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Favorite Homeschool Related YouTube videos for mom?


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I have a gillion baskets of laundry to fold today and would like to find something to watch that isn't Netflix. I was hoping for some homeschool centered YouTube recs that aren't simply someone paging through curriculum on camera. I don't mind curriculum run downs after a school year where they explained what the did/didn't like and why, but those are easy to find and I was hoping for something different. I was almost hoping for something conference-y in feel, like the old SWB casual talks she used to give on the WTM channel just answering questions. (I think I've watched all of hers multiple times) 

Are there any channels out there like that?

I found Angela Braniff a while ago and watch her sometimes (only the homeschooling stuff). I watch our boardie Lexi's channel sometimes too. 

I am not in a Julie Bogart place of mind- no BW please, not even the collab with SWB.. 

 I would love something like a seasoned homeschool Mom who does videos- like a Cindy Rollins type if that exists? Any faves you want to share? 

 

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I hope you found something to watch!

(And I'm totally jealous of people being able to watch those videos with interest; I've yet to find one that was at all relevant for me and/or didn't fill me up with envy!)

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1 hour ago, WendyAndMilo said:

I hope you found something to watch!

(And I'm totally jealous of people being able to watch those videos with interest; I've yet to find one that was at all relevant for me and/or didn't fill me up with envy!)

I did not. Nor did the laundry get folded, lol. Apparently there is a market void for thoughtful homeschooling content on YouTube.  

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1 hour ago, mms said:

I am not a vlog fan, but I do watch Bonnie Landry’s channel.

Thanks. I did not know she had a Youtube channel. Going to check it out now. 

I don't see much on Youtube other than curriculum reviews of early elementary school curricula. 

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A recommendation - Elizabeth Foss (now that's a blast from the past) is starting a series on Youtube about homeschooling. Her first video was posted yesterday. It's long. She said something that really resonated with me. Her worst years are when she was undisciplined. I'm paraphrasing her. It's been a very long time since I've seen anything from Elizabeth Foss about homeschooling. 

 

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17 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

A recommendation - Elizabeth Foss (now that's a blast from the past) is starting a series on Youtube about homeschooling. Her first video was posted yesterday. It's long. She said something that really resonated with me. Her worst years are when she was undisciplined. I'm paraphrasing her. It's been a very long time since I've seen anything from Elizabeth Foss about homeschooling. 

 

I haven't ever heard of Elizabeth Foss- I need to look her up. 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
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1 minute ago, OKBud said:

This is difficult to listen to bc of sound quality, but absolutely delightful!

 

I guess you've been sent to tell me I need to go fold laundry now. 😂 Becuase I should, lol. And I use Saxon so this will be nice. 

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Ok, I LOVE John Saxon the person after hearing this interview...but having had Saxon math stuck in front of me when I was homeschooled (poor fit, nothing else was available, no teacher, etc), I have a VERY visceral, nauseous reaction at the thought of it now.  

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Not necessarily youtube, some are but some are just mp3s, but I-huge puffy heart- love listening to Peter Kreeft.  I just relistened to his Till We Have Faces lecture a couple of days ago and am rereading the book.  (In case you don't know the book, it is Lewis's version of the story of Psyche and Cupid.) http://www.peterkreeft.com/audio/16_cslewis-till-we-have-faces/peter-kreeft_till-we-have-faces_.mp3  (If you do a google for Kreeft, you can find all sorts of great talks.)

BTW, Elizabeth Foss is Catholic, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of her.  She started a yahoo Charlotte Mason group back when we were in Brazil, so that would have been in the late 90s.

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2 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Not necessarily youtube, some are but some are just mp3s, but I-huge puffy heart- love listening to Peter Kreeft.  I just relistened to his Till We Have Faces lecture a couple of days ago and am rereading the book.  (In case you don't know the book, it is Lewis's version of the story of Psyche and Cupid.) http://www.peterkreeft.com/audio/16_cslewis-till-we-have-faces/peter-kreeft_till-we-have-faces_.mp3  (If you do a google for Kreeft, you can find all sorts of great talks.)

BTW, Elizabeth Foss is Catholic, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of her.  She started a yahoo Charlotte Mason group back when we were in Brazil, so that would have been in the late 90s.

