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4 minutes ago, Bagels McGruffikin said:

Actually the transmission risks among teachers look pretty good, similar to other service industries with PPE. That’s in the article too.

Transmission rates where? So far nowhere has tried to open schools with the kind of numbers we have in much of the US, so any existing data on teacher transmission rates wouldn't mean much when it comes to opening schools in such areas. And here schools are opening with 2 cloth masks provided to teachers (which is not considered PPE by most definitions) and no mask requirements for students. 

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Our society needs kids to be in school.  Our economy sure as hell needs kids in school full time.  Many kids need to be in school, for a wide variety of reasons.   But kids in school is only safe

From my perspective, because of what they've done, crap upon crap happens. Obviously the pandemic itself was out of everyone's control.  But as we have seen around the world, a population's behav

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1 hour ago, square_25 said:

I also don't really understand the point of the risk assessment thing. Yeah, you're right -- my kids are extremely unlikely to die from COVID-19, even if they catch it. They are probably even very unlikely to get hospitalized. However, I have no idea what the long-term prognosis for kids who have had it is (and the Kawasaki-like disease was not inspiring me with confidence that there are no long-term effects at all.) 

Furthermore, if my kids get it, they are likely to pass it on to me. If they pass it on to me, I'm not that unlikely to be hospitalized or to suffer long-term effects. Same for my husband. I don't think it's some sort of insane overly cautious risk assessment to decide that I do not want this. 

Don’t want it, and can’t afford it! The possibility of long term health effects concerns me. A boatload of medical bills concerns me almost as much. 

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3 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

We have been having drive in movies in large parking lots mostly where there were entertainment events earlier.

Ah maybe their is some plan in the works to do the movies in the park but Drive in.  Since these guidlines are specific to our health district it seemed a little weird.

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I sent a long list of questions to our school, and they kindly wrote out answers to each one. I don't necessarily like all of the answers, but at least I have more information now.

They had only given a one-line statement in the opening plan regarding what they will do when cases of Covid occur in the school community -- follow the health department's guidance. I posed a bunch of questions about that, and found out that the school is not making their own plans for what to do when there are cases in the school. They will let the health department make the decisions about who to notify and/or quarantine. The health department has told the school that they will not automatically consider every student within a classroom to be a contact, if someone in the classroom ends up positive.

On the one hand, it seems appropriate for the school administration to defer to the health department for medical decisions, and it lets the school focus on working through the academic issues. On the other hand, it seems like passing the buck, and it will mean that parents can't press the school for info about what is happening in the classrooms with the virus, because they will be referred to the health department.

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I got the school's message today. Interestingly, yesterday, we received an email from the school's athletic director saying that a case has been identified that affects the cheerleaders and this weekend's try-outs (DD15 is trying out and has been going to the practices). They will make the decision today whether to cancel try-outs or not. The health department will notify people individually if they are considered a close contact.

DD15 saw a social media post from one of her friends, saying that she was tested this morning. I'm hoping that DD15 is not found to have been a close contact.

So I guess we are getting a little glimpse into what it might be like during the school year to be in a group or class that has an infected individual.

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Our small rural Midwestern school started their third week of summer school this week. They made it 13 days before having to quarantine a classroom of elementary students. They have been using the students must stay in one room approach with no specials and having designated adults take individual students to the bathroom when needed. The teachers don't get breaks, and they monitor their own students at recess and lunch. Desks are two feet apart. Masks are optional. The quarantined teacher and students cannot return to the school for two weeks. This was actually the second elementary student to test positive. I don't know why they didn't end up quarantining the other class.

ETA: For what it's worth, our county has had only 36 confirmed cases.

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I don't see how we can say kids don't get it at the same rate at this point.  We don't have enough information since most kids haven't been in their usual group programs, and we're seeing an awful lot of outbreaks lately in kids and teens.  I'm not willing to be complacent and say kids don't get it that often or that badly.  Not yet at least.

