Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Frances said:

But what about the lack of physical activity? In regular brick and mortar school are first graders doing that much work with no recess? In my elementary school we had three recesses every day plus PE several times per week. I mean maybe the teachers have the kids up and moving during much of the instructional time. I certainly hope so. 

I think that level of recess, etc is highly unusual in the US. Our schools have one recess, just for younger elementary. Older elementary don't get a recess at many schools. PE varies from daily to a few times a week. Growing up I had zero recess, but daily PE. 

5 hours ago, Terabith said:

Especially since they describe dismissing one row at minute 13, another row at minute 14.....it's at least a five minute process to move everyone around and get them re-settled.  I mean, movement breaks can help, but this doesn't seem like a productive way of doing it for instructional time, nor will it help reduce virus transmission.  

It will actually likely INCREASE spread since instead of one set of students exposed to a positive kid, you have multiple sets of kids exposed to that same positive kid. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Our society needs kids to be in school.  Our economy sure as hell needs kids in school full time.  Many kids need to be in school, for a wide variety of reasons.   But kids in school is only safe

One of our good friends is a family practice physician and they were getting swamped by requests by adults when the mask requirements came out. They got together and unanimously decided their response

From my perspective, because of what they've done, crap upon crap happens. Obviously the pandemic itself was out of everyone's control.  But as we have seen around the world, a population's behav

Posted Images

5 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

If you don’t mind my asking what is your positive rate in your area?  Schools haven’t been a huge driver here other than possibly one in vic.  but then the vic schools have been mostly shut.

 

Our state's positivity rate was 3 percent as of last Wednesday.  I'm in the same general area.  There are at least three colleges in the general area that have had a huge number of positives.  It has calmed down a bit but at least two of them delayed in person classes or changed from in-person to online because of the case numbers.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, JanOH said:

Our state's positivity rate was 3 percent as of last Wednesday.  I'm in the same general area.  There are at least three colleges in the general area that have had a huge number of positives.  It has calmed down a bit but at least two of them delayed in person classes or changed from in-person to online because of the case numbers.

That’s not good about the colleges.  I wondered because most of the guidelines were saying it would be ok to carefully open schools provided positivity was under 5pc I think.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ktgrok said:

I think that level of recess, etc is highly unusual in the US. Our schools have one recess, just for younger elementary. Older elementary don't get a recess at many schools. PE varies from daily to a few times a week. Growing up I had zero recess, but daily PE. 

It will actually likely INCREASE spread since instead of one set of students exposed to a positive kid, you have multiple sets of kids exposed to that same positive kid. 

Even in high school here we had a 20 minute recess and 50 mins to an hour lunch.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Even in high school here we had a 20 minute recess and 50 mins to an hour lunch.

Wow! Mind blown!

Here it is 20 minutes for lunch, no recess, no study hall. (at least, that was the case when I went and my kid went)

  • Like 1
  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Wow! Mind blown!

Here it is 20 minutes for lunch, no recess, no study hall. (at least, that was the case when I went and my kid went)

Yeah, here our middle schools and high schools have 30 minutes for lunch and 4-6 minutes between classes.  No recess, no study hall.  They aren't even designed with any indoor or outdoor spaces for kids to relax and hang out other than the cafeteria and hallways.

Even our elementary schools only have 30 minutes total for lunch and mid-day recess combined and 15 minutes for afternoon recess...and really, during much of the school year here, playing outside requires enough bundling up that just getting dressed and undressed eats up most of that time.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Vermont's colleges are off to a solid start - I was really nervous about students flooding back to UVM, but so far so good. 0.09% positivity rate!

https://vtdigger.org/2020/09/11/officials-tout-success-of-college-reopening-with-38-student-cases/

And an interesting article on our health commisioner: https://vtdigger.org/2020/09/13/health-commissioner-mark-levine-reluctantly-fills-the-spotlight/

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I think that level of recess, etc is highly unusual in the US. Our schools have one recess, just for younger elementary. Older elementary don't get a recess at many schools. PE varies from daily to a few times a week. Growing up I had zero recess, but daily PE. 

