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41 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Counselors fill a vital role during times of stress.  If the schools turns you into hall monitors, then who is seeing to kids' social emotional needs?

Probably still her, in the hallway 🙄

24 minutes ago, EmseB said:

Creativity and leadership, excellent. 

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Our society needs kids to be in school.  Our economy sure as hell needs kids in school full time.  Many kids need to be in school, for a wide variety of reasons.   But kids in school is only safe

From my perspective, because of what they've done, crap upon crap happens. Obviously the pandemic itself was out of everyone's control.  But as we have seen around the world, a population's behav

One of our good friends is a family practice physician and they were getting swamped by requests by adults when the mask requirements came out. They got together and unanimously decided their response

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48 minutes ago, Kanin said:

My coworker, who is from Europe, says that her family back in Italy and France think all of us Americans are insane for resisting masks at all, and for thinking we can open schools. 

She's right. My next door neighbor posted this on her Facebook page. Now, here I think wearing a mask shows respect and love for my fellow citizens. And that I respect science and facts. But this is what I'm surrounded with. 😭 And again, I'm in Arizona, where we are in extremely bad shape.

 108627083_Masknonsense.png.1ed487a138139f6534b9a87d2aadc47c.png

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6 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

It's consistent. If a kid is going to participate in a small group with a counselor in person they have to get the parent permission first as well.

It's only consistent if the virtual session was going to be small group, and I think she was saying that students had to get parental permission before talking to the counselor privately on the virtual platform, whereas they did not need to do so in school. 

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3 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Well, but how will that work if the kid is at home?  

I think we're saying the same thing, that this is why this system won't work. 

 

Oh yeah, that was sarcasm, because I wouldn't put it past a principal to suggest that she just do a lil counseling on the fly as she ushered kids to their classrooms. 

Edited to add that I just saw you quoted my next post also, and I wanted to clarify that my "creativity and leadership" comment was not sarcasm. I really am very glad to see cities working on solutions. 

Edited by katilac
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54 minutes ago, Kanin said:

I'm thinking I could make a decent living by assisting kids with their remote schooling (also remotely) while their parents work. There have got to be a bunch of wealthy people who would pay to have a certified teacher meet with their kid for an hour or two a day. 

I'm seriously considering it.

My coworker, who is from Europe, says that her family back in Italy and France think all of us Americans are insane for resisting masks at all, and for thinking we can open schools. 

My homeschool connections are constantly listing groups of families requesting a dedicated teacher for their students in their homes. $100/hour is about the going rate in certain high income areas near me. Trust me...I've considered it.

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8 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

For scheduled small groups, or also for one off conversations?

At my school, if a counselor is going to conduct a group they need parental consent.  But students can drop by the counselor's office to get advice on what science to take next year, or for a place to compose themselves if something in the classroom was triggering, or to problem solve an issue without that consent.  

Scheduled small group.

 

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23 minutes ago, PerfectFifth said:

My homeschool connections are constantly listing groups of families requesting a dedicated teacher for their students in their homes. $100/hour is about the going rate in certain high income areas near me. Trust me...I've considered it.

I've thought about doing this specifically for the teachers I've signed for, but I don't know how the teachers would be able to afford it.

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36 minutes ago, katilac said:

Probably still her, in the hallway 🙄

Creativity and leadership, excellent. 

From the article:

"The child care programs will be capped at fifteen students per room, in line with state social distancing rules, said city budget director Melanie Hartzog.

The programs will supervise children while they participate in online learning, and offer arts and recreation activities and possibly local field trips."

 

Why is this not just...school? Why are teachers not in charge of the groups of 15 kids and just teaching them instead of a daycare worker supervising online learning?? I am so confused, honestly not being obtuse, about how this is better or different than opening schools.

Meanwhile, the wealthy parents are hiring licensed teachers to come to their homes?

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1 minute ago, EmseB said:

From the article:

"The child care programs will be capped at fifteen students per room, in line with state social distancing rules, said city budget director Melanie Hartzog.

The programs will supervise children while they participate in online learning, and offer arts and recreation activities and possibly local field trips."

 

Why is this not just...school? Why are teachers not in charge of the groups of 15 kids and just teaching them instead of a daycare worker supervising online learning?? I am so confused, honestly not being obtuse, about how this is better or different than opening schools.