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So, another orange county, FL update...it is looking like they are going to try to get around the state executive order. When the county health department refused to give guidance they formed their own medical advisory committee. The school board does not want to reopen, so I'm guessing what happens is the advisory board says to stay closed, and they use that as the "guidance from local health officials" that the mandate requires. 

But that means even shorter notice. School is supposed to start in person classes in 3 weeks. 

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I found out today, via someone who works there, that the hospital in my dc’s college town is completely overwhelmed. They’re having to send people elsewhere which ends up being a bit of a distance away. I’m not seeing this on the news though and the plans to return next month are still on. 

I’m glad we had already decided youngest wouldn’t be in a dorm and oldest has agreed to stay here instead of his apartment if numbers are still bad there. I fear it’s just going to be a huge mess.

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3 minutes ago, Joker said:

I found out today, via someone who works there, that the hospital in my dc’s college town is completely overwhelmed. They’re having to send people elsewhere which ends up being a bit of a distance away. I’m not seeing this on the news though and the plans to return next month are still on. 

I’m glad we had already decided youngest wouldn’t be in a dorm and oldest has agreed to stay here instead of his apartment if numbers are still bad there. I fear it’s just going to be a huge mess.

Yup. Hospitals are being silenced in some areas. Our governor keeps saying Florida is fine regarding hospitals. That is not what the employees say. 

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2 hours ago, pitterpatter said:

Our small rural Midwestern school started their third week of summer school this week. They made it 13 days before having to quarantine a classroom of elementary students. They have been using the students must stay in one room approach with no specials and having designated adults take individual students to the bathroom when needed. The teachers don't get breaks, and they monitor their own students at recess and lunch. Desks are two feet apart. Masks are optional. The quarantined teacher and students cannot return to the school for two weeks. This was actually the second elementary student to test positive. I don't know why they didn't end up quarantining the other class.

ETA: For what it's worth, our county has had only 36 confirmed cases.

Oh gosh! That's exactly what I'm afraid of. Our county has had fewer than 50 cases total, too. Just goes to show that low case numbers don't mean a whole lot. 

Is there a newspaper article about this? If you would feel comfortable PMing me, I would like to share this info with my superintendent.

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This just happened today. I will let you know if a newspaper article or health department notice or something else is published.

7 minutes ago, Kanin said:

Oh gosh! That's exactly what I'm afraid of. Our county has had fewer than 50 cases total, too. Just goes to show that low case numbers don't mean a whole lot. 

Is there a newspaper article about this? If you would feel comfortable PMing me, I would like to share this info with my superintendent.

 

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2 minutes ago, pitterpatter said:

This just happened today. I will let you know if a newspaper article or health department notice or something else is published.

 

Thank you!

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2 hours ago, Storygirl said:

I got the school's message today. Interestingly, yesterday, we received an email from the school's athletic director saying that a case has been identified that affects the cheerleaders and this weekend's try-outs (DD15 is trying out and has been going to the practices). They will make the decision today whether to cancel try-outs or not. The health department will notify people individually if they are considered a close contact.

DD15 saw a social media post from one of her friends, saying that she was tested this morning. I'm hoping that DD15 is not found to have been a close contact.

So I guess we are getting a little glimpse into what it might be like during the school year to be in a group or class that has an infected individual.

 

I'm sorry. This is why DD elected to sit out this season and she was a shoe-in for Varsity. There's just no way to prevent close contact while stunting and without stunting or yelling there is no cheer.

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1 hour ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I'm sorry. This is why DD elected to sit out this season and she was a shoe-in for Varsity. There's just no way to prevent close contact while stunting and without stunting or yelling there is no cheer.

I'm not even sure there will be a chance to cheer. Will there be football? Will there be basketball? Who knows? I'm sorry your daughter is missing out on varsity this year. I am not thrilled with DD doing cheer this year, either, and if the cheer season ends up not happening, I'll be okay with it. Ultimately, DD15 will, too, I think, even though this would have been her first year.

