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1 minute ago, DawnM said:

 

Yeah, and the 2nd largest school district in the country isn't opening in the Fall.  

I had heard about that school district not reopening but it didn’t fully register until you just used those words. 

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Our society needs kids to be in school.  Our economy sure as hell needs kids in school full time.  Many kids need to be in school, for a wide variety of reasons.   But kids in school is only safe

From my perspective, because of what they've done, crap upon crap happens. Obviously the pandemic itself was out of everyone's control.  But as we have seen around the world, a population's behav

One of our good friends is a family practice physician and they were getting swamped by requests by adults when the mask requirements came out. They got together and unanimously decided their response

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18 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

FOUR people? That’s pretty serious. 

 

The rest of the world is taking this MUCH more seriously than we are.

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2 hours ago, Sneezyone said:

 

What state is this? Ugh. Y'all are making me very grateful for my options.

Ohio. But each district in Ohio gets to make their own plans while following guidance from the state department of education, so it varies. Some districts are offering a hybrid option. Some have decided to be all online, including Columbus Public schools. I have a gym teacher friend who teaches in Columbus who is trying to plan online elementary gym classes.

We just now got the official document outlining the plan. Kids have to wear masks and use hand sanitizer on buses; siblings must sit together; there will be a seating plan; and parents are encouraged to drive kids themselves (which is what we plan to do). In the classrooms, students grades 3 and up must wear masks, unless they cannot (this is state guidance), and there will be additional cleaning and hand sanitizer happening. Classroom doors will be left open. No visitors to the building unless essential, and no field trips. No one can use lockers.  No info about how they will manage the high school kids in the hallways or about lunch periods.

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

There was also info about the online option. They are using an outside source but some local teachers may also run some classes. They can't guarantee that all of the classes that would be offered in-person will be available online. They can't guarantee that all IEP accommodations can be managed online and will have IEP meetings for students with needs who select the online option.  They promise the online classes will be better than remote learning last spring, with more teacher interaction (there really was almost none) and more rigor.

They said they may offer a hybrid option if conditions with the pandemic change through the school year, but the logistics were too difficult (according to the committee) to offer it now. One of their concerns with hybrid was that kids would be at various daycares on days off and so would be adding exposure to the mix.

Students have to take temp at home before going to school.

Oh, and teachers and staff have to wear masks. Which goes without saying, since students have to, but I thought I should say it anyway.

Edited by Storygirl
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12 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Ohio. But each district in Ohio gets to make their own plans while following guidance from the state department of education, so it varies. Some districts are offering a hybrid option. Some have decided to be all online, including Columbus Public schools. I have a gym teacher friend who teaches in Columbus who is trying to plan online elementary gym classes.

We just now got the official document outlining the plan. Kids have to wear masks and use hand sanitizer on buses; siblings must sit together; there will be a seating plan; and parents are encouraged to drive kids themselves (which is what we plan to do). In the classrooms, students grades 3 and up must wear masks, unless they cannot (this is state guidance), and there will be additional cleaning and hand sanitizer happening. Classroom doors will be left open. No visitors to the building unless essential, and no field trips. No one can use lockers.  No info about how they will manage the high school kids in the hallways or about lunch periods.

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

There was also info about the online option. They are using an outside source but some local teachers may also run some classes. They can't guarantee that all of the classes that would be offered in-person will be available online. They can't guarantee that all IEP accommodations can be managed online and will have IEP meetings for students with needs who select the online option.  They promise the online classes will be better than remote learning last spring, with more teacher interaction (there really was almost none) and more rigor.

They said they may offer a hybrid option if conditions with the pandemic change through the school year, but the logistics were too difficult (according to the committee) to offer it now. One of their concerns with hybrid was that kids would be at various daycares on days off and so would be adding exposure to the mix.

Students have to take temp at home before going to school.

Oh, and teachers and staff have to wear masks. Which goes without saying, since students have to, but I thought I should say it anyway.

