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If you enrolled your child in public high school during their high school years.


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Home school to a public high school.    Did they have to test in?  Did you have a cover school? no cover school?  Show them your transcripts and got right in or still have to test in?  I was told today when I withdrew my daughter that she would have no high school credits if she did not  use an accredited curriculum but could test in using their final exam?   Any experience?  Ideas?  suggestions?  We decided to start the year home schooling because everything is remote learning so when that gets straightened out we want to put her in the high school.    Just curious of others experiences.

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My 2nd son started in PS in 10th grade.  He did not have to test in, but we did show a transcript I made.   Other than that, it was not a problem.  And we homeschooled traditionally, not with an online program.

3rd son went in during 7th grade, so that wasn't an issue since there were no credits to worry about.  No test.

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In my state no unaccredited credits are accepted. Period. When I wanted to enroll my son at grade 11 I would have had to restart him in grade 9. No exceptions. No testing. (Another boardie friend tried appealing their decision for her son and lost. She actually put him back in 9th grade.). 

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Completely depends on location. In my state, grade placement is at the discretion of the principal, and I'd be willing to bet a lot of principals will place by age the next couple of years rather than having enormous 9th-grade classes.

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1 minute ago, Bagels McGruffikin said:

That is NOT COOL. Ugh. Were the students allowed to test for equivalency or anything?

Nope. By then my son had taken algebra 1, 2 and geometry. I was firmly told that he would have to go back to algebra 1. Not allowed to prove his mastery of the subjects. 

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3 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

Completely depends on location. In my state, grade placement is at the discretion of the principal, and I'd be willing to bet a lot of principals will place by age the next couple of years rather than having enormous 9th-grade classes.

This is an important point. COVID19  will have an impact on policy. 

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24 minutes ago, lynn said:

Home school to a public high school.    Did they have to test in?  Did you have a cover school? no cover school?  Show them your transcripts and got right in or still have to test in?  I was told today when I withdrew my daughter that she would have no high school credits if she did not  use an accredited curriculum but could test in using their final exam?   Any experience?  Ideas?  suggestions?  We decided to start the year home schooling because everything is remote learning so when that gets straightened out we want to put her in the high school.    Just curious of others experiences.

My daughter transferred in the 2nd semester of 9th grade. They accepted her first semester grades from me. They also gave her a math and English test to confirm her placement. Her second semester grades in school mimicked her first semester homeschool grades. 
 

The schools don’t often know the homeschooling laws very well. A lot of time people say “accredited” and have no idea what they’re talking about. You’ll probably get the best advice from homeschoolers in your particular district. 

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38 minutes ago, lynn said:

Home school to a public high school.    Did they have to test in?  Did you have a cover school? no cover school?  Show them your transcripts and got right in or still have to test in?  I was told today when I withdrew my daughter that she would have no high school credits if she did not  use an accredited curriculum but could test in using their final exam?   Any experience?  Ideas?  suggestions?  We decided to start the year home schooling because everything is remote learning so when that gets straightened out we want to put her in the high school.    Just curious of others experiences.

DS now 24 -- From home school to local public high school. No testing, no cover school. They looked at the transcript I prepared and his standardized test scores and the counselor said "Well, obviously he can take anything he wants." Done.

DS now 21 -- From home school to early college high school. No cover school. They looked at my transcript, his standardized test scores and his Accuplacer scores for English placement. The math teacher had some concerns about his correct placement and wanted him to take a test. I showed her the curriculum we had been using and his scores and she placed him in the required beginning course and said he would likely be bored (he was).

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Do you mean starting public high school as a freshman, or in the middle of high school?


DS went from homeschool to public as a freshman. We had a chat with his counselor the spring of his 8th grade year and she placed him in all honors classes and an AP. We didn’t have to show her anything.

I only know of one other local homeschool family; their kid is attending the high school part time, so presumably credits transfer somehow. I guess they’d just use the high school credits when she graduates from their homeschool; the classes she takes are fluff courses (electives) not the core courses, which I find oddly backward.

Eta we did our research before we moved here. DS was just 8 at the time but we wanted to make sure public high school was an option down the road if he wanted it. So we already knew the school was going to be friendly to homeschoolers (even though homeschooling is really uncommon in our town).

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35 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

In my state no unaccredited credits are accepted. Period. When I wanted to enroll my son at grade 11 I would have had to restart him in grade 9. No exceptions. No testing. (Another boardie friend tried appealing their decision for her son and lost. She actually put him back in 9th grade.). 

Same in California. It's an all or nothing thing if you start the high school years privately homeschooling. The workarounds are to go through a charter or private umbrella.