So far, we haven't been contacted by the health department, so I'm thinking DD was not deemed a close contact.

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And...now our Governor is claiming that the decision to open schools or not was always up to the local districts. Of COURSE they can make up their own minds! Except, the commissioner that made the excecutive order has said over and over that parents HAVE to be able to send their kids to school  in person five days a week, period. That all districts MUST offer that choice. 

So, um, no, Governor, that decision has NOT always been up to the local schools, and you know it. You are just realizing your approval rating is tanking, and trying to scramble. 

 

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A middle school in my state started today and had a student attend half the classes before they were notified he was positive. It sounds like he must have had a test but started school anyway and then the health department notified them. So, a huge part of the problem is going to be counting on people being honest and doing the right thing. It didn’t happen for this school. 🙃

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7 hours ago, pitterpatter said:

Our small rural Midwestern school started their third week of summer school this week. They made it 13 days before having to quarantine a classroom of elementary students. They have been using the students must stay in one room approach with no specials and having designated adults take individual students to the bathroom when needed. The teachers don't get breaks, and they monitor their own students at recess and lunch. Desks are two feet apart. Masks are optional. The quarantined teacher and students cannot return to the school for two weeks. This was actually the second elementary student to test positive. I don't know why they didn't end up quarantining the other class.

ETA: For what it's worth, our county has had only 36 confirmed cases.

It is stories like this that make me assume there wont be in-person school until a vaccine or herd immunity.

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Long thread, and I don't know if somebody has posted this yet: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds

If you'd rather read the study itself instead of the article, click here.

This is a small study and should not be overstated. (Please click through to the NYTimes article for a full list of caveats.) However, anybody here who is considering sending their kid to school or extracurriculars should be aware in case they need to re-evaluate based on this information.

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12 hours ago, square_25 said:

Furthermore, if my kids get it, they are likely to pass it on to me. If they pass it on to me, I'm not that unlikely to be hospitalized or to suffer long-term effects. Same for my husband. I don't think it's some sort of insane overly cautious risk assessment to decide that I do not want this. 

 

11 hours ago, Bagels McGruffikin said:

Children. The risk is specifically about children, and scaling risk for the actual danger of transmission and death of the disease in a given age range does indeed matter when we are talking about school. 

Sometimes I feel like we’re talking past each other. I think the majority of people are not hugely worried about their child becoming seriously ill or dying from Covid19. There is certainly the concern about what unknown longterm ramifications there might be in kids given the diffuse long term effects we are seeing in many adults, but I think most people’s primary concern with kids in school are all those adults the kids will spread it to. Close to half the adult population in this country falls into one of the higher risk categories. I expect my youngest would likely be fine if she caught it, but I also know it’s likely that I would catch it from her and there’s a much higher risk than I am comfortable with that I would end up hospitalized, or worse. I believe this is the biggest concern with exposing so many kids to the virus, which makes the stats comparing death rates in kids not the main info that will put people at ease because most people already know kids tend to do well with it and that’s not their main worry. 
 

I’ve been really hoping to find that very young children do not pass it on to others, so that I could let my youngest play with other kids and go to in person therapy. Unfortunately, the last week or two have made that look more and more unlikely ☹️  

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I’m frustrated because I intended to watch the zoom school board meeting last night, but I was in a Benadryl haze.  No news outlets reporting yet, but a friend posted a screen shot outlining once a week in-school, on a 1-hour delay schedule. 4 separate groups, split alphabetically.

It does say “sample plan” on top.

I don’t really know what 1 day a week is supposed to accomplish except maybe for getting some of the proposed money that only goes to schools physically opening up.

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Oh, I’ve been meaning to mention that our summer sports workouts/practices have been deemed optional, and that parents have to sign a waiver of liability for anything COVID related for their kids to participate.  Just thought that was interesting.

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4 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Probably allowing the teachers to at least meet the kids to build relationships?

It doesn’t solve the childcare problem, of course.