 

I have so may questions about this. Taking temps at home, for ex.? Fat chance.

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Oh, wait. It does say that they will have consistent seating in the lunchroom, that hand sanitizer must be used before and after eating, and that social distancing will happen as much as is possible. Whatever that means. Although, to be fair,  they don't know how many students will choose the in-person option yet -- we have a week to decide -- they probably couldn't be too specific yet.

I know another school in our area is only going to have 3 foot social distancing. Which is obviously less than optimal. I've watched high school kids at sports practices over the past couple of weeks, and social distancing is not happening among the kids as they walk about outside the school. I can hope they will do better in the classrooms, but I also know the high school teachers are not going to want to be the social distancing police.

The superintendent did say that she knows not all families will like the options. I'm not happy, but I'm resigned to it, and we will do what we can at home. I'll probably have the kids leave their backpacks in the garage and come in and take showers first thing every day. Wipe their computers before they use them for homework, etc.

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48 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

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The only person I know who is vocal about "KIDS MUST RETURN IN PERSON OR SCHOOLS SHOULD LOSE MONEY!" is a retired law professor, wealthy Seattleite (his kid went to school with me and is a pediatrician). He has no grandkids either.

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5 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I have so may questions about this. Taking temps at home, for ex.? Fat chance.

Yeah, the honor system doesn't really work all that well. I did anticipate this and bought a digital forehead reading thermometer, so that I can shoot my kids before they leave each day.

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I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

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1 minute ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

 

I also know many people who are benefiting in a major way due to increased access to remote and tele-health options to include increased access to mental health sessions online, one on one. We didn't have access to live instruction this spring for equity reasons but will this fall through a district-wide virtual school.

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That's great for the people you know, but the people I know are not benefiting from it. They're suffering and are terrified of schools not opening back up. 

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23 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

 

Sports will happen as long as state guidance allows it. Masks in the locker room and on buses but not when competing. No decision yet on whether there can be spectators. Band and choir will happen, but they don't know the logistics for those yet (which is one of my primary questions that I was hoping for answers about). IEP meetings will be virtual.

 

Um..so classes full of kids, kids eating with no masks in a big room together, but IEP meetings, THOSE are virtual???

3 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

But how will their mental health be effected by schools opening and then closing again, by rolling quarantines when people test positive and whole classes have to go home on short notice, if a teacher or friend gets ill, if they get ill, if they bring the infection home and get a parent or sibling ill? None of that seems good for mental health either. 

I do think one on one appointments for counseling could happen,or even outdoor group counseling, etc. But shoving thousands of teens into a school is likely going to lead to outcomes that hurt mental health too. 

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1 minute ago, kdsuomi said:

That's great for the people you know, but the people I know are not benefiting from it. They're suffering and are terrified of schools not opening back up. 

I see a lot of parents saying their kids need "normalcy" but things are not going to be normal, even at school. Normal isn't an option. 

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29 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Um..so classes full of kids, kids eating with no masks in a big room together, but IEP meetings, THOSE are virtual???

 

I'm guessing the thought is to keep people out of the building who are not normally there daily???

It will be interesting! We've had so many Zoom sessions for various things this summer that I'm used to it, and I don't think it will bother me, but it will be different, for sure.

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37 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

I have a kid with mental health issues, for whom isolation and stuck at home-ness is certainly massively exacerbating.  (We pulled them out of school last October, started medication, began community college classes in January.  By February, they were thriving and happy and back to normal.  Then lockdown started, and they began spiraling downwards again.)  I want them to go to school.  I think they really, really need the mental health benefits school could bring.  Things are really, REALLY hard here.  They don't sleep alone.  Their sister is stressed.  We're all seriously stressed by their misery.  Their public school friends ditched them when we pulled them out of school, and community college didn't really generate peers or friendships, since they were so much younger.  So they really don't have any friends to connect with online, other than friends that they've MET online.  We are signed up for a private high school for next year in the hope of making friends.  