I’m guessing childcare workers can be paid less than certified teachers. And it’s easier to get funding for something like this that to hire twice as many teachers as normal, if you could even find that many.

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13 minutes ago, Danae said:


I’m guessing childcare workers can be paid less than certified teachers. And it’s easier to get funding for something like this that to hire twice as many teachers as normal, if you could even find that many.

So the state will pay low wage daycare workers to put themselves at the same risks that the licensed professionals claimed to be too great to bear, meanwhile, said professionals will still get paid for providing some kind of online content (so we're paying teachers and daycare workers with money that doesn't exist), kids are still going to be in groups with one or two adults per not-a-classroom with someone attempting to supervise learning, provide art and rec, and field trips? 

Aside from the logistics, if kids can't be in school because it's going to cause outbreaks, why can they be in these daycares? It says up to 8th grade?

And those with means will pay the licensed teachers to just...come to their homes on an ad hoc basis and teachers who are scared to teach groups will still be going in and out of multiple homes to tutor?

I'm sure it's no surprise to many of you that I can't wrap my brain around all this.

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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

NYC is planning to open schools on a part time schedule.  NYC has about a million students.  With their current buildings, and numbers of teachers, and social distancing expectations, they can provide in person education for 1 to 3 days. So, this is the solution for the 100,000 kids they see as needing supervision on the other days.

 

I get that. I don't understand how, if the goal is preventing outbreaks and keeping kids out of groups in the classroom, that this plan does that. The kids are still in something that they are not calling a classroom, but instead daycare.

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23 minutes ago, EmseB said:

From the article:

"The child care programs will be capped at fifteen students per room, in line with state social distancing rules, said city budget director Melanie Hartzog.

The programs will supervise children while they participate in online learning, and offer arts and recreation activities and possibly local field trips."

 

Why is this not just...school? Why are teachers not in charge of the groups of 15 kids and just teaching them instead of a daycare worker supervising online learning?? I am so confused, honestly not being obtuse, about how this is better or different than opening schools.

Meanwhile, the wealthy parents are hiring licensed teachers to come to their homes?

This is happening locally. People paying $200/wk for their kids to be in education "pods" while schools are closed.

 

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1 hour ago, PerfectFifth said:

My homeschool connections are constantly listing groups of families requesting a dedicated teacher for their students in their homes. $100/hour is about the going rate in certain high income areas near me. Trust me...I've considered it.

Same here. My friend (licensed teacher) is considering doing this. 
 

Our local schools are not going to enforce mask wearing because even though our state mandated masks, there are no enforcement provisions. 

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1 hour ago, Alte Veste Academy said:

She's right. My next door neighbor posted this on her Facebook page. Now, here I think wearing a mask shows respect and love for my fellow citizens. And that I respect science and facts. But this is what I'm surrounded with. 😭 And again, I'm in Arizona, where we are in extremely bad shape.

 108627083_Masknonsense.png.1ed487a138139f6534b9a87d2aadc47c.png

 

It needs a rebuttal type of graphic  for Facebook, maybe other uses 

 

something like two people masked 

and

 

wearing a mask signals 

 

I am intelligent and can understand science

and

I care for my fellow human beings

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Honestly.. that meme is so idiotic I'm not sure I'd even respond to it. The people who actually think that are probably beyond being responded to and they certainly won't listen in response to that.

(Maybe because I know for sure neither is true for myself and I am secure in my beliefs I don't feel the need to argue when it seems pointless)

 

I've got people in my life who think masking is unnecessary, probably not having the effect we want it to, etc. But for the most part they are not offensively throwing it in your face or callling me names for disagreeing. I've heard of people doing that. But the ones on the community groups doing it are the same folk who were boorish before all this began.

Insert other media

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I was just at my kids' new high school, and the staff there are very eager to get the kids back to school.  Plans for re-opening here seem fluid at the moment.  Our district sent out a "plan" last night that provides various plans depending on the level of community spread week by week.  They are doing it by county.  (Unfortunately, we're at the southern end of a big county with more cases up north.)

Hoping cases continue to decrease, but also concerned that the numbers required are unreasonable and the data unreliable.  For one thing, when testing increases, it looks like cases are increasing even when they aren't.