I guess, maybe. I’m trying to figure out what that might look like if the state makes me send my niece and nephew. The usual 6.5 hour day would be 5.5 hours. There are no hints as to whether special services would be provided online or during their 1 day/week. Not sure how lunch is to be handled. It doesn’t leave a whole lot of time.

Then again, I’m probably ridiculous, because my kids seem to connect to coop teachers just fine with 1 hour classes once a week, lol. But I’m not electing to do that this year  because I’m not comfortable with kids gathering, even with smaller groups once a week, so that’s probably steering my reaction.

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Well, our local schools released possible schedules for this fall/year. There are 4 options. 1 is basically school as normal, with distancing/masking as possible and some extra cleaning.  Options 2 is 4 days a week for all with slightly more stringent distancing/masking/cleaning stuff. Option 3 is the same as option 2 for k-8, but with HS split into A/B days. Of course, option 4 is the ever popular all virtual learning.

I am just...(confused? I don't know the right word)...that they aren't planning for at least one A/B type schedule for k-8. I feel as though they may come to regret that.

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16 hours ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I'm sorry. This is why DD elected to sit out this season and she was a shoe-in for Varsity. There's just no way to prevent close contact while stunting and without stunting or yelling there is no cheer.

In my state, cheer is not allowed to stunt yet, including club cheer. DD didn’t want to go back, and looking at what they’re doing, I am glad-tumbling isn’t recommended for her to avoid restarting her knee issues, so she would have nothing to do, since practice right now is everyone tumbling on their own strip of mat, with masks. On the plus side, the standing tumbling is looking great :).  

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2 hours ago, barnwife said:

Well, our local schools released possible schedules for this fall/year. There are 4 options. 1 is basically school as normal, with distancing/masking as possible and some extra cleaning.  Options 2 is 4 days a week for all with slightly more stringent distancing/masking/cleaning stuff. Option 3 is the same as option 2 for k-8, but with HS split into A/B days. Of course, option 4 is the ever popular all virtual learning.

I am just...(confused? I don't know the right word)...that they aren't planning for at least one A/B type schedule for k-8. I feel as though they may come to regret that.

I've heard from both our district and a neighboring one that the reason they did not choose a hybrid A/B option is that they felt that on the days off, too many kids would be going to too many different babysitters/daycares, etc. and thereby increasing their potential exposure. They felt that exposure possibilities would be lower if they kids were consistently in the same environment.

I see their point, but I don't know if they are right. All of my own kids are high school and above, so the daycare issue doesn't apply to me, and I feel my high schoolers would be safer with fewer days at school per week. But my school has five days per week in person for those who didn't select the virtual option, even for high schoolers.

1 hour ago, Danae said:

Minnesota released the statewide school plan yesterday. It’s five-tiered based on active cases in the county, moving from all in-person to elementary in-person, secondary hybrid to all hybrid to elementary hybrid, secondary distance learning, to all distance learning. 
 

Given the goal of in-person as much as possible and prioritizing younger kids I think it’s a good plan.  I’m not sure, however, at what point the advantages of in-person as much as possible are outweighed by the disadvantages of waiting to find out every week whether school the next week will be in person five days, two days, or not at all. I suspect that districts in counties that are hovering on the line between two levels will decide to stay at the more restrictive level rather than switching back and forth from week to week.

My school addressed this when answering some email questions that I sent and said that they didn't want to flip flop every week from closure to being open. Our state is not requiring schools to base their opening decisions on active cases in the state or county, but some districts are doing that. Ours is not. They said they would shut down for a couple of weeks, if they ever need to, but they don't want to be switching back and forth constantly.

 

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4 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

I don’t really know what 1 day a week is supposed to accomplish except maybe for getting some of the proposed money that only goes to schools physically opening up.

