Jump to content

Menu

Help me prep for DH's surgery...


Recommended Posts

DH will be getting his hip replaced on Monday.  I have spent the last month handling 95% of the admin, from making sure I have arrangements to have the kids looked after, to getting the short term disability approved, etc etc.

Which means we are in the home stretch.  I am packing the kids tonight, tomorrow, I drop them off with my oldest.  DH's surgery is at 11:30 on Monday, so we have to be at the hospital at 9:30.  According to everything we have been told, I am able to remain there with him.  The surgery is supposed to take about an hour.  He was told he's likely to have to spend 1 night in the hospital due to his weight, but we also told the surgeon that we really want to have him come home that night, if there's any possibility, and the fact that his surgery is in the morning, plus that we are *so close* to the hospital (like, less than 1/4 mile as the crow flies, but like 3/4 mile actually driving there because it's on the other side of the freeway.)  Anyway, so probably he's staying the night, but maybe, coming home.

He can't eat the morning of, but if he stays, his food for dinner will be included in his hospital stay.  Mine of course is not.  And then, although I can stay through like the pre-op stuff (and will be writing all the copious notes necessary) and then can stay through post op and recovery, his visits with the PT, etc.....I don't know if I am allowed to spend the night or not....I don't think so, but again, super close anyway.  

So....there's stuff I will need as his support person.  I will be taking all the notes, so I will have a note book and pen, and DH will handle all his packing (he has things that he wants specific ways lol).  Which means food and anything else for ME, sitting there waiting, maybe coming home for the night, maybe not, etc etc.  This is my first experience with a potential overnight hospital stay, where I wasn't giving birth to children myself.

 

Advice, things to prep to bring or have ready at home (we have his medical equipment situation taken care of and we have masks and other Covid protection covered)  or anything else you can share?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband recently had dual colon and kidney surgery.

You mentioned having medical equipment already. Does that include an elevated toilet seat?

Some things that proved helpful here:

An arm chair that my husband was able to seat himself in independently; we raised the height by putting a couch cushion on the seat of an old recliner.

A captain's chair for the dining table; the arms helped my husband to sit and stand by himself.

A seat for sitting at the bathroom sink for shaving and toothbrushing.

A handheld urinal.

Disposable bed pads.

We kept a notebook. Each day had its own page. Top half had columns for drinks (he was supposed to have 64 ounces a day), food, and walks (he was supposed to take 3 or 4 fifteen minutes walks a day). The bottom half had columns for medications, temperature readings, and notes. The notebook lived on the kitchen counter but also went to follow up appointments. It also had phone numbers of doctors, hospital, pharmacy. We occasionally had to look up things when talking with the doctor's office. It was also great when remembering what time that dose was given.

My husband's incisions meant that he needed fresh towels  and clothes after each shower. He also needed clean sheets daily.

I made our bed as normal, then I put a twin sheet across the width of the bed; I also gave us each separate top twin sheets. This way I needed to launder only two flat twin sheets and a pillowcase daily instead of all our queen bedding.

My husband had swollen feet and calves for a few weeks post surgery and his regular socks left marks on his legs. I found some nonbinding socks at Wal-Mart for him to wear; Dr Scholl's brand, I believe.

We moved some furniture in order to place a small table next to the chair in which my husband spent much of his time; it was useful for a drink, his glasses, his tablet or book, speakers and headphones, his phone, and the breathing gadget that the hospital sent home with him. If you get disposable bed pads, I recommend putting one under the table for the obligatory spilled drink. (Ask me how I know....)

Other useful items were an abundance of pillows (my husband slept propped up for a couple of weeks) and a lightweight blanket to use when sitting.

Wishing your husband a successful operation and recovery.

Regards,

Kareni

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

No way I would accept that I could not spend the night with him. Dh has had two surgeries that required overnights since we have been married.  I stayed with him every time. 

Dh had a total knee replacement. The worst part of that was his nausea the first night....once we got that under control we were home free. Please ask for the anti-nausea patch which helps so so much.  

  • Like 2
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Scarlett said:

No way I would accept that I could not spend the night with him. Dh has had two surgeries that required overnights since we have been married.  I stayed with him every time. 

Dh had a total knee replacement. The worst part of that was his nausea the first night....once we got that under control we were home free. Please ask for the anti-nausea patch which helps so so much.  