It will actually likely INCREASE spread since instead of one set of students exposed to a positive kid, you have multiple sets of kids exposed to that same positive kid. 

 

My kids' school had two recesses everyday through 2nd grade. 1 recess in 3-5th grade (but the teachers often had a "snack break" everyday that was taken outside as well).  PE three times a week in 3rd-5th. I forget how often in the first few grades.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, wendyroo said:

Yeah, here our middle schools and high schools have 30 minutes for lunch and 4-6 minutes between classes.  No recess, no study hall.  They aren't even designed with any indoor or outdoor spaces for kids to relax and hang out other than the cafeteria and hallways.

Even our elementary schools only have 30 minutes total for lunch and mid-day recess combined and 15 minutes for afternoon recess...and really, during much of the school year here, playing outside requires enough bundling up that just getting dressed and undressed eats up most of that time.

My middle school has 30 minutes for lunch and 5 minute passing periods. No lunch or recess. Study hall went away this year, but that was due to moving to block schedule and not COVID. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

https://m.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/michigan-state-students-asked-quarantine-coronavirus_n_5f5e520bc5b67602f606af8a?ri18n=true

 

Michigan State University has requested that all of its local students self-quarantine for two weeks due to “an alarming surge” in COVID-19 cases, the school said Saturday.

The request follows at least 342 confirmed cases of the virus being linked back to the university since Aug. 24, when students began returning to the campus in East Lansing ahead of the start of the fall semester, the university and the local health department said”

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, square_25 said:

That’s a pretty decent positivity rate! 

3 colleges out of how many, do you know? I do expect colleges to have giant outbreaks.

Oh, we have a ton of colleges in our area.  I wouldn't even want to hazard a guess.  I think there are five within 15 miles of me.  The Christian college near us is doing great for now, 5 cases at the moment.  My dh thinks the major difference at this point is the partying  atmosphere.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Days before the High Holy Days begin, Israel becomes the first nation to beck into national lockdown due to  a spike in cases.  From BBC (or choose any other major outlet)

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-54134869

Quote

Israel is to impose a new national lockdown to contain the spread of coronavirus - with tough restrictions coming into effect on Jewish new year.

The country's second lockdown begins on Friday and lasts at least three weeks.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the measures would "exact a heavy price on us all", but the country faced a surge with 4,000 new daily infections...The country has seen 1,108 deaths from Covid-19 and more than 153,000 confirmed infections, according to a global tally kept by US university Johns Hopkins...

The measures he announced will be the most extensive imposed in Israel since the first lockdown, which ran from late March until early May, and include:

  • No more than 10 people can meet indoors while groups of 20 are allowed outdoors
  • Schools and shopping centres will close, and Israelis must stay within 500 metres of their homes with the exception of travelling to workplaces
  • Non-governmental offices and businesses can stay open but must not accept customers
  • However supermarkets and pharmacies can remain open to the public.

Mr Netanyahu acknowledged the disruption the lockdown would cause to Jewish communities celebrating religious holidays that normally see families come together.
"This is not the kind of holiday we are used to. And we certainly won't be able to celebrate with our extended families," he said.

The restrictions on indoor gatherings will severely impact prayers in synagogues.

 

An ultra-orthodox minister has resigned in protest of the restrictions on communal religious worship.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter’s high school has a 50 minute lunch period, and they have 10 minutes between classes. The school told the kids to go outside and spend as much of that time outdoors before heading to their next class.  Block scheduling- 4 classes a day.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/12/2020 at 11:58 PM, Frances said:

What does the color of your county have to do with it?

Red meaning "very high exposure and spread" of Covid 19.  I would think being in a "red" county, a person (who is not hiding from others) would have some connection with more than one person who tested positive for Covid throughout 2020.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well we finished week 1 of high school at home.  Clearly the teachers are taking this very seriously, and it seems my kids are as well.  They have periods 1-4 (plus "lunch") on Tues/Thurs, periods 5-8 (plus "lunch") on Wed/Fri, and Monday is for independent study.  Each class period is 50 minutes long, with the first class starting at 9:30 and the last one ending at 2:05.  (Time is available in the early morning & mid-afternoon for individual intervention / enrichment if the teacher schedules it.) 