They are going to have at least 7 full days of staff training regarding the new safety procedures.  The first day of school is postponed for 2.5 weeks as of now.  If nothing changes in terms of community spread, looks like my kids will have in-person school 2 days per week.

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44 minutes ago, EmseB said:

 

 

Why is this not just...school? Why are teachers not in charge of the groups of 15 kids and just teaching them instead of a daycare worker supervising online learning?? I am so confused, honestly not being obtuse, about how this is better or different than opening schools.

Meanwhile, the wealthy parents are hiring licensed teachers to come to their homes?

That's about half as many kids as in many classrooms. If we are cutting size in half, we either need twice as many teachers, or the same number of teachers plus just as many non teachers. That second option is more practical. We can't double the number of certified teachers in the country overnight. 

Also, because the kids are doing virtual school on their laptop at their level, you can group siblings together. So that also reduces risk, both for the students and the teachers. If you have say, 12 kids from 4 families, versus 12 families, that's a big difference in potential exposure. Plus, if there is a case in that group of kids, you are only isolating 4 families for 14 days, versus the 12 families from that room, PLUS then worrying about all the classrooms that the siblings of those 12 kids were in. 

So if Bob, Jessica, and Sally are siblings, and in a learning lab group together, and there is a positive case, they all have to isolate at home and their parents are exposed. But if Bob, Jessica, and Sally are all in different classes, in different rooms and maybe different schools, then if Bob is exposed in his room, we have to assume that he has potentially exposed Jessica and Sally and their parents, but ALSO Jessica may have exposed all the kids in her classroom, and Sally exposed all the kids in her classroom, and then they can spread it to their parents, and their siblings can spread it to THEIR classrooms...etc etc. 

But putting families together, it helps control spread and makes contact tracing much easier, as well as making it easier to ramp up needed staff by not needing a certified teacher with each group of kids. And it would be easier to hire those people, because you are asking them to take on less risk, and they could have their own children in that small group, rather than exposing their child to still another group of people. 

 

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1 hour ago, Alte Veste Academy said:

She's right. My next door neighbor posted this on her Facebook page. Now, here I think wearing a mask shows respect and love for my fellow citizens. And that I respect science and facts. But this is what I'm surrounded with. 😭 And again, I'm in Arizona, where we are in extremely bad shape.

 108627083_Masknonsense.png.1ed487a138139f6534b9a87d2aadc47c.png

 

This right here is exactly why we will have Covid around for a long time!~

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Looks like it's online learning for the CA counties on the Governor's List.

Quote

In order to resume in-person class instruction, a county must have been off the state's COVID-19 watch list for 14 consecutive days. Districts in counties on the watch list will only be able to do distance learning.

As of Friday, 33 of California's 58 counties are on the COVID-19 watch list. That represents more than 80% of the state's population.

https://abc7.com/education/live-newsom-announces-which-ca-school-district-can-reopen-this-fall/6321702/

 

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49 minutes ago, EmseB said:

From the article:

"The child care programs will be capped at fifteen students per room, in line with state social distancing rules, said city budget director Melanie Hartzog.

The programs will supervise children while they participate in online learning, and offer arts and recreation activities and possibly local field trips."

 

Why is this not just...school? Why are teachers not in charge of the groups of 15 kids and just teaching them instead of a daycare worker supervising online learning?? I am so confused, honestly not being obtuse, about how this is better or different than opening schools.

I think that hiring enough teachers to be in charge of groups of 15 would be impossible even if they tried, and schools do not have enough room to have all the students there in groups of 15. Schools only have so much room, whereas these care programs will be spread all over the place.  

33 minutes ago, EmseB said:

So the state will pay low wage daycare workers to put themselves at the same risks that the licensed professionals claimed to be too great to bear, meanwhile, said professionals will still get paid for providing some kind of online content (so we're paying teachers and daycare workers with money that doesn't exist), kids are still going to be in groups with one or two adults per not-a-classroom with someone attempting to supervise learning, provide art and rec, and field trips? 

Aside from the logistics, if kids can't be in school because it's going to cause outbreaks, why can they be in these daycares? It says up to 8th grade?