Till We Have Faces is one of my all-time favorite books so thanks for sharing this!!

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1 hour ago, WendyAndMilo said:

Ok, I LOVE John Saxon the person after hearing this interview...but having had Saxon math stuck in front of me when I was homeschooled (poor fit, nothing else was available, no teacher, etc), I have a VERY visceral, nauseous reaction at the thought of it now.  

Ha!  I had A variety of teachers, and had to do Saxon Math at my high school boarding school and I hated it with a PASSION!  I don’t get why anyone does it with their kids, but to each their own!  

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9 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Not necessarily youtube, some are but some are just mp3s, but I-huge puffy heart- love listening to Peter Kreeft.  I just relistened to his Till We Have Faces lecture a couple of days ago and am rereading the book.  (In case you don't know the book, it is Lewis's version of the story of Psyche and Cupid.) http://www.peterkreeft.com/audio/16_cslewis-till-we-have-faces/peter-kreeft_till-we-have-faces_.mp3  (If you do a google for Kreeft, you can find all sorts of great talks.)

BTW, Elizabeth Foss is Catholic, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of her.  She started a yahoo Charlotte Mason group back when we were in Brazil, so that would have been in the late 90s.

 

Ooh thanks!

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19 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Now I want the Elizabeth Foss Home Learning book and wow is it expensive used. Can someone who follows her on social media or is in the loop maybe let me know when the new version comes out? 

I bought it years ago. I brought it out again after watching her video. It's okay but there isn't that much to it. I wonder if she is going to update it?

It's also very Catholic which some people might find off-putting. 

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9 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

I bought it years ago. I brought it out again after watching her video. It's okay but there isn't that much to it. I wonder if she is going to update it?

It's also very Catholic which some people might find off-putting. 

She said she's hoping to release the update next month, so I guess I'll just keep an eye out on Amazon or her website. I looked for a used copy of the old one and holy cow, they are crazy expensive. 

I almost converted to Catholicism at one point, so that part won't bother me at all. 

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17 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

She said she's hoping to release the update next month, so I guess I'll just keep an eye out on Amazon or her website. I looked for a used copy of the old one and holy cow, they are crazy expensive. 

I almost converted to Catholicism at one point, so that part won't bother me at all. 

I just finished re-reading her book. It was a quick read. Like I wrote above, there isn't that much to it. I would like to read an update now that she has adult children. I'm curious how faithful she was to this method as her kids got older. I believe her oldest was about 11 when she wrote the book. I know she went through a Waldorf phase. Then there was the blow-up with a bunch of other Catholic HSers over Waldorf and she stopped writing about HSing online. I remember a blog post where she wrote about how hurt she was by how she was treated. 

Her book includes a few quotes from Michele Quigley. Will she delete them now that Michele Quigley has left the Catholic church? 

She probably won't write the book I'd like to read, a BTDT journey through HSing that acknowledges both the good and the bad. 

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I appreciated a lot of what she had to say about the family dynamic being as important, or I guess more important than the actually homeschooling itself. The chores and responsibilities and all of that. The first one wasn't really about methodology at all, but life style. I want to go back and watch the series before on the Discipline of Self Care. I hadn't realized she had been on RAR either. I downloaded those episodes but have yet to listen. 

I think I much prefer her to Sally Clarkson as far as homeschoolers in a similar part of life. 

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Every HSer I follow talks about how much they were inspired by Sally Clarkson but I've never read her. 

I liked the first video better than the second video but that's probably because my DD is already past the learning to read phase. 

You should check out Bonnie Landry's videos. She discusses the importance of relationships in HSing. She sounds very Canadian and is sometimes sipping wine during her videos which is adorable. 

 

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1 hour ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

Every HSer I follow talks about how much they were inspired by Sally Clarkson but I've never read her. 

I liked the first video better than the second video but that's probably because my DD is already past the learning to read phase. 

You should check out Bonnie Landry's videos. She discusses the importance of relationships in HSing. She sounds very Canadian and is sometimes sipping wine during her videos which is adorable. 

