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1 hour ago, Storygirl said:

Our district is planning to have band camp during the regularly scheduled week in August. I have one son who does percussion, and some of the percussion section is going to start practicing tomorrow in person (not his section). The messages say that masks will be required for these percussion practices, but the athletes practicing at the school already have not been wearing masks, so I am guessing that they will really not enforce the mask wearing.

We are waiting for a message about school opening that is supposed to come tomorrow, and I'm hoping it will contain information about band and choir, but I won't be surprised if it does not. We already know that there is no hybrid option; students have to be all online or fully in the classroom, but we don't know what the plans for the classrooms are yet.

My son who plays percussion is going to be less at risk, because percussion stands at the back and does not involve spit or blowing. During marching formations, he does not march but stands on the track in an ensemble.

But my son who plays saxophone will be right in there in the spitty section. And DD who sings in the choir......ugh.

I'm hoping the school will have a plan to make things at least a bit safer, but I don't know. They could cut the risk during performances in half if schools only perform at their own football games and don't bring the visiting band.

I don't think they should have football at all, actually, but I think they are going to try their hardest to make sports happen.

The lack of an hybrid option is really disappointing to me. I was hoping that they could benefit from in-class instruction (which my particular kids need -- two have IEPs) but have half of the risk by staying home a few days each week. If my kids were different people, I would have them skip music this year.

 

What state is this? Ugh. Y'all are making me very grateful for my options.

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nm--I'll tell you later 😉

Edited by kokotg
I'm not sure it's public information yet.
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1 hour ago, Storygirl said:

We have a friend who is superintendent of a nearby district, and DH saw him on a Zoom session yesterday. DH said that friend was visibly stressed  -- more stressed than he has been before this week. The superintendent knows there isn't a way for them to keep Covid out of the school building. He said that he knows parents will send kids sick to school, because some parents do this and will give Tylenol to take a fever down before sending kids to class. He says it will take very little to shut the building down.

And I've been thinking of my own personal experience this week. I have a very mild runny nose (I blow my nose once or twice a day) and an extremely slight cough. DD18's graduation is this Saturday (in-person but at a church with a very small graduating class), so I got a Covid test over the weekend, so that I can be sure that it's safe for me to go to the graduation and  be around some people (socially distanced) on Saturday. The nurse told me that my whole family should stay at home until I get my results, which will take up to five days. DD18 is having to take time off of work. Two of my other kids are missing some athletic practices at school, and we've had to reschedule an ortho appointment and a sports medicine appointment and at least one other thing.

All because mom has a runny nose and a bitty cough.

So if people do things right according to public health measures, any time ANYONE in the house is sniffly, everyone needs to stay home until no one in the whole house has symptoms, or until cleared by testing.

If people do that, schools will have tons of absences every day. Normally, if the school has a certain number of sick students for the flu or whatever, the school closes for the day. I would think they would need to follow those guidelines, still, which will mean a lot of day-by-day closures. I suppose they could let those standards be more lax, but that would make no sense in a pandemic.

However, I suspect that it's more likely for a portion of families to dose their kids with cold medicine and just send their runny nose or coughing kids to class. And as long as a portion of families do this, the risk of the virus spreading will be higher.

 

By this point, we should have more testing options so that results are given faster.   If everyone only needed to stay home for one day, or if results were immediate, things would run much smoother.  

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4 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Paywall (I should say, subscribe wall)

 

This is the gist.  

Screen Shot 2020-07-13 at 6.10.50 PM.png

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5 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

FOUR people? That’s pretty serious. 

 

Yeah, and the 2nd largest school district in the country isn't opening in the Fall.  

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FYI NY Times has free COVID updates with registration, no money.

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1 minute ago, DawnM said:

 

Yeah, and the 2nd largest school district in the country isn't opening in the Fall.  

I had heard about that school district not reopening but it didn’t fully register until you just used those words. 

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18 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

FOUR people? That’s pretty serious. 

 

The rest of the world is taking this MUCH more seriously than we are.

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2 hours ago, Sneezyone said:

 

What state is this? Ugh. Y'all are making me very grateful for my options.

Ohio. But each district in Ohio gets to make their own plans while following guidance from the state department of education, so it varies. Some districts are offering a hybrid option. Some have decided to be all online, including Columbus Public schools. I have a gym teacher friend who teaches in Columbus who is trying to plan online elementary gym classes.