And those with means will pay the licensed teachers to just...come to their homes on an ad hoc basis and teachers who are scared to teach groups will still be going in and out of multiple homes to tutor?

I'm sure it's no surprise to many of you that I can't wrap my brain around all this.

They can be in schools, with limited number of students and proper physical distancing and other protocols. But the schools cannot all accommodate students every day while still limiting numbers and having increased space. It's the impossibility that many of us were talking about from the beginning - the space to do this and till be full time does not exist in the vast majority of school systems. 

27 minutes ago, EmseB said:

I get that. I don't understand how, if the goal is preventing outbreaks and keeping kids out of groups in the classroom, that this plan does that. The kids are still in something that they are not calling a classroom, but instead daycare.

My answers above go for this post as well. Groups of 15 are better than groups of 30, more space is better than less space. And keeping them home is best of all, but obviously not always possible. 

3 minutes ago, SKL said:

   For one thing, when testing increases, it looks like cases are increasing even when they aren't.

You can check hospitalizations and deaths as well as number of cases.  

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So, our board at this time voted to say that they should get to determine when and if schools open...and are forming a medical advisory board for that purpose, given that the department of health has been told by the governor not to advise them. So they are making their own panel. And told the state to shove it, basically. 

Meanwhile Governor DeSantis is IN MY CITY (I did not know this.....probably for the best or I might have done bad things) and said that Orange County should open because our death rate is good compared to some places and based on the current trends. Um, we had nearly 1,400 new cases in the county yesterday, we had over 700 today, and we do not have some sort of special get out of dead free card that means these people will be less likely to die than anywhere else. Florida hospitals are filling up, including in Orange County. He does not care. 

https://www.clickorlando.com/news/local/2020/07/17/orange-county-school-board-insists-on-right-to-determine-when-schools-reopen/

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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

Positivity rates are another stat that you can use that is less influenced by the numbers of tests.  It detects changes more quickly than hospitalizations or deaths. 

Except in Florida, where that number is total nonsense, because on the one hand we are counting negatives from the same person multiple times, but positives only once....and on the other hand we have labs not reporting their negative tests like they are supposed to. 

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23 minutes ago, EmseB said:

I get that. I don't understand how, if the goal is preventing outbreaks and keeping kids out of groups in the classroom, that this plan does that. The kids are still in something that they are not calling a classroom, but instead daycare.

The typical class size here is about 30 normally. Getting the numbers down enough to allow social distancing and reduce numbers requires either removing half the kids without reducing the number of teachers, or doubling the number of teachers. Here, parents are able to pick virtual or in person, and the teachers who are doing virtual are going to have more students each (the district is purchasing the FLVS program, but local teachers will be supervising, grading, doing class meetings, etc) so the class sizes in person can be kept small enough to allow social distancing. Parents who elect virtual are on their own for child care if they need it, and yeah, more affluent parents are hiring tutors or nannies or college education majors or teachers to provide child care and assist with virtual school.

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6 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

That's about half as many kids as in many classrooms. If we are cutting size in half, we either need twice as many teachers, or the same number of teachers plus just as many non teachers. That second option is more practical. We can't double the number of certified teachers in the country overnight. 

Also, because the kids are doing virtual school on their laptop at their level, you can group siblings together. So that also reduces risk, both for the students and the teachers. If you have say, 12 kids from 4 families, versus 12 families, that's a big difference in potential exposure. Plus, if there is a case in that group of kids, you are only isolating 4 families for 14 days, versus the 12 families from that room, PLUS then worrying about all the classrooms that the siblings of those 12 kids were in. 

So if Bob, Jessica, and Sally are siblings, and in a learning lab group together, and there is a positive case, they all have to isolate at home and their parents are exposed. But if Bob, Jessica, and Sally are all in different classes, in different rooms and maybe different schools, then if Bob is exposed in his room, we have to assume that he has potentially exposed Jessica and Sally and their parents, but ALSO Jessica may have exposed all the kids in her classroom, and Sally exposed all the kids in her classroom, and then they can spread it to their parents, and their siblings can spread it to THEIR classrooms...etc etc. 

But putting families together, it helps control spread and makes contact tracing much easier, as well as making it easier to ramp up needed staff by not needing a certified teacher with each group of kids. And it would be easier to hire those people, because you are asking them to take on less risk, and they could have their own children in that small group, rather than exposing their child to still another group of people. 

