Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Plum

Reopening schools

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Pen said:

And, for classes that need hands on like welding, say, have it meet for a long day to get in a week or two worth of instruction once a week or every other week, with a single unchanging group (masked, distanced etc), not one period each day coming in and going out of rooms. 

Every other week could be good to give a quarantine period between meetings. But weekly is easier to keep track of as a schedule. 

I hope this is offered locally--maybe a day or two in person with a fraction of the class vs. every day for 2-3 hours with a full class. We homeschool, but one of my kids is supposed to go to the local votech school just for their carpentry classes. I would really like to know what my son could do for "at home" credit as well because he has a lot of opportunity to do hands-on work at home. They already do their OSHA certifications online at their own pace, and my son is building a shed at home (the first year carpentry students build sheds in lab). I think we'd even be willing to run electric to it if he needs experience with that portion. He'll be reading plans as well as doing the bulk of the work. We've already run into situations where the materials available don't match the plans (shortages due to everyone tackling home projects), so he is learning about what building materials are equivalent. He's also been helping us remodel for years and helping friends with projects as well (potentially more jobs coming up that he can either mask or social distance for). He owns nice tools and knows how to use them. The only real reason I am comtemplating sending him is for the connections they build during the 2nd year of the program where they go to job sites and work for real (if they have done the required pre-requisites).

Incidentally, if he were in welding, I'd be less worried--they wear protective shields, have their labs in solo booths (with limited group time), and their welding booths have clear curtains. None of that is because of COVID. I am not sure how all student welding programs are set up, but it might be one of the more safe options!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My school district announced they will be online only when school reopens on August 15th. 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've had the guidelines from the state and parent surveys we haven't seen the final plan yet.  If school started now it would be virtual because we are still in stage 1. 

If we get to stage 2 schools will be open with social distancing, masks and no mixing of groups.    Which looks like it will happen using a variety of things K12 is already available here free.  The school district is offering another virtual option for people.  They will use some sort of split schedule.  They have also been adding portables our hybrid school got two they expanded our enrollment by a couple hundred.  They will rent out space they have done this before.  They are also looking at using some of the space at the school the scheduled to open next year.  

People don't seem prepared for their not to be things like sports, choir and band but their is really no way to do those safely unless our levels go way down.  Our school is expanding it's private lessons, and other safer music programs like Marimba and Ukulele.  Safer PE options like archery.  

I think it can be done my only worry is community buy in. So much depends not sending sick kids or even more so healthy kids where someone in the home is sick.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Danae said:

I have teacher friends whose school has decided that 4 feet of space between desks is adequate social distancing and that that means measuring from the center of one desk to the center of the next desk.  Coincidentally, that works out to their normal desk spacing!

Apparently our schools have decided 3 ft of spacing is okay.  And I think that's between students, not desks... so, probably also pretty much normal spacing...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rebcoola said:

If we get to stage 2 schools will be open with social distancing, masks and no mixing of groups.   

I keep hearing of this as an aspirational goal, which may work for elementary level, but how in heavens will that be working for high school?

Also, just the hallways during class changes in most high schools is going to be no distancing.  At our high school it's shoulder to shoulder.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

I keep hearing of this as an aspirational goal, which may work for elementary level, but how in heavens will that be working for high school?

Also, just the hallways during class changes in most high schools is going to be no distancing.  At our high school it's shoulder to shoulder.

At our high school, they're talking about 15 minute passing periods, with staggered dismissals, combined with one way hallways, only a fraction of the kids in the building at a time, 100% masking during transitions, and lots of adult supervision.  I still don't think it's a complete solution, but it should help.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

I keep hearing of this as an aspirational goal, which may work for elementary level, but how in heavens will that be working for high school?

Also, just the hallways during class changes in most high schools is going to be no distancing.  At our high school it's shoulder to shoulder.

Most SoCal schools have classrooms that open to the outdoors. I do hope they study to see if that makes a difference compared to indoor halls. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Plum said:

Most SoCal schools have classrooms that open to the outdoors. I do hope they study to see if that makes a difference compared to indoor halls. 

Yeah, that's so not a thing here, lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's crazy is I have seen ONE person in my facebook feed/social media say their kids need to go to school because of logistics of work - her husband works full time and she starts her radiology internship in the fall. 

everyone else that I've seen saying boldly that they don't care what the numbers are, their kids are going, are single income families with a stay at home parent. Kids are not special needs. They just don't want them home. They don't learn as much, or they can't make them do school work. Mind you, we had 15 THOUSAND cases reported today. We have had 11,000 positive kids so far in the state, and that's just the ones symptomatic enough to get testing (which is still incredibly hard to get). We don't have enough PPE for nursing homes, or hospitals, let alone teachers. 

Oh, and they do NOT want their kids wearing masks. 

  • Confused 2
  • Sad 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just left to get groceries and the country club by us was absolutely full of teenagers. They were having a huge party. No masks. And they start school in 2.5 weeks. It’s going to be such a mess because people here just don’t seem to care at all.

