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Cases in children are increasing in Florida:

"On July 16, the state had a total of 23,170 children ages 17 and under who had tested positive since the beginning of the pandemic, according to the Florida Department of Health. By July 24, that number jumped to 31,150. That's a 34% increase in new cases among children in eight days." 

Hospitalizations of children are also increasing.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/health/florida-covid-children-hospitalizations/index.html

This is also happening in Texas.

Susan in TX

 

 

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Our society needs kids to be in school.  Our economy sure as hell needs kids in school full time.  Many kids need to be in school, for a wide variety of reasons.   But kids in school is only safe

From my perspective, because of what they've done, crap upon crap happens. Obviously the pandemic itself was out of everyone's control.  But as we have seen around the world, a population's behav

Okay, we can compare the states of the US to the countries of the European Union, and the whole EU to the US.  It's got an even higher population, and it doesn't have a more centralized government tha

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And didn’t FL just announce the first pediatric death, a 9yo girl with no known underlying symptoms?

ET correct myself, she was not the first, she was the youngest. There have already been other pediatric deaths in FL.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2020/07/23/health/florida-coronavirus-child-death/index.html

 

(someone may have already linked that, sorry if it’s redundant)

Edited by Seasider too
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Shelby County (the big, urban district with many schoolwide Title I schools, lots of ELLs, and lots of special ed programs, including some that serve the entire region, not just the county) has just announced all virtual for fall. Apparently over 80% of parents were not willing to send their kids back in person. https://www.wmcactionnews5.com/2020/07/27/shelby-county-schools-going-all-virtual-this-august/?fbclid=IwAR2e5JtlkKc_zJY9rfmXT5Zha7NBhxzwrR6icX1IlmZr9ILP9wLX9AXxIsE

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6 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Thank you. Yes, he likes the regular kind a lot, and my DD10 who is picky like yours will take that one too, and she will NOT take the one with K. They each take 2 a day - the dosage reccomended by PANDAS experts, and the 3 yr old takes one a day. (not counting days we forgot, which happens). DH was low, and is taking his prescription plus taking a liquid formula with K in it that tastes minty. 

Honestly, I think my kid is still skeptical when I give them supplements because when they were younger, I kept trying and trying to give them omega 3 derived from fish oil, only to find out later that they were actually allergic to fish.  

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56 minutes ago, dmmetler said:

Shelby County (the big, urban district with many schoolwide Title I schools, lots of ELLs, and lots of special ed programs, including some that serve the entire region, not just the county) has just announced all virtual for fall. Apparently over 80% of parents were not willing to send their kids back in personhttps://www.wmcactionnews5.com/2020/07/27/shelby-county-schools-going-all-virtual-this-august/?fbclid=IwAR2e5JtlkKc_zJY9rfmXT5Zha7NBhxzwrR6icX1IlmZr9ILP9wLX9AXxIsE

Wow.  That is real data from precisely the population I would expect to have the most urgent need for what we're calling "childcare."

If 80% of that population is unwilling to send their kids in for IRL class at current case #s... it would seem that the bulk of attention and resources should shift radically towards "how do we improve the delivery of distant learning" for that 80%.  And think of the remaining 20% as the exception that needs to be addressed rather than trying to make it the rule.

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15 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

Wow.  That is real data from precisely the population I would expect to have the most urgent need for what we're calling "childcare."

If 80% of that population is unwilling to send their kids in for IRL class at current case #s... it would seem that the bulk of attention and resources should shift radically towards "how do we improve the delivery of distant learning" for that 80%.  And think of the remaining 20% as the exception that needs to be addressed rather than trying to make it the rule.

Many churches and community centers that are licensed for child care are offering child care/supervision of virtual learning for children of essential workers. The school district is partnering with them to do this (and I'm guessing some of the employees are the teacher's aides and paraprofessionals that are not going to be in the classroom, which also gives them an income. I wouldn't be surprised if custodial staff are also assisting in the cleaning and maintenance), and this will be free to qualifying parents. The school district food service will be providing meals to these sites and for pick up for families. Students on IEPs will be getting services either virtually if appropriate or at their homes or child care sites. Devices will be distributed for those who need them. They are contracting with FLVS for curriculum, but lessons will be taught/supervised and regular class connects done by the teacher the child would be in class with if schools were open. 

