's in the parking lot of a local farm supply store). It is the only place to get peaches here (in my rural WI area) that are anything worthwhile. Theirs are actually good. I want one. 

But...they are done for the season, I think.

I've never asked why theirs are good and others are so terrible. I kid you not. This year after buying various boxes of them, when we were out, DH tried to be sweet and picked up half a dozen or so at a grocery store. I had so much trouble acting grateful. They were completely flavorless and a gross texture. A few days later he admitted that the ones I buy are better. I explained I'd come to that conclusion long ago. Yes, they are more expensive, but they are worth it.

And I don't/can't have any right now. But...tis the season to drown in tomatoes, so that's something I guess.

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9 minutes ago, barnwife said:

I need this thread to stop popping up. It's making this pregnant person really, really want a good peach. But, I only buy peaches from one specific stand (it's in the parking lot of a local farm supply store). It is the only place to get peaches here (in my rural WI area) that are anything worthwhile. Theirs are actually good. I want one. 

But...they are done for the season, I think.

I've never asked why theirs are good and others are so terrible. I kid you not. This year after buying various boxes of them, when we were out, DH tried to be sweet and picked up half a dozen or so at a grocery store. I had so much trouble acting grateful. They were completely flavorless and a gross texture. A few days later he admitted that the ones I buy are better. I explained I'd come to that conclusion long ago. Yes, they are more expensive, but they are worth it.

And I don't/can't have any right now. But...tis the season to drown in tomatoes, so that's something I guess.

You must be talking about Tree Ripe Citrus Co.  And yes I do believe they are done for the season.  They get their peaches out of Georgia and those come much earlier than the Michigan ones.  We used to buy wholesale peaches in MI and bring them back.  I talked to one of the guys at Tree Ripe to try to get them connected to MI growers so they could extend the season they were bringing peaches over to WI but it never happened as far as I know.  I get peaches from the Amish (who are getting them from MI).  They switched suppliers this year and frankly it's getting late so I might be out of luck.  They should be on the tail end of mid season peaches and there simply isn't as many late season peaches.

As far as the taste difference, one huge point is to look for fuzz. If there is no fuzz don't even bother.  In order to run a peach through the machine that rubs off the fuzz, they have to be picked very green or the fruit gets damaged.  Hence the reason you never ever buy a grocery store peach.  Even the ones that Tree Ripe brings in, are picked slightly greener than I'd prefer (trust me if you've ever picked a peach from the tree you'd know the difference) but it's still one of the better options on this side of the lake.

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5 hours ago, Liz CA said:

 

Can you share your version of French topping? I see a lot of Bisquick mixes in those recipes. Is there a made from scratch version? There must be.  🙂

I feel for all of you who cannot get their hands on a ripe, fresh peach. We are truly blessed here. Wish my arm would reach to CT, I'd hand you a few.

This is from my Betty Crocker cookbook. I use a French topping on apple, peach and apricot pie.

image.jpg

Edited by KrissiK
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1 hour ago, Liz CA said:

@Lady Marmalade that peach salsa is fantastic!!!!!

Isn't it!? I love it with corn chips or on fish tacos.  Or on a simple black bean and rice bowl... so many options!

And, if your lids have popped, that means they've sealed. Sometimes they pop right out of the bath but sometimes they take a few minutes. If the button has firmly sucked into place, your jars are sealed and ready for storage. I find this particular salsa is good for about two years before the quality starts to head south.

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I haven’t read all the responses but I have gotten amazing bulk in season peaches and one thing I would do is prepare the filling for peach cobbler and freeze in smallish cobbler sizes.  Then you can just defrost and throw on the cobbler which is usually like mixing a handful ingredients up and bake.  Such a yummy treat in the winter!

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8 hours ago, mum said:

I used to live in Fresno (read 100+ for 30+ day stretches). We had a LOT of peaches. I peeled, sliced, and froze them on cookie sheets. Once they are frozen, pick them off the sheets and put them in gallon ziploc bags in the freezer. Then freeze the next batch. THEN, when it's winter and you are happy to stand over the stove, find a simple recipe for peach jam. Also peach cobbler in the winter is heavenly. You can make that with frozen peaches. Also use frozen peaches for smoothies. In other words, eat all you want fresh, and slice and freeze the rest. You will be glad you did!

This is where I live and that’s why I freeze peaches.🤣

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