But....the reality is, no matter how awful their mental health is, school really isn't safe.  And if they bring home covid and a bad health outcome happens to me or their grandparent, that's going to be damaging to their mental health, too.  There simply are no good options right now, and that's the fault of the virus and the fact that people and government have not done what is required to bring down rates of community transmission.  

It just sucks, all the way around, for everyone.  In person school just really isn't safe, no matter how badly we need it to be, for any number of reasons:  societally, mental health wise, educationally.  

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6 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I think virtual IEP meetings are something that is going to be here to stay after the pandemic is over.  I've been to many many IEP meetings, on both sides of the table, and now to a handful of virtual ones when invited by friends.  Virtual means that everyone can be there.  Parents can take an hour off work, instead of three because they don't have to drive back out from their jobs.  If Grandma is a great source of wisdom and support to the family, she can be there even if she lives several states away. You no longer have to choose between the day when the TVI is there, or the day when the school psychologist is there or the day when the PT is there.   And there's no awkwardness with someone on the speaker phone who can't hear 2/3 of what's going on.  The Voc Rehab counselor can make two or three times as many meetings, because he/she isn't driving from school to school.  If you're in a transition year, you can have both the sending and receiving school there. 
 

Virtual IEP meetings are awesome.  I'm whole heartedly hoping they're here to stay, and we've never had any issues with real life ones, either.  

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I dont have a dog in this fight. We have not had a salary change and my only school aged kid is homeschooled already...

Our local district is "inviting all students to return" - all.classes, all students. Full time. The first release didn't even require masks. (That has been updated to masking requirements) No screening procedure. No specific distancing guidelines. There are some nods to transportation changes but most of the students in our district are not bussed.  There is a little talk about the availability of elearning but I dont expect that to be popular. Sports are on. Brief nod that choirs and band might be moved into larger spaces. They are starting 4 days late. ... see https://www.d49.org/domain/2177

Edited by theelfqueen
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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Almost every other developed country has responded to this virus with strict lockdowns, and continued measures that have brought their numbers down to the point where they can open up schools and health care (including mental healthcare) completely and safely, without risking grandparents or continuing to damage their economy.   If they can do it, we can do.  The fact that we, as a nation, aren't choosing that isn't because it's not a good option.  It's not an easy option, but it would be worth it. 

We could have done it, but we didn't, and in much of the country we no longer have time to do it before schools are supposed to start again. 

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((terabith)) and ((terabith's kid)).

One of mine is really struggling too.  Sucks all around.  There are no good options, just different flavors of sucks.

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4 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Almost every other developed country has responded to this virus with strict lockdowns, and continued measures that have brought their numbers down to the point where they can open up schools and health care (including mental healthcare) completely and safely, without risking grandparents or continuing to damage their economy.   If they can do it, we can do.  The fact that we, as a nation, aren't choosing that isn't because it's not a good option.  It's not an easy option, but it would be worth it. 

Oh, I wholeheartedly agree.  Our SOCIETY has made decisions, both by collective actions and lack thereof and also by governmental actions/ inactions that have landed us in this spot.  Every other developed nation, with the slight exception of the UK (but even they're in way better shape than we are) has figured this crap out and managed to drive down community transmission to the point that reopening schools is safe, to varying degrees.  

What I mean by no good options is that both individual families and school districts as a whole are stuck with no good options because of the virus and the poor response that has been made to it.  Neither families nor school districts have the power to alter levels of community transmission in the way that governments and civic minded behavior could, which leaves them with no good choices.  

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3 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

((terabith)) and ((terabith's kid)).

One of mine is really struggling too.  Sucks all around.  There are no good options, just different flavors of sucks.

It really does.  And, I'm not really complaining.  We are soooooooo incredibly blessed in many ways, and I'm very conscious that it could be so much worse.  

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Just now, CuriousMomof3 said:

I agree, but we could do it now, and have schools open by Thanksgiving "normally", or we could flip flop back between lousy hybrid models and problematic distance learning until we have a vaccine.  

