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Book a Week 2020 - BW33: Pick a book by its cover


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I just finished The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey by Candice Millard which my book group will be discussing on Zoom later this week. Last month's book group book (A Primate's Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling ... though not quite as compelling as the author's Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.

 "At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, The River of Doubt is the true story of Theodore Roosevelt’s harrowing exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth.


The River of Doubt—it is a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron.
 

After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped, rapids-choked tributary of the Amazon. Together with his son Kermit and Brazil’s most famous explorer, Cândido Mariano da Silva Rondon, Roosevelt accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it. In the process, he changed the map of the western hemisphere forever.

Along the way, Roosevelt and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. The River of Doubt brings alive these extraordinary events in a powerful nonfiction narrative thriller that happens to feature one of the most famous Americans who ever lived."

Regards,

Kareni

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Late night last night as we watched Transformers and were up until 2:00.  Great movie.   Went to the Dodge dealership yesterday and completely difference experience from all the rest.  Since we were a

Happy Sunday, dear hearts.  Are you ready for a mini challenge?  Me too!  Book covers that are dark and haunting, colorful, and bold, present a mystery, a challenge, all intrigue me. Sometimes it the

Love the book covers!  I am very visual and pick many of my books by the cover frequently although I read the descriptions after loving the cover.  I plan to go and investigate a couple of those cover

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Shantaram

I actually really liked Shantaram. It is just so full of heart. I agree that the guy does use what you might call purple prose, but it's almost part of the fun. Here's the first line:

" It took me a long time and most of the world to learn what I know about love and fate and the choices we make, but the heart of it came to me in an instant, while I was chained to a wall and being tortured."

I mean, doesn't that make you want to keep reading?

Dreamergal, I am a massive Michael Ondaatje fan too - we had to study him at school. I think Anil's Ghost is my favourite, followed by The English Patient and then In the Skin of a Lion. I quite liked Warlight, but it wasn't up to his usual standard.

Right now I am reading a lot of urban fantasy - Helen Harper's very funny 'slouch witch' series, Ilona Andrews' movie-like books, a few others. They're fun but fluff, really. I am desperate for a good rich fantasy read. Hanging out for the next Megan Whalan Turner book (due next year), the next Becky Chambers, I'd love the last Kingkiller book to appear (not holding my breath), something which is not grim, which has big ideas and great characters. I've read all Lois McMaster Bujold books, and The Goblin Emperor (many times). Apparently the genre is 'hopepunk', the opposite of 'grimdark'. 

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On 8/17/2020 at 9:29 PM, Pen said:

 

I am realizing that as I am listening to audiobooks so much, I now am more likely to judge a book by its narrator’s voice than by its cover!  Though when I go onto Hoopla I do see a book cover and maybe that has some effect on me.

 

Yep. George Guidall and The Cat Who books ... *heart*.

On 8/17/2020 at 10:02 PM, Seasider too said:

My reading has slowed, for all kinds of reasons. Not only have I had a surge of other people and business needing my attention, I have also gotten hooked on Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries. I have four words for you: Detective Inspector Jack Robinson.

I

love

him.

Seriously, I would listen to any audiobook narrated by Nathan Page, regardless of topic. If I could choose his voice for my iPhone’s Siri, I would. I am not usually a swooner, but I have been enjoying his character so much in these Miss Fisher stories. Life has been demanding and I have cocooned a little while each evening, lost in Gatsby-era Melbourne, Australia.

I have a stack of books and, finally, a leisurely day tomorrow, so I hope to get back into the swing of it [BAW].

 

Is this the TV show then?

13 hours ago, Penguin said:

iI enjoy following the Danish royals, especially the Queen. Princess Mary, who is married to the heir apparent to the throne, is from Austraila, and she is also interesting to me.  Don’t be embarrassed, @Dreamergal

 

In my family we refer to the Danish Royals as the beautiful people. Princess Mary's whole family is so cute.