My kids generally have a lot of unassigned time during the "school day."  They each only have 6 classes, because (a) if school is in-person, lunch takes a class period, and (b) their foreign language electives were nixed due to scheduling issues.  So my kids have an average of about 2 hours per day for lunch & study, or roughly 45% of the "school day."  I wish I could have signed them up for more classes rather than have all this unassigned time.  They are not using it wisely.

So far it has been kind of hard for my kids to get things done.  They have to learn new technologies on the spot, taught by someone over a screen who doesn't know them and probably isn't an expert in the tech themselves.  I can't offer much, because I have no experience with Chromebooks nor any of the tech they are using, and I am supposed to be working when they're in class.  One of my kids ticked off a teacher by accidentally editing the master slide of a group PowerPoint presentation.  The teacher told the class "someone thought she was being funny ... we know who it was ...."  So it's been kinda stressful, but hopefully the second week will be better.

If our county stays "orange," the kids should only have 2 more weeks of all-virtual learning, but then they only go back 2 days a week, until who knows when.  The other 3 days will be the same as now, I guess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SKL said:

Red meaning "very high exposure and spread" of Covid 19.  I would think being in a "red" county, a person (who is not hiding from others) would have some connection with more than one person who tested positive for Covid throughout 2020.

Got it. I thought you were talking political colors, as my state doesn’t use colors to denote counties. Just due to population density and demographics, I guess my county would be one of the highest in my state, although my state has done very well compared to most others. I think we rank in the bottom five for cases per capita. As an introvert, I have a relatively small friend/acquaintance group, but I know several people who have had it. The first was a school teacher way back at the beginning of all this.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We finished week 1 of online school, too, and, though I was preparing to be disappointed, it was actually pretty good. The teachers that matter haven't lowered expectations, so, unlike in spring, I think DS is going to have to work his tail off. Math is going at a slower pace, due to what was omitted last spring, but DS is doing AoPS online concurrently. It'll be OK. His PE teacher gives a list of activities they can do and talks with them at the start of each class about making activity a priority when working from home. That motivated DS to find something active to do during his 20-30 minutes of passing periods each day. I think it is actually more useful long term than what they do in person. DS chose to bike 12 miles for PE one time last week! Also, his math enrichment that he used to do at a nearby college started back up via Zoom and he is happy again. 🙂 If Spanish ends up being a drag, I'll have him continue weekly or EOW lessons with his iTalki tutor, but it is too soon to tell.

The only problem is going to be finding time for math research since the school got its rear in gear. Last year he finished his math research project during the teachers' strike!

Emily

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, JanOH said:

Oh, we have a ton of colleges in our area.  I wouldn't even want to hazard a guess.  I think there are five within 15 miles of me.  The Christian college near us is doing great for now, 5 cases at the moment.  My dh thinks the major difference at this point is the partying  atmosphere.

There is a school mentioned in the big COVID thread for having COVID+ students partying. It's west of us a bit but with a branch in the next town over, and a lot of the students from main campus do shop in our area. Anyway, when I tried to google something about the school, one of the suggested searches was whether or not this was a party school. The answer is that it's one of the top three in the country! 

I am glad to hear that other non-party schools are doing quite a lot better. 

Local high schools are a mix of reopening plans, and at least one has been pretty transparent about cases and proactive about prevention and mitigation. Another one sounds like it's not doing as well. Others are just not open or are private schools that likely won't be saying much publicly if they don't have to.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://m.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/michigan-state-students-asked-quarantine-coronavirus_n_5f5e520bc5b67602f606af8a?ri18n=true

 

Michigan State University has requested that all of its local students self-quarantine for two weeks due to “an alarming surge” in COVID-19 cases, the school said Saturday.

The request follows at least 342 confirmed cases of the virus being linked back to the university since Aug. 24, when students began returning to the campus in East Lansing ahead of the start of the fall semester, the university and the local health department said”

 

 

I didn’t read this particular article, but I read the article in the Detroit Free Press yesterday and I think I have a different definition of the word quarantine.  Michigan State says that kids are supposed to isolate except for going to in person class or labs (I thought they were all online anyway), go to work, get food, etc, etc.  What exactly is the point of a quarantine if you are still going to work or school?