My niece, 18, just had surgery and my sister was NOT allowed in the hospital at all.  She had to drop her off at the door and pick her up in the evening.   Then niece had trouble breathing the next day and fear was pulmonary embolism.....again, my sister was NOT allowed in at all.  It was horrible for my niece and my sister.   They are in Georgia.    It was dangerous as my niece, who had had major surgery the day before was left alone in the bathroom with a possible pulmonary embolism.  Ended up with double pneumonia.

That fact that OP can even go in with her husband is something not allowed in many areas yet ......which is horrible for patients and family.

  • Sad 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Ottakee said:

My niece, 18, just had surgery and my sister was NOT allowed in the hospital at all.  She had to drop her off at the door and pick her up in the evening.   Then niece had trouble breathing the next day and fear was pulmonary embolism.....again, my sister was NOT allowed in at all.  It was horrible for my niece and my sister.   They are in Georgia.    It was dangerous as my niece, who had had major surgery the day before was left alone in the bathroom with a possible pulmonary embolism.  Ended up with double pneumonia.

That fact that OP can even go in with her husband is something not allowed in many areas yet ......which is horrible for patients and family.

I guess I wasn’t thinking when I posted, but you are right, many if not most hospitals are not allowing anyone in.  Ugh, that is so scary to me.  And so much more work for the poor nurses and other staff because family helps so much.  
 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

I guess I wasn’t thinking when I posted, but you are right, many if not most hospitals are not allowing anyone in.  Ugh, that is so scary to me.  And so much more work for the poor nurses and other staff because family helps so much.  
 

 

Exactly.   Before COVID, hospitals would require you to have a friend/family member there for surgery and really wanted someone there almost all the time.  Family member/friend can help with anxiety, understanding the doctors directions/findings/concerns, help explain medical history, monitor for medication errors, falls, etc.  

I am all for being careful but all of these risks have not gone away and must be balanced with the covid risks of a person with no symptoms wearing a mask and staying in the one room full time (aka not wandering the halls/cafeteria/gift shop, etc.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Kareni said:

My husband recently had dual colon and kidney surgery.

You mentioned having medical equipment already. Does that include an elevated toilet seat?

Some things that proved helpful here:

An arm chair that my husband was able to seat himself in independently; we raised the height by putting a couch cushion on the seat of an old recliner.

A captain's chair for the dining table; the arms helped my husband to sit and stand by himself.

A seat for sitting at the bathroom sink for shaving and toothbrushing.

A handheld urinal.

Disposable bed pads.

We kept a notebook. Each day had its own page. Top half had columns for drinks (he was supposed to have 64 ounces a day), food, and walks (he was supposed to take 3 or 4 fifteen minutes walks a day). The bottom half had columns for medications, temperature readings, and notes. The notebook lived on the kitchen counter but also went to follow up appointments. It also had phone numbers of doctors, hospital, pharmacy. We occasionally had to look up things when talking with the doctor's office. It was also great when remembering what time that dose was given.

My husband's incisions meant that he needed fresh towels  and clothes after each shower. He also needed clean sheets daily.

I made our bed as normal, then I put a twin sheet across the width of the bed; I also gave us each separate top twin sheets. This way I needed to launder only two flat twin sheets and a pillowcase daily instead of all our queen bedding.

My husband had swollen feet and calves for a few weeks post surgery and his regular socks left marks on his legs. I found some nonbinding socks at Wal-Mart for him to wear; Dr Scholl's brand, I believe.

We moved some furniture in order to place a small table next to the chair in which my husband spent much of his time; it was useful for a drink, his glasses, his tablet or book, speakers and headphones, his phone, and the breathing gadget that the hospital sent home with him. If you get disposable bed pads, I recommend putting one under the table for the obligatory spilled drink. (Ask me how I know....)

Other useful items were an abundance of pillows (my husband slept propped up for a couple of weeks) and a lightweight blanket to use when sitting.

Wishing your husband a successful operation and recovery.

Regards,

Kareni

Yes they gave us a whole list of suggestions of aids he might need, and his doc/surgeon highlighted the most necessary.  And, anything that we don't have already, I can easily access should we discover that we need it or it would be most helpful.  This is a total hip replacement and he is supposed to have a single waterproof dressing that doesn't need to be changed.  It's supposed to be "anterior approach" method which seems to have less restrictions on movements make recovery faster.  And he should be up and walking the day of, though obviously only a little bit at a time.  Because of the pain DH has been in, especially this past week as they had him stop all medications in preparation, he already has a little table next to the chair he uses.  He has had a really hard time getting around.  

