Jump to content

Menu

Can I transfer to public school from homeschool in VA?


Recommended Posts

After 6 years of homeschooling, we switched to a private K-8 school last year.  My oldest was set to go to public high school for 9th this fall. They just announced they will only do distance learning this year. Their track record with distance learning is dismal. I am considering homeschooling him for 9th grade. Can I return to public school for 10th in Virginia? How do I best keep track of his credits? Would he need to take a placement test? I want to make sure I don't remove any future options for him.

Thanks for all of your help!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I would talk to your particular school district, but in my district, credits earned during high school from unaccredited schools/ programs (or done at home) would not be counted as credits.  In our district, once you start ninth grade, if you homeschool, you're pretty much committed until graduation.  They would force your kid to take remedial level credit recovery courses and no electives if you went back after homeschooling.  

If you do something like k12 or other accredited program for all the coursework, that would be a different story.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are some links to read through.

One district's policy about how to transfer credits in high school https://www.lcps.org/Page/78848 One of the options is like Terabith said that you use an accredited program.  But it's not the only thing that district accepts.  Other districts set their own decisions.  Check with your local district for policy (as was already stated but I felt like researching too)

general advice from a VA homeschool group about extra record keeping for credits in case you transfer https://vahomeschoolers.org/guide/return-to-school#HSTC

and a different homeschool group that has same info just written differently https://heav.org/blog/2014/11/08/transferring-credits-to-public-school/

and this one to the VA DOE with some chart that might make sense.  http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/student_transfers.shtml It's not making sense to me but I don't live there.  I just wanted to research and share.  Hope it all works out for you.

 

 

Edited by cbollin
Link to post
Share on other sites

We’re in VA and my boys just finished 9th.  We applied to the specialty program we wanted in our county for 9th grade and were accepted.  They decided to continue homeschooling though.  It was a big decision because we were essentially committing to all 4 years at home.  That being said, I do know of one mom who’s child homeschooled for 9th and attened public school in 10th.  It took a whole school year, but they ended up approving their 9th grade work for credit.  They had to turn in textbooks and work though.

Unfortunately, it isn’t easy to do in this state.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's odd, because we were able to get placement accepted based on pretty much mom's word (for math, needing to start with Algebra 2 because they'd done algebra 1 and geometry at home, foreign language, and earth science).  They were pleasant and easy to work with.  But when my kid had a mental health crisis in tenth and I had to pull them out mid year, when I asked about options for returning, even if we were willing to completely redo 10th grade in the future, there was pretty much no option to leave and come back (or, from friends, to enter after completing 9th grade) that didn't involve being sent to the alternative school for credit recovery in remedial classes with no electives.  

I don't know if it's policy or if it's their way of punishing.  I know the state doesn't make it super easy, but the contrast with how breezy it was to register in the first place was stark.  

  • Sad 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Talk to your specific school about what they accept.

They may accept CLEP, then you could teach what you want for most things but teach to the CLEP test and get those credits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m in Virginia, and I agree with everyone else. Everything I have heard is that it’s very difficult to get anything done as a homeschooler accepted for credits here for high school. I agree with going to your specific school because the way the statues are written it’s really up to each school. They can but don’t have to accept credits. 

Have you looked at Virtual Virginia? https://www.virtualvirginia.org/programs/courses/ The courses there are technically through the public school system.My oldest took one course through them and it was fine. It was Computer Science which was perhaps more suited as an online class anyway. You can take courses through Virtual Virginia through the public school, for free. (Schools are limited to how many kids they enroll...it’s mainly designed to offer classes that the school system doesn’t offer. I’m not sure how things are changing this year with everything going virtual anyway.) You can also take courses through Virtual Virginia as a homeschooler, but you have to pay. It’s not an ideal solution but it may be that they would be more likely to accept those credits over typical homeschool credits. And it may be that the courses from teachers who are experienced with online classes may be done better than the distance learning the public schools are offering. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

He took a Virtual Virginia class for Spanish this year in his private school, and it did not go well.  It would count his answer wrong if he added an extra space or made the slightest variation. He hated it. I fear distance learning through the public school will be similar. He really needs the accountability of a classroom to really thrive. This whole thing stinks.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

In general I believe that once one begins 9th grade, one should not change schools. Also, from reading many threads on WTM, it may be impossible for a home schooled student to receive credit in a brick and mortar school, for courses taken in the home school. At the least that would probably require examinations be passed.  Don't plan to switch schools in High School!  The school that issues the diploma is responsible for the education the student received.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I met someone recently who told me that her granddaughter had been alternatively educated outside the country and then moved to my area at 16, where one school system administered some sort of exams and placed her in tenth grade. So it could happen, but you might consider either using an online school with some sort of accreditation, including those offered by the public school or paid for by taxes (not something like the Well Trained Mind Academy), or a private school like Clonlara, which will essentially allow you to complete your homeschooling but will document it so as to qualify your child as a private school student. Either of those would be more like transferring schools than going from homeschooling to school. Some people might also find a private school or a high school/college blend (in some states they are called early colleges or middle colleges) that would accept your homeschool work. (I have spoken to such schools myself so I know they do exist in some places!) Investigate those options. These are the options that will not “force” you to commit to 4 years of homeschooling.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You can test into/ out of classes, but generally they won't give credit towards graduation. You wouldn't have to repeat Geometry, for example, assuming you pass the SOL, but it's not going to count as a year of math towards graduation. I sat in the office once while someone who took off 1 year for cancer was told that none of the homeschool classes would transfer and she had to repeat the year. It's really not too homeschool friendly in VA. 

Edited by Paige
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Paige said:

You can test into/ out of classes, but generally they won't give credit towards graduation. 

This is why it’s so important to find out what the situation is where you are, in any schools or districts you have available and might realistically consider. The options may surprise you, and they certainly will be helpful in making your decision. Don’t assume anything one way or the other.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I do know a local homeschooling family who was able to put their daughter into a Virginia public school in 11th grade and receive credit for the work she did in 9th and 10th grade. The girl had taken a very challenging course load and likely had testing to back up some of the work she had done. This is not the norm, though.

On the other hand, I had a friend years ago whose stepdaughter came from Germany to live with her the summer before 10th grade and they would not accept her 9th grade work for credit. She wound up returning to Germany because she did not want to repeat 9th grade. This is the same school that later accepted the homeschooled student's credit.

It is all dependent on the school. However, I would frankly be wary about counting on anything the school promised ahead of time. It is one thing to check out the situation and see if they would accept credits already earned when you already have a child going into 10th grade and seeing if it will work out. It is another to pull the student to homeschool based on the word of some administrator in the school system saying they will accept the kid back the next year, imo. If it was me, I wouldn't count on it working out unless the school published a statement on how they would treat students who homeschool this year or they had a track record for accepting homeschoolers part way through high school.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...