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FINISHED:

The Silent Pool (Miss Silver) by Patricia Wentworth - All I'm getting finished this year are read alouds and audiobooks. It'll be interesting to compare the number of audiobooks I read this year versus other years in December. Anyway ... if you like Miss Silver books then this is a recommend. 🙂

I've now read 20/32 Miss Silver books. I'm kinda bummed about that. They're my favorite easy listen.

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57 minutes ago, aggieamy said:

In my family we refer to the Danish Royals as the beautiful people. Princess Mary's whole family is so cute.

They are indeed a cute family! I'm sure it wasn't easy for Princess Mary to marry into the family, but the Danish press is gentler on its royals than the British press. Prince Henrik, the Queen's husband (d. 2018) took quite a bit of flak from the press over his French-accented Danish but Mary seems to receive praise over her Danish. Queen Margarethe is SO talented. She has designed costumes for the Royal Danish Ballet, and her illustrations for LOTR were used in a Danish edition. 

I went to a premier performance of the Royal Danish Ballet in November 2019. My friend and I were sitting in our seats, and all of a sudden everyone stood up. The Queen had just entered her Royal Box 🙂 The show we saw was Blixen, based on the life of Karen Blixen / Isak Dinensen. Wow, that is such a great pre-pandemic memory. Such a short time ago and yet so long ago...

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23 minutes ago, Lady Florida. said:

@mumto2 I'm pretty sure you're not in the DeLand area, but I'm checking on you just in case. 

For the rest of you, there was some wild weather there yesterday, with a probable tornado. I'm not sure if they confirmed it yet. 

Thanks,  we are fine!  We aren’t in DeLand but yesterday’s storm was really something.  I don’t think they have confirmed the tornado but as roofs were ripped off it certainally seems likely.  These afternoon storms seem to be much more powerful than I remember them.......I haven’t spent an August in Florida for over a decade.  My kids have been biking every day for many miles on the trails and got in seconds before the sky opened yesterday........btw they had texted so we knew they were heading in as we watched the black clouds coming our way.

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10 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

Thanks,  we are fine!  We aren’t in DeLand but yesterday’s storm was really something.  I don’t think they have confirmed the tornado but as roofs were ripped off it certainally seems likely.  These afternoon storms seem to be much more powerful than I remember them.......I haven’t spent an August in Florida for over a decade.  My kids have been biking every day for many miles on the trails and got in seconds before the sky opened yesterday........btw they had texted so we knew they were heading in as we watched the black clouds coming our way.

Yikes! Yeah, August and September can be wild. Glad you are all okay. Remind the kids those storms come up fast. My cousin works for the City of DeLand but lives in Deltona and was home when it started. One SIlL (dh's brother's wife) has family in DeLand but it looks like they were okay too. We had some heavy thunderstorms here but nothing like there was there. 

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Yesterday I finished The Spy and the Traitor on Audible. The last bit where they were getting him out of the Soviet Union (to Finland then Norway, and finally the UK) was so harrowing that instead of doing something like I usually do while listening to an audio book, I just sat and listened. One surprise (not a spoiler to anyone but me) is that it was Aldrich Ames who actually gave him up. His name was just one of many that Ames passed along, but it caught the eye of the KGB. 

I haven't finished anything else, but made progress in Why Slay the Wicked, a Sebastian St. Cyr mystery. 

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15 hours ago, Penguin said:

iI enjoy following the Danish royals, especially the Queen. Princess Mary, who is married to the heir apparent to the throne, is from Austraila, and she is also interesting to me.  Don’t be embarrassed, @Dreamergal

 

I am so happy people share I thought my unique interests. 😄. I think if you read historical fiction, you tend to like royalty ?

My favorite is Queen Maxima of Netherlands. 

In my eternal quest to improve my french, I read newspapers and was introduced to her amazingness. She is absolutely lovely, accomplished, stylish and has the most ginormous gemstones.and her love story is so nice too. Now here is a commoner/prince love story I can get behind. 