 

She is next on my list, and awesome on the wine, that'll give me an excuse to sip wine while I watch her! 😂

I tried on Sally Clarkson for years, and I did really appreciate her book with her son- Different, I think it was called. But she has done what so many have done lately and she crossed into politics a bit- or rather maybe lifestyle and politics became intertwined in what she does, and that's where I hit the no thanks button and deleted her podcast. I know a lot of people probably like the "all in" sectionally there, where politics is part of their lifestyle, but to me, my home and homeschool is sacrosanct and I don't need my inspiration to be tainted with the very ugly of American politics I am trying to keep out of my house, you know? So when she went down that path on Twitter and elsewhere I was beyond done. 

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I watched Bonnie Landry's dictation video today (after reading the spelling thread 😄) and I have to say I was more impressed than I thought I'd be! 

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18 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Someone remind me who Elizabeth Foss is? I know the name, but can't place why I know the name. 

She wrote the book Real Learning about 20 years ago. It's out of print now. I think it was one of the early Charlotte Mason HSing books and probably the first one directed towards Catholic homeschoolers. She founded a forum for Catholic homeschoolers. I don't think it exists anymore. She has a blog, In the Heart of my Home

She stopped writing about homeschooling about 10 years ago. You probably remember her name from when she was a big name in the Catholic homeschooling world. 

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37 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

She wrote the book Real Learning about 20 years ago. It's out of print now. I think it was one of the early Charlotte Mason HSing books and probably the first one directed towards Catholic homeschoolers. She founded a forum for Catholic homeschoolers. I don't think it exists anymore. She has a blog, In the Heart of my Home

She stopped writing about homeschooling about 10 years ago. You probably remember her name from when she was a big name in the Catholic homeschooling world. 

Oh, I think I saw videos her speaking at a Catholic homeschool conference!

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On 7/26/2020 at 8:40 PM, 8FillTheHeart said:

Not necessarily youtube, some are but some are just mp3s, but I-huge puffy heart- love listening to Peter Kreeft.  I just relistened to his Till We Have Faces lecture a couple of days ago and am rereading the book.  (In case you don't know the book, it is Lewis's version of the story of Psyche and Cupid.) http://www.peterkreeft.com/audio/16_cslewis-till-we-have-faces/peter-kreeft_till-we-have-faces_.mp3  (If you do a google for Kreeft, you can find all sorts of great talks.)

BTW, Elizabeth Foss is Catholic, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of her.  She started a yahoo Charlotte Mason group back when we were in Brazil, so that would have been in the late 90s.

 

Til We Have Faces had been sitting in my audible basket for a while, finally pulled the trigger based on this.  Finished yesterday and then listened to the Kreeft discussion.  Absolutely fantastic, thanks for sending me down that little rabbit trail.  Have you read Kreeft Christianity for the Modern Pagan?  I think that might be my next place to go from here.  

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5 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

Til We Have Faces had been sitting in my audible basket for a while, finally pulled the trigger based on this.  Finished yesterday and then listened to the Kreeft discussion.  Absolutely fantastic, thanks for sending me down that little rabbit trail.  Have you read Kreeft Christianity for the Modern Pagan?  I think that might be my next place to go from here.  

Yes.  It's about Pascal's wager.  I combine that book with several of his Socrates Meets series and (not his) Great Courses lectures for high school philosophy.  It has been one of my kids' favorite coureses.    We read his Philosophy of Tolkien with our LOTR study. (He spends as much time discussing Lewis in this book as he does Tolkien.  Since we are Lewis fans, it works for us.) He has a great LOTR talk as well.  

Here is an easy list of his free talks. Free Kreeft talks (you can find tons on youtube as well).  Of these, I also really enjoy Lost in the Cosmos where he compares Walker Percy's Lost in the Cosmos to C.S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man.

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1 hour ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Yes.  It's about Pascal's wager.  I combine that book with several of his Socrates Meets series and (not his) Great Courses lectures for high school philosophy.  It has been one of my kids' favorite coureses.    We read his Philosophy of Tolkien with our LOTR study. (He spends as much time discussing Lewis in this book as he does Tolkien.  Since we are Lewis fans, it works for us.) He has a great LOTR talk as well.  