  • Sad 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Plum said:

Most SoCal schools have classrooms that open to the outdoors. I do hope they study to see if that makes a difference compared to indoor halls. 

Wow, not a thing here! Classroom doors only open to the outdoors if you're in a trailer. I think it will make a difference and I sure hope they study it.  

21 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

 Oh, and they do NOT want their kids wearing masks. 

I'm going to digress for one cranky moment and vent about my cousin. She is always desperately searching for childcare for her second job, begging people to help her on short notice, yet she posted an anti-mask meme and said that people should leave her alone about it. Okay, yes, I am leaving you alone about it, but I am also certainly not going to provide childcare for you when you can't be bothered to wear a mask. Yes, the mask protects other people, but I'm going to go ahead and assume that you are spending time with people who are also not wearing masks. I mean, you are certainly not being careful about it if you loudly proclaim it's nonsense 😡

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Plum said:

Most SoCal schools have classrooms that open to the outdoors. I do hope they study to see if that makes a difference compared to indoor halls. 

 

Ironically, our old local schools had, until ~2 years ago, opened right up to outdoors, both windows and doors for many rooms and at least one for all I can think of.  

Due to school violence, active shooters etc concerns, they got remodeled into more closed up fortresses. 

  • Like 1
  • Sad 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://amp.charlotteobserver.com/news/coronavirus/article244147427.html?__twitter_impression=true
 

Almost certainly a case of child spread where child passed it on to the two grandparents 

 

I am sorry that happened, but it is really important information. 

That Children can infect other people seems clear to me, but there seems to be much opposition to the idea. 

It seems important to deal with this information rather than to open up schools with the false narrative that it does not happen. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, LarlaB said:



I get what you’re saying- I do.  But the bolded is a bit dramatic.  Teachers-  like everyone else- can, have and will choose what they are comfortable doing.   They are not commodities that we force into service.  We lost 60% of our income and an entire small business to COVID so I really feel for those who will suffer financial hardship if they aren’t comfortable or cannot returning to work due to safety concerns. 😞 I get it.  More than most.  I am one of the few on WTM who has been severely affected by COVID. so I’ve earned the right to comment on realities.  Teachers, if they don’t want to teacher can pivot like we have been forced to do, and find another path.
 

Life, especially now, is far from easy or perfect.  Our ideals are on hold right now. You can stay at home and wait till everything is safer and more contained and I bless you if that is your choice and option.  But there are some of us who really don’t have any options other than to make this work, try to be safe and find a way forward in this awful situation. Because, we have no other choice. 

I would encourage all of us to start digging more into how can we make this work instead of promoting discussions that favor idealism, “catastrophizing”, politicizing.every.single.thing, and ruminating over worst case scenarios.  I’m not saying be reckless and in denial- but respect that life and time goes forward. And we are all living different realities and have varying perspectives so there is not “perfect” option anymore.  Don’t let perfect be the enemy of good!  Time is already going on. It’s been 4 months. We can’t go back and fix or change anything, we can only work from here and try to salvage what we can. 

I feel I have earned the right, having lost our business, tens of thousands of dollars and financial stability, to speak to this from a pretty blunt, base level. YMMV 

I can imagine it is wild to have that contrast play out in front of you.  Another reality is that there are a LOT of people who have been working on what we have celebrated as the “front lines” this entire time!  For months and months.  People knowingly and repeatedly exposed to germs and doing high volume, prolonged contact, public facing roles.    Airline flight attendants, medical personnel, millions of store employees, mass transit, daycares...the list goes on. 

It’s awesome that your DH can work from home and stay safer.  And presumably hasn’t had a salary disruption. But that has not been the case for millions of households and remote work will never be an option so it’s unrealistic to keep putting that lens in place in these discussions as a viable option. 

My experience has been the opposite of yours so it is not weird at all to think of modified school restarting.  Both my husband and my DD16 are now in high contact public facing jobs....literally doing work so that those who choose, can stay hunkered down. God willing, in September  I will be starting a job in a busy office environment.  Not remote. Not Zoom.  Just regular office with precautions in place. New career path for me- YAY!   
 

My thinking is this..... Either masks, social distancing and hygiene related endeavors help us or they don’t. It really seems they do slow down the spread and minimize prolonged, heavy viral load exposure, so I have no problem making responsible living choices in that context.  Sure everyone won’t be compliant but if I’m trying to stay safe and smart, that’s the only thing I can control. 

I am sorry for how you and your family have been affected. I am one of the others on the board that have also been, if that makes any difference. I at least can truly empathize with your position. I can hear your emotion at this situation and the choices you have had to make. This is not where you were expecting to be and it has all happened very quickly. I truly, truly am sorry for everything you have had to sacrifice. I agree with you on a lot of the sentiment of your post.