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7 hours ago, bookbard said:

I actually really liked Shantaram. It is just so full of heart. I agree that the guy does use what you might call purple prose, but it's almost part of the fun. Here's the first line:

" It took me a long time and most of the world to learn what I know about love and fate and the choices we make, but the heart of it came to me in an instant, while I was chained to a wall and being tortured."

I mean, doesn't that make you want to keep reading?

Dreamergal, I am a massive Michael Ondaatje fan too - we had to study him at school. I think Anil's Ghost is my favourite, followed by The English Patient and then In the Skin of a Lion. I quite liked Warlight, but it wasn't up to his usual standard.

I am glad you liked Shantaram.

I should not say anything much about it since I read twaddle littered with purple prose like Twilight :blush:. But pulpy, twaddle and purply is a bridge too far for me. It reminded me of what we call masala movies. Masala is usually good, but too much is not good for anyone and Shantaram was that for me. 

I liked Anil's Ghost too and consider it one of the best of Ondaatje's novels if not the best because it seems semi-autobiographical to me with the east and west juxtaposition of character and narration. Also, the narrative he weaves of the civil war in Srilanka is heart breakingly personal it seemed in a way only someone who has roots there can write.

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12 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

I liked Anil's Ghost too and consider it one of the best of Ondaatje's novels if not the best because it seems semi-autobiographical to me with the east and west juxtaposition of character and narration. Also, the narrative he weaves of the civil war in Srilanka is heart breakingly personal it seemed in a way only someone who has roots there can write.

The only Ondaatje I've read is The Cat's Table, which is also semi-autobiographical, about a boy taking a trip alone from Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) to England.  I've just seen the movie of The English Patient.  I should read more - Anil's Ghost sounds interesting!

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@aggieamy yes, this is the TV series. I did not realize it was based on books, I discovered it when looking for costume dramas to distract me from worldly woes (no huge woes, just typical CV stress, yknow). When I realized that there were novels that came first, I googled around. Sadly, I found that in the written stories, Jack & Phryne never get ‘shipped. Well, to be fair, they don’t exactly get together in the screen version, either, but there are enough quality words and dreamy looks between them to satisfy me. Though I find Phryne almost too...liberated?...for my own taste, I do admire the way her backstory is trickled in so we see the life events that shaped her personality and behaviors. And I love her clothes! I appreciate the current ease of yoga pants, but I do miss the way fashion was a daily thing. I don’t really want to go back to waking up at 5am to have time for hot rollers in my hair, but I admit to missing a world where I could feel the difference between “dress for success” and at-home leisure wear. Showing my age, I guess. There’s a scene in a season 2 episode I just watched wherein Phryne explains to Dot the reasons she dresses fashionably, and I found myself wistful for the days my wardrobe consisted of more than tops from Target and hand me downs (now from my daughters instead of my mom and aunts!😂). Not that clothes have to be expensive - it’s just that I don’t take time anymore to pull together an ensemble, kwim? I have started setting aside a little money into a fashion fund. Once I reach a fitness goal, and this CV mess subsides, I am going shopping!

Ok sorry to derail from this thread’s topic about BOOKS! In an earlier BAW thread I mentioned that I was 470 millionth in line for Ballad of Songbirds & Snakes, but my library must have ordered 60 million copies because I now have it in hand and will crack the cover today after completing  some chores. 
 

These are titles I have either recently finished or am currently reading, I will not take time to report on them today, but will in a future thread:

Gulf Music (poetry) and Singing School (poetry craft) by Robert Pinsky

The Poetry Home Repair Manual by Ted Kooser (poetry craft)

The Inner Circle and its sequels by Brad Meltzer (fiction)

Reforesting Faith by Matthew Sleeth (nonfiction faith study)

I could use another audiobook, but I am rather picky so I haven’t come up with one yet. You all have interesting recommendations, but I have found that I have to stick with nonfiction for audiobook, I have trouble tracking with fiction aloud unless it is an intentional audio drama (ie, podcast) or I’m doing nothing more than a jigsaw puzzle while I listen. 