We just now got the official document outlining the plan. Kids have to wear masks and use hand sanitizer on buses; siblings must sit together; there will be a seating plan; and parents are encouraged to drive kids themselves (which is what we plan to do). In the classrooms, students grades 3 and up must wear masks, unless they cannot (this is state guidance), and there will be additional cleaning and hand sanitizer happening. Classroom doors will be left open. No visitors to the building unless essential, and no field trips. No one can use lockers.  No info about how they will manage the high school kids in the hallways or about lunch periods.

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

There was also info about the online option. They are using an outside source but some local teachers may also run some classes. They can't guarantee that all of the classes that would be offered in-person will be available online. They can't guarantee that all IEP accommodations can be managed online and will have IEP meetings for students with needs who select the online option.  They promise the online classes will be better than remote learning last spring, with more teacher interaction (there really was almost none) and more rigor.

They said they may offer a hybrid option if conditions with the pandemic change through the school year, but the logistics were too difficult (according to the committee) to offer it now. One of their concerns with hybrid was that kids would be at various daycares on days off and so would be adding exposure to the mix.

Students have to take temp at home before going to school.

Oh, and teachers and staff have to wear masks. Which goes without saying, since students have to, but I thought I should say it anyway.

Edited by Storygirl
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12 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Ohio. But each district in Ohio gets to make their own plans while following guidance from the state department of education, so it varies. Some districts are offering a hybrid option. Some have decided to be all online, including Columbus Public schools. I have a gym teacher friend who teaches in Columbus who is trying to plan online elementary gym classes.

We just now got the official document outlining the plan. Kids have to wear masks and use hand sanitizer on buses; siblings must sit together; there will be a seating plan; and parents are encouraged to drive kids themselves (which is what we plan to do). In the classrooms, students grades 3 and up must wear masks, unless they cannot (this is state guidance), and there will be additional cleaning and hand sanitizer happening. Classroom doors will be left open. No visitors to the building unless essential, and no field trips. No one can use lockers.  No info about how they will manage the high school kids in the hallways or about lunch periods.

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

There was also info about the online option. They are using an outside source but some local teachers may also run some classes. They can't guarantee that all of the classes that would be offered in-person will be available online. They can't guarantee that all IEP accommodations can be managed online and will have IEP meetings for students with needs who select the online option.  They promise the online classes will be better than remote learning last spring, with more teacher interaction (there really was almost none) and more rigor.

They said they may offer a hybrid option if conditions with the pandemic change through the school year, but the logistics were too difficult (according to the committee) to offer it now. One of their concerns with hybrid was that kids would be at various daycares on days off and so would be adding exposure to the mix.

Students have to take temp at home before going to school.

Oh, and teachers and staff have to wear masks. Which goes without saying, since students have to, but I thought I should say it anyway.

 

I have so may questions about this. Taking temps at home, for ex.? Fat chance.

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Oh, wait. It does say that they will have consistent seating in the lunchroom, that hand sanitizer must be used before and after eating, and that social distancing will happen as much as is possible. Whatever that means. Although, to be fair,  they don't know how many students will choose the in-person option yet -- we have a week to decide -- they probably couldn't be too specific yet.

I know another school in our area is only going to have 3 foot social distancing. Which is obviously less than optimal. I've watched high school kids at sports practices over the past couple of weeks, and social distancing is not happening among the kids as they walk about outside the school. I can hope they will do better in the classrooms, but I also know the high school teachers are not going to want to be the social distancing police.

The superintendent did say that she knows not all families will like the options. I'm not happy, but I'm resigned to it, and we will do what we can at home. I'll probably have the kids leave their backpacks in the garage and come in and take showers first thing every day. Wipe their computers before they use them for homework, etc.

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48 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

No photo description available.

 

The only person I know who is vocal about "KIDS MUST RETURN IN PERSON OR SCHOOLS SHOULD LOSE MONEY!" is a retired law professor, wealthy Seattleite (his kid went to school with me and is a pediatrician). He has no grandkids either.

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5 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I have so may questions about this. Taking temps at home, for ex.? Fat chance.

Yeah, the honor system doesn't really work all that well. I did anticipate this and bought a digital forehead reading thermometer, so that I can shoot my kids before they leave each day.

Edited by Storygirl
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I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

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1 minute ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

 

I also know many people who are benefiting in a major way due to increased access to remote and tele-health options to include increased access to mental health sessions online, one on one. We didn't have access to live instruction this spring for equity reasons but will this fall through a district-wide virtual school.