Here is an easy list of his free talks. Free Kreeft talks (you can find tons on youtube as well).  Of these, I also really enjoy Lost in the Cosmos where he compares Walker Percy's Lost in the Cosmos to C.S. Lewis's The Abolition of Man.

 

Would you mind sharing your booklist for your philosophy course?  This is what I have for 8th-9th, but some I haven't read myself yet:

8th

A Little History of Philosophy

Sophie's World

Best Things in Life(Kreeft)

9th

A Little History of Religion

The Universe Next Door

Christianity for Modern Pagans (which I will probably now introduce with Til We Have Faces and Kreeft's lecture, because I like his discussion of Paganism in it and it might be a good lead-in)

Mere Christianity

 

 

I do have a lit of books for 10th-12th, but at that point kiddo will be in post-obligatory gymnase and I don't know what our book life might look like at that point.  

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11 minutes ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 

Would you mind sharing your booklist for your philosophy course?  This is what I have for 8th-9th, but some I haven't read myself yet:

8th

A Little History of Philosophy

Sophie's World

Best Things in Life(Kreeft)

9th

A Little History of Religion

The Universe Next Door

Christianity for Modern Pagans (which I will probably now introduce with Til We Have Faces and Kreeft's lecture, because I like his discussion of Paganism in it and it might be a good lead-in)

Mere Christianity

 

 

I do have a lit of books for 10th-12th, but at that point kiddo will be in post-obligatory gymnase and I don't know what our book life might look like at that point.  

It depends on the student and their future goals bc I have altered it accordingly.  Also, I intertwine a lot of theological perspectives into our philosophy courses bc being grounded in faith and understanding the arguments against it are the reason we study philosophy.

So, for my ds who is in grad school for physics, we took a more science/religion bent.  So, he read Science and Religion: SOme Historical Perspectives along with Kreeft's books and Abolition of Man.  (But, keep in mind that books like Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man (Chesterton), Mere Christianity, as well as encyclicals like Humanae Vitae, Divini Redemptoris, and John Paul II's Address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences (on the theory of evolution) are just part of what we do anyway.)

For my dd we spent more time on the political aspects (communism).

For a good understanding of how philosophy impacts our thinking without our conscious awareness, I recommend GC's The Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History of the 17th and 18th Centuries   The course guidebook for this and other GC philosophy lectures have lots of additional resources listed.  (But Kreeft's philosophy books are by far my favorite bc they are easily accessible to high school students without going way over their heads.  There is a list of them here https://www.peterkreeft.com/books.htm )

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7 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

Have you read Kreeft Christianity for the Modern Pagan?  I think that might be my next place to go from here.  

This is basically selected Pensees (argh, can't figure out the accent on this keyboard) with commentary. See what you think - it is a great book, but I don't know that my 9th grade self would have been able to appreciate what Kreeft and Pascal are up to. Of course, you can assess that for your own kid.

I was going to suggest you just read the Wager, but then I thought about it some more and I'm not sure. I read it in isolation later in high school, and I think it kind of misdirected me about Pascal's project. I did read and enjoy Sophie's World (have you read this one yourself yet? my vague memory of it is that it ends on a pretty radically skeptical note) and Kreeft's Socrates Meets... books around this age. 

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1 hour ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

It depends on the student and their future goals bc I have altered it accordingly.  Also, I intertwine a lot of theological perspectives into our philosophy courses bc being grounded in faith and understanding the arguments against it are the reason we study philosophy.

So, for my ds who is in grad school for physics, we took a more science/religion bent.  So, he read Science and Religion: SOme Historical Perspectives along with Kreeft's books and Abolition of Man.  (But, keep in mind that books like Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man (Chesterton), Mere Christianity, as well as encyclicals like Humanae Vitae, Divini Redemptoris, and John Paul II's Address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences (on the theory of evolution) are just part of what we do anyway.)

For my dd we spent more time on the political aspects (communism).

For a good understanding of how philosophy impacts our thinking without our conscious awareness, I recommend GC's The Birth of the Modern Mind: The Intellectual History of the 17th and 18th Centuries   The course guidebook for this and other GC philosophy lectures have lots of additional resources listed.  (But Kreeft's philosophy books are by far my favorite bc they are easily accessible to high school students without going way over their heads.  There is a list of them here https://www.peterkreeft.com/books.htm )

 

I'm so grateful for your input.  I'm switching out Sophie's World for Philosophy of Tolkien to go with LotR, which we've already read, but want to read again more deeply.  Do you know of a good companion for The Space Trilogy?  