Atlanta Public Schools decided to do the first 9 weeks online and then re-evaluate; I think that's a smart and reasonable approach and I hope more districts in my area follow suit. 

 

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Regarding mental health, I just read this on facebook. No proof the writer is an actual therapist, but another perspective all the same. 

The writer is a LCMFT RPT CFPT in Maryland.

------------------‐-----------------------‐

As a child and family therapist, I strongly disagree with the arguments that "schools should reopen for children's emotional health". No version of this situation is good for children's mental well-being, so we are choosing between bad situations here. Calls to open up schools are shorted sighted and illogical. Here are some things bad for emotional health about reopening:

- Children experiencing so much more death of their loved ones, friend's loved ones, and community members.

- Having to obey rigid and developmentally inappropriate behavioral expectations to maintain social distancing for hours at a time.

- Restricting their engagement with their peers even though those peers are right in front of them.

- Having to constantly actively participate in cleaning rituals that keep their community trauma present with them

- Somehow having to have the executive functioning within all of this to meet educational standards and possibly experiencing overwhelm, shame, and self-doubt when they reasonably can't

- Being unable to receive age appropriate comfort from teachers and staff when dysregulated from all of this, thereby experiencing attachment injuries daily.

- Lack of any predictability as COVID takes staff members for weeks at a time with no warning while children wonder if that staff will die as well as the looming threat of going to back into quarantine any random day

Returning to school as things are now is NOT better for children's mental health.

It is a complete rationalization by people who are uncomfortable with children not engaging in productivity culture.

The majority of schooling NEEDS to stay virtual to protect our children and teachers and to make room for the safe return of the populations of students who actually do need to be in person.

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35 minutes ago, Terabith said:

I have a kid with mental health issues, for whom isolation and stuck at home-ness is certainly massively exacerbating.  (We pulled them out of school last October, started medication, began community college classes in January.  By February, they were thriving and happy and back to normal.  Then lockdown started, and they began spiraling downwards again.)  I want them to go to school.  I think they really, really need the mental health benefits school could bring.  Things are really, REALLY hard here.  They don't sleep alone.  Their sister is stressed.  We're all seriously stressed by their misery.  Their public school friends ditched them when we pulled them out of school, and community college didn't really generate peers or friendships, since they were so much younger.  So they really don't have any friends to connect with online, other than friends that they've MET online.  We are signed up for a private high school for next year in the hope of making friends.  

But....the reality is, no matter how awful their mental health is, school really isn't safe.  And if they bring home covid and a bad health outcome happens to me or their grandparent, that's going to be damaging to their mental health, too.  There simply are no good options right now, and that's the fault of the virus and the fact that people and government have not done what is required to bring down rates of community transmission.  

It just sucks, all the way around, for everyone.  In person school just really isn't safe, no matter how badly we need it to be, for any number of reasons:  societally, mental health wise, educationally.  

I agree with you. I see so many people pushing hard to go back for mental health reasons, but it seems really dangerous to pile a serious physical illness on top of the mental one. 

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And.....schools are a gigantic vector.  I mean, they just are, for any kind of illness.  I mean, my kids got lice multiple times in middle school, when they weren't even sharing hats or anything like that, and lice are actually kinda hard to catch.  We don't have great data on how much young kids transmit covid, but a) the lack of that data should make us far more cautious, and b) it increasingly looks like they DO, at least to some degree.  And older kids and teens definitely spread it, so opening up another gigantic vector is going to make it even harder to get community transmission levels low.  It's just stupid to open up something that's potentially up there with rallies or bars in terms of transmission rates and make attendance MANDATORY.  

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22 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I agree, but we could do it now, and have schools open by Thanksgiving "normally", or we could flip flop back between lousy hybrid models and problematic distance learning until we have a vaccine.  

 

ITA. I just don't see Americans getting on board with anything like that without significantly improved leadership at all levels of government.