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That's great for the people you know, but the people I know are not benefiting from it. They're suffering and are terrified of schools not opening back up. 

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23 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

 

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

 

Um..so classes full of kids, kids eating with no masks in a big room together, but IEP meetings, THOSE are virtual???

3 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

But how will their mental health be effected by schools opening and then closing again, by rolling quarantines when people test positive and whole classes have to go home on short notice, if a teacher or friend gets ill, if they get ill, if they bring the infection home and get a parent or sibling ill? None of that seems good for mental health either. 

I do think one on one appointments for counseling could happen,or even outdoor group counseling, etc. But shoving thousands of teens into a school is likely going to lead to outcomes that hurt mental health too. 

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1 minute ago, kdsuomi said:

That's great for the people you know, but the people I know are not benefiting from it. They're suffering and are terrified of schools not opening back up. 

I see a lot of parents saying their kids need "normalcy" but things are not going to be normal, even at school. Normal isn't an option. 

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29 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Um..so classes full of kids, kids eating with no masks in a big room together, but IEP meetings, THOSE are virtual???

 

I'm guessing the thought is to keep people out of the building who are not normally there daily???

It will be interesting! We've had so many Zoom sessions for various things this summer that I'm used to it, and I don't think it will bother me, but it will be different, for sure.

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24 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Um..so classes full of kids, kids eating with no masks in a big room together, but IEP meetings, THOSE are virtual???

I think virtual IEP meetings are something that is going to be here to stay after the pandemic is over.  I've been to many many IEP meetings, on both sides of the table, and now to a handful of virtual ones when invited by friends.  Virtual means that everyone can be there.  Parents can take an hour off work, instead of three because they don't have to drive back out from their jobs.  If Grandma is a great source of wisdom and support to the family, she can be there even if she lives several states away. You no longer have to choose between the day when the TVI is there, or the day when the school psychologist is there or the day when the PT is there.   And there's no awkwardness with someone on the speaker phone who can't hear 2/3 of what's going on.  The Voc Rehab counselor can make two or three times as many meetings, because he/she isn't driving from school to school.  If you're in a transition year, you can have both the sending and receiving school there. 

I think that full classes, and band, and choir, and lunch in the cafeteria are nuts right now, but I hope we get back to those one day.  But I imagine that virtual IEP meetings are here to stay.  For families with access, home visits are a really powerful way to do an IEP, and virtual means you don't need to choose between home visit and full team, because a couple people can drive over with a couple devices and a hotspot, and every one else can participate remotely.

24 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

But how will their mental health be effected by schools opening and then closing again, by rolling quarantines when people test positive and whole classes have to go home on short notice, if a teacher or friend gets ill, if they get ill, if they bring the infection home and get a parent or sibling ill? None of that seems good for mental health either. 

I do think one on one appointments for counseling could happen,or even outdoor group counseling, etc. But shoving thousands of teens into a school is likely going to lead to outcomes that hurt mental health too. 

I think that schools need to do a far better job at figuring out how to support kids' mental health during distance learning.  But frankly, they needed to do a far better job of supporting kids mental health in the building before COVID.  In my experience, both as a parent and from what I've heard from teacher friends, some kids with mental health needs do better with the virtual environment.  One of my kids has found virtual therapy to work really really well.  I've heard from special ed teachers in schools that are doing a decent job that some of their kids with executive functioning issues are way less overwhelmed.  And, for some kids, it's absolutely worse.  One of my kids gets very little out of virtual therapy.  

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37 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

I have a kid with mental health issues, for whom isolation and stuck at home-ness is certainly massively exacerbating.  (We pulled them out of school last October, started medication, began community college classes in January.  By February, they were thriving and happy and back to normal.  Then lockdown started, and they began spiraling downwards again.)  I want them to go to school.  I think they really, really need the mental health benefits school could bring.  Things are really, REALLY hard here.  They don't sleep alone.  Their sister is stressed.  We're all seriously stressed by their misery.  Their public school friends ditched them when we pulled them out of school, and community college didn't really generate peers or friendships, since they were so much younger.  So they really don't have any friends to connect with online, other than friends that they've MET online.  We are signed up for a private high school for next year in the hope of making friends.  

But....the reality is, no matter how awful their mental health is, school really isn't safe.  And if they bring home covid and a bad health outcome happens to me or their grandparent, that's going to be damaging to their mental health, too.  There simply are no good options right now, and that's the fault of the virus and the fact that people and government have not done what is required to bring down rates of community transmission.  