7 hours ago, Scarlett said:

No way I would accept that I could not spend the night with him. Dh has had two surgeries that required overnights since we have been married.  I stayed with him every time. 

Dh had a total knee replacement. The worst part of that was his nausea the first night....once we got that under control we were home free. Please ask for the anti-nausea patch which helps so so much.  

The plan is that he will have a spinal anesthesia with a light sleep, and that there won't be any general anesthesia.  This is supposed to cut down on the possibility of nausea.  🤞

49 minutes ago, Ottakee said:

My niece, 18, just had surgery and my sister was NOT allowed in the hospital at all.  She had to drop her off at the door and pick her up in the evening.   Then niece had trouble breathing the next day and fear was pulmonary embolism.....again, my sister was NOT allowed in at all.  It was horrible for my niece and my sister.   They are in Georgia.    It was dangerous as my niece, who had had major surgery the day before was left alone in the bathroom with a possible pulmonary embolism.  Ended up with double pneumonia.

That fact that OP can even go in with her husband is something not allowed in many areas yet ......which is horrible for patients and family.

Right, with Covid restrictions, I am not sure if there's going to be a restriction on how long I can be there, or where I have to wait during his surgery etc.  I also have no idea if there will be any food places in the hospital even open.  There are plenty very close and really, I can drive home, grab food and come back, that itself would only take a few minutes.

I am thinking that maybe I should pack a little cooler for myself as if I was planning to spend the day at a park or similar.  And then if we come home that night, I can just unpack it, but if we stay, then I have it there for when I am hungry. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

If no family member is allowed to be physically present with the patient, I would insist on Duo or Facetime while the staff is explaining aftercare or anything of importance.  After one surgery, dh was given aftercare instructions shortly after he came out of recovery and while I was not present -- he had no memory of what the staff member told him.  Never again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

if I need to be hospitalized, I will insist on a family member with me.  That is because I have aphasia, brain fog, etc and absolutely need someone with me to help me communicate, to be able to relate my very, very complicated history if I am not able, etc,  

What I know people are doing is calling themselves the caretaker of X.  I am the caretaker of my husband and he definitely is the caretaker of me.  I also want to be with my husband, and as of right now can be, when he has his colonoscopy. Not in the room, but in the waiting room and to go back when they have him in the recovery.  Last time, he was in recovery, he stopped breathing several times and I had to get the nurse quickly.   That is how we discovered his sleep apnea,   Now they are having him bring his device but he is late in getting a new one and it isn't working well now.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kareni had a lot of excellent ideas.  My dh actually just returned home yesterday from hip surgery.  The fact that your dh will only be there for one night is amazing!  My dh was hospitalized for 5 weeks.  (But his situation was a little more complex.)   I wasn't able to see him at all due to being in a big city with lots of Covid cases and escalated violence during the protests, etc.  I couldn't step foot in the hospital that entire time.  But, the hospital staff was always available to answer my questions when I called.  They were really quite amazing!

What my dh needs since coming home: a raised toilet seat with handles, but one that actually attaches to the back with two long screws;  a tall handle that attaches to tub (we don't have a walk-in shower);  a shower chair;  a cane;  a simple bed rail for pulling himself more easily in and out of bed;  a long shoehorn;  a "grabber" on a long handle;  an extra pillow for his calf that still swells on the side of his hip surgery;  an ace bandage for that calf that he wears at night.  Also, making sure that he can sit in a chair with arm rests so that he can push himself to a standing position or settle into a sitting position more easily; a plastic urinal that he can use in bed during the night.

A flashlight near your bed so that you can help him with meds during the night, and a 24-hour telephone number of his medical staff for any questions that come up.  Good luck and take care!!

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 For hospital: 

  • Blanket and sweatshirt in a tote 
  • Power bank for phone 
  • Crisp dollar bills for vending machine 
  • Mints and gum, the cold air can irritate your throat 
  • Easy snacks like protein bars, nuts

Will their cafeteria be open to visitors? If so, I'd probably not worry about packing in real food. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

if I need to be hospitalized, I will insist on a family member with me.  That is because I have aphasia, brain fog, etc and absolutely need someone with me to help me communicate, to be able to relate my very, very complicated history if I am not able, etc,  

What I know people are doing is calling themselves the caretaker of X.  I am the caretaker of my husband and he definitely is the caretaker of me.  I also want to be with my husband, and as of right now can be, when he has his colonoscopy. Not in the room, but in the waiting room and to go back when they have him in the recovery.  Last time, he was in recovery, he stopped breathing several times and I had to get the nurse quickly.   That is how we discovered his sleep apnea,   Now they are having him bring his device but he is late in getting a new one and it isn't working well now.