It really seems like they have thought of everything. 

 

Meanwhile, the suburbs are still mostly going in person, with a virtual option, and some are going hybrid for high school, and are starting as early as next Monday. 

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4 hours ago, Pen said:

@JennyD  I think that something about the Michael Mina interview should be added here as that sort of test could help schools to be open more safely.

but I am having linking troubles today

Sure thing!

Michael Mina is an epidemiologist at Harvard who has been advocating strongly for approval and rollout of at-home, inexpensive saliva tests.  These tests -- which apparently have already been developed -- are not nearly as sensitive as the PCR tests that are used right now, but his (and others') argument is that the tests only need to be sensitive enough to catch people when they are transmitting the virus, and that the ability for people to test every day would more than outweigh any reduced sensitivity.

Here is an interview he did on This Week in Virology. here is a compressed video version of the interview, and here is a news article about this sort of testing.

 

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3 hours ago, Susan in TX said:

Cases in children are increasing in Florida:

"On July 16, the state had a total of 23,170 children ages 17 and under who had tested positive since the beginning of the pandemic, according to the Florida Department of Health. By July 24, that number jumped to 31,150. That's a 34% increase in new cases among children in eight days." 

Hospitalizations of children are also increasing.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/health/florida-covid-children-hospitalizations/index.html

This is also happening in Texas.

Susan in TX

 

 

And yet today, again, I'm seeing posts locally that say, "Due to Covid we are going to homeschool - how can we find group activities? and "Where can I sign my newly homeschooling kid up for football and wrestling teams?"  

I'm like, are you missing the point as to WHY schools are masking or going virtual?!?!?  Wrestling team? SERIOUSLY?????

43 minutes ago, JennyD said:

Sure thing!

Michael Mina is an epidemiologist at Harvard who has been advocating strongly for approval and rollout of at-home, inexpensive saliva tests.  These tests -- which apparently have already been developed -- are not nearly as sensitive as the PCR tests that are used right now, but his (and others') argument is that the tests only need to be sensitive enough to catch people when they are transmitting the virus, and that the ability for people to test every day would more than outweigh any reduced sensitivity.

Here is an interview he did on This Week in Virology. here is a compressed video version of the interview, and here is a news article about this sort of testing.

 

Oh! I'd missed that part of it. Yes, if pepole were testing daily, than even if it is wrong often, it would pick it up ONE of the times they test, and certainly if they can test daily at home, it would pick it up before say, only testing when symptomatic, and needing an appointment, waiting on results, etc. 

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@Terabith  I was looking things up about zinc and found a case where someone had an overdose caused by using lots of zinc based acne creams for a very long time (850-1000mg /day), so apparently zinc does get into body from skin applications similar to how magnesium can absorb through skin. 

 

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2 hours ago, dmmetler said:

Many churches and community centers that are licensed for child care are offering child care/supervision of virtual learning for children of essential workers. The school district is partnering with them to do this (and I'm guessing some of the employees are the teacher's aides and paraprofessionals that are not going to be in the classroom, which also gives them an income. I wouldn't be surprised if custodial staff are also assisting in the cleaning and maintenance), and this will be free to qualifying parents. The school district food service will be providing meals to these sites and for pick up for families. Students on IEPs will be getting services either virtually if appropriate or at their homes or child care sites. Devices will be distributed for those who need them. They are contracting with FLVS for curriculum, but lessons will be taught/supervised and regular class connects done by the teacher the child would be in class with if schools were open. 

It really seems like they have thought of everything. 

 

Meanwhile, the suburbs are still mostly going in person, with a virtual option, and some are going hybrid for high school, and are starting as early as next Monday. 