 

This sounds like magical thinking of we're talking about people being at less risk so we're paying them less. I'm thinking of the concept of bubbles here and vectors of disease.

If we put families together, wouldn't that mean older kids, who are more likely to transmit would be spread out in more different groups on daycare days (increasing risk to the workers), who are then in yet other different groups on the days they are in school with more kids their own age? And I'm still not sure how a larger group size with the same group every day (in school) isn't better. This just seems like NY is adding another group for kids and adults to be in and limiting their time at school. And of course this is only for poor families who can't afford to bring in private tutors 

Also, aren't teachers going to be in people's homes on days they aren't in the classroom?

All of this sounds like increasing the amount of people in each bubble rather than limiting it, plus requiring daycare workers to provide school-lite for less pay because they aren't licensed. If we can't even get enough subs for schools, how can we get all these daycare workers? And who subs for them and what happens to the group if there are cases?

I guess I'm still not understanding how all the problems with schools opening don't apply to these daycares?

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1 hour ago, EmseB said:

So the state will pay low wage daycare workers to put themselves at the same risks that the licensed professionals claimed to be too great to bear, meanwhile, said professionals will still get paid for providing some kind of online content (so we're paying teachers and daycare workers with money that doesn't exist), kids are still going to be in groups with one or two adults per not-a-classroom with someone attempting to supervise learning, provide art and rec, and field trips? 

Aside from the logistics, if kids can't be in school because it's going to cause outbreaks, why can they be in these daycares? It says up to 8th grade?

 

Well, you forgot that it’s NY and they’re on their way to paying a living wage, lol. Day care workers in NYC get an average of $13/hour. Of course it’s still low paying, but I’ll bet they’ll have applicants.

Cuomo also has a plan in place on when the state’s individual districts can return. Some of you guys act like NYC is the only place that needs to be discussed, when there’s a pretty big area outside of it that matters. 

Once again, I applaud the governor for listening to ideas and advice, realizing we’re not all in the same straits as the city, and putting forth a plan that admits if things get worse, this is what needs to happen. 

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3 hours ago, Pen said:

 

Did CA not have anything open for children whose parents needed to work?

 

For kids under some age (12?), we had schools open as locations for kids to be safely at (and work on distance schooling from there), up to physical distanced space available with a priority basis, LEO and HCW, other “Essential workers”, and trailing out to any situation where no parent could be at home whatever the work type of there was enough room. 

The school parking lot looked about 30% as full as usual— no busses running iirc since if people had to work out of home idea was they could drop kids off.

 

This still left a lot of problems with regard to getting kids educated, particularly resistant ones.  But afaik there were no CV19 cases in that system of doing things. So went well  that way. 

There are daycares open, but all that does is punt the entire risk from teachers to daycare workers. Also, my area has a ridiculously low number of daycare spots when not in a pandemic, so,  at least here, there is nothing as of now. 

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1 hour ago, EmseB said:

So the state will pay low wage daycare workers to put themselves at the same risks that the licensed professionals claimed to be too great to bear, meanwhile, said professionals will still get paid for providing some kind of online content (so we're paying teachers and daycare workers with money that doesn't exist), kids are still going to be in groups with one or two adults per not-a-classroom with someone attempting to supervise learning, provide art and rec, and field trips? 

Aside from the logistics, if kids can't be in school because it's going to cause outbreaks, why can they be in these daycares? It says up to 8th grade?

And those with means will pay the licensed teachers to just...come to their homes on an ad hoc basis and teachers who are scared to teach groups will still be going in and out of multiple homes to tutor?

I'm sure it's no surprise to many of you that I can't wrap my brain around all this.

Yep, the low paid daycare workers get all the risk, and the gap between wealthy and poor students will widen even more. 

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26 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

 Um, we had nearly 1,400 new cases in the county yesterday, we had over 700 today, and we do not have some sort of special get out of dead free card that means these people will be less likely to die than anywhere else.  

I'm stealing this phrase! Applicable to so many situations, lol. 

20 minutes ago, EmseB said:

This sounds like magical thinking of we're talking about people being at less risk so we're paying them less. I'm thinking of the concept of bubbles here and vectors of disease.