Aw, I feel for you so, so much!!  But even this might go against hospital policies.  My dh has aphasia too.  He would never be able to even write or say "I have aphasia."  His heath history is extremely complex and life-threatening, and I'm the only one who knows all of it.  But, I was not allowed to even step one foot into the hospital during his recent surgery and one month+ time of recovery.  Ugh.  It was very, very difficult, but these are unprecedented times and they made absolutely no exceptions.  I was very impressed with his medical team.  They were always available to answer my many questions, and took great care of him.  He was in good hands.  I just made sure to keep up every day, and to not be afraid to voice any concerns or express any ideas or thoughts.  They are always very good about listening.  I was often present during conversations with staff via cell phone or FaceTime.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is reassuring, my dh has this surgery 3 weeks ago.  I had to drop him off and then pick him up the next day.  I was not allowed to enter.

His recovery has been fairly easy.  What I needed to do primarily was keep track of all the medicines and make sure he got them on time.  Making sure he had food and drinks, ice packs as needed.  Helping him use walker and then cane to walk constantly.  At first it was 10 minutes every hour (not through the night).  He was able to toilet and shower independently.   Incision cover was same as you mentioned, and easily changed after first week.   They gave him things to help put on socks, pick up things etc, but he didn’t need them.  
 

Doctor did not do a great job communicating with me, but I was able to figure it out from discharge instructions and my own research.

 

hoping your dh has a quick recovery and is soon without pain! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is great that you can go in.  My dh has had about 20 proceedures since we were married.  I think all patients need an advocate of some type.

We try to be nice, but we have learned to pitch a fit if necessary.  Do not hesitate to do this if you have already made reasonable requests with no response or unacceptable response.  It actually works.

At this point in hsitory with all that's going on I would include calling your representative if necessary to make sure your loved one is being cared for properly.  It is unfair to expect a sick or in pain person to reasonably know what all is going on.

The other thing we've learned is mostly everything will be ok and we don't need to be super anxious.  It might not turn out 100% perfect, but it is usually ok with a few hiccups in proceedure or medication.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband just had surgery 2 weeks ago. No one is allowed in our local hospitals except the patient, unless the patient is under 18. I had to drop hubs off at the front door and pick him back up at the front door when he was released. The nurses called and gave me updates and Post op care info. It was hard :-(

Link to post
Share on other sites

A friend who had hip replacement had tremendous pain during first movements and steps back to walking stage.  Needed a strong person to help with getting out of bed first morning after surgery. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, katilac said:

 For hospital: 

  • Blanket and sweatshirt in a tote 
  • Power bank for phone 
  • Crisp dollar bills for vending machine 
  • Mints and gum, the cold air can irritate your throat 
  • Easy snacks like protein bars, nuts

Will their cafeteria be open to visitors? If so, I'd probably not worry about packing in real food. 

I spent many weeks staying in the hospital as a caregiver.  If you have a small tote on wheels, that will be most helpful for lugging your stuff around. I used stuff sacks or space saver bags. 

Earbuds/earplugs, or if you have them, noise cancelling headphones and extra batteries. 

Any meds and basic toiletries you might need for an overnight stay. 

Warm socks or footies for night (for you.)

Paper copy of his power of attorney for healthcare if he has one. If not, you can print one off online to complete. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, J-rap said:

Kareni had a lot of excellent ideas.  My dh actually just returned home yesterday from hip surgery.  The fact that your dh will only be there for one night is amazing!  My dh was hospitalized for 5 weeks.  (But his situation was a little more complex.)   I wasn't able to see him at all due to being in a big city with lots of Covid cases and escalated violence during the protests, etc.  I couldn't step foot in the hospital that entire time.  But, the hospital staff was always available to answer my questions when I called.  They were really quite amazing!

What my dh needs since coming home: a raised toilet seat with handles, but one that actually attaches to the back with two long screws;  a tall handle that attaches to tub (we don't have a walk-in shower);  a shower chair;  a cane;  a simple bed rail for pulling himself more easily in and out of bed;  a long shoehorn;  a "grabber" on a long handle;  an extra pillow for his calf that still swells on the side of his hip surgery;  an ace bandage for that calf that he wears at night.  Also, making sure that he can sit in a chair with arm rests so that he can push himself to a standing position or settle into a sitting position more easily; a plastic urinal that he can use in bed during the night.