14 minutes ago, LostCove said:

This is basically selected Pensees (argh, can't figure out the accent on this keyboard) with commentary. See what you think - it is a great book, but I don't know that my 9th grade self would have been able to appreciate what Kreeft and Pascal are up to. Of course, you can assess that for your own kid.

I was going to suggest you just read the Wager, but then I thought about it some more and I'm not sure. I read it in isolation later in high school, and I think it kind of misdirected me about Pascal's project. I did read and enjoy Sophie's World (have you read this one yourself yet? my vague memory of it is that it ends on a pretty radically skeptical note) and Kreeft's Socrates Meets... books around this age. 

 

Thank you for mentioning this.  I haven't read it since college, when I was a skeptic anyway.  I decided to go with what is probably a more age-appropriate choice, as I wrote to 8 just above.  

I hate that my own education here is so lacking!

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12 minutes ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

I hate that my own education here is so lacking!

Hey, it's an opportunity for you to learn, too! Exciting! I was trying to think more about the kind of stuff I read in high school. The Apology, the Symposium, the famous excerpts from the Republic. My senior year I read a little bit of Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx - but I don't know that I would do that much modern stuff myself.  Aristotle on friendship would be a great thing for a high schooler to read, I think. Something from St. Augustine's Confessions. Boethius. Aquinas's five proofs for God.

I plan to do things differently than the standard chronological approach, which I think smuggles in certain assumptions, but my oldest is only 12, so I haven't put a lot of time into thinking exactly how, yet. I want to make the Isocratic tradition more prominent (it was totally absent from my education, except in caricature) - so maybe we will read Cicero, Erasmus (he made a very big impact on me when I read him in college), More's Utopia.

For high school theology, my husband wants to do a big study of the Divine Comedy. I also might try to get him to do something with the kids on 20th century virtue ethicists.

Another way to organize it would be by topic or question: What is justice?; What do we owe to authority?; What can we know and how can we know it?;  What is virtue?; How can we be good?; What is man? etc, etc. 

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28 minutes ago, LostCove said:

Hey, it's an opportunity for you to learn, too! Exciting! I was trying to think more about the kind of stuff I read in high school. The Apology, the Symposium, the famous excerpts from the Republic. My senior year I read a little bit of Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx - but I don't know that I would do that much modern stuff myself.  Aristotle on friendship would be a great thing for a high schooler to read, I think. Something from St. Augustine's Confessions. Boethius. Aquinas's five proofs for God.

I plan to do things differently than the standard chronological approach, which I think smuggles in certain assumptions, but my oldest is only 12, so I haven't put a lot of time into thinking exactly how, yet. I want to make the Isocratic tradition more prominent (it was totally absent from my education, except in caricature) - so maybe we will read Cicero, Erasmus (he made a very big impact on me when I read him in college), More's Utopia.

For high school theology, my husband wants to do a big study of the Divine Comedy. I also might try to get him to do something with the kids on 20th century virtue ethicists.

Another way to organize it would be by topic or question: What is justice?; What do we owe to authority?; What can we know and how can we know it?;  What is virtue?; How can we be good?; What is man? etc, etc. 

My kids are little still but this is fun to think about : ) 

When I was in high school (secular), we really only read philosophy for its connection to history and government. So, a sprinkling of Plato, a little bit of Utopia, and also Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau when we did US history in the upper years. I think we read the transcendentalists as well but I'm not sure.

That was a useful way of doing philosophy in a big high school, where you want to be able to study ideas kind of dispassionately. But it's really interesting to read about how many more approaches are open to homeschoolers.

 

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The video that SWB did about why co-ops aren't worth it is my favorite. Every time I think "Maybe I could try a co-op or organizing a homeschool event again! Surely it will work out this time!", I watch the video and come to my senses. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Melisa Nielsen's Waldorf planning video is 12 years old, but never gets dated.

Fold up a large piece of art paper and create a planner for a year. Inexpensive, low tech and KISS: keep it simple stupid.

 

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