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Here starting as a 9th grader is a piece of cake - no tests or anything generally required.  But starting any time after 9th grade, it is very school district dependent, as the state doesn't require districts to accept homeschool credits for high school.  Definitely check state laws and check with local homeschoolers to find out their experience.

My 8th grader will probably enter public school in a year, and one thing I did find out is that if we want placement for anything above what is "typical" for 9th grade, he would need to test to show competency. A Geometry placement is considered "normal" so they wouldn't require an algebra test for an incoming 9th grader, but since we would be looking at a pre-calc placement, he will need to show competency, most likely by taking an exam. 

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1 hour ago, lynn said:

Home school to a public high school.    Did they have to test in?  Did you have a cover school? no cover school?  Show them your transcripts and got right in or still have to test in?  I was told today when I withdrew my daughter that she would have no high school credits if she did not  use an accredited curriculum but could test in using their final exam?   Any experience?  Ideas?  suggestions?  We decided to start the year home schooling because everything is remote learning so when that gets straightened out we want to put her in the high school.    Just curious of others experiences.

 

DD started again as an 8th grader b/c testing into/receiving honors classes is much easier when you start in that grade. If I had needed to, I could have used her PSAT scores for 8th grade which I used for annual state reporting. If you start mid-year tho, or even in 10th grade, receiving an appropriate course placement let alone getting credit for a course is much, much tougher. In our area, you can offer to take the district's EOC exam to get credit but the course grade will never be counted in their GPA and the district doesn't have to actually award course credit. They can honor it for course placement only if they choose. This is fine if you have an 8th grade algebra course and the student plans to continue with four more years of math. An honors diploma here requires four years of math.

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NYC requires anybody who wants to enter into a public high school in the 9th grade to go through the high school admissions process. Only some high school programs look at test scores for admissions, and entering as homeschoolers was pretty straightforward, if mind-eating. We just deprioritized those schools on the kids' applications because we neither had grades nor statewide test scores. (We could've had statewide test scores, we just didn't do those tests.) LOL, actually, the younger kiddo was very insistent on her chosen school, which theoretically looks at grades but also wanted to see a portfolio (it's an art school) and that was the school she got into, so the lack of grades apparently didn't matter at all. Her portfolio was AMAZING.

The same high school admissions process is used for incoming 10th graders or those who wish to change schools for 10th grade, so presumably it's as straightforward for incoming 10th graders as incoming 9th graders. I don't know about 11th and 12th grade, though.

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Here you cannot enroll past 9th unless you want to start over. Ideally you need to enroll in 8th to get placed without having to fight the PTB. My friend put her son in 9th, he should have went to the advanced math track based on test scores and what he had taken but they put him in the remedial track. Finally after a crapton of fighting he got in the regular track. He had to do JROTC because they wouldn't let him have any electives he wanted. My son went in 8th, Jr high looked at his test scores and transcript I made and put him in all advanced. My daughter is entering this year I just sent in test scores for her as she didn't want advanced they wanted to put her in 2 advanced classes, she decided to take 1 and got all the electives she wanted. 

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We had no trouble starting out the girls in 9th. Then I did get a call from the counseling office to schedule a math placement test, and I pushed back and said I was her math teacher and I placed her in the appropriate class (and I am a former high school math teacher, it was very important to me that my kids start in geometry, and I prepared them for that). My beef with placement testing is that you don't test all of the public school kids for math placement after a 3 month summer break, so don't test my kids. And of course they did fine as I knew they would. The school was fine with my plan since the kids "had math support at home." Meaning it's a rule for some kids but not all, which of course is a major equity issue. But I would say let any motivated kid try the course they want to try. Move them if they can't handle it.

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When I enrolled my son at the public high school for 9th grade, they said they would accept my word for it with regard to math placement (everything else was fixed).  He would have had to take a test for honors math placement, except they didn't have a test for honors precalculus placement (their test just went up to Algebra 2).  So the chair of the math department looked at my son's Algebra 2 work from his Derek Owens class and based on that allowed him to do honors.

I was astounded that it wasn't more difficult than that.  

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We just enrolled our ninth grade twins.  Easy going district -- they just took our word for the classes they had taken.  Didn't even ask for proof that my ninth grader could handle Calc.  

However enrolling after ninth would have been too much.  We would have had to go through a charter.

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I haven't done it, but I have a friend whose dd was supposed to start high school this year. As a former homeschooler, she went back to homeschooling this year. Her school district will accept homeschool credits if the school has the exact same class. So, for example, if your child took algebra 1 or biology they would probably accept the credits, but an unusual elective or other class they don't offer would not be counted. In my district, another friend taught physical science in 8th grade homeschool, but the district considers it a freshman level class and required him to repeat it.  All this to say, in this area it's up to each individual high school to determine what they will accept or not.