I work with high schoolers as an educational assistant helping with math. This last spring I was wishing we had even just 1 day a week to touch base with students. We had maybe half of our students doing nothing or almost nothing. With one day a week, we could show them how to use the technology if that was a stumbling block, check their skills, do some tutoring, explain stuff in person they're not getting, and have them take quizzes in person (it's amazing how our students who never scored over 60% in person could suddenly ace everything online). Starting with a new set of kids we've never even met, one day a week would help to build relationships and connect with them.

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15 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

I work with high schoolers as an educational assistant helping with math. This last spring I was wishing we had even just 1 day a week to touch base with students. We had maybe half of our students doing nothing or almost nothing. With one day a week, we could show them how to use the technology if that was a stumbling block, check their skills, do some tutoring, explain stuff in person they're not getting, and have them take quizzes in person (it's amazing how our students who never scored over 60% in person could suddenly ace everything online). Starting with a new set of kids we've never even met, one day a week would help to build relationships and connect with them.

I agree with this. I have a high schooler with a significant IEP, and meeting with his teachers once a week would be much better than never meeting with them. Last spring, his math intervention teacher sometimes scheduled Google Meets to work with him individually, but mainly DH and I had to function as his intervention teachers during that time.

Even for my kids who don't have intervention needs, seeing their teachers once a week would have improved the remote learning experience. I'm guessing that I was more actively involved with my teens' remote learning last spring than many parents. I set a school start time for each day, made sure they knew what to work on and were keeping up with their deadlines, and helped them with work when they needed it. I read Animal Farm with my IEP son and discussed it with him. I scribed some things for one of my dyslexic daughter's classes.

And my kids were older; younger kids could use even more help. Though high schoolers may be more likely to slack off if no one is holding them accountable. Checking in with a teacher once a week would have made things easier for ME, because I was standing in and providing the support and accountability. For kids whose parents can't help them, once a week meetings would make remote learning work better for the students, in my opinion.

One of the reasons that we didn't choose the virtual option for my kids for this upcoming year is that even as high schoolers, it's not feasible for them to self-teach via an online platform. They need actual instruction and interaction with a teacher, and my teens don't want that teacher to be me (there are reasons that we no longer homeschool). We actually made it through the remote learning in the spring better than I anticipated, but none of us want to have an entire school year like that.

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15 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

I work with high schoolers as an educational assistant helping with math. This last spring I was wishing we had even just 1 day a week to touch base with students. We had maybe half of our students doing nothing or almost nothing. With one day a week, we could show them how to use the technology if that was a stumbling block, check their skills, do some tutoring, explain stuff in person they're not getting, and have them take quizzes in person (it's amazing how our students who never scored over 60% in person could suddenly ace everything online). Starting with a new set of kids we've never even met, one day a week would help to build relationships and connect with them.

 

I totally agree!  In fact, I think even one day FTF every other week could make a big difference .   And would greatly lessen physical  population density in buildings. 

I wonder if I can do a revision of survey with that idea on it. 

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2 minutes ago, kokotg said:

interactive map that estimates how many cases of covid will be in schools of various sizes on the first day of class. Not encouraging for many of us: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/07/31/us/coronavirus-school-reopening-risk.html?fbclid=IwAR3mvLPYjcRU2CfxJKlo2XHOGWawYBOvrXZ_mQkyIk1pCb1ENYynaZgUk_Y

That map suggests three people might be positive for our local high school. That definitely seems within the realm of possibility. I'm a little surprised it wasn't higher. But if there are three unknowingly positive on day one, there will likely be more than three unknowingly positive by day two.....

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2 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

That map suggests three people might be positive for our local high school. That definitely seems within the realm of possibility. I'm a little surprised it wasn't higher. But if there are three unknowingly positive on day one, there will likely be more than three unknowingly positive by day two.....

My husband's school (2000 people, so I had to double the 1000 estimate) is 26 people. The county's own closing decision matrix calls for the district to close all schools indefinitely if there's substantial community spread and multiple schools have more than 5 cases. 