I believe the cases must be due to off campus activities and housing because Michigan State made a big deal about going online and telling students not to come back to campus.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Pam in CT said:

Days before the High Holy Days begin, Israel becomes the first nation to beck into national lockdown due to  a spike in cases.  From BBC (or choose any other major outlet)

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-54134869

An ultra-orthodox minister has resigned in protest of the restrictions on communal religious worship.

Not exactly.  Litzman resigned because he claimed the Corona Czar could have started this earlier and stopped this process happening over the High Holidays.  I'm not really sure that this is even realistic as this time of year is like Xmas and Thanksgiving all wrapped up in a three week period, i.e., family visiting, worship services etc.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

So our county has been doing pretty well--most days we see 0, 1, or 2 cases. A bad day is 4. College students started moving in yesterday (which continues through Tuesday I think?). They are rapid tested when they arrive and....27 cases today (yesterday's testing). Our K-12 schools have no chance of in-person this year (have to have <9 cases/week in county for 3 weeks running). But so glad all the college kids can live here and party here for their 95% online classes. Grrrr.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

So our county has been doing pretty well--most days we see 0, 1, or 2 cases. A bad day is 4. College students started moving in yesterday (which continues through Tuesday I think?). They are rapid tested when they arrive and....27 cases today (yesterday's testing). Our K-12 schools have no chance of in-person this year (have to have <9 cases/week in county for 3 weeks running). But so glad all the college kids can live here and party here for their 95% online classes. Grrrr.

 

Current State rule: 10 cases or under per week per 100,000 population for 3 weeks in a row for 4th to 12th.   30 cases or under per 100,000 population for 3 weeks for K-3. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Full time in person school has been going for 1 month here.

The high school has 1600 or so students+ staff, there are 6 cases. There is no mask mandate, although they are encouraged and students have been told that they are less likely to have to do quarantine if within range of an COVID+ person. Teachers will have to wear masks starting Tuesday.

The Jr. High has 2 cases with 800 or so students. There are none at the K center, 1 think only one elementary (1-3rd) has a case. The middle school (4-6) has a couple. 

My son is at the high school and wears a mask except to eat. I don't think my daughter does, she is just starting school and masking isn't popular among students, makes it hard for kids at that age to go against the grain especially as she is already different coming from homeschool.

They keep sending out surveys about what parents think about masking, IMO it shouldn't be about opinions but facts but what do I know. 

I am pleasantly surprised it has gone as well as it has considering they are effectively doing nothing.

They had a virtual practice day at the jr. high, just in case, but none at the highschool. However, the rumor among the teachers is they will have paperwork packets not online school. I hope that it is just papers and not a bunch of zoom meetings, then dd wake whenever she wants and do school when and wherever. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ali in OR said:

So our county has been doing pretty well--most days we see 0, 1, or 2 cases. A bad day is 4. College students started moving in yesterday (which continues through Tuesday I think?). They are rapid tested when they arrive and....27 cases today (yesterday's testing). Our K-12 schools have no chance of in-person this year (have to have <9 cases/week in county for 3 weeks running). But so glad all the college kids can live here and party here for their 95% online classes. Grrrr.

Yep! Our local schools are allowing parents to choose either all virtual or hybrid. The possibility of going back full time this year seems small because it's based on our state's county by county color rating and takes into account neighboring counties. The college students arrived a few weeks ago and our county just went into high risk level and it's being traced to off campus parties.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am really impressed with how well the kids are doing. Not just at my center, but according to my teaching friends. For the most part, AT SCHOOL, the kids are masking and keeping social distance, and are glad to be on campus. Most of our elementary/middle schools are either full time in person or full time virtual, while high schools are hybrid. We really didn't see the expected spike two weeks after schools opened, although we definitely got one for Labor Day (Schools open in early August here). 