If we put families together, wouldn't that mean older kids, who are more likely to transmit would be spread out in more different groups on daycare days (increasing risk to the workers), who are then in yet other different groups on the days they are in school with more kids their own age? And I'm still not sure how a larger group size with the same group every day (in school) isn't better. This just seems like NY is adding another group for kids and adults to be in and limiting their time at school. And of course this is only for poor families who can't afford to bring in private tutors 

Also, aren't teachers going to be in people's homes on days they aren't in the classroom?

All of this sounds like increasing the amount of people in each bubble rather than limiting it, plus requiring daycare workers to provide school-lite for less pay because they aren't licensed. If we can't even get enough subs for schools, how can we get all these daycare workers? And who subs for them and what happens to the group if there are cases?

I guess I'm still not understanding how all the problems with schools opening don't apply to these daycares?

I haven't seen anyone say that the people will be paid less because they're at less risk? They will be paid less because they are not teaching. It sounds like they will be using the same precautions for school and care locations, so risk should be roughly the same. 

This only goes up to age 12, so no teenagers. I don't think we have even a rough idea of when the 'child advantage' ends, but I also don't think we truly know how kids of any age might spread the disease, because they haven't been at school. But, assuming the 10-12s are more likely to spread it, then yes, they will very possibly be in one group for school and another for care. It would be ideal if that were avoidable, but it's not, and I definitely think 2 small groups that are distancing are much safer than 1 large group that is not distancing. I'm sure we'll keep learning as we go, and they'll adjust as they can. 

We don't actually know that we can get the needed daycare workers and subs, but I think getting the main workers will at least be possible. Many of them will have their own kids as part of their pod. And remember, when we were discussing the difficulty of of getting subs for schools, it was mostly in the context of schools that are not prepared and/or do not intend to follow basic protocols, like the schools that are not reducing their numbers, not requiring masks, and not physically distancing. When people know that is the situation, and know that a sub is needed because someone caught Covid, then I predict that very few people will want to sub in that situation. I think they are more likely to sub in both schools and daycares that take care, reduce numbers, and physically distance, but it certainly might still be a problem. It may turn into a situation like at Target and other stores, where they had to offer 'combat pay' to keep workers, and then decided to make the increase permanent. Target went from hiring at $13 per hour to $15 per hour, which is particularly powerful in states like mine where minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. 

One of the biggest problems with schools opening is 30+ kids crowded into a classroom. They are reducing those numbers and increasing physical distance. 15 kids with enough room to physically distance are the same problem in a school or in a care location, but it is impossible to achieve that using schools alone. The space does not exist. 

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2 hours ago, PerfectFifth said:

My homeschool connections are constantly listing groups of families requesting a dedicated teacher for their students in their homes. $100/hour is about the going rate in certain high income areas near me. Trust me...I've considered it.

Holy moly!

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1 minute ago, kdsuomi said:

Yep, the low paid daycare workers get all the risk, and the gap between wealthy and poor students will widen even more. 

Well, they get the same risk as the higher paid teachers, not all the risk. And I agree that the gap between wealthy and poor students will widen with this crisis, as it does with any crisis. But what would you have them do? Start school with 30+ students per room and no physical distancing? That's just a risk I'm not comfortable taking.

School closures or modifications will not hit wealthy and poor students equally, but neither will a covid outbreak. I'll take an education gap over a death gap. 

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I'm in Ohio where the governor has a county by county color coding system. Yellow means low risk, then orange, red, and then to purple when the number of positive Covid cases gets very high. One of the local school districts has offered two plans. The first is full time online instruction. The other plan changes depending on where the county is on the color code. If it's yellow or orange, all students attend every day which means little to no social distancing. If it's red (as it is right now), they go to a hybrid plan. If they get into purple, everyone goes remote. I can't imagine what chaos this creates for parents. It's an upper middle class suburb with mostly two income families, and many would be in a position to work from home when necessary. However, how do single parents or parents who can't work from home handle having the kids at school full time sometimes, going two days a week other times, and then possibly going to full time remote at any time? I'm a believer that school isn't daycare and parents shouldn't expect that the school will always provide it, but this plan has so little continuity that I feel sorry for people without flexible schedules trying to plan for fall.