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....to be clear, they ARE starting the year online--probably because they looked at numbers like these and realized opening wasn't going to go well. Right now they're planning on phasing back in to in person as early as September 8, but it's dependent on things turning around in the area, numbers-wise. Which doesn't seem imminent. The two neighboring counties that ARE starting in person as soon as next week have estimates of 6 and 7 cases per thousand the first week of school.

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13 hours ago, Joker said:

A middle school in my state started today and had a student attend half the classes before they were notified he was positive. It sounds like he must have had a test but started school anyway and then the health department notified them. So, a huge part of the problem is going to be counting on people being honest and doing the right thing. It didn’t happen for this school. 🙃

This kind of stuff worries me almost as much as actual numbers and observed behavior. Ugh.

5 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

I don’t really know what 1 day a week is supposed to accomplish except maybe for getting some of the proposed money that only goes to schools physically opening up.

Locally, our career center is reopening with a plan to do 1 day per week by splitting up classes. Some classes are going to be 10-ish people, and it's just lab classes and time with interventionists. So, if you are a carpentry student, you would go with half your class, one day per week, and you'd be in the lab all day doing your carpentry work (the rooms are huge, thankfully!) with about 9 other students. You have all meals there, including kids eligible for breakfast. 

But anyway, a socially distanced lab class that small is on par with risk level on the job in the essential industries these kids will be going into or from jobs they already have after school--most of these kids are going to HAVE to work as soon as they graduate.

That said, gatherings of ten people in our county carry a 16% risk of someone being COVID positive according to the Georgia Tech map.

 

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5 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

 I don’t really know what 1 day a week is supposed to accomplish except maybe for getting some of the proposed money that only goes to schools physically opening up.

I'd say that getting out of the house and seeing their friends once a week is a great improvement over never, even without regard to it improving their education and/or relationship with the teacher. 

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On 7/30/2020 at 8:30 AM, Bagels McGruffikin said:

The article went into much greater detail, the specific focus was on children and school risks, as well as extrapolated risks to teachers and families.

Quite frankly, to have something comparative to make decisions against, a number had to be picked. That is one within the range of happening, and made sense for an article at this time, on this subject. The author is not one who is conservative, either in politics or in assessments, more of a pragmatist. I’d happily message someone my copy if they’re interested, I just cannot repost the whole thing publicly because of fair use and copyright issues.

I have to cringe at the flu comparisons, for the opposite reason as all of you. I can name, off the top of my head, seven children whose families I KNOW who have died from flu complications in the last twelve months. In my circles this is common, and a much higher risk. Dismissing it because it’s the devil you know ignores the actual data of risk, who is at risk and why. That is the point, and a huge flaw in the analysis of many on these boards, IMO.

 

I am sorry you have had so many children die of flu in your personal circle this past year.

I don’t know the total at end of flu season, but it sounds like a very high percentage of total were in your personal circle. 😢

“39 children have died during the 2019-2020 fluseason. The number seems grim, but flu activity shows signs of tapering off. Influenza has killed 6,600 people in the U.S. so far this season, 39 of them children. Data collected for January shows a weekly decline in activity.Jan 17, 2020
 
 

39 children have died during the 2019-2020 flu season | TheHill “

 

When you say “your circle” btw was that in a nationwide circle of people dealing with similar health issues in children ? Or was there a local really bad outbreak where you live?

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35 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

I am sorry you have had so many children die of flu in your personal circle this past year.

I don’t know the total at end of flu season, but it sounds like a very high percentage of total were in your personal circle. 😢

“39 children have died during the 2019-2020 fluseason. The number seems grim, but flu activity shows signs of tapering off. Influenza has killed 6,600 people in the U.S. so far this season, 39 of them children. Data collected for January shows a weekly decline in activity.Jan 17, 2020
 
 

39 children have died during the 2019-2020 flu season | TheHill “

 

When you say “your circle” btw was that in a nationwide circle of people dealing with similar health issues in children ? Or was there a local really bad outbreak where you live?

That article is very out of date.  The total over the course of the 2019/2020 flu season is actually around 150 kids.