Forgive me for not taking time to respond to your individual posts but know that I read them all with great interest!

 

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5 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

 I admit to missing a world where I could feel the difference between “dress for success” and at-home leisure wear. Showing my age, I guess. There’s a scene in a season 2 episode I just watched wherein Phryne explains to Dot the reasons she dresses fashionably, and I found myself wistful for the days my wardrobe consisted of more than tops from Target and hand me downs (now from my daughters instead of my mom and aunts!😂). Not that clothes have to be expensive - it’s just that I don’t take time anymore to pull together an ensemble, kwim? I have started setting aside a little money into a fashion fund. Once I reach a fitness goal, and this CV mess subsides, I am going shopping!

I can relate to this.  My kids finally grew up and moved out so I could pay more attention to myself after years of Kohl's stuff that was often years and years old and stretched out; was all motivated, went and hit my fitness goal and was just starting to build up a put-together new wardrobe, and then... Covid!  I have nowhere to go and no one to see, and now I live in Yoga pants.  Sigh.

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2 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

I can relate to this.  My kids finally grew up and moved out so I could pay more attention to myself after years of Kohl's stuff that was often years and years old and stretched out; was all motivated, went and hit my fitness goal and was just starting to build up a put-together new wardrobe, and then... Covid!  I have nowhere to go and no one to see, and now I live in Yoga pants.  Sigh.

It won’t last forever!!! And the new clothes will be ready and waiting for you!

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1 minute ago, Seasider too said:

It won’t last forever!!! And the new clothes will be ready and waiting for you!

LOL, and this is why I'm living in Yoga pants.  Since I can't go to the gym, I need to live in workout clothes to even have a small chance of actually working out and still fitting in those clothes when this is over!  If I have to get changed to workout, it will.not.happen.  Sad, but true...

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2 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

LOL, and this is why I'm living in Yoga pants.  Since I can't go to the gym, I need to live in workout clothes to even have a small chance of actually working out and still fitting in those clothes when this is over!  If I have to get changed to workout, it will.not.happen.  Sad, but true...

Oh, I feel that! 

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I bought a bunch of tennis skirts to wear during Covid because they are forgiving if you put on a few pounds and I hate slacks of any sort. As an added bonus I really like how they make me look a little more put together and whenever DH gets home from the water treatment plant and sees me in my tennis skirt he figures that I plan for us to go as a family and play tennis that evening. So we've been doing that and it's lots of fun. He doesn't know how incredibly comfortable skirts are.

 

 

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1 minute ago, aggieamy said:

I bought a bunch of tennis skirts to wear during Covid because they are forgiving if you put on a few pounds and I hate slacks of any sort. As an added bonus I really like how they make me look a little more put together and whenever DH gets home from the water treatment plant and sees me in my tennis skirt he figures that I plan for us to go as a family and play tennis that evening. So we've been doing that and it's lots of fun. He doesn't know how incredibly comfortable skirts are.

 

 

Is there a particular brand you like? I like the exercise skirts that are a little longer than a tennis skirt, but a skirty thing is a great idea for not feeling too slouchy. 
 

Gosh, Robin, sorry to get so OT. Blaming it on the ‘rona!

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1 minute ago, Seasider too said:

Is there a particular brand you like? I like the exercise skirts that are a little longer than a tennis skirt, but a skirty thing is a great idea for not feeling too slouchy. 
 

Gosh, Robin, sorry to get so OT. Blaming it on the ‘rona!