I don't want anyone else to have to make the sacrifices you and I have. I also don't want more people to have to potentially sacrifice their lives, and the safety of their families.  I don’t think it is "catastrophizing" to say that we are making a huge gamble after having a losing streak at the poker table. (exhibit 1: Arizona)

And I'm not saying that you are for full reopening - I know you said "modified" in your post, and you didn't really address the country-wide push aspect so most of this is going farther than your original scope. A lot of what I think is agreeing with you: we should be looking at where we are and actually figure out what to do, not planning an idealized world. I totally agree with you there. I also think that reopening schools across the country is promoting idealism.

I agree with you that we need to accept where we are and move forward. I just see where we are as being a dangerous place to open schools across the country. It is not logical to look at our current state and then tell teachers/children/staff, "Well! Just use the masks, good luck, let's see where this goes!" We tried that a couple times already. (exhibit 2: Arizona) 

Other essential workers, yes, have been working this entire time. But, not only do re-opening schools give risk to teachers, they give more risk to the community than hospitals or grocery stores (which are literally essential to living). It is an epicenter where multiple people from different industries, areas of town, ages, and socioeconomic groups congregate on a daily basis with the specific goal of interacting for multiple hours and talking to each other.

Then there is the risk that opening schools tangentially creates. For one example:  I think for a lot of people, seeing schools reopen is going to trigger the same "things must be okay" subconscious response, and the carelessness that will creep in and change their other actions. (exhibit 3: Arizona) 

This is not a case of the perfect being the enemy of the good. This is a case of a potential catastrophe (not “catastrophizing” to me) being chosen over an alternative safer approach.  

You are right: It's been 4 months. We should have been figuring this out. Some places have, plus they have the resources to put the plans into action, and their community spread is either under control or at least not raging, and maybe they should be the vanguard if they have the confidence in their mitigations. For many, it is not a safe solution and it will not solve our problems. More likely it will just compound them, and then where will we be? 

Also, schools potentially are a much, much riskier place for everyone involved, teachers especially: 

  • These are not all adults, and cannot be expected to act with more responsibility and maturity than what many, many adults have shown over the past months. (exhibit 4: Arizona) 
  • there is not room for social distancing, especially in schools already crowded  
  • the cleanliness standards are not up to par often in the best of times and certainly will not be what has been done in grocery stores where we still see spread (plus, impoverished schools have an even greater hurdle here), 
  • they are being forced together into closed rooms with little air circulation, and the air circulation involved is in a closed environment,  
  • many people forget how often parents send kids to schools when sick, or when the PARENT is sick and the kid is probably too. I mean, "I need the daycare” is literally being used as one of the chief reasons to reopen.
  • even with just adults, we can't forget that this virus is still spreading despite precautions we are taking. These are precautions, not fool-proof virus stoppers (exhibit 5: Arizona) 
  • there is an inappreciably high number of people who are not trying to keep safe and smart as you are, who will be interacting on school grounds. that cannot be barred. or forced to behave otherwise. Heck, even with all the government mandates and high numbers in AZ, today I saw *5* people in stores without masks. So, yay?, 90% compliance, but that means 10% not. Even if we have 99% compliance of everyone who walks onto school grounds, what does that "small" percentage mean in numbers?

So by saying that there are situations where the risk is acceptable, does not mean that schools are acceptable risk levels or that teachers as an industry should be forced to take on this level of risk. 

Then, stacking on that schools pose a greater risk to the community at large and not just teachers, the forced country-wide mass experiment regardless of local conditions does not seem to be in anyone's long term best interest. 

Basically: AZ is living a worse-case scenario right now, which can easily turn inso a worst-case, so I have no issues with people who want to think about what that would look like in their local school districts. Kind of wish our governor had. (exhibit 6: Arizona)

PS - originally I was saying "Exhibit: Arizona" partly tongue in cheek but also as a reminder of all the bad decisions we have made. Later, I went and added the links to vaguely relevant stories or data. But, the links aren't really "sources" or "proof" of what I'm saying. It is more, "Look at Arizona, cautionary tale."

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Pen said:

That Children can infect other people seems clear to me, but there seems to be much opposition to the idea. 

People don't want it to be true. And I get it, I certainly would love it if kids didn't spread it or at least not very much, but we can't cross out fingers and hope it's true. We've found out so much in a short amount of time; surely this is worth investigating further before opening schools on the assumption that it's true?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, katilac said:

People don't want it to be true. And I get it, I certainly would love it if kids didn't spread it or at least not very much, but we can't cross out fingers and hope it's true. We've found out so much in a short amount of time; surely this is worth investigating further before opening schools on the assumption that it's true?

 

I don’t know how you would go about investigating that in an ethical way.

 I really don’t want to subject additional monkeys or even hamsters,  nor know how easy it is for monkeys or hamsters to catch it. Moreover, I don’t know how much it would take for people who don’t want to see that children can spread it to be convinced.  

How many sick grandparents or infected monkeys or even hamsters would it take?  And it has to be the right kids.  Clearly not all people, no matter their age, infect anyone else.  Some spread to zero others, some are right on the average R naught rate, some are superspreaders...and we don’t have a way to identify who will be spreading to zero and who will infect 3 or more others. 