A flashlight near your bed so that you can help him with meds during the night, and a 24-hour telephone number of his medical staff for any questions that come up.  Good luck and take care!!

 

 

DH's surgery is really a "basic" hip replacement.  I mean it's still a surgery obviously, but according to every person we have talked to, there's nothing complicating about it.  (at least, according to everything they see now.....obviously Xrays and such can only provide so much data.)

6 hours ago, katilac said:

 For hospital: 

  • Blanket and sweatshirt in a tote 
  • Power bank for phone 
  • Crisp dollar bills for vending machine 
  • Mints and gum, the cold air can irritate your throat 
  • Easy snacks like protein bars, nuts

Will their cafeteria be open to visitors? If so, I'd probably not worry about packing in real food. 

Thanks for the reminder for the phone charger.  

5 hours ago, bzymom said:

If it is reassuring, my dh has this surgery 3 weeks ago.  I had to drop him off and then pick him up the next day.  I was not allowed to enter.

His recovery has been fairly easy.  What I needed to do primarily was keep track of all the medicines and make sure he got them on time.  Making sure he had food and drinks, ice packs as needed.  Helping him use walker and then cane to walk constantly.  At first it was 10 minutes every hour (not through the night).  He was able to toilet and shower independently.   Incision cover was same as you mentioned, and easily changed after first week.   They gave him things to help put on socks, pick up things etc, but he didn’t need them.  
 

Doctor did not do a great job communicating with me, but I was able to figure it out from discharge instructions and my own research.

 

hoping your dh has a quick recovery and is soon without pain! 

Thank you for this.  THIS is extremely helpful.  We have a walker, and also crutches, and plan to bring both just to see how they go.  His doc has said he absolutely should be able use the toilet and shower without help.  I have absolutely no problem helping him do things like put his socks on and such, though to be honest, I don't expect him to need 

3 hours ago, Mbelle said:

It is great that you can go in.  My dh has had about 20 proceedures since we were married.  I think all patients need an advocate of some type.

We try to be nice, but we have learned to pitch a fit if necessary.  Do not hesitate to do this if you have already made reasonable requests with no response or unacceptable response.  It actually works.

At this point in hsitory with all that's going on I would include calling your representative if necessary to make sure your loved one is being cared for properly.  It is unfair to expect a sick or in pain person to reasonably know what all is going on.

The other thing we've learned is mostly everything will be ok and we don't need to be super anxious.  It might not turn out 100% perfect, but it is usually ok with a few hiccups in proceedure or medication.  

 

Oh I am pretty good at pitching a fit.  

Super anxious is where DH is right at this moment.  And I am struggling to help him with it.  

2 hours ago, Pen said:

A friend who had hip replacement had tremendous pain during first movements and steps back to walking stage.  Needed a strong person to help with getting out of bed first morning after surgery. 

DH already has quite a bit of pain.  I am hopeful that the surgery pain is less than the pain he is currently in.  

2 hours ago, Pippen said:

I spent many weeks staying in the hospital as a caregiver.  If you have a small tote on wheels, that will be most helpful for lugging your stuff around. I used stuff sacks or space saver bags. 

Earbuds/earplugs, or if you have them, noise cancelling headphones and extra batteries. 

Any meds and basic toiletries you might need for an overnight stay. 

Warm socks or footies for night (for you.)

Paper copy of his power of attorney for healthcare if he has one. If not, you can print one off online to complete. 

 

Oooh, earbuds/headphones....that will be good for the time I am sitting in the waiting room.  

Actually we already have an overall POA because I was handling so much of the admin of FIL's estate, even though DH was the co-executor.  I will did that out to add to my folder.

 

Edited by happysmileylady
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a hip replacement last year.  I was happy to be in the hospital overnight b/c I really did need help getting up, using the bathroom, etc.  Also, I spent the first two weeks or so mostly in a recliner - it was much more comfortable for me than my bed.  You’ve gotten great suggestions here from everybody.  My only addition is, get an excellent physical therapist.  Your dh will go home with some exercises that are to be done frequently through the day - super important for him to do them!  When he’s released to PT, again, it will be super important to do the exercises - that will determine the quality of his recovery.  

Best of luck to your dh!

Anne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Once he is done with PT, you might look into DDPYoga as they have a rebuild program and several of the exercisers there