 

Colleges are another story. The state U just suspended their football season after a single non-conference game led to 39 cases among the team and staff.  I get the distinct impression that the students are partying MORE than usual, not less, in absence of  the more formal start of year parties and gatherings, like football tailgating, rush week, and every single campus organization doing some sort of get together. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

In Texas, the public schools have to report the number of cases to the state and they maintain a dashboard that updates once a week. Cases still sound low (995 students - over a 1,000,000 estimated students (not sure if they are all in-person classes or not) and 792 staff out of slightly over 800,000 - side note - that seems like a very high staff/student ratio).  (Note - these numbers are for public schools - not colleges)

However, one of the local state colleges -
0 cases the week before school starts (kids moving in)
0 cases the first week of classes
1 case the second week of classes
4 cases the third week of classes
26 cases the fourth week of classes - with 42 cases still pending. Positivity ratio for this week is currently at 16%.)

Many of the kids are upset. There is no info about which dorm (or off campus) for any of these positives. And mostly they have been good about masking in campus buildings (required)

Locally off campus, fewer people are wearing masks (although there is still an Executive order to do so). 

ETA: The school population is slightly over 6,000 attending at least one in-person class/working there/etc. 

There is also a local private religious university, but they have not published any of their numbers. 


 

Edited by Bambam
Make it clear some numbers are ISDs not colleges
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Local schools lasted 3 days before each had a child test positive. When they decided to open cases were almost non existent and it made sense, but now there is a large cluster traced back to a local church not following the guidelines, and cases have skyrocketed.

  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The other district in our county just voted to start hybrid school Oct 12th.  If we under 75 per 100K for the two weeks beforehand  which we should be based on projections.  Our district has a zooming meeting this week to discuss opening hybrid.  

The health district wrote a letter backing the plan but their were a lot of ifs.  If all safety procedures are followed if all supplies are available, etc than it re-opening schools as planned shouldn't cause a spike.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2020 at 8:13 AM, Ausmumof3 said:

Even in high school here we had a 20 minute recess and 50 mins to an hour lunch.

That's what we had in suburban California. Oh, just checked the website and now it is 15 min for "brunch" at 50 for lunch.

Emily

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bambam said:

In Texas, the schools have to report the number of cases to the state and they maintain a dashboard that updates once a week. Cases still sound low (995 students - over a 1,000,000 estimated students (not sure if they are all in-person classes or not) and 792 staff out of slightly over 800,000 - side note - that seems like a very high staff/student ratio). 

However, one of the local state schools -
0 cases the week before school starts (kids moving in)
0 cases the first week of classes
1 case the second week of classes
4 cases the third week of classes
26 cases the fourth week of classes - with 42 cases still pending. Positivity ratio for this week is currently at 16%.)

Many of the kids are upset. There is no info about which dorm (or off campus) for any of these positives. And mostly they have been good about masking in campus buildings (required)

Locally off campus, fewer people are wearing masks (although there is still an Executive order to do so). 

ETA: The school population is slightly over 6,000 attending at least one in-person class/working there/etc. 

There is also a local private religious university, but they have not published any of their numbers. 


 

Are all of these numbers for colleges and universities in Texas?  Baylor has had over 900 positive cases since 8/1--other universities are similar, so there has to be more than 995 of the over 1,000,000 college and university students who have tested positive in Texas.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

Are all of these numbers for colleges and universities in Texas?  Baylor has had over 900 positive cases since 8/1--other universities are similar, so there has to be more than 995 of the over 1,000,000 college and university students who have tested positive in Texas.  

The NYT College tracker says there are 8,543 positives at the Texas colleges they're tracking.  This has to mean positives since early August - which would match TAMU's tracking with its NYT record.

 

A&M's dashboard says it.currently has about 300 active cases, with 64k students and 10k faculty and staff.

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

Are all of these numbers for colleges and universities in Texas?  Baylor has had over 900 positive cases since 8/1--other universities are similar, so there has to be more than 995 of the over 1,000,000 college and university students who have tested positive in Texas.  

I'm sorry - I wasn't clear - those numbers are for public schools - not universities.

As for that local university, that had been doing extremely well compared to the others. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My school district just cut back the hours required to be online. It is the same district that had those schedules I posted up thread. K-2 is 9:1130 now instead of until 1:30. Grades 2-5   also cut back with core classes being scheduled as a block at the beginning of the day. It took a couple of week but they have some relieved parents. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...