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c/p Math Help 7th grade needs spiral review


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We are doing Saxon 7/6 right now and are halfway through.  My daughter NEEDS constant review.  She will forget stuff constantly; even from day to day.  The problem is - she gets really frustrated really easily.  Math was the only reason I sent her to school and even with going to school, every night I re-taught her math.  I have the ability to teach her math but every day I am getting a headache because she is constantly huffing and puffing.  I think the number of problems defeats her a bit.  I need something a little more straightforward and something with less problems.  Her dream is to be a marine biologist so she will need math.  I need something that will get her to decent math scores eventually while not making me want to rip out my hair.  Would Math U See fit?  Nothing computer related.

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42 minutes ago, bethben said:

We are doing Saxon 7/6 right now and are halfway through.  My daughter NEEDS constant review.  She will forget stuff constantly; even from day to day.  The problem is - she gets really frustrated really easily.  Math was the only reason I sent her to school and even with going to school, every night I re-taught her math.  I have the ability to teach her math but every day I am getting a headache because she is constantly huffing and puffing.  I think the number of problems defeats her a bit.  I need something a little more straightforward and something with less problems.  Her dream is to be a marine biologist so she will need math.  I need something that will get her to decent math scores eventually while not making me want to rip out my hair.  Would Math U See fit?  Nothing computer related.

If she needs constant review, I doubt anything other than Saxon is going to work very well for her, imho.  I would either take two days to do a lesson (with the reasoning that going slower is better than switching and finding out what you switched to isn't working) OR assign the odds for the Mixed Practice so that she still gets a little review, but the number of problems is not overwhelming.  If her test scores drop below 80 you can always go back to doing all problems.  

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2 hours ago, Another Lynn said:

If she needs constant review, I doubt anything other than Saxon is going to work very well for her, imho.  I would either take two days to do a lesson (with the reasoning that going slower is better than switching and finding out what you switched to isn't working) OR assign the odds for the Mixed Practice so that she still gets a little review, but the number of problems is not overwhelming.  If her test scores drop below 80 you can always go back to doing all problems.  

I’m pretty sure she would fail every test I give her at the end of the section.  I would be constantly reviewing prior sections.  I have gone back a few lessons in the book, retaught the material, and tried to move on, but she is not learning it to be point she can do even 50% of a lesson on her own.  She’ll initially completely understand the material do a bunch of practice problems correctly, but have no recall of it.  We did Saxon over the summer and she did great (at least with all the hints I give her).  We took two weeks off and she had forgotten about 40% of what she learned.  There will be problems that she hasn’t seen for a week and has no idea how to do them again.  I am constantly giving hints for about 75% of the problems.  
 

When she was younger, it took years for her to learn her addition/subtraction problems with instant recall.   I tried flash cards, manipulatives, and games.  She just never could remember them.  Even today, she’ll have to skip count on things7x8 but complete 27x38 with no hesitation.  I am at a loss with how her brain thinks.  

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What about doing math every single day including weekend and summers but only doing half the problems each day?  So teach the lesson on the first day and do odds, then reteach the lesson and do evens the next day.

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1 hour ago, bethben said:

I’m pretty sure she would fail every test I give her at the end of the section.  I would be constantly reviewing prior sections.  I have gone back a few lessons in the book, retaught the material, and tried to move on, but she is not learning it to be point she can do even 50% of a lesson on her own.  She’ll initially completely understand the material do a bunch of practice problems correctly, but have no recall of it.  We did Saxon over the summer and she did great (at least with all the hints I give her).  We took two weeks off and she had forgotten about 40% of what she learned.  There will be problems that she hasn’t seen for a week and has no idea how to do them again.  I am constantly giving hints for about 75% of the problems.  
 

When she was younger, it took years for her to learn her addition/subtraction problems with instant recall.   I tried flash cards, manipulatives, and games.  She just never could remember them.  Even today, she’ll have to skip count on things7x8 but complete 27x38 with no hesitation.  I am at a loss with how her brain thinks.  

That sounds really challenging!  No wonder she is constantly huffing and puffing and you have a headache.  I can see why you're thinking about MUS.  Maybe a more conceptual approach would address the struggles she is having.  But if you try it, I would keep practicing other math skills in the background with a daily math minute worksheet (I forget the name of the one - it used to be free on the internet....) below her frustration level.  Also, maybe ask on the learning challenges board?  

 

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With this extra information, you might look at Rod and Staff. My oldest also struggled with math, forgetting concepts he previously did okay on. We found Rod & Staff when he was ready for the 6 book and he was more successful with their 6-8 books than anything we'd tried. It's mastery by chapter and every lesson ends with a spiral review section. It's just straight math, black and white pages, very little illustrations. Sometimes we'd do all odds of a lesson one day and all evens the next. If he was doing well we'd do a whole lesson in a day.

(I tried Saxon with him once. It took a week for me to give up. He couldn't even get out of the gate with that book.) 

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My dd is a visual learner, big picture thinker.  All math before Algebra was p.a.i.n.f.u.l.  That said, she really required color, picture, stories, or humor to learn well.  I don't know if this fits your dd, but if it does, MUS, the Key to books, possibly Singapore, possibly Horizons might be much better options than Saxon.  

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So, she did Singapore in school (US edition).   I think partially it was taught badly by teachers who had no idea what they were doing, but I also think it didn't review enough.  She would somewhat learn fractions, and then the text would go onto something completely different, like angles, and never review fractions again.  The next time she saw them was in the chapter reviews and by then she had COMPLETELY forgotten how to any of the problems.  It's like there are black holes in her brain where conceptual math goes.  

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So, I gave her a placement test for MathUSee.  I was just having a lot of trouble trying to figure out where her gaps are.  Apparently, her gaps start at fractions so we have to back up quite a bit with MathUSee.  I made her do the test without me helping at all or giving hints.  She failed miserably.  Though, on some other days, she could have done all the problems well.  Obviously what we are doing is not working at all. So, how could having an "off" day give us such horrible results?  

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I've heard that MUS fractions is really excellent.  Generally, MUS has about 3 or 4 worksheets solely on the topic and then maybe 3 review sheets.  So some people give one regular worksheet and one review worksheet per day, or you could alternate and do one regular worksheet one day and one review sheet the next day and so on.

What kind of a learner is she, generally?  Visual, auditory, kinesthetic?

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This is my son exactly! He is also a 7th grader. With that said I have no good advice I guess because I am in the same boat 😕 I just bought Saxon 6/7 for him to start in a couple weeks. He was in PS last year and for 5th and 4th grade as well. When I homeschooled his early years he struggled with learning addition and all the basics then and then in school was put in title one classes for math every year. I noticed at the end of this year with remote learning that the teacher would move him forward after he just started getting the concept then he would forget the next day but still get pushed ahead. I am hoping having him home again this year and repeating a lot of 6th grade math will help? I have no experience with Saxon but I read a lot about it and gave him the placement test so I am hoping it will be a good fit for him? I plan to do math everyday with him and let him go as slow as he needs to to avoid frustration and overwhelming him, fingers crossed!

Good luck, I hope you can find a good fit for you daughter and here is hoping for a successful math year!

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