 

ETA: here's the CDC page about kids and the flu

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/highrisk/children.htm

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Well scratch everything I said yesterday.  They have now shut down all music and sports everything at my kids' school, effective immediately.  I am not happy.  These summer activities are optional and do not force anyone to be exposed if they don't want to.

The health toll on our communities from not allowing kids to opt in to sports and music will be way worse than the Covid impact of these activities would have been, and yes I am considering the fact that kids can spread Covid.

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5 minutes ago, kokotg said:

Wow. This is from the CDC report on the overnight camp in Georgia that I've mentioned before. These attack rates are....daunting.  https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/early_release.html

 

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Something seems wrong - how can the staff attack rate be way higher than the attack rate for age groups 18-21 and 22+?  Or was this a family camp?

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5 minutes ago, SKL said:

Something seems wrong - how can the staff attack rate be way higher than the attack rate for age groups 18-21 and 22+?  Or was this a family camp?

It says in the report that the median age for staffers was 17, so lots of staff members in that younger group. I've read elsewhere that the oldest person there was 22. It also says attack rate increased with time spent at camp: staffers were there before campers.

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3 minutes ago, SKL said:

Something seems wrong - how can the staff attack rate be way higher than the attack rate for age groups 18-21 and 22+?  Or was this a family camp?

I would assume that staff does not have to be 18+. Lots of camps have counselors and junior counselors that can be as young as 13-14. They help with the younger kids. 

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22 hours ago, Storygirl said:

I sent a long list of questions to our school, and they kindly wrote out answers to each one. I don't necessarily like all of the answers, but at least I have more information now.

They had only given a one-line statement in the opening plan regarding what they will do when cases of Covid occur in the school community -- follow the health department's guidance. I posed a bunch of questions about that, and found out that the school is not making their own plans for what to do when there are cases in the school. They will let the health department make the decisions about who to notify and/or quarantine. The health department has told the school that they will not automatically consider every student within a classroom to be a contact, if someone in the classroom ends up positive.

On the one hand, it seems appropriate for the school administration to defer to the health department for medical decisions, and it lets the school focus on working through the academic issues. On the other hand, it seems like passing the buck, and it will mean that parents can't press the school for info about what is happening in the classrooms with the virus, because they will be referred to the health department.

In my state I don't think the school has a choice. They're required to follow health department guidelines for isolating students or staff. It's also less liability for them if they follow health department recommendations. 

The health department has been working with area schools in planning and will do teacher inservice on our first day back. 

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3 hours ago, dmmetler said:

In my state, cheer is not allowed to stunt yet, including club cheer. DD didn’t want to go back, and looking at what they’re doing, I am glad-tumbling isn’t recommended for her to avoid restarting her knee issues, so she would have nothing to do, since practice right now is everyone tumbling on their own strip of mat, with masks. On the plus side, the standing tumbling is looking great :).  

 

That's pretty much what we have here. Cheer was conditioning only. DD does a pretty good job of conditioning at home so she wasn't interested. The only thing she really needs to work on is stunting (basing) and since that's disallowed...yeah...BO-RING! LOL.

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1 hour ago, katilac said:

I'd say that getting out of the house and seeing their friends once a week is a great improvement over never, even without regard to it improving their education and/or relationship with the teacher. 

I don’t see how that  would really be a a thing. The whole idea is to reduce transmission, so it would seem counterintuitive to then encourage “hanging out”.  A class of 28 would then be 7, so good luck with the other 6 being the ones they hope for.
 

(For the record, I don’t believe there’s any perfect answer to be had. Pandemics suck!)

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10 minutes ago, Carrie12345 said:

I don’t see how that  would really be a a thing. The whole idea is to reduce transmission, so it would seem counterintuitive to then encourage “hanging out”.  A class of 28 would then be 7, so good luck with the other 6 being the ones they hope for.
 

(For the record, I don’t believe there’s any perfect answer to be had. Pandemics suck!)

They sure do! 