Either people —at least ones in decision making positions like education department heads—need to accept that instances that appear to be child spreading it prove that it can happen, or there will need to be a wide scale open up schools, and as seems to be the direction we are headed now in many places,  don’t bother to demand physical distance and masks from kids (it’s one thing to say there will certainly be breaches kids being kids, and another to not even make the rules) and whatever can be done for hygiene, testing and tracing — and let the chips fall where they may, or let the seriously sick fall where they may more than likely. And I think even then it will be likely that people don’t accept what they don’t want to see.  Especially since situations where the child appears to have infected two grandparents and a neighbor might be ascribed to some other cause very easily.  

 

All we really need to know is that some swans are black not white to prove that black swans exist, that some mallards have blue heads not green to prove that blue headed mallards exist, and some kids do spread CV19 to know that they can.   Maybe it’s only one kid in 50 or 100 who does, but in a typical school, without plenty of safety precautions, that’s enough to be a problem.   Maybe teacher 1 is lucky and her class of 28 1st graders doesn’t have a kid who spreads it.  But teacher 2 with 28 other kids next room over does have a spreader, and teacher 2 gets it. Then while presymptomatic, teacher 2 passes it to teacher 1 .  Teacher 1 has a couple of teens of her own, and while they are all presymptomatic but infectious, one of them spreads it to some friends and teachers over at the high school. Etc. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mentioned it before, but it's a long thread: this overnight camp in North Georgia was all kids and young adults 7-22 and 18% of them have tested positive now after one counselor had coronavirus (all counselors, and I believe all the campers tested negative before camp started): https://www.ajc.com/news/coronavirus-cases-from-north-georgia-youth-camp-outbreak-rising/qN0G9TG38tUX5gurg7Of3O/ ...seems pretty clear to me that kids and teens CAN spread it and spread it widely. I believe there was a camp in Missouri with a very similar story. I read about one study that found that kids are less likely to spread it but because they tend to interact with more people on a regular basis than adults, it evens out. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

I don’t know how you would go about investigating that in an ethical way.

 

 

All we really need to know is that some swans are black not white to prove that black swans exist, that some mallards have blue heads not green to prove that blue headed mallards exist, and some kids do spread CV19 to know that they can.   Maybe it’s only one kid in 50 or 100 who does, but in a typical school, without plenty of safety precautions, that’s enough to be a problem.    

Agreed. I didn't use a good word; I didn't mean 'investigate' in the sense of setting up trials and so forth, but rather that a bit more time (and contact tracing!) would make things much clearer. We're seeing some clear cases of children infecting others popping up now, so maybe wait and see if it turns into a bunch more? Maybe a month from now is not quite enough time to sort all these things out? 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

I keep hearing of this as an aspirational goal, which may work for elementary level, but how in heavens will that be working for high school?

Also, just the hallways during class changes in most high schools is going to be no distancing.  At our high school it's shoulder to shoulder.

Well they are only planning to have 1/2.or 1/3 of students on campus at one time.  I have heard they are doing a staggered start and class times so group A classes will be on the hour.  Group b will at the 1/4 hour.  But I think the mixing groups is more about assemblies, sports, extra curriculars, and electives that have larger numbers than normal classes 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, katilac said:

Agreed. I didn't use a good word; I didn't mean 'investigate' in the sense of setting up trials and so forth, but rather that a bit more time (and contact tracing!) would make things much clearer. We're seeing some clear cases of children infecting others popping up now, so maybe wait and see if it turns into a bunch more? Maybe a month from now is not quite enough time to sort all these things out? 

 

 

I think we already know that children can spread it.  We need substantial safeguards in place if schools are opening based on the working assumption that kids do spread it.  If later - like in spring 2021, it turns out that everything goes great and there is no spread in schools, perhaps safeguards can be relaxed.

we need to be proactive not reactive 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask, too...if those reading who are prayerful, would pray for the school situation here in Florida, and particularly for my sister? She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan. She's scared. We had 15,000 cases in Florida yesterday, over 1,000 cases in the county she teaches in yesterday. We have 7,000 people hospitalized in the state with a primary diagnosis of Covid. We have 11,000 kids diagnosed with Covid in the state. I don't know what the answer is, but just opening up full time is terrifying. And she is also a single mom of two kids, one with significant asthma as well. And if she has to be on campus full time, so will her kids. She will and has sacrificed for the kids she is in charge of, but darn it, I love her and don't want her to sacrifice her life for them. And I know if she has kids and teachers getting sick, or dying, that will tear her up as well. 

The school board vote is tomorrow. 