So if you're reading some good books on tennis and want to dress the part you might be interested in these 17" skirts that last forever and have great pockets. (Their other styles are darling too but I like a longer skirt.)

https://www.donajobrand.com/collections/ultimate-skirts-17

 

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47 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

I can relate to this.  My kids finally grew up and moved out so I could pay more attention to myself after years of Kohl's stuff that was often years and years old and stretched out; was all motivated, went and hit my fitness goal and was just starting to build up a put-together new wardrobe, and then... Covid!  I have nowhere to go and no one to see, and now I live in Yoga pants.  Sigh.

I feel this too. I mean, my kids are still little but at least they're old enough so that I don't spend time sitting on the playground floor drawing with chalk. I've been trying to remember what it's like to dress nicely...I've pretty much settled on a middle ground of easy cotton dresses. Onward and upward.

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43 minutes ago, aggieamy said:

So if you're reading some good books on tennis and want to dress the part you might be interested in these 17" skirts that last forever and have great pockets. (Their other styles are darling too but I like a longer skirt.)

https://www.donajobrand.com/collections/ultimate-skirts-17

 

I don't want to dress the tennis part, more like medieval and space and royalty, especially tiaras !! 😀

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I just want to talk about The Age of Innocence for a minute. I am liking it much better than I expected to. Some of the scenes are just so well done! The one-on-one scenes between the protagonist and his love interests (it's a love triangle) are really well done, especially the scenes between him and his forbidden love. And the characters are well drawn; there are some very appealing, rich New York eccentrics which give the book lots of oomph.

At the same time I keep getting irritated by the book's pushy agenda. Every few chapters we get a clunker about women's equality, or the constrictions of life in upper class New York, or how narrow-minded people are. I mean, I agree with all those messages but find it so annoying to have them spelled out. It makes me distrust the book.

I keep comparing it in my mind to Mill on the Floss, and Maggie's doomed romance with (I think) Stephen Guest. Maybe it's just because I read it when I was much younger, but I remember that romance as being totally spell-binding and I remember the societal constrictions as seeming much more convincing.

Still, I'm only halfway done with Age of Innocence. 

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23 minutes ago, Little Green Leaves said:

I just want to talk about The Age of Innocence for a minute. I am liking it much better than I expected to. Some of the scenes are just so well done! The one-on-one scenes between the protagonist and his love interests (it's a love triangle) are really well done, especially the scenes between him and his forbidden love. And the characters are well drawn; there are some very appealing, rich New York eccentrics which give the book lots of oomph.

At the same time I keep getting irritated by the book's pushy agenda. Every few chapters we get a clunker about women's equality, or the constrictions of life in upper class New York, or how narrow-minded people are. I mean, I agree with all those messages but find it so annoying to have them spelled out. It makes me distrust the book.

I keep comparing it in my mind to Mill on the Floss, and Maggie's doomed romance with (I think) Stephen Guest. Maybe it's just because I read it when I was much younger, but I remember that romance as being totally spell-binding and I remember the societal constrictions as seeming much more convincing.

Still, I'm only halfway done with Age of Innocence. 

I have not read Age of Innocence, but Mill on the Floss which I remember reading when I was much younger too, the over arching thing I remember is how uncomfortable the relationship between Maggie and Tom ? made me feel. 

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6 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

I have not read Age of Innocence, but Mill on the Floss which I remember reading when I was much younger too, the over arching thing I remember is how uncomfortable the relationship between Maggie and Tom ? made me feel. 

Yes it is definitely problematic!  I don't think there's anything exactly inappropriate about it, but he is definitely the voice of Control for her. She can never quite get away from him, but her happiest moments are when she half escapes! But I thought the book did such a good job of showing Tom's struggles too, and the siblings' continuing love for each other.

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8 minutes ago, Little Green Leaves said:

Yes it is definitely problematic!  I don't think there's anything exactly inappropriate about it, but he is definitely the voice of Control for her. She can never quite get away from him, but her happiest moments are when she half escapes! But I thought the book did such a good job of showing Tom's struggles too, and the siblings' continuing love for each other.