I found the article you linked really encouraging as far as how they’re handling the problems with going remote (childcare, meals, etc) and that they’re committed to the kids still getting an education this year.

It’s interesting that this is bearing out in more and more places that the suburbs are seeming to be the ones most likely to want kids to be back in school, while the families that people are so concerned about being harmed by virtual schoolomg don’t feel comfortable returning to the classroom. I can’t even read my local Nextdoor anymore, for everyone apoplectic about the school year starting online and berating teachers for being lazy bums, and how the flu is even worse and this is all being done to win an election, etc, etc. People are just irrational about it. 

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The fact that Major League Baseball, with all its money and testing all their players every other day, cannot make it without massive numbers of players testing positive just makes me think there's no way schools can reopen (even the tiny school my kid wants to attend).  

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6 minutes ago, Terabith said:

The fact that Major League Baseball, with all its money and testing all their players every other day, cannot make it without massive numbers of players testing positive just makes me think there's no way schools can reopen (even the tiny school my kid wants to attend).  

This. If the Marlins couldn't keep a third of their starting roster well with all the resources in the world and millions of dollars at stake, schools will not be able to do it. 

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Well, it's official. We'll be doing the first 6 weeks of school online and then re-evaluate which I'm sure means we're online for the year--it's not going to get better. I was hoping to at least start in person, get to know the kids, and teach them how to use the technology before probably having to go online for late fall/winter. I totally understand why this call was made but it's just frustrating. I don't see how they're going to get the spring no-shows to engage, even though this is now what they call "robust" online learning, unlike spring (meaning that attendance and grades count this time). I would like there to be some way to get some of these kids in the building (these are the kids I typically work with). I knew it was going to be a crappy year no matter what--now there's just enough information to envision exactly how it will be crappy. And my senior will have a year stripped of all the good senior things and experiences. Ugh.

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Orange County, FL just announced that no, they are not actually pushing the start date for schools from August 10th to August 21st like they've announced. Instead they are starting August 10th, but all virtual, for 9 days, and then those that chose face to face will come into the buildings starting the 21st. 

Mind you, they didn't tell the teachers this, they just announced it on social media. Now the teachers are starting their preplanning days THIS friday - two weeks earlier than they were told, but back to the original date they agreed to last year. People are scrambling, some are out of town, it's a mess. 

Oh, and the union filed another grievance, so it could change again. 

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14 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

Well, it's official. We'll be doing the first 6 weeks of school online and then re-evaluate which I'm sure means we're online for the year--it's not going to get better. I was hoping to at least start in person, get to know the kids, and teach them how to use the technology before probably having to go online for late fall/winter. I totally understand why this call was made but it's just frustrating. I don't see how they're going to get the spring no-shows to engage, even though this is now what they call "robust" online learning, unlike spring (meaning that attendance and grades count this time). I would like there to be some way to get some of these kids in the building (these are the kids I typically work with). I knew it was going to be a crappy year no matter what--now there's just enough information to envision exactly how it will be crappy. And my senior will have a year stripped of all the good senior things and experiences. Ugh.

I’m not sure if this is even practical or viable but is there any way you could see the students of most concern in person once before hand to make sure the tech is working right?  

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I don't know yet. I did ask the question of the superintendent if small groups of kids could be in school for help and online support, and he said it would depend on the numbers in the county and how the metrics get defined on when/if school buildings can be used. I think there is a way we could support kids in most need without too much risk (not without no risk), but I'm guessing that's not going to happen. And I think the problem goes beyond students knowing how the tech works; I think some of these kids need the supervision in order to do any work at all (the couple I'm thinking of have parents at work during the day and they did nothing on their own in spring. Absolutely nothing.)

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10 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

I don't know yet. I did ask the question of the superintendent if small groups of kids could be in school for help and online support, and he said it would depend on the numbers in the county and how the metrics get defined on when/if school buildings can be used. I think there is a way we could support kids in most need without too much risk (not without no risk), but I'm guessing that's not going to happen. And I think the problem goes beyond students knowing how the tech works; I think some of these kids need the supervision in order to do any work at all (the couple I'm thinking of have parents at work during the day and they did nothing on their own in spring. Absolutely nothing.)