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51 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Here's a story about quarantine during the 1950s: https://www.wbez.org/stories/i-survived-tuberculosis-in-the-1950s-so-im-no-stranger-to-quarantine/2611210c-3af3-4cf4-be14-64edfad4d1ce

Now, that's a long time to be cooped up inside!

My gosh!  If my child had to be quarantined away from me, even for three weeks, I would be devastated.  What a story!

Thank you for posting this.  It was great to read her unique perspective on our current situation.

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5 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

ITA. I just don't see Americans getting on board with anything like that without significantly improved leadership at all levels of government.

My nightmare is that we're not going to take actions to slow it down and that by the time there's any kind of "regime change" in the government, we will have reached a point of no return in which the virus is too entrenched in the population for action to be capable of slowing it down.  I'm worried that viral loads in cities and communities will get so high that exercising outdoors will not be safe, or even that we will not be safe in our own homes.  I'm worried that we have enough levels of death and serious morbidities that the economy plunges into a horrible depression and community services and eventually society collapses.  

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5 hours ago, Lanny said:

The Public school districts in L.A. and in San Diego announced that they will reopen in August. Everything will be Online.  I can see many students in the High Schools doing OK with Online courses. Some in the Middle Schools will be able to handle Online courses. The kids in Elementary (K-5) are going to need help. Probably constant help. If their parents work, who will give them that help?  Who will take care of the little kids at home?  

 

 

The older kids will take care of the little kids -- or nieces and nephews. And thus the older kids won't get their work done either.  It's the classic reason kids are pulled out of school in many countries.

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8 minutes ago, square_25 said:

It’s quite possible one of the adults brought it, though, given that AZ is pretty full of virus.

Oh, I don't doubt that, I'm just saying they were doing all the things and the other 2 caught it. 

Edited to add: the thought that they were the only 3 people in the room does not seem to make it better, lol (as per Curious's post).

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7 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Yeah, if there was a class of kids and none of them caught it, it would be a little promising that the 1 teacher small group of kids model might work.   But for everyone in the room to get it, despite masks, is not promising at all.

Yeah, I think masks are helpful in reducing risks for things where you're in contact with people for relatively low periods of time.  So, I think it is super helpful for shopping, or getting a hair cut, or even most medical visits.  But I'm not sure that they're really all that protective after extended period of time....enough virus is going to be aerosolized that infection will occur even with masks if you're in the room with someone for hours.  That's another thing that really concerns me about schools.  

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28 minutes ago, square_25 said:

It’s quite possible one of the adults brought it, though, given that AZ is pretty full of virus.

 

It isn’t likely to be a child transmission situation.  We don’t know for sure which teacher got it initially (probably Byrd along with the sinus infection symptoms, but not necessarily) and we don’t know from whom. Presumably some contact in life outside of the school was the “case zero” for the cluster, and most likely an adult. 

However, the situation is important because it demonstrates the ease of spread in a classroom with only 3 people present (not a whole class full), and all apparently following “the rules” of masks, distance, and hygiene apparently. 

 

 

 

 

 

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I think I need to quit one of my teaching jobs... the Covid plan is basically ignore it. No masks, no social distancing in place. I have tiny classroom - really small. I will have 16 kids in there. It is just not possible. I am stunned at the board's recommendations. They are changing that kids can't use the drinking fountain, no lunchroom - so guess who gets to monitor lunch with kids in her room - and no large gathering for devotion time and dismissal will be done from the parking deck - all 100 kids out there. Temp checks done at home - not at school. Recess still together with another class. We are not allowed to use Clorox or lysol only hydrogen peroxide and essential oil cleaners. The school will not close unless the building closes or if the governor mandates it. Teachers do not get extra sick days - 2 per teacher and then our pay gets cut. I am so upset. I worked tirelessly to get these kids caught up and establish relationships with them. I feel awful abandoning them. I just don't think I can work there.  What makes it really awkward is that I work at another hybrid that is in the same building. That hybrid is wearing masks in the hallway and bathroom, using social distancing in the classrooms, staggering hallway movement, etc.. really trying to meet CDC standards. I trust their plan. Ugg - just so disappointed and disgusted that people can be so reckless when there are ways to make us safer. 