  • Like 2
  • Sad 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Ktgrok said:

I'm going to ask, too...if those reading who are prayerful, would pray for the school situation here in Florida, and particularly for my sister? She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan. She's scared. We had 15,000 cases in Florida yesterday, over 1,000 cases in the county she teaches in yesterday. We have 7,000 people hospitalized in the state with a primary diagnosis of Covid. We have 11,000 kids diagnosed with Covid in the state. I don't know what the answer is, but just opening up full time is terrifying. And she is also a single mom of two kids, one with significant asthma as well. And if she has to be on campus full time, so will her kids. She will and has sacrificed for the kids she is in charge of, but darn it, I love her and don't want her to sacrifice her life for them. And I know if she has kids and teachers getting sick, or dying, that will tear her up as well. 

The school board vote is tomorrow. 

Praying!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

I'm going to ask, too...if those reading who are prayerful, would pray for the school situation here in Florida, and particularly for my sister? She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan. She's scared. We had 15,000 cases in Florida yesterday, over 1,000 cases in the county she teaches in yesterday. We have 7,000 people hospitalized in the state with a primary diagnosis of Covid. We have 11,000 kids diagnosed with Covid in the state. I don't know what the answer is, but just opening up full time is terrifying. And she is also a single mom of two kids, one with significant asthma as well. And if she has to be on campus full time, so will her kids. She will and has sacrificed for the kids she is in charge of, but darn it, I love her and don't want her to sacrifice her life for them. And I know if she has kids and teachers getting sick, or dying, that will tear her up as well. 

The school board vote is tomorrow. 

Thinking of her and all the teachers, admin, etc and hoping this country comes to its freaking senses already.
You must be so worried. 😞 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read one of our local districts are starting on time, July 30th, but changed course to be fully online until further notice. With rising numbers, it seems the only sensible thing to do. Now to see if others follow suit.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Plum

California is funding schools in 2020/2021 based on 2019/2020 school headcounts. I heard that’s why Connections Academy and CAVA aren’t as keen for more students.  My district pays a token amount when a current student transfers to a public charter but I don’t know if other districts pay a dime for transfers. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

@Plum

California is funding schools in 2020/2021 based on 2019/2020 school headcounts. I heard that’s why Connections Academy and CAVA aren’t as keen for more students.  My district pays a token amount when a current student transfers to a public charter but I don’t know if other districts pay a dime for transfers. 

What does that do to the CA homeschool charters that pay stipends? 

I don't know yet how they plan to fund our district, only that they are cutting and that online charters here have long waiting lists. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ktgrok said:

She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan  

 I'm losing track of what we've discussed, but she might consider a face shield because it seems to offer more protection for the wearer. It's what I'd wear if I had to be on a big campus daily. If masks in particular were mandated, I'd wear both, but in my area they can choose mask or shield (and the people I know are choosing shields, mostly bc people can see your lips and hear you so much better). 

Face shields

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Plum said:

What does that do to the CA homeschool charters that pay stipends? 

Their funding for 2020/21 would be based on 2019/20 enrollment figures. They are regarded as public charter schools. (ETA: California govt has issued IOUs a few times including IOUs for state tax refunds)

https://edsource.org/2020/california-legislature-approves-state-budget-here-are-the-highlights-for-education-funding/634806

Following are the highlights in the budget for education.

k12communitycollegesNew.png

Prop. 98 funding will fall from $81.5 in 2019-20 to $70.5 billion next year.

Increases for K-12

  • $11 billion in deferrals (money appropriated but not funded until a year later) will make up the difference. If Congress provides $14 billion to California through the proposed HEROES Act, deferrals and some additional cuts will be reversed.
  • $6.3 billion, primarily federal CARES Act funding to address coronavirus needs and learning loss, must be spent by Dec. 31.
    • $2.9 billion to districts for learning loss, distributed to districts based on numbers of low-income students, English learners, foster youth and homeless youth.
    • $1.5 billion to districts for learning loss distributed based on numbers of special education students.
    • $1.4 billion to districts based on federal Title I formula.
    • $980 million to districts based on Local Control Funding Formula.
  • $2.3 billion in funding relief to pension funds CalPERS and CalSTRS over 2 years.
  • $645 million more for special education, including $545 million to equalize funding.
  • $100 million proposed cuts restored for after-school programs critical for low-income working parents.

Other K-12 changes

  • No layoffs in 2020-21 for teachers and classified employees who provide custodial, nutrition and transportation services.
  • Per-student funding will be guaranteed at 2019-20 rates before the onset of COVID-19. Additional funding for districts and charter schools with enrollment growth may be dealt with at future date. To be paid districts must fully:
    • Offer a full year of instruction (180 days for districts, 175 for charters).
    • Document daily student participation and communicate with parents for students not participating a minimum of three days per week.
  • California schools will continue to provide 180 days of instruction per year (175 days for charter schools). Instructional minutes will be reduced to a minimum 240 minutes per day for grades 4-12 (180 minutes for kindergarten, 230 minutes for grades 1 to 3) in an effort to offer teachers more flexibility during distance learning (see section 43501 of AB-77).
  • If permitted by the local health agency, districts must provide some form of in-school instruction (see sections 43502 and 43503 of AB 77).
  • In lieu of a full Local Control Accountability Plan, by Sept. 30 districts must do a Learning Continuity and Attendance plan describing how they will respond to the impact of the coronavirus on in-school and district learning, learning loss and students’ mental health (see section 43509 of AB 77).