Yeah I agree.  A mixed solution where more vulnerable and special needs kids get in person instruction and kids with parents that can help at home do seem  best.  Means more space and teacher one on one for those kids as well, which could be a really good thing.  Figuring out a fair way to address who gets that and making it as safe as possible is a whole different thing though.

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Our local district released the figures, and 50% of students have opted for virtual learning for the first 9 weeks (the plan is to let them change at 9 weeks if they wish). That gives some hope for the in-person students to be able to have some kind of distancing. 

They say they have the capacity to immediately switch everyone to virtual as needed. 

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11 hours ago, Terabith said:

The fact that Major League Baseball, with all its money and testing all their players every other day, cannot make it without massive numbers of players testing positive just makes me think there's no way schools can reopen (even the tiny school my kid wants to attend).  

This isn't good at all, but they weren't wearing masks while gathered in dugouts and after the game, some aren't following distancing/masks in all situations, and didn't one guy visit a strip club when he traveled for a funeral?

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CCSD, the 5th largest school district, is looking into various retail spaces such as gyms, movie theaters, convention centers and working on some commercial partnerships to open up safe spaces for virtual learning. They plan to go all virtual and there are many that don’t have access to the internet or a computer. 

I’ve been thinking this is a solution for awhile so I guess I’ll get to see if it works. 

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49 minutes ago, Where's Toto? said:

This isn't good at all, but they weren't wearing masks while gathered in dugouts and after the game, some aren't following distancing/masks in all situations, and didn't one guy visit a strip club when he traveled for a funeral?

Wasn't the strip club a basketball player? Maybe there were two strip clubs. At any rate, big school district (40,000+ students) next door to me (metro Atlanta--soaring numbers) is planning to start in person next week with no distancing, no mask requirement, and nothing that says students and teachers can't go whatever high risk places they want outside of school hours (though, frankly, I doubt they'll find many places more high risk than their own schools). 

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23 minutes ago, kokotg said:

Wasn't the strip club a basketball player? Maybe there were two strip clubs. At any rate, big school district (40,000+ students) next door to me (metro Atlanta--soaring numbers) is planning to start in person next week with no distancing, no mask requirement, and nothing that says students and teachers can't go whatever high risk places they want outside of school hours (though, frankly, I doubt they'll find many places more high risk than their own schools). 

Yeah, that's not going to end well.   

I don't understand why so many people are ignoring some of the basic facts we know - masks help, distancing helps - so that things can open safely.    We should be way past the point of head in the sand, ignore the situation and do what we want.  

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34 minutes ago, kokotg said:

Wasn't the strip club a basketball player? Maybe there were two strip clubs. At any rate, big school district (40,000+ students) next door to me (metro Atlanta--soaring numbers) is planning to start in person next week with no distancing, no mask requirement, and nothing that says students and teachers can't go whatever high risk places they want outside of school hours (though, frankly, I doubt they'll find many places more high risk than their own schools). 

Ugh - I thought Atlanta was planning on an all virtual start? That sounds like a disaster waiting to happen!

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1 minute ago, AmandaVT said:

Ugh - I thought Atlanta was planning on an all virtual start? That sounds like a disaster waiting to happen!

All the counties immediately surrounding Atlanta (and Atlanta Public Schools itself) are...but some of the farther out but still metro counties are starting in person. Cherokee County teachers went back yesterday and students will be there Monday.

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1 hour ago, Where's Toto? said:

Yeah, that's not going to end well.   

I don't understand why so many people are ignoring some of the basic facts we know - masks help, distancing helps - so that things can open safely.    We should be way past the point of head in the sand, ignore the situation and do what we want.  