It just sucks, all the way around, for everyone.  In person school just really isn't safe, no matter how badly we need it to be, for any number of reasons:  societally, mental health wise, educationally.  

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6 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I think virtual IEP meetings are something that is going to be here to stay after the pandemic is over.  I've been to many many IEP meetings, on both sides of the table, and now to a handful of virtual ones when invited by friends.  Virtual means that everyone can be there.  Parents can take an hour off work, instead of three because they don't have to drive back out from their jobs.  If Grandma is a great source of wisdom and support to the family, she can be there even if she lives several states away. You no longer have to choose between the day when the TVI is there, or the day when the school psychologist is there or the day when the PT is there.   And there's no awkwardness with someone on the speaker phone who can't hear 2/3 of what's going on.  The Voc Rehab counselor can make two or three times as many meetings, because he/she isn't driving from school to school.  If you're in a transition year, you can have both the sending and receiving school there. 
 

Virtual IEP meetings are awesome.  I'm whole heartedly hoping they're here to stay, and we've never had any issues with real life ones, either.  

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2 minutes ago, Terabith said:

It just sucks, all the way around, for everyone.  

I agree that it sucks.  It sucks so so much.  For my kids with mental health needs, COVID has caused so many problems, and the loss of school is just one of them.

But I'm quoting you out of order because I want to disagree with this.  

2 minutes ago, Terabith said:

There simply are no good options right now.

Almost every other developed country has responded to this virus with strict lockdowns, and continued measures that have brought their numbers down to the point where they can open up schools and health care (including mental healthcare) completely and safely, without risking grandparents or continuing to damage their economy.   If they can do it, we can do.  The fact that we, as a nation, aren't choosing that isn't because it's not a good option.  It's not an easy option, but it would be worth it. 

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I dont have a dog in this fight. We have not had a salary change and my only school aged kid is homeschooled already...

Our local district is "inviting all students to return" - all.classes, all students. Full time. The first release didn't even require masks. (That has been updated to masking requirements) No screening procedure. No specific distancing guidelines. There are some nods to transportation changes but most of the students in our district are not bussed.  There is a little talk about the availability of elearning but I dont expect that to be popular. Sports are on. Brief nod that choirs and band might be moved into larger spaces. They are starting 4 days late. ... see https://www.d49.org/domain/2177

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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Almost every other developed country has responded to this virus with strict lockdowns, and continued measures that have brought their numbers down to the point where they can open up schools and health care (including mental healthcare) completely and safely, without risking grandparents or continuing to damage their economy.   If they can do it, we can do.  The fact that we, as a nation, aren't choosing that isn't because it's not a good option.  It's not an easy option, but it would be worth it. 

We could have done it, but we didn't, and in much of the country we no longer have time to do it before schools are supposed to start again. 

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((terabith)) and ((terabith's kid)).

One of mine is really struggling too.  Sucks all around.  There are no good options, just different flavors of sucks.

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4 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Almost every other developed country has responded to this virus with strict lockdowns, and continued measures that have brought their numbers down to the point where they can open up schools and health care (including mental healthcare) completely and safely, without risking grandparents or continuing to damage their economy.   If they can do it, we can do.  The fact that we, as a nation, aren't choosing that isn't because it's not a good option.  It's not an easy option, but it would be worth it. 

Oh, I wholeheartedly agree.  Our SOCIETY has made decisions, both by collective actions and lack thereof and also by governmental actions/ inactions that have landed us in this spot.  Every other developed nation, with the slight exception of the UK (but even they're in way better shape than we are) has figured this crap out and managed to drive down community transmission to the point that reopening schools is safe, to varying degrees.  

What I mean by no good options is that both individual families and school districts as a whole are stuck with no good options because of the virus and the poor response that has been made to it.  Neither families nor school districts have the power to alter levels of community transmission in the way that governments and civic minded behavior could, which leaves them with no good choices.  

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3 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

((terabith)) and ((terabith's kid)).

One of mine is really struggling too.  Sucks all around.  There are no good options, just different flavors of sucks.

It really does.  And, I'm not really complaining.  We are soooooooo incredibly blessed in many ways, and I'm very conscious that it could be so much worse.  

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15 minutes ago, kokotg said:

We could have done it, but we didn't, and in much of the country we no longer have time to do it before schools are supposed to start again. 

I agree, but we could do it now, and have schools open by Thanksgiving "normally", or we could flip flop back between lousy hybrid models and problematic distance learning until we have a vaccine.  

