Jump to content

Menu

2020 Vionics (Tide II) for foot issues?


Recommended Posts

I have read the various threads on Vionic shoes for foot issues and was ready to pull the trigger on the Tide IIs. But then I noticed that a bunch of recent reviewers on more than one site said that the new Vionics are not the same as the old ones. Have any of you bought these in 2020, and, if so, have you noticed that the new shoes are not as good as the old ones? I really don't want to buy shoes that may make my feet worse

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a pair of grey Tide 2 this year... I bought the same shoes early last year. I just put them side by side and I can’t see a difference.

The fit is very close to the Vionic Kirra through the arch, and the fit of the 2019 and 2020 are the same.

I also bought a pair of Vionic High Tides. The arch is slightly different from the above too, but is fully supportive unlike how the Vionic Carrol ballet flat feels to my feet.

I will still choose Vionics over nearly any other brand for all day wear. I am usually literally hobbling otherwise. If I didn’t have Vionics I would be in custom orthotics to stay functional.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know the answer to your question, but I would be leery of ordering those without trying on your actual pair.

For one thing, those therapeutic brands often don't match exactly from one pair to another.  I have tried on lots of Dansko sandals, and have found that two of the same model from the same year might have slightly different arch support locations, which makes all the difference in whether they help or hurt me.  

Also, you might need a different size than normal to be able to have the arch hit properly.  I normally wear an 8 - 8 1/2, but have to get a 7 1/2 in Abeo's to get the arch to hit the right spot.  Because of this, my Abeo's cause hammer toes, so I can't wear them all the time, but when I need them, I REALLY need them.

Lastly, you might find as I did that your feet heel themselves once you have treated them with a Medic Massager daily for a while.  I got mine after a demo at Costco, and it has reduced my need for arch support almost completely.  I mostly wear cushy running shoes these days, with Altra being my preferred brand.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, prairiewindmomma said:

@Carol in Cal. were your foot issues all soft tissue based? I have been able to heal my PF, but I have enough bone structural issues that affect my soft tissue that I hadn’t been given any hope of improving.

I am also needing new walking shoes...thanks for the tip about Altras.

OK, voodoo weird--PF was soft tissue, and it was a bear to get rid of but I finally did so.

However, ALSO, I had a bump down into one arch for a while that I was told was a bone protrusion that would need surgery, and a chiro fixed it with light, feathery touches as she was trying to just diagnose it.  Cue Twilight Zone music.  I had been icing and massaging it for over a month.  Still not sure how she did it.

Also, I used to have bad hammer toes that I was told would need to be surgically removed as they were bone spurs, but they kind of resolved themselves down to nothing once I started wearing shoes with wide toe boxes, which was supposed to be impossible.  

Re the Altras--seems like most people who want cushy running shoes end up with either Altras or Hokas.  And they are fiercely loyal to one or the other.  For me Altras are the best, and Hokas don't fit me right.  I encourage you to try both on before you decide what to buy.  Also, the non-trail runner Altras I have (Torins), although they are extremely high in cushioning, are unbearable on honeycombed asphalt roadway.  Fine on smooth cement, roads or sidewalks, fine on tile, fine on packed dirt, but any more topography than that and not all that wearable.  I wear the Superior 4 trail runners when I go on the highly broken asphalt, and am going to try them with their removal rock plate in for granite hiking.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

Thanks...I am needing to get a good pair of hiking boots I can get some mileage on. There is a ten mile in trail the kids want me to hike on this fall....mixed topography for sure.

 

PSA:  Folks are hiking the Pacific Crest Trail in trail running shoes, specifically non-waterproof ones to cut down on foot sweat, more so than in traditional hiking boots.  The last time I talked with a through hiker was a few years back (maybe 3? 4?) and at the time Brooks Cascadia was by far the most common choice for through hiking.  I bought a pair and wore them pretty happily until I discovered Altra.  The Brooks ones squeeze in my little toes a bit, and although they have a lower drop than the Salomon's I used to wear, they are not true zero drop shoes.  They are great, but now I think that Altra is greater.  The Brooks ones do have a very good rock plate, suitable for my hiking in the Sierra on sometimes sharp granite.  I have not tried the Altra's rock plates yet as they are insertable and my first pair didn't have them (was supposed to), so I'm hopeful but not sure that the Altra Superior 4's with the rock plates are just as good at terrain, while knowing that they are better at being zero drop, cushy, and with room for my toes to spread on out.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Lostinabook said:

@Carol in Cal. Which massager did you use? I looked at the Costco website, and there are several.

I'm not sure whether they still sell this at Costco--it was a demo special and I haven't seen it in a long time.  What I have is the foot one on this page:  https://www.medmassager.com/our-massagers/

I would put my bare heel on the top of the slope of it and crank it up.  It would vibrate pretty hard.  I actually had partial numbness from it.  But somehow it jumpstarted my recovery from 15 months of intractible PF.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Carol in Cal. said:

PSA:  Folks are hiking the Pacific Crest Trail in trail running shoes, specifically non-waterproof ones to cut down on foot sweat, more so than in traditional hiking boots.  The last time I talked with a through hiker was a few years back (maybe 3? 4?) and at the time Brooks Cascadia was by far the most common choice for through hiking.  

Yup. My younger cousins are ultra trail runners (those crazy 50-100 miles races) and have done the PCT a couple of times. I am made of less hardy stuff. The PCT runs by us, but it gets busy this time of year. I am on less busy trails, and depending on the time of year, dealing with wet leaves, a bit of mud, and slick rocks. I really just need to go try on shoes again. The local good store has just opened back up. 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, Carol in Cal. said:

I'm not sure whether they still sell this at Costco--it was a demo special and I haven't seen it in a long time.  What I have is the foot one on this page:  https://www.medmassager.com/our-massagers/

I would put my bare heel on the top of the slope of it and crank it up.  It would vibrate pretty hard.  I actually had partial numbness from it.  But somehow it jumpstarted my recovery from 15 months of intractible PF.

 

They do have it on the website. Thank you!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, prairiewindmomma said:

Thanks...I am needing to get a good pair of hiking boots I can get some mileage on. There is a ten mile in trail the kids want me to hike on this fall....mixed topography for sure.

 

 

Look at Altra Lone Peak (ankle height) as an alternative too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I ended up getting a pair of Vionics (Kirra), and they have been amazing! I also use a pair of Teva Verra Sport Sandals for exercising, and my feet feel *so* much better. I'm not nearly as hobbled in the morning as I used to be. Thank you for the advice!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha! This thread prompted me to go get my new hikers. I ended up in Keen Targhees with a green superfeet insert and a pedag metatarsal drop pad layered on top of that.

This is my first pair of shoes with a metatarsal pad and it is amazing! It pushes your metatarsals up and spreads them out and it’s crazy. It feels really good but I have no tolerance for hiking in those shoes yet. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...