My dd and dsil were thinking about going to a funeral of a friend of theirs who died of brain cancer,  This friend was in MS and the funeral was about 8 hours away.  They would have to stay at his parents' house and he really wanted to also see his parents since he hasn't seen them for a long time,  But his parents not only aren't masking, they also have been exposed to COVID positive people in the last two weeks and aren;'t quarantining either. Other factors in their not going was that dd had a lot of work to do on a deadline and dsil has his last final in his last class for getting his BS degree this weekend.   DD convinced DSIL that they should send flowers and a nice note instead.  DSIL is a high risk person, as well as his parents, but this disease is really drawing lines in the sand.

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Is pod schooling popular in your area? (basically a group of parents hire a teacher or facilitator to help the small group of students do their virtual learning) Micro schools are also popping up (small group of students with a teacher who is teaching not just making sure virtual work gets done). My friend is helping connect teachers to groups and said the price is going up and up - the last teacher she placed is going to be paid $70,000 for 6 kids Pk - 2; she will work 8 - 3 M - F and provide all materials, etc.. But still! 

I have been asked a few times to pod school, but I no longer have an ideal spot in my home to house a group of kids plus my hybrid school is opening. The hybrid is keeping my classes under 10 students, masks,... I feel good about their precautions. Plus we meet once a week. My other school did not require masks nor did it allow for social distancing so I quit that one, although they are trying to get me to come back to teach algebra. It would only be 4 kids in that class so we would have social distancing. They meet three times a week. I would not attend faculty meetings or parent meetings. I will be allowed to do all parent conferences over Zoom, etc.. I think I will go back and teach - I need to decide by today!  It just confuses me how the second school can be so obtuse - we are in the Atlanta area and too many families want in person school  Both schools have had more registrations since they are advertising in -person classes. I am not sure we will even make it past the first week at either one! 

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51 minutes ago, lmrich said:

My other school did not require masks nor did it allow for social distancing so I quit that one, although they are trying to get me to come back to teach algebra. It would only be 4 kids in that class so we would have social distancing. They meet three times a week. I would not attend faculty meetings or parent meetings. I will be allowed to do all parent conferences over Zoom, etc.. I think I will go back and teach - I need to decide by today!  It just confuses me how the second school can be so obtuse - we are in the Atlanta area and too many families want in person school  Both schools have had more registrations since they are advertising in -person classes. I am not sure we will even make it past the first week at either one! 

Could you teach via Zoom, while the students sit in the classroom?  Is there an ed tech or administrator would could provide supervision to the students?

I wouldn't risk your life to teach algebra. They're making bad decisions, but it shouldn't be on you to accommodate them!

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1 hour ago, lmrich said:

Is pod schooling popular in your area? (basically a group of parents hire a teacher or facilitator to help the small group of students do their virtual learning) Micro schools are also popping up (small group of students with a teacher who is teaching not just making sure virtual work gets done). My friend is helping connect teachers to groups and said the price is going up and up - the last teacher she placed is going to be paid $70,000 for 6 kids Pk - 2; she will work 8 - 3 M - F and provide all materials, etc.. But still! 

I have been asked a few times to pod school, but I no longer have an ideal spot in my home to house a group of kids plus my hybrid school is opening. The hybrid is keeping my classes under 10 students, masks,... I feel good about their precautions. Plus we meet once a week. My other school did not require masks nor did it allow for social distancing so I quit that one, although they are trying to get me to come back to teach algebra. It would only be 4 kids in that class so we would have social distancing. They meet three times a week. I would not attend faculty meetings or parent meetings. I will be allowed to do all parent conferences over Zoom, etc.. I think I will go back and teach - I need to decide by today!  It just confuses me how the second school can be so obtuse - we are in the Atlanta area and too many families want in person school  Both schools have had more registrations since they are advertising in -person classes. I am not sure we will even make it past the first week at either one! 

There's a lot of discussion about pods but I'm not sure how much is actually getting implemented.  Most of the schools around here are offering multiple options and school doesn't start until September, some after Labor Day which is late this year, so it's hard to say what will happen.  There are people who need childcare so I'm sure some form of pods will happen.