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9 minutes ago, Terabith said:

Oh, I wholeheartedly agree.  Our SOCIETY has made decisions, both by collective actions and lack thereof and also by governmental actions/ inactions that have landed us in this spot.  Every other developed nation, with the slight exception of the UK (but even they're in way better shape than we are) has figured this crap out and managed to drive down community transmission to the point that reopening schools is safe, to varying degrees.  

What I mean by no good options is that both individual families and school districts as a whole are stuck with no good options because of the virus and the poor response that has been made to it.  Neither families nor school districts have the power to alter levels of community transmission in the way that governments and civic minded behavior could, which leaves them with no good choices.  

I agree with all of this, I'm just in a place where I really really hate COVID right now, and so I felt the need to preach a little. 

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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

I agree, but we could do it now, and have schools open by Thanksgiving "normally", or we could flip flop back between lousy hybrid models and problematic distance learning until we have a vaccine.  

Atlanta Public Schools decided to do the first 9 weeks online and then re-evaluate; I think that's a smart and reasonable approach and I hope more districts in my area follow suit. 

 

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Just now, kokotg said:

Atlanta Public Schools decided to do the first 9 weeks online and then re-evaluate; I think that's a smart and reasonable approach and I hope more districts in my area follow suit. 

The school where I teach hasn't announced, but our district has announced that they're starting the year with distance learning, and then gradually opening in phases, which seems to make sense to me. But only if we use those initial weeks wisely.  If the plan is to keep letting the virus spread, then we might as well just put our efforts into figuring out what the very best, most equitable and inclusive distance learning would look like.  Because certainly what was offered in our district in the spring fell very very short of that target.

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Regarding mental health, I just read this on facebook. No proof the writer is an actual therapist, but another perspective all the same. 

The writer is a LCMFT RPT CFPT in Maryland.

------------------‐-----------------------‐

As a child and family therapist, I strongly disagree with the arguments that "schools should reopen for children's emotional health". No version of this situation is good for children's mental well-being, so we are choosing between bad situations here. Calls to open up schools are shorted sighted and illogical. Here are some things bad for emotional health about reopening:

- Children experiencing so much more death of their loved ones, friend's loved ones, and community members.

- Having to obey rigid and developmentally inappropriate behavioral expectations to maintain social distancing for hours at a time.

- Restricting their engagement with their peers even though those peers are right in front of them.

- Having to constantly actively participate in cleaning rituals that keep their community trauma present with them

- Somehow having to have the executive functioning within all of this to meet educational standards and possibly experiencing overwhelm, shame, and self-doubt when they reasonably can't

- Being unable to receive age appropriate comfort from teachers and staff when dysregulated from all of this, thereby experiencing attachment injuries daily.

- Lack of any predictability as COVID takes staff members for weeks at a time with no warning while children wonder if that staff will die as well as the looming threat of going to back into quarantine any random day

Returning to school as things are now is NOT better for children's mental health.

It is a complete rationalization by people who are uncomfortable with children not engaging in productivity culture.

The majority of schooling NEEDS to stay virtual to protect our children and teachers and to make room for the safe return of the populations of students who actually do need to be in person.

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35 minutes ago, Terabith said:

I have a kid with mental health issues, for whom isolation and stuck at home-ness is certainly massively exacerbating.  (We pulled them out of school last October, started medication, began community college classes in January.  By February, they were thriving and happy and back to normal.  Then lockdown started, and they began spiraling downwards again.)  I want them to go to school.  I think they really, really need the mental health benefits school could bring.  Things are really, REALLY hard here.  They don't sleep alone.  Their sister is stressed.  We're all seriously stressed by their misery.  Their public school friends ditched them when we pulled them out of school, and community college didn't really generate peers or friendships, since they were so much younger.  So they really don't have any friends to connect with online, other than friends that they've MET online.  We are signed up for a private high school for next year in the hope of making friends.  

But....the reality is, no matter how awful their mental health is, school really isn't safe.  And if they bring home covid and a bad health outcome happens to me or their grandparent, that's going to be damaging to their mental health, too.  There simply are no good options right now, and that's the fault of the virus and the fact that people and government have not done what is required to bring down rates of community transmission.  

It just sucks, all the way around, for everyone.  In person school just really isn't safe, no matter how badly we need it to be, for any number of reasons:  societally, mental health wise, educationally.  

I agree with you. I see so many people pushing hard to go back for mental health reasons, but it seems really dangerous to pile a serious physical illness on top of the mental one. 