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3 hours ago, Terabith said:

Virtual IEP meetings are awesome.  I'm whole heartedly hoping they're here to stay, and we've never had any issues with real life ones, either.  

I agree! After 10+ years of IEP and 504 meetings, we had our first virtual one in June. I loved it! I usually have to mentally prepare and take 1/2 day off work. It was a quick easy meeting, and honestly I felt like everyone had to pay attention to the speaker more. There are times when side conversations were distracting at meetings, and the virtual format made that almost impossible. 

I know that wasn't the Katie's point when she mentioned it, but I hope it is a new trend!. 

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5 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I should add that I actually have no idea why I think there were no students.  Now that I'm looking, I can't find any articles that back that up.  Maybe I heard it on NPR?  Maybe because all the summer school here is virtual I assumed and I'm wrong?

It seems a weird thing to leave out either way.   Like if there were kids you'd think it would mention whether or not they had symptoms, and if there weren't kids it would mention that too.

I'm certain I had read that, as well.  I'm quite sure I had read 3 teachers but no students, that the teachers had joined together to jointly produce the virtual lessons.  Maybe it was a different article, but I'm pretty confident in that fact.  

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Florida, y'all. 

They have the army looking at turning the convention center into a field hospital for Covid patients, another thousand people have been hospitalized since Friday, and they may implement a curfew by the weekend...but the county health department says it is safe and schools are still required to open.https://www.clickorlando.com/news/local/2020/07/14/feds-scope-out-orange-county-convention-center-for-possible-covid-care-center/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=snd&utm_content=wkmg6&fbclid=IwAR1b0VuRLLvCJV-oWyBNaaCWPpc6zkkLyMR-NXgHVN7S8ppWfmAZLxkOHkI

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Regarding the Arizona teacher who passed away....

I have absolutely no idea if this happened or not, but what I see at my work:

People wear masks when others are around or are close by. If they are the only one in an office or classroom, they take off their masks. My work has an open floor plan, but small open-style cubicle style work stations spread around the exterior walls. When people are in their cubicles, or in some of the small offices (which used to hold two people, but now have only one) they remove their masks and only put them back on when people come around them. 😞 If they have it, then it is entirely possible it is in the air around the desks.  Which is then spread to the other work stations via air conditioning, various circulation fans blowing, and the fans on the 19 computers, a dozen commercial printers, and a huge robotic computer.  

It would be interesting to know, if when just one of the women where in the classroom, if they wore their masks or not. For instance, if one came an hour before the others, did they wear a mask until the others showed up? Totally reasonable to do, unless you really understand how the particulates stay aerosolized and airborne for quite a while after a cough or sneeze. 

Sooooo sad 😞 

 

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19 minutes ago, Terabith said:

I'm certain I had read that, as well.  I'm quite sure I had read 3 teachers but no students, that the teachers had joined together to jointly produce the virtual lessons.  Maybe it was a different article, but I'm pretty confident in that fact.  

Yes, it was just teachers. Quote from Superintendent (article on CNN): 

Gregorich reiterated the three teachers were careful and still got Covid-19.
"I think that's really the message or the concern that our staff has is we can't even keep our staff safe by themselves ... how are we going to keep 20 kids in a classroom safe? I just don't see how that's possible to do that," he said.
 
This clearly implies that there were no students in the room. 
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9 hours ago, kdsuomi said:

I know a number of teenagers who are having mental health issues right now due to these closures, and not opening again will make it even worse. The high school here has a very robust mental health program, and that all went kaput when the school went remote. So, it's not all an obvious decision for everyone. Can they talk on the phone or through Zoom? It wasn't an option given last school school, but if it remains closed this year might be. However, it's not the same as an in person session, and these teens are suffering dearly for it.