I would take the job if they were okay with me wearing a mask and face shield, I was the only one using that room, it was getting thoroughly cleaned in between days, and possibly I'd want HEPA filters on air conditioning and/or an air purifier.

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5 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

This isn't good at all, but they weren't wearing masks while gathered in dugouts and after the game, some aren't following distancing/masks in all situations, and didn't one guy visit a strip club when he traveled for a funeral?

I'd heard some of these teams are basically "pods" themselves - supposedly living in a hotel together with no outside exposure. obviously, something failed. 

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5 minutes ago, Bagels McGruffikin said:

I am 100% ready, vouchers with money following the student should have been done years ago, I think. Especially since not every family can homeschool and not every district is worth the funds for the sub par education they’ve provided. I know the criticisms and drawbacks but that is one of the better things to come out of the school upheaval IMO.

As long as it’s an option and doesn’t take over fully parent funded independent homeschool then I don’t have a problem with it.
 

The thing is, it usually ties lots of strings to homeschoolers that weren’t there before. I saw that when my state attempted to get ESA started. Only approved curriculum means no home grown courses. Required testing means focusing your efforts towards that test. Along with the ridiculousness of having to enroll my kids into ps for a year to qualify for the ESA. 👎

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2 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

 

With a voucher system, the disadvantaged kids should also be given the opportunity to go to better schools and not be stuck in their poor performing zoned schools.

HOw it has worked here is that the "good" private schools just charge more than the voucher is worth, to keep the voucher kids out and just serve the wealthy elite. 

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2 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

 

With a voucher system, the disadvantaged kids should also be given the opportunity to go to better schools and not be stuck in their poor performing zoned schools.

* with free bussing 

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On 7/25/2020 at 6:59 PM, dmmetler said:

What I find it interesting is that the district here that has the highest % high need kids (Title I, special needs, ELL, etc) also has the highest percentage opting for virtual for the first semester. The percentages are much lower in the suburbs which are more middle income. Having said that, the district with the highest % opting out has also delayed their start date and was the first to officially close in March. 

 

My gut feeling is that there will be a lot of grad students analyzing this year for years to come.

They are often the ones with the most pre-existing conditions, and the least access to good health care. More likely to have a grandparent and a young child in the same house, increasing risk if the kids go to school. Etc. 

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8 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Well, this is another one where we'll see what happens if we do this. I'm personally guessing nothing good, because a lot of what private schools have going for them is the ability to select the population. I don't really know we're going to get if we only have the most disadvantaged kids left in the public school system... we'll see, I guess. I would also be utterly unsurprised if what we wind up getting is lots of private options that are good at marketing and awful at education. 

The push for vouchers has never really been about "quality education." If people were really concerned about quality they'd be pushing for better quality in the schools that already exist rather than pushing to divert public money to private schools. Vouchers benefit two groups of people: those who invest in for-profit educational companies and those who want taxpayers to pay for their children's private (almost always religious) schools. For example, 97% of students who use school vouchers in Ohio attend private religious schools, and a large percentage (more than 60% in many districts) have never attended the public schools in their area, so it's not as if they were badly served by the public system and needed a change. These are students who have always attended private religious schools, paid for with public money, while draining much-needed funds from the local public schools.

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Ok, in, too stupid to even know how to handle it....the school my family member is at orignally had signs put up by the district saying masks were highly encouraged. 

Then masks became mandatory, so they sent someone out to put up new signs saying that. 

Except I guess they didn't specifically clarify that the old signs should be removed. 

So now they have, side by side, two signs. One says they mandatory. one says they are high encouraged. Sigh. 

Oh, and he was using double sided mounting tape, but on the outside, like you would scotch tape, with the backing still on. Which really, for reasons I can't fathom, is bothering me more than the rest of it right now. that stuff isn't cheap! 

But yeah, I'm supposed to believe they can follow every measure to keep everyone safe...when they can't even figure out how to put the signs up. 