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2 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I'm in Ohio where the governor has a county by county color coding system. Yellow means low risk, then orange, red, and then to purple when the number of positive Covid cases gets very high. One of the local school districts has offered two plans. The first is full time online instruction. The other plan changes depending on where the county is on the color code. If it's yellow or orange, all students attend every day which means little to no social distancing. If it's red (as it is right now), they go to a hybrid plan. If they get into purple, everyone goes remote. I can't imagine what chaos this creates for parents. It's an upper middle class suburb with mostly two income families, and many would be in a position to work from home when necessary. However, how do single parents or parents who can't work from home handle having the kids at school full time sometimes, going two days a week other times, and then possibly going to full time remote at any time? I'm a believer that school isn't daycare and parents shouldn't expect that the school will always provide it, but this plan has so little continuity that I feel sorry for people without flexible schedules trying to plan for fall.

I'm in Michigan which has a 6 phase re-opening plan that includes businesses and schools.  The state has said that schools will not provide any in-person instruction in regions that are in phases 1-3.  Yesterday most of the state was in phase 4, with one areas in phase 3 and two regions (ours included) demoted to phase 2.  Today, however, there is only one region in the whole state still in phase 4; most of the rest are now in phase 3, with the two hardest hit areas still in phase 2.

Michigan schools don't normally start until around Labor Day, so we still have ~6 weeks, but right now only a few rural counties would be allowed to open school buildings, and things are getting worse by the day, not better.

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17 hours ago, kand said:

I’m a bit speechless at this. 

 

Me too! Our superintendent is a lovely, thoughtful person who makes great leadership decisions typically. She is the type to want teacher input and made a point to continue paying everyone during the shut-down, including the hourly employees who no longer had work. When DH read the letter, he sounded like she was trying to thread a needle and that she may have had pressure from the state dept of ed to downplay any possible problems with full reopening next year. It was odd. 

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Maine is going with masks for anyone 2 and older. I'm so relieved!

Even with masks, I may not feel (or be!) safe. But I'm so glad they didn't leave it up to the individual districts. Now we don't have to be the bad guy, we can just get on with gaining community support. Hope we can do it!

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2 hours ago, mom2scouts said:

I'm in Ohio where the governor has a county by county color coding system. Yellow means low risk, then orange, red, and then to purple when the number of positive Covid cases gets very high. One of the local school districts has offered two plans. The first is full time online instruction. The other plan changes depending on where the county is on the color code. If it's yellow or orange, all students attend every day which means little to no social distancing. If it's red (as it is right now), they go to a hybrid plan. If they get into purple, everyone goes remote. I can't imagine what chaos this creates for parents. It's an upper middle class suburb with mostly two income families, and many would be in a position to work from home when necessary. However, how do single parents or parents who can't work from home handle having the kids at school full time sometimes, going two days a week other times, and then possibly going to full time remote at any time? I'm a believer that school isn't daycare and parents shouldn't expect that the school will always provide it, but this plan has so little continuity that I feel sorry for people without flexible schedules trying to plan for fall.

Yeah, ugh. This just made my life about ten times harder today and I’m pissed. My schedule is a complete cluster, especially when they haven’t told us which days the in person days are. So I can’t start shifting things around to make it work because we have no certainty.

The principal did say she thinks they’ll be able to go full time in person fairly quickly here in the fall, at least at our school, but who knows.

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16 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

How can that be legal?   Can the White House block anyone from testifying in any kind or situation?  

Presidents do this sort of thing all of the time.  Legal wrangling will commence, or not.  I'm not saying it's right, but it is pretty common.

Without looking it up, I'd assume the CDC is part of the Dept. of Health and Human Services, which is under the HHS Secretary, who is a cabinet member under the Executive Branch.  I suspect they'll eventually work something out.

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1 hour ago, Arctic Mama said:

Yeah, ugh. This just made my life about ten times harder today and I’m pissed. My schedule is a complete cluster, especially when they haven’t told us which days the in person days are. So I can’t start shifting things around to make it work because we have no certainty.

The principal did say she thinks they’ll be able to go full time in person fairly quickly here in the fall, at least at our school, but who knows.