But I still think most people would choose getting out of the house and seeing other people once a week over . . . not doing that, lol. I didn't say hanging out. You're right that of course it might not be the friends they most hope to see, but just seeing people other than those you live with is pretty exciting if you're not doing a lot otherwise! 

When I was staying home with two nursing babies in a neighborhood full of working parents, I was excited to see the mail carrier 😂

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32 minutes ago, Carrie12345 said:

I don’t see how that  would really be a a thing. The whole idea is to reduce transmission, so it would seem counterintuitive to then encourage “hanging out”.  A class of 28 would then be 7, so good luck with the other 6 being the ones they hope for.
 

(For the record, I don’t believe there’s any perfect answer to be had. Pandemics suck!)

 

That interactive NY Times map shows a lot more white (unlikely to encounter a CV19 positive student) for pods of under 10. And it makes contact tracing or quarantine easier.

I think especially for only children a few kids once per week or once per two weeks would make a huge social difference. 

When my son has had even just one close friend, like a neighbor kid in easy access distance it has made a huge difference.

That aspect may matter much less for kids with siblings or similar. 

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25 minutes ago, katilac said:

They sure do! 

But I still think most people would choose getting out of the house and seeing other people once a week over . . . not doing that, lol. I didn't say hanging out. You're right that of course it might not be the friends they most hope to see, but just seeing people other than those you live with is pretty exciting if you're not doing a lot otherwise! 

When I was staying home with two nursing babies in a neighborhood full of working parents, I was excited to see the mail carrier 😂


I can accept that as a valid principle in general but, all options being equal (which they’re obviously not to every individual family... but the equally stink to most, lol) I don’t think I’m comfortable with calling that a reason for 5.5 hours of school per week.

My younger kids aren’t getting out once a week, but they are getting out once in a while (despite everything inside me wanting to keep them away from people who are around people who are around people and so on) without putting teachers and staff at risk.  I don’t personally know or know of anyone’s kids that have not gotten together with at least a friend or two this whole time even though school hasn’t been in session since March or April... I can’t even remember!

If parents are already going to turn their lives upside down by having kids home 6 out of 7 days of the week, I don’t see how it’s logical to think they need a socialization date provided for them when they can just pick actual friends to meet up with on a day that works best for them.

That reminds me, I have to make sure two boys go get in the shower so we can go spend time with other humans tonight. 😬 🦠 

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2 hours ago, kokotg said:

Wow. This is from the CDC report on the overnight camp in Georgia that I've mentioned before. These attack rates are....daunting.  https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/early_release.html

 

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Ugh. That’s worse than I would have expected.  And it’s worse than it looks from that table, if you read the full report. They counted anyone that they didn’t get test results for as a negative, but the attack rate for those that they got test results for was 76%.

2 hours ago, SKL said:

The health toll on our communities from not allowing kids to opt in to sports and music will be way worse than the Covid impact of these activities would have been, and yes I am considering the fact that kids can spread Covid.

How do you figure?

1 hour ago, square_25 said:

This is the problem with the limited testing, which is that unless you managed to get tested, you wind up figuring that you may have had it, and that makes people feel like it's overblown. 

Agree. Statistically, it’s clear that the overwhelming majority of people who think that they have it and then get tested don’t have it after all. Yet people who don’t get testing tend to assume it’s likely what it was. I had classic Covid symptoms in March, and still have overwhelming fatigue, yet I know it’s most likely that what I had was something else. 

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4 minutes ago, kand said:

Ugh. That’s worse than I would have expected.  And it’s worse than it looks from that table, if you read the full report. They counted anyone that they didn’t get test results for as a negative, but the attack rate for those that they got test results for was 76%.

 

yeah, I missed that when I read through the report, but it was pointed out in the summary on CNN, too. And there are some precautions that camp didn't take and clearly should have (like requiring masks for campers and not just staff), but they did require a negative test from every staff member and camper before camp started and were for the most part following CDC guidelines. And numbers were much better in June in Georgia than they are now.

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