The emotional part was the one that was a bit troubling to me. It was emotional incest for me. A bit severe, but can't really find other words to describe it except  the words I used. I have whited it as it made me uncomfortable to describe it thus, but that is what I felt. 

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Just now, Dreamergal said:

The emotional part was the one that was a bit troubling to me. It was emotional incest for me. A bit severe, but can't really find other words to describe it except  the words I used. I have whited it as it made me uncomfortable to describe it thus, but that is what I felt. 

Well, I think I can imagine what you mean. And I can definitely see that. For whatever reason, that wasn't my take when I read the book, but I can definitely see it. Oof I am glad that I read the book differently, because I really loved it : ) 

 

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19 hours ago, LaughingCat said:

Melusine by Sarah Monette   -- This book was nothing like the Goblin Emperor (by this author under the name Katherine Addison and which I loved) unfortunately-- much darker, with multiple scenes that could trigger,  and one of the 2 main characters was a selfish jerk with no improvement from his travails...

My daughter read Melusine and further books in that series after reading The Goblin Emperor; she also said that they were quite dissimilar. Have you read Addison's most recent work, The Angel of the CrowsI'm looking forward to her next book which is to be set in the world of the Goblin Emperor.

Regards,

Kareni

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Hmmph, I lost my post in progress! Trying again....

13 hours ago, bookbard said:

Right now I am reading a lot of urban fantasy - Helen Harper's very funny 'slouch witch' series, Ilona Andrews' movie-like books, a few others. They're fun but fluff, really. I am desperate for a good rich fantasy read.

How do you feel about science fiction? I'll recommend SK Dunstall's  Linesman series. It carries a recommendation by Ilona Andrews which I can no longer access because they updated their blog. 

Regards,

Kareni

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13 hours ago, bookbard said:

the genre is 'hopepunk', the opposite of 'grimdark'. 

I've spent way too much time this afternoon looking at posts about hopepunk and comfort reads and.... Thank you, ...I think!

 

Heart-warming, sweet, and uplifting books to read in times of stress

COMFORTING BOOKS FOR HARD TIMES: SOOTHING READS IN EVERY GENRE

Comfort Reads

10 Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books That Will Remind You What Joy Feels Like

6 books that feel like a hug

Hopepunk book recommendations

Regards,

Kareni

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This evening I finished a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener   by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I'm not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it's the first time I've encountered a major character in a book who was a 

 

garden gnome.

"A lonely teenage boy whose father has moved them too often for him to make lasting friendships.

A mysterious neighbor his own age who hums as he gardens... at night... surrounded by fireflies.

Superstition is the town Thaddeus Cane and his father, Nathan, have settled in this time, and every evening Thaddeus becomes more intrigued with his new neighbor. When Thaddeus finally works up the nerve to visit his neighbor, the crush blooming underneath surfaces, and he realizes that Teofil, the midnight gardener, is lonely as well. When his father finds out where he's been spending his time, Thaddeus is forbidden from returning. But the attraction is too strong, and soon Thaddeus is back in Teofil's yard, leading to the revelation of long held secrets that upend Thaddeus' quiet life and sends him on the adventure of a lifetime."

Regards,

Kareni

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Dance has been my go-to exercise during the pandemic. I'm in the market for some ballet wrap skirts to go over my yoga pants. Maybe something like this one. Although maybe I should just go all in and get a tutu, lol. 

And, hey, let's not fail to mention the House Dress Trend. I have succumbed 🙂 My uniform: work-out shorts with a cell-phone pocket and a work out top. Cellphone in pocket and earbuds in ears. Throw house dress on top when I need more coverage. For those, you know, moments of high adventure like taking out the trash or walking to the mailbox. If I am just sick of seeing myself in the workout clothes, I throw the house dress on over the work out clothes and thread the earbuds up through the neckline. Because, like @Matryoshka, getting dressed in work out clothes is key.