...

distance_learningNew.png

In response to reports of uneven access and low-quality distance learning during school closures, legislators will require districts to do the following (see section 43502 of AB-77😞

  • Confirm that all students have access to a computer and internet at home in order to participate in distance learning.
  • Provide standards-aligned content and instruction.
  • Provide daily live interaction with students “for the purposes of instruction, progress monitoring and maintaining school connectedness”.
  • Maintain regular communication with parents on student progress.
  • Establish procedures to re-engage students who are absent for more than 60% of instruction per week.
  • Provide academic supports for English learners, students with disabilities, foster youth, homeless students and students who have fallen behind in their academic progress.
  • Continue special education services.”
Edited by Arcadia
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I'm going to ask, too...if those reading who are prayerful, would pray for the school situation here in Florida, and particularly for my sister? She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan. She's scared. We had 15,000 cases in Florida yesterday, over 1,000 cases in the county she teaches in yesterday. We have 7,000 people hospitalized in the state with a primary diagnosis of Covid. We have 11,000 kids diagnosed with Covid in the state. I don't know what the answer is, but just opening up full time is terrifying. And she is also a single mom of two kids, one with significant asthma as well. And if she has to be on campus full time, so will her kids. She will and has sacrificed for the kids she is in charge of, but darn it, I love her and don't want her to sacrifice her life for them. And I know if she has kids and teachers getting sick, or dying, that will tear her up as well. 

The school board vote is tomorrow. 

Praying.

For some local leaders to stand up. For courts where this will be fought to have wisdom even in the face of opposition. It happened for us in TX with the 6000 in person state republican convention cancelled and the state supreme court denied it today. We were praying for it. Not at all as big or significant as yours but I just wanted to say don't lose hope. 

Edited by Dreamergal
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Plum said:

Most SoCal schools have classrooms that open to the outdoors. I do hope they study to see if that makes a difference compared to indoor halls. 

In the 1960’s many elementary schools in the Houston suburbs were like that. They even had a restroom in each class, or shared with one other.

I think it should be doable to bring in and set up temporary rooms, tho that takes planning, and it seems too many don’t want to think that far in advance. I also think that by doing all of these precautionary things being considered proves that this country is at risk. And that is definitely does not fit with the “this country is open for business” mantra we keep hearing, nor does it give the feeling of confidence, and that’s really the only things they’ve got to chant, because everything else sucks.

Edited by Dotwithaperiod
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

In the 1960’s many elementary schools in the Houston suburbs were like that. They even had a restroom in each class, or shared with one other.

I think it should be doable to bring in and set up temporary rooms, tho that takes planning, and it seems too many don’t want to think that far in advance. I also think that by doing these precautionary things, it proves that this country is at risk. And that is definitely does not fit with the “this country is open for business” mantra we keep hearing, nor does it give the feeling of confidence, and that’s really the only things they’ve got to chant, because everything else sucks.

Elementary schools in Florida were like that too. I went to one in the 80s like that - all open hallways (covered with a roof, but open), each had at least one door to the outside, the lower grades had a bathroom. The way they were set up, was there were a group of 4 classrooms that were divided with temporary floor to ceiling walls, and in corner they all met was carved out a square office area that all four teachers/classrooms used for storage, materials, etc. There was a glass window into that office, so the teachers, if they needed to go in to get stuff, could still see their classroom. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Dreamergal said:

Praying.

For some local leaders to stand up. For courts where this will be fought to have wisdom even in the face of opposition. It happened for us in TX with the 6000 in person state republican convention cancelled and the state supreme court denied it today. We were praying for it. Not at all as big or significant as yours but I just wanted to say don't lose hope. 

Thank goodness for people like Mayor Sylvester Turner. Maybe he can find away to enlighten Cornyn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

Maybe. 

Legal advisors for other districts, including my own, are saying that even if they vote to keep schools closed the commissioner of education at the state level can overrule them and force the county superintendent to open them anyway. I just discussed this with one of the Orange County School Board members. 

  • Confused 2
  • Sad 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I'm going to ask, too...if those reading who are prayerful, would pray for the school situation here in Florida, and particularly for my sister? She's Kelly, and has asthma, and about to have 3-4 thousand students on campus if they stick with the current plan. She's scared. We had 15,000 cases in Florida yesterday, over 1,000 cases in the county she teaches in yesterday. We have 7,000 people hospitalized in the state with a primary diagnosis of Covid. We have 11,000 kids diagnosed with Covid in the state. I don't know what the answer is, but just opening up full time is terrifying. And she is also a single mom of two kids, one with significant asthma as well. And if she has to be on campus full time, so will her kids. She will and has sacrificed for the kids she is in charge of, but darn it, I love her and don't want her to sacrifice her life for them. And I know if she has kids and teachers getting sick, or dying, that will tear her up as well. 