 

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I changed schools between 9th and 10th (military family, so we moved every 3 years) - still, one public school to another public school. I tested into precalculus and had to retake everything else. My 10th grade year, I took 9th and 10th science, which was no big deal. In 11th, I took 11th and 9th English and the age difference was huge and I hated the freshmen. In 12th, I flat out refused to take 12th and 9th social studies. They allowed me to substitute a different history elective, so I never actually took civics. All of that never would have worked if I was in music. Lacking music, I had a free block to "retake" a freshman level course. Also, it was impossible to qualify for Honor Society, I simply didn't have enough credits no matter the final grade. In hindsight, I'd never do this to a kid. 

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12 minutes ago, Pintosrock said:

I changed schools between 9th and 10th (military family, so we moved every 3 years) - still, one public school to another public school. I tested into precalculus and had to retake everything else. My 10th grade year, I took 9th and 10th science, which was no big deal. In 11th, I took 11th and 9th English and the age difference was huge and I hated the freshmen. In 12th, I flat out refused to take 12th and 9th social studies. They allowed me to substitute a different history elective, so I never actually took civics. All of that never would have worked if I was in music. Lacking music, I had a free block to "retake" a freshman level course. Also, it was impossible to qualify for Honor Society, I simply didn't have enough credits no matter the final grade. In hindsight, I'd never do this to a kid. 

 

Fortunately, this doesn't happen (to this degree) anymore. The interstate compact prevents the worst offenses. https://www.mic3.net/assets/rules-2018-re-print-single-page-rev-19-jul-2018.pdf

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6 hours ago, lynn said:

Home school to a public high school.    Did they have to test in?  Did you have a cover school? no cover school?  Show them your transcripts and got right in or still have to test in?  I was told today when I withdrew my daughter that she would have no high school credits if she did not  use an accredited curriculum but could test in using their final exam?   Any experience?  Ideas?  suggestions?  We decided to start the year home schooling because everything is remote learning so when that gets straightened out we want to put her in the high school.    Just curious of others experiences.

I wouldn’t do this at our public school. Our principal would not be pleased. He holds grudges, and this plan would put us under his negative radar.  Whatever small benefit we would get from homeschooling the beginning of the year would be more than offset by the negatives for the remaining years (and the years from siblings). 
 

I would do this with our parochial school. In fact, it was my plan for 4th grade if we started virtually. 
 

ETA: would this serve your child well? Are you using the same materials and teaching the same classes he/she would have in the Public school? The beginning of freshman year is spent learning norms and teacher expectations. Seems like your child would have an easier transition to public school if she/he was already in her/his classes virtually. 

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15 hours ago, Ali in OR said:

We had no trouble starting out the girls in 9th. Then I did get a call from the counseling office to schedule a math placement test, and I pushed back and said I was her math teacher and I placed her in the appropriate class (and I am a former high school math teacher, it was very important to me that my kids start in geometry, and I prepared them for that). My beef with placement testing is that you don't test all of the public school kids for math placement after a 3 month summer break, so don't test my kids. And of course they did fine as I knew they would. The school was fine with my plan since the kids "had math support at home." Meaning it's a rule for some kids but not all, which of course is a major equity issue. But I would say let any motivated kid try the course they want to try. Move them if they can't handle it.

In my district they don’t test all incoming 9th graders, but they do test everyone who is transferring in from out of the district. So, in this sense, it can be equitable and not specifically targeted at homeschoolers. 

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3 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

In my district they don’t test all incoming 9th graders, but they do test everyone who is transferring in from out of the district. So, in this sense, it can be equitable and not specifically targeted at homeschoolers. 

But having worked with the in-district kids for 2 years now, with math, I can tell you that there is no way that many of them could pass the previous year's final in the fall. Many of them didn't pass the previous year's final in the spring! And they are allowed to go on and take the next math class. In that sense it's unfair. And not passing the final doesn't mean they don't have math skills and can't learn the next thing--they just can't hold a year's worth of math in their heads. Or they don't study.

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I did some groundbreaking on this issue in my district.  We were in MN, my oldest was an honor student and ultimately graduated 7th in her class.  Her Junior and Senior year she spent half days at home.  This was...25 years ago. 

After her graduation we moved to MI.  I went to the local high school to enroll my next daughter in 9th grade, half days.  They had no idea what to do with me, but took her on . We had a few bumps along the way, but she ultimately graduated with honors from that school.