One thing I have done for myself lately is start wearing perfume again. I put it on in the morning and again at night after my shower. It makes me happy 🙂 My allergies kept me from being able to wear perfume for decades. Now that I can wear it again, by golly, I want to wear it! And I since I am very conscious of not inflicting scent on those who cannot tolerate perfume, I think wearing it at home is actually a pretty good idea.

Bringing it back around to books, I remember a great discussion here about a book that was about the lost art of dressing up. Or something like that...It was when I first joined BaW so that would have been circa 2016. Any of the long time posters remember which book it was? 

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13 hours ago, Robin M said:

Squee!!!  My new baby arrived!!!!

 

 

2020 dodge charger.jpg

Nice. That'll be great for around town and roadtrips. Now for the important question ... do you and your DH like the same roadtrip audiobooks?

29 minutes ago, Penguin said:

Dance has been my go-to exercise during the pandemic. I'm in the market for some ballet wrap skirts to go over my yoga pants. Maybe something like this one. Although maybe I should just go all in and get a tutu, lol. 

 

If you have a semi-legitimate reason to buy a tutu then you should.

29 minutes ago, Penguin said:

Bringing it back around to books, I remember a great discussion here about a book that was about the lost art of dressing up. Or something like that...It was when I first joined BaW so that would have been circa 2016. Any of the long time posters remember which book it was? 

I remember that but not the title! @Negin - this sounds like your type of book! Do you remember the title?

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@aggieamy Maybe I should get the tutu for walking around outside. I live on a busy city street, and it would help with social distancing. But the one to get for that has to be this one:

(I hardly ever embed YouTube videos here but this one is only 1 min 18 sec. It is from the Dutch National Ballet Company.)

 

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8 minutes ago, Penguin said:

@aggieamy Maybe I should get the tutu for walking around outside. I live on a busy city street, and it would help with social distancing. But the one to get for that has to be this one:

(I hardly ever embed YouTube videos here but this one is only 1 min 18 sec. It is from the Dutch National Ballet Company.)

LOL, that's awesome.

I'm already weird enough walking about with my Nordic poles.  If I added a tutu (even a tinier one), people would really stare! 😂

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2 hours ago, Penguin said:

Dance has been my go-to exercise during the pandemic. I'm in the market for some ballet wrap skirts to go over my yoga pants. Maybe something like this one. Although maybe I should just go all in and get a tutu, lol. 

And, hey, let's not fail to mention the House Dress Trend. I have succumbed 🙂 My uniform: work-out shorts with a cell-phone pocket and a work out top. Cellphone in pocket and earbuds in ears. Throw house dress on top when I need more coverage. For those, you know, moments of high adventure like taking out the trash or walking to the mailbox. If I am just sick of seeing myself in the workout clothes, I throw the house dress on over the work out clothes and thread the earbuds up through the neckline. Because, like @Matryoshka, getting dressed in work out clothes is key.

LOL, nope, not gonna wear a house dress.  Instead I've just started inflicting my butt in yoga pants on the general public.  Sometimes if I go out shopping I'll consider it a 'dress up day' and put on real clothes, but more often, not.  Too bad, so sad. 🙃  

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1 hour ago, Matryoshka said:

LOL, nope, not gonna wear a house dress.  Instead I've just started inflicting my butt in yoga pants on the general public.  Sometimes if I go out shopping I'll consider it a 'dress up day' and put on real clothes, but more often, not.  Too bad, so sad. 🙃  

House dresses don’t leave the house! Ok, for quick runs to the trash or mailbox - yes, they do. And anyway, house dresses have come a long way from the ones my dear Nana wore in the late sixties. She called them house coats because they snapped all the way down. 

“These are not your grandmother’s house dresses.” As the internet likes to say about such things, lol.

ETA my work-out tops are kinda skimpy and I am not, um, buff. I am not comfortable in them out and about.