The school board vote is tomorrow. 

I'll pray for her. Please pray for my DIL too. As a high school band director, it's impossible for her students to wear masks while they're playing, plus there's blowing and spit. Fortunately, she's young and healthy and they don't have any kids yet, but she's in a county not far from you that's not doing well and recently had a teen death due to Covid. I hope your sister's district decides they aren't going to open in person!

  • Sad 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I'll pray for her. Please pray for my DIL too. As a high school band director, it's impossible for her students to wear masks while they're playing, plus there's blowing and spit. Fortunately, she's young and healthy and they don't have any kids yet, but she's in a county not far from you that's not doing well and recently had a teen death due to Covid. I hope your sister's district decides they aren't going to open in person!

Will do. 

And as of today, I'm being told that the district is not allowed to not reopen fully, due to the emergency order. I just emailed our director of the department of health as well. 

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I'll pray for her. Please pray for my DIL too. As a high school band director, it's impossible for her students to wear masks while they're playing, plus there's blowing and spit. Fortunately, she's young and healthy and they don't have any kids yet, but she's in a county not far from you that's not doing well and recently had a teen death due to Covid. I hope your sister's district decides they aren't going to open in person!

So, they aren't just opening, but they're opening and allowing kids to blow into instruments?

The only way I can imagine band happening safely this school year, would be if they did music theory or something like that on the in person days, and then had kids keep up their skills through practicing at home.  

I'll pray for her and her students. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

So, they aren't just opening, but they're opening and allowing kids to blow into instruments?

The only way I can imagine band happening safely this school year, would be if they did music theory or something like that on the in person days, and then had kids keep up their skills through practicing at home.  

I'll pray for her and her students. 

Yep, and I just checked their website. As of now, they are planning to open full time saying that's what most families want, although they're offering an online option. This is the week they normally have band camp and according to her Facebook page today, she "hit the ground running" this morning, so I think band camp is happening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

Yep, and I just checked their website. As of now, they are planning to open full time saying that's what most families want, although they're offering an online option. This is the week they normally have band camp and according to her Facebook page today, she "hit the ground running" this morning, so I think band camp is happening.

Normally we would have information about band camp. Nothing has come out. I'm not really expecting band to be much of a thing in the fall at least.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our district is planning to have band camp during the regularly scheduled week in August. I have one son who does percussion, and some of the percussion section is going to start practicing tomorrow in person (not his section). The messages say that masks will be required for these percussion practices, but the athletes practicing at the school already have not been wearing masks, so I am guessing that they will really not enforce the mask wearing.

We are waiting for a message about school opening that is supposed to come tomorrow, and I'm hoping it will contain information about band and choir, but I won't be surprised if it does not. We already know that there is no hybrid option; students have to be all online or fully in the classroom, but we don't know what the plans for the classrooms are yet.

My son who plays percussion is going to be less at risk, because percussion stands at the back and does not involve spit or blowing. During marching formations, he does not march but stands on the track in an ensemble.

But my son who plays saxophone will be right in there in the spitty section. And DD who sings in the choir......ugh.

I'm hoping the school will have a plan to make things at least a bit safer, but I don't know. They could cut the risk during performances in half if schools only perform at their own football games and don't bring the visiting band.

I don't think they should have football at all, actually, but I think they are going to try their hardest to make sports happen.

The lack of an hybrid option is really disappointing to me. I was hoping that they could benefit from in-class instruction (which my particular kids need -- two have IEPs) but have half of the risk by staying home a few days each week. If my kids were different people, I would have them skip music this year.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Our district is planning to have band camp during the regularly scheduled week in August. I have one son who does percussion, and some of the percussion section is going to start practicing tomorrow in person (not his section). The messages say that masks will be required for these percussion practices, but the athletes practicing at the school already have not been wearing masks, so I am guessing that they will really not enforce the mask wearing.

We are waiting for a message about school opening that is supposed to come tomorrow, and I'm hoping it will contain information about band and choir, but I won't be surprised if it does not. We already know that there is no hybrid option; students have to be all online or fully in the classroom, but we don't know what the plans for the classrooms are yet.

My son who plays percussion is going to be less at risk, because percussion stands at the back and does not involve spit or blowing. During marching formations, he does not march but stands on the track in an ensemble.

But my son who plays saxophone will be right in there in the spitty section. And DD who sings in the choir......ugh.

I'm hoping the school will have a plan to make things at least a bit safer, but I don't know. They could cut the risk during performances in half if schools only perform at their own football games and don't bring the visiting band.

I don't think they should have football at all, actually, but I think they are going to try their hardest to make sports happen.

The lack of an hybrid option is really disappointing to me. I was hoping that they could benefit from in-class instruction (which my particular kids need -- two have IEPs) but have half of the risk by staying home a few days each week. If my kids were different people, I would have them skip music this year.