So is your school district doing a plan like this too? This seems like the worst of all possible (bad) options. We homeschool, but our local district is planning a choice of either all remote learning or 2 days at school/3 days at home for at least the semester. I think this is a better option because it allows parents to know when (or if) their children will be at school and when they'll be home. I can't imagine not knowing week to week whether they're going 5 days a week, 2 days a week, or not at all.

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16 minutes ago, DoraBora said:

Presidents do this sort of thing all of the time.  Legal wrangling will commence, or not.  I'm not saying it's right, but it is pretty common.

Without looking it up, I'd assume the CDC is part of the Dept. of Health and Human Services, which is under the HHS Secretary, who is a cabinet member under the Executive Branch.  I suspect they'll eventually work something out.

I thought they weren’t based on the whole database debacle but figuring out US politics from the outside is complicated

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8 hours ago, DawnM said:

 

It didn't work so well in the Spring.  We have to get parent permission before talking to them virtually and students didn't want their parents to know, so they would refuse.  

Like someone else said, it seems really helpful if permission for this could be part of the regular school registration paperwork. Alternatively, if all kids were just scheduled for a short session as a matter of course, which would also require a blanket permission from all parents, but then kids who need additional support could be flagged that way. Seems like there could be ways to do it, but of course not if you are being hall monitor instead.  Counseling sessions themself can work pretty well virtually. 

7 hours ago, Alte Veste Academy said:

She's right. My next door neighbor posted this on her Facebook page. Now, here I think wearing a mask shows respect and love for my fellow citizens. And that I respect science and facts. But this is what I'm surrounded with. 😭 And again, I'm in Arizona, where we are in extremely bad shape.

 108627083_Masknonsense.png.1ed487a138139f6534b9a87d2aadc47c.png

The irony is that it has become quite clear it’s the reverse: refusal to wear a mask is highly correlated with irrational fear. 

5 hours ago, kdsuomi said:

Yep, the low paid daycare workers get all the risk, and the gap between wealthy and poor students will widen even more. 

A silver lining of this pandemic is that a lot more people seem to be noticing some long standing societal problems such as this and caring about them. Hopefully that will continue after the pandemic is over. 

1 hour ago, Corraleno said:

What on earth is going on there? This country’s gone crazy 😥

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11 minutes ago, kand said:

 

Like someone else said, it seems really helpful if permission for this could be part of the regular school registration paperwork. Alternatively, if all kids were just scheduled for a short session as a matter of course, which would also require a blanket permission from all parents, but then kids who need additional support could be flagged that way. Seems like there could be ways to do it, but of course not if you are being hall monitor instead.  Counseling sessions themself can work pretty well virtually. 

 

I am not even sure we can do that.  There are all sorts of stipulations involved.

All kids scheduled for a short session?  Not all kids need it, and I have 517 kids on my caseload.

I don't do therapy, so it really is kids who need added social/emotional support.  Some kids need more and some need less.

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1 hour ago, DawnM said:

All kids scheduled for a short session?  Not all kids need it, and I have 517 kids on my caseload.

I wondered before I said it how many you would have and tried to do some quick math how long it would take to get through them. Yeah, that idea probably wouldn’t work. 

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I thought they weren’t based on the whole database debacle but figuring out US politics from the outside is complicated

It's no walk in the park from the inside, either. 

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So now the debacle here is that the parents need to pick what option they want for their kids - face to face which may or may not actually happen depending on what they can legally decide, launch -ed which is a livestream interactive virtual option done by the regular teachers, or Orange County Virtual School. (or they can do FLVS or regular homeschool or private school or whatver)

They need to know in order to assign teachers to the various options. Except the teachers have kids, and don't know which option to pick for their own kids, because they don't know if they will be teaching virtually and can keep kids home or teaching in person and can't. 

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14 hours ago, Kanin said:

Maine is going with masks for anyone 2 and older. I'm so relieved!

Even with masks, I may not feel (or be!) safe. But I'm so glad they didn't leave it up to the individual districts. Now we don't have to be the bad guy, we can just get on with gaining community support. Hope we can do it!

Great news!!

I hope additional policies will allow you to feel that you can stay in your job. 
 

I haven’t seen the school news yet but I will say in my area mask compliance, in the few places I’ve been, has been 100% for awhile. 👍

 

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