 

9 hours ago, kdsuomi said:

That's great for the people you know, but the people I know are not benefiting from it. They're suffering and are terrified of schools not opening back up. 


I have no doubt many teens will continue to suffer without the normalcy of school. Mine is breaking down but I guarantee it would get much, much worse for him if he has to go back to school, no matter how desperately he would love to in an ideal year. He is very aware of the risks that 1,000 people in a building poses, and that this year will be anything but normal even if it does try to open.
 

I don’t see any scenario in which opening up schools makes it *easier* for kids who are suffering. Not if we are being honest about what it would look like. 

Regardless, the mental health impacts are very real and terrifying, in or out of school. It’s a generational crisis this country isn’t at all prepared for. 😞 

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10 hours ago, lmrich said:

I think I need to quit one of my teaching jobs... the Covid plan is basically ignore it. No masks, no social distancing in place. I have tiny classroom - really small. I will have 16 kids in there. It is just not possible. I am stunned at the board's recommendations. They are changing that kids can't use the drinking fountain, no lunchroom - so guess who gets to monitor lunch with kids in her room - and no large gathering for devotion time and dismissal will be done from the parking deck - all 100 kids out there. Temp checks done at home - not at school. Recess still together with another class. We are not allowed to use Clorox or lysol only hydrogen peroxide and essential oil cleaners. The school will not close unless the building closes or if the governor mandates it. Teachers do not get extra sick days - 2 per teacher and then our pay gets cut. I am so upset. I worked tirelessly to get these kids caught up and establish relationships with them. I feel awful abandoning them. I just don't think I can work there.  What makes it really awkward is that I work at another hybrid that is in the same building. That hybrid is wearing masks in the hallway and bathroom, using social distancing in the classrooms, staggering hallway movement, etc.. really trying to meet CDC standards. I trust their plan. Ugg - just so disappointed and disgusted that people can be so reckless when there are ways to make us safer. 

 

Hydrogen Peroxide afaik is an excellent coronavirus disinfectant. That part seems okay.

Otherwise what you describe sounds like a problem.  

(Is no lunch or other break for teachers a labor law violation? I can’t recall how many hours requires a break of how long.) 

 

Maybe you can make the different safety protocols clear to them as the reason why you are quitting the one and not the other.   The “awkward” could be used to try to educate.

I hope the 2 schools being in same building won’t result in transmission from the one that isn’t careful to the one that is. 

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Today’s John Campbell video is a US Update.  It isn’t specifically about schools, but is relevant. 

 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, Terabith said:

And.....schools are a gigantic vector.  I mean, they just are, for any kind of illness.  I mean, my kids got lice multiple times in middle school, when they weren't even sharing hats or anything like that, and lice are actually kinda hard to catch.  We don't have great data on how much young kids transmit covid, but a) the lack of that data should make us far more cautious, and b) it increasingly looks like they DO, at least to some degree.  And older kids and teens definitely spread it, so opening up another gigantic vector is going to make it even harder to get community transmission levels low.  It's just stupid to open up something that's potentially up there with rallies or bars in terms of transmission rates and make attendance MANDATORY.  

Here's a PDF I ran across today about kids and COVID in Florida: http://ww11.doh.state.fl.us/comm/_partners/covid19_report_archive/pediatric_report_latest.pdf

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Our school district in a hotspot within a hotspot (AZ) presented a plan for opening which includes recommending but not requiring masks for everyone, which is especially ridiculous given that the school is located within a city and county which both have mask mandates for everyone over the age of six. I predict swift disaster. 

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1 minute ago, square_25 said:

That's the thing... you reopen in a wishful thinking kind of way, you'll just have to close again, and then who benefits?? 

Do you expect any district anywhere to not have rolling closures? I thought mostly in person with whole classes or the entire building dismissed and quarantined at least a few times was pretty much what fall would be. Has someone said differently?

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