Ah, a percussionist. I have one of those. They're a unique breed.😂 DS volunteers at the school with the percussionists in his wife's band, so he'll probably be around all of them too. He's furloughed from his jobs so he'll have time.

I agree that there should be a hybrid version. It allows at least some in person teaching while keeping class sizes lower

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a friend who is superintendent of a nearby district, and DH saw him on a Zoom session yesterday. DH said that friend was visibly stressed  -- more stressed than he has been before this week. The superintendent knows there isn't a way for them to keep Covid out of the school building. He said that he knows parents will send kids sick to school, because some parents do this and will give Tylenol to take a fever down before sending kids to class. He says it will take very little to shut the building down.

And I've been thinking of my own personal experience this week. I have a very mild runny nose (I blow my nose once or twice a day) and an extremely slight cough. DD18's graduation is this Saturday (in-person but at a church with a very small graduating class), so I got a Covid test over the weekend, so that I can be sure that it's safe for me to go to the graduation and  be around some people (socially distanced) on Saturday. The nurse told me that my whole family should stay at home until I get my results, which will take up to five days. DD18 is having to take time off of work. Two of my other kids are missing some athletic practices at school, and we've had to reschedule an ortho appointment and a sports medicine appointment and at least one other thing.

All because mom has a runny nose and a bitty cough.

So if people do things right according to public health measures, any time ANYONE in the house is sniffly, everyone needs to stay home until no one in the whole house has symptoms, or until cleared by testing.

If people do that, schools will have tons of absences every day. Normally, if the school has a certain number of sick students for the flu or whatever, the school closes for the day. I would think they would need to follow those guidelines, still, which will mean a lot of day-by-day closures. I suppose they could let those standards be more lax, but that would make no sense in a pandemic.

However, I suspect that it's more likely for a portion of families to dose their kids with cold medicine and just send their runny nose or coughing kids to class. And as long as a portion of families do this, the risk of the virus spreading will be higher.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Public school districts in L.A. and in San Diego announced that they will reopen in August. Everything will be Online.  I can see many students in the High Schools doing OK with Online courses. Some in the Middle Schools will be able to handle Online courses. The kids in Elementary (K-5) are going to need help. Probably constant help. If their parents work, who will give them that help?  Who will take care of the little kids at home?  

https://www.foxnews.com/us/los-angeles-san-diego-schools-wont-reopen

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

We have a friend who is superintendent of a nearby district, and DH saw him on a Zoom session yesterday. DH said that friend was visibly stressed  -- more stressed than he has been before this week. The superintendent knows there isn't a way for them to keep Covid out of the school building. He said that he knows parents will send kids sick to school, because some parents do this and will give Tylenol to take a fever down before sending kids to class. He says it will take very little to shut the building down.

And I've been thinking of my own personal experience this week. I have a very mild runny nose (I blow my nose once or twice a day) and an extremely slight cough. DD18's graduation is this Saturday (in-person but at a church with a very small graduating class), so I got a Covid test over the weekend, so that I can be sure that it's safe for me to go to the graduation and  be around some people (socially distanced) on Saturday. The nurse told me that my whole family should stay at home until I get my results, which will take up to five days. DD18 is having to take time off of work. Two of my other kids are missing some athletic practices at school, and we've had to reschedule an ortho appointment and a sports medicine appointment and at least one other thing.

All because mom has a runny nose and a bitty cough.

So if people do things right according to public health measures, any time ANYONE in the house is sniffly, everyone needs to stay home until no one in the whole house has symptoms, or until cleared by testing.

If people do that, schools will have tons of absences every day. Normally, if the school has a certain number of sick students for the flu or whatever, the school closes for the day. I would think they would need to follow those guidelines, still, which will mean a lot of day-by-day closures. I suppose they could let those standards be more lax, but that would make no sense in a pandemic.

However, I suspect that it's more likely for a portion of families to dose their kids with cold medicine and just send their runny nose or coughing kids to class. And as long as a portion of families do this, the risk of the virus spreading will be higher.

 

If everyone stays home for the slightest family snivel and cough it might be that much less sickness of all sorts would be transmitted to others and instead of most people needing to be home most of the time maybe most people would be healthy most of the time. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far, the big public school district is delaying opening until September,  (And parents are electing online or in person), but the superintendent has said that he is not bringing kids back if it is not safe to do so, and one of the charter networks Is starting online in mid-August, with the plan of going back “when the state of emergency is lifted”. The suburban districts (several, but they usually coordinate on scheduling, and did so on closing in March) and the other big charter network haven’t announced yet. I am anticipating that I will be starting the semester with everyone online, too, although parks and rec is in a holding pattern right now until the schools announce. Which definitely reduces my stress. 
 

DD is now completely online this year, but her math class does have a synchronous Microsoft TEAMS session once a week, and students who need to be on campus due to lack of access at home or who are on student visas will do those sessions on campus, socially distanced, with the professor teaching from their office or home. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...