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And.....schools are a gigantic vector.  I mean, they just are, for any kind of illness.  I mean, my kids got lice multiple times in middle school, when they weren't even sharing hats or anything like that, and lice are actually kinda hard to catch.  We don't have great data on how much young kids transmit covid, but a) the lack of that data should make us far more cautious, and b) it increasingly looks like they DO, at least to some degree.  And older kids and teens definitely spread it, so opening up another gigantic vector is going to make it even harder to get community transmission levels low.  It's just stupid to open up something that's potentially up there with rallies or bars in terms of transmission rates and make attendance MANDATORY.  

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22 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I agree, but we could do it now, and have schools open by Thanksgiving "normally", or we could flip flop back between lousy hybrid models and problematic distance learning until we have a vaccine.  

 

ITA. I just don't see Americans getting on board with anything like that without significantly improved leadership at all levels of government.

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3 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

ITA. I just don't see Americans getting on board with anything like that without significantly improved leadership at all levels of government.

Neither do I, but that doesn't mean it wouldn't be a good choice.  It just means that we apparently can't have nice things.  

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51 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Here's a story about quarantine during the 1950s: https://www.wbez.org/stories/i-survived-tuberculosis-in-the-1950s-so-im-no-stranger-to-quarantine/2611210c-3af3-4cf4-be14-64edfad4d1ce

Now, that's a long time to be cooped up inside!

My gosh!  If my child had to be quarantined away from me, even for three weeks, I would be devastated.  What a story!

Thank you for posting this.  It was great to read her unique perspective on our current situation.

Edited by DoraBora
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5 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

ITA. I just don't see Americans getting on board with anything like that without significantly improved leadership at all levels of government.

My nightmare is that we're not going to take actions to slow it down and that by the time there's any kind of "regime change" in the government, we will have reached a point of no return in which the virus is too entrenched in the population for action to be capable of slowing it down.  I'm worried that viral loads in cities and communities will get so high that exercising outdoors will not be safe, or even that we will not be safe in our own homes.  I'm worried that we have enough levels of death and serious morbidities that the economy plunges into a horrible depression and community services and eventually society collapses.  

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1 minute ago, Terabith said:

My nightmare is that we're not going to take actions to slow it down and that by the time there's any kind of "regime change" in the government, we will have reached a point of no return in which the virus is too entrenched in the population for action to be capable of slowing it down.  I'm worried that viral loads in cities and communities will get so high that exercising outdoors will not be safe, or even that we will not be safe in our own homes.  I'm worried that we have enough levels of death and serious morbidities that the economy plunges into a horrible depression and community services and eventually society collapses.  

I worry about that too.  

I also worry that we'll still have the opportunity to change things when the regime change comes, but people who didn't vote for the regime change will feel alienated and angry and will express that anger by defying whatever orders are put in place.  

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5 hours ago, Lanny said:

The Public school districts in L.A. and in San Diego announced that they will reopen in August. Everything will be Online.  I can see many students in the High Schools doing OK with Online courses. Some in the Middle Schools will be able to handle Online courses. The kids in Elementary (K-5) are going to need help. Probably constant help. If their parents work, who will give them that help?  Who will take care of the little kids at home?  

 

 

The older kids will take care of the little kids -- or nieces and nephews. And thus the older kids won't get their work done either.  It's the classic reason kids are pulled out of school in many countries.

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10 minutes ago, DoraBora said:

My gosh!  If my child had to be quarantined away from me, even for three weeks, I would be devastated.  What a story!

Thank you for posting this.  It was great to read her unique perspective on our current situation.

The children at the long term care hospital where my son used to live have had no visitors since March 16, 2020.    The majority of children there are young enough that they may not recognize their parents when they are reunited, and the process of training parents to care for their kids so they can bring them home has be paused.  

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3 teachers share a room and all get Covid; one dies

"All three teachers wore masks and gloves, used hand sanitizer and socially distanced, but still got sick, according to school officials at the small community in the eastern part of the state."

The teacher who died was quite high risk; what I find concerning is that all 3 caught it. 

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5 minutes ago, katilac said:

3 teachers share a room and all get Covid; one dies

"All three teachers wore masks and gloves, used hand sanitizer and socially distanced, but still got sick, according to school officials at the small community in the eastern part of the state."

The teacher who died was quite high risk; what I find concerning is that all 3 caught it. 

It’s quite possible one of the adults brought it, though, given that AZ is pretty full of virus.

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