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Today only, free for Kindle readers ~

Three Ghost Stories by Charles Dickens

 "A bone-chilling trio of supernatural tales by fiction master Charles Dickens

In “The Haunted House,” a new homeowner discovers he is sharing his bed with the skeleton of the house’s former master. In “The Trial for Murder,” a revengeful ghost haunts a juror serving at his killer’s trial. In “The Signal-Man,” an apparition warns a man of impending disaster.
 
These strange and frightening occurrences unfold in grim and gripping detail in this collection of 3 Victorian ghost stories that puts Charles Dickens’s first-rate storytelling on display."

ETA: Also free:

The Knight's Journal I: Descendent . Ardent . Evident 

Regards,

Kareni

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1 hour ago, Penguin said:

House dresses don’t leave the house! Ok, for quick runs to the trash or mailbox - yes. And anyway, they have come a long way from the ones my dear Nana wore in the late sixties. She called them house coats because they snapped all the way down. 

“These are not your grandmother’s house dresses.” As the internet likes to say about such things, lol.

ETA my work-out tops are kinda skimpy and I am not, um, buff. I am not comfortable in them out and about.

Ah, I wear shirts or tanks on top that probably cover as much as a dress' top would.  I sometimes take them off to actually work out when it's really hot (the one benefit of working out at home vs the gym!).  I've got some new sports bras on the way!  But yeah, my midriff stays covered in public!

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@Violet Crown Do Library of America titles typically go out of print? Other posters are free to answer, of course. I just know I have seen VC mention LoA.

I want the first Faulkner novel collection, and it is out of print. Used copies are above the list price. I only have a few LoA volumes, and they were all found through serendipitous in-person browsing in used shops. The first time I go to order one, I find it out of print. Waah.

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Completed The Truths we Hold by Kamala Harris

https://www.amazon.com/Truths-We-Hold-American-Journey/dp/0525560718

I have been debating with how to write a review because this book talks a lot about her politics and decisions she made. I did not want to talk about that because I do not want to be banned from here. So I am going to talk about essentially why I read that book and what It means to me. 

Kamala Harris is known as the Junior Senator from California, the second African American woman to become a Senator. What is lesser known is she is the first South Asian American, male or female to hold that position. Though "Asians" are thrown into this big basket in America and everyone from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Indian, Pakistani are thrown in, South Asian distinction matters because the Asian American senators were not South Asian. It is a subtle distinction in words, but very much a distinction in appearance. It absolutely matters especially to an immigrant because we want to be seen in a country that does not have many people who look like you on TV, books, toys. So it is very much a big deal when you see people who look like you in any medium like this. It means a less of the othering which always implicitly happens. It is especially very important in politics because it is very much a glass ceiling for any immigrant, male or female. So I have always watched with pride and kept an eye on her. The Indian press always wrote articles about her South Asian roots and so I was very familiar with that. But I was always curious about her south Asian identity in her own words. 

Senator Harris's full name is Kamala Devi Harris which means Lotus and Goddess. It is a full on Indian name that hits you in the face. I remember naming our kids, we wanted a name that was pronounceable, yet had meaning to our culture. Most often the middle name is the one that is full on Indian, difficult to pronounce not the first one. But Senator Harris's parents named her with two names from India when only one parent was from there. Very intriguing. Also, the time her mother came was not one where loads of Indians came. 

I hope it is not political to say when she was announced as VP, I cried. I have heard of so many that did because we felt seen. This book talks a lot about her mother, she is a brave woman and I am so sad she was not there to see this day. It also talks about her grandparents, particularly grandfather. The book mentions places well known to me. It is very personal in ways I cannot describe. Many politicians do not embrace their identity for whatever reason so when you see one who does especially something that is my own, it brings me to tears. This book had the same effect, brought me to tears so many times because so much of what she said is so relatable and that very rarely happens to me.

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1 hour ago, Dreamergal said:

I will delete parts of this review that later, but for a brief moment I want to put out whatever I wanted to say completely.

Please don't delete anything.  I appreciate your honest and heartfelt thoughts on the book.  

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