 

Fast forward 5 years and I had two sons who had always been at home.  One was entering 9th grade and one was entering 11th grade.  I wanted to enroll them full time and again,  they had no idea what to do with me.  Huge meeting was called with principal, vice principal, all the counselors, etc.  I was prepared with a report card and full course of study for both of them.  My freshman was just a matter of where to put him in the math program.  My Junior was another story.  They combed thru his course of study and were impressed.  Then the counselor who had been my 2nd daughters counselor spoke up on my behalf.  ( she was not at all enthused about working with me when we started there years before, but I had won her over).  She told them that they would do well to accept my sons, and their transcripts because if I said I had done it, I had done it.  They accepted all of my son's credits. Both sons graduated with honors.

I realize they likely have a better game plan now, but I left them with a very good impression of homeschoolers who get it done. 

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I put my kids in Public Virtual school at 9th for this reason.

Oldest dd transferred in at Grade 10. Had a great principal at the virtual school who looked at her transcript and allowed her to test in to Grade 10 rather than repeating classes. My dd's boyfriend (now my son in law) tried the same thing and had to repeat stuff because the principal at his virtual school was not so accommodating.

Second dd transferred in at grade 9. No problems at all, no testing required.

Third dd transferred in at grade 9. No problems, no testing.

I do tell parents that in our area, they may want to decide whether they want to do virtual and start that at grade 9 if at all possible to avoid transfer issues. They can always go back to homeschooling if the virtual is not working out, but they may lose credits if they try to do it the other way round.

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1 minute ago, fairfarmhand said:

I put my kids in Public Virtual school at 9th for this reason.

Oldest dd transferred in at Grade 10. Had a great principal at the virtual school who looked at her transcript and allowed her to test in to Grade 10 rather than repeating classes. My dd's boyfriend (now my son in law) tried the same thing and had to repeat stuff because the principal at his virtual school was not so accommodating.

Second dd transferred in at grade 9. No problems at all, no testing required.

Third dd transferred in at grade 9. No problems, no testing.

I do tell parents that in our area, they may want to decide whether they want to do virtual and start that at grade 9 if at all possible to avoid transfer issues. They can always go back to homeschooling if the virtual is not working out, but they may lose credits if they try to do it the other way round.

Public virtual school is still public school.  If my kids had been in virtual public school then they could have transferred to in person public school at any time with no problem.  But I could not "transfer" from homeschooling to even public virtual school after 9th grade without going back to the start of 9th  in my state. 

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20 hours ago, sassenach said:

Same in California. It's an all or nothing thing if you start the high school years privately homeschooling. The workarounds are to go through a charter or private umbrella.

The only workaround my district would accept (other than using charter or private umbrella) is AP exam scores and dual enrollment credits. 

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4 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

The only workaround my district would accept (other than using charter or private umbrella) is AP exam scores and dual enrollment credits. 

Our school district won't even accept courses taken at the community college.  They'd make kids do credit recovery at the alternative school in remedial level classes.

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It depends on your school. I enrolled mine her sophomore year. The lady in admissions was so mean. Basically telling me that nothing she took would transfer since it wasn't from an accredited source. The secretary was pointing out all the things that her classes should transfer to. Her academic advisor put her into the 10th grade classes with the caveat that she would have to take the end of course tests for the core freshman classes as that's what the state requires. I did insist she retake her math because she didn't get the concepts. They had her take summer classes for that. Without taking their classes she aced the history and literature tests just by reviewing their study guide. She had straight A's at the public school.

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56 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Public virtual school is still public school.  If my kids had been in virtual public school then they could have transferred to in person public school at any time with no problem.  But I could not "transfer" from homeschooling to even public virtual school after 9th grade without going back to the start of 9th  in my state. 

Yes, that was my point. Sorry, I wasn't clear. I was trying to make the point that my kids were in normal homeschool till 8th and went into public at 9th except for my oldest, who was darn lucky we ended up with a reasonable principal.

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5 hours ago, ashfern said:

It depends on your school. I enrolled mine her sophomore year. The lady in admissions was so mean. Basically telling me that nothing she took would transfer since it wasn't from an accredited source. The secretary was pointing out all the things that her classes should transfer to. Her academic advisor put her into the 10th grade classes with the caveat that she would have to take the end of course tests for the core freshman classes as that's what the state requires. I did insist she retake her math because she didn't get the concepts. They had her take summer classes for that. Without taking their classes she aced the history and literature tests just by reviewing their study guide. She had straight A's at the public school.

I did have someone tell me to request the study's guides for the test.   

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5 hours ago, Terabith said:

Our school district won't even accept courses taken at the community college.  They'd make kids do credit recovery at the alternative school in remedial level classes.

It doesn't make sense that home schooled kids can take ACT or SAT and send that score with home school transcripts to colleges and universities and be accepted but some public schools won't give credits for the same home school classes.

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Doing some research yesterday and asking some local home school veterans and was told for high school it's best to persevere all four years home schooling to avoid credit issues in public schools.  All or nothing approach.

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