Edited by Ktgrok
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I was in one of the cities in my state that I was last in around 3 months ago.  

I observed a Tremendous improvement in the mask wearing and / or distancing that I saw (it has been mandated between the two trips).  It gives me s tiny bit of hope for people doing better on compliance and schools maybe, maybe able to open in some very careful hybrid way without disasters. 

I saw some Street people and some people working on construction and roads and bus stop people who weren’t wearing masks (is an over 90 deg F day), but were doing what looked like good physical distancing plus outdoors.  A lot of other people outdoors did have masks on.  Everyone indoors did. 

 

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The school district by me that's starting up next week changed the wording on their mask policy from masks encouraged to masks "strongly encouraged," so I think things will be fine there now 🙄

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Outdoor classes 

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/07/outdoor-schools-coronavirus/614680/

I can see a couple of issues - I have one kid that would be really miserable being outdoors all day in spring due to hay fever. And when we do outdoor learning at home I do find book learning hard due to pages blowing etc.  there are plenty of other ways to teach but it could be hard for teachers to develop that in such a short time.  And then there’s stupid testing requirements etc.  I feel like it is a way better option educationally but logistically could be difficult.

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Oregon released metrics today that will be used to determine when school can be held in person (hybrid or otherwise). We don't meet the requirements now (and we announced yesterday that we're doing online at least the first 6 weeks). I personally think we're online for the year--it's just hard for me to imagine that numbers get better as we enter our indoor time and cold and flu season. But I'm glad that they're defining some kind of metric and not just winging it. Perhaps it will give people some motivation to try a little harder. Quoting my union email:

The metrics specify conditions that must be met in order to resume in-person learning in any form:

  • County Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Ten or fewer cases per 100,000 over seven days
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • Statewide Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • K-3 Students/Remote and Rural Districts
    • Under some conditions, in-person instruction can resume for students in kindergarten through third grade. Remote and rural districts with fewer than 100 students can reopen schools for all students under the same conditions:
      • Fewer than 30 cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
      • COVID-19 is not actively spreading in the school community
      • School districts are in compliance with sections 1-3 of the Ready Schools, Safe Learners Guidance
         
  • Transition Planning for Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • For schools districts where in-person learning is occurring during the school year, planning for a switch to comprehensive distance learning should take place, including training staff and notifying the community, if one or both conditions are met:
      • 20 cases or greater per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 7.5 percent or greater over seven days
         
  • Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • All school districts must implement comprehensive distance learning if the following conditions are met:
      • 30 or more cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 10 percent or greater over seven days

 

Edited by Ali in OR
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4 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

Oregon released metrics today that will be used to determine when school can be held in person (hybrid or otherwise). We don't meet the requirements now (and we announced yesterday that we're doing online at least the first 6 weeks). I personally think we're online for the year--it's just hard for me to imagine that numbers get better as we enter our indoor time and cold and flu season. But I'm glad that they're defining some kind of metric and not just winging it. Perhaps it will give people some motivation to try a little harder. Quoting my union email:

The metrics specify conditions that must be met in order to resume in-person learning in any form:

  • County Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Ten or fewer cases per 100,000 over seven days
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • Statewide Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • K-3 Students/Remote and Rural Districts
    • Under some conditions, in-person instruction can resume for students in kindergarten through third grade. Remote and rural districts with fewer than 100 students can reopen schools for all students under the same conditions:
      • Fewer than 30 cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
      • COVID-19 is not actively spreading in the school community
      • School districts are in compliance with sections 1-3 of the Ready Schools, Safe Learners Guidance
         
  • Transition Planning for Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • For schools districts where in-person learning is occurring during the school year, planning for a switch to comprehensive distance learning should take place, including training staff and notifying the community, if one or both conditions are met:
      • 20 cases or greater per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 7.5 percent or greater over seven days
         
  • Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • All school districts must implement comprehensive distance learning if the following conditions are met:
      • 30 or more cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 10 percent or greater over seven days

 

What I found most interesting about the announcement today is that the metrics apply to both public and private schools. Although private schools aren’t really very common here compared to many other parts of the country.

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1 hour ago, Ausmumof3 said:

there are plenty of other ways to teach but it could be hard for teachers to develop that in such a short time.  And then there’s stupid testing requirements etc.  I feel like it is a way better option educationally but logistically could be difficult.

I think most experienced teachers know tons of active learning activities, they just don't often get a chance to use them. 

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20 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

Oregon released metrics today that will be used to determine when school can be held in person (hybrid or otherwise). We don't meet the requirements now (and we announced yesterday that we're doing online at least the first 6 weeks). I personally think we're online for the year--it's just hard for me to imagine that numbers get better as we enter our indoor time and cold and flu season. But I'm glad that they're defining some kind of metric and not just winging it. Perhaps it will give people some motivation to try a little harder. Quoting my union email:

The metrics specify conditions that must be met in order to resume in-person learning in any form:

  • County Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Ten or fewer cases per 100,000 over seven days
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • Statewide Metrics (Must be Met Three Weeks in a Row)
    • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
       
  • K-3 Students/Remote and Rural Districts
    • Under some conditions, in-person instruction can resume for students in kindergarten through third grade. Remote and rural districts with fewer than 100 students can reopen schools for all students under the same conditions:
      • Fewer than 30 cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of five percent or less over seven days
      • COVID-19 is not actively spreading in the school community
      • School districts are in compliance with sections 1-3 of the Ready Schools, Safe Learners Guidance
         
  • Transition Planning for Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • For schools districts where in-person learning is occurring during the school year, planning for a switch to comprehensive distance learning should take place, including training staff and notifying the community, if one or both conditions are met:
      • 20 cases or greater per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 7.5 percent or greater over seven days
         
  • Comprehensive Distance Learning
    • All school districts must implement comprehensive distance learning if the following conditions are met:
      • 30 or more cases per 100,000 over seven days
      • Test positivity of 10 percent or greater over seven days

 

 

So where are we now with this?  What is the state positivity level? If school were three weeks away could it open in most counties? 

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20 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

So where are we now with this?  What is the state positivity level? If school were three weeks away could it open in most counties? 

percent-positive.png

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18 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

So where are we now with this?  What is the state positivity level? If school were three weeks away could it open in most counties? 

The article I read said only one small rural county, Wheeler, currently meets the criteria. My very large district just announced no in person classes until at least the second nine week grading period (mid November) unless there are drastic changes. Also, juniors and seniors likely won’t return until Spring and k-3 and special ed will be first to return.

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20 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

So where are we now with this?  What is the state positivity level? If school were three weeks away could it open in most counties? 

I'm exploring the Oregon Health Authority website. Now that we have metrics, I would like to see those specific numbers reported. What I can definitely find on the website is the weekly state positivity rate from the "Weekly Testing Summary." The most recent week was 4.8% but the two previous were both 5.8%, so we wouldn't make it on that metric yet. I need to start tracking our county numbers. We need to be 10 or lower for the week, and I don't think we've been hitting that (our population is close to 100k). Some days we have 0 cases, some days 1 or 2 or 3. The most I've seen in a day is 6 I think. Today was 3. I don't know where to track down our positivity rate yet. 

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1 minute ago, Ali in OR said:

I'm exploring the Oregon Health Authority website. Now that we have metrics, I would like to see those specific numbers reported. What I can definitely find on the website is the weekly state positivity rate from the "Weekly Testing Summary." The most recent week was 4.8% but the two previous were both 5.8%, so we wouldn't make it on that metric yet. I need to start tracking our county numbers. We need to be 10 or lower for the week, and I don't think we've been hitting that (our population is close to 100k). Some days we have 0 cases, some days 1 or 2 or 3. The most I've seen in a day is 6 I think. Today was 3. I don't know where to track down our positivity rate yet. 

 

I know that they have been giving more detailed information on Wednesdays, but I don’t know if it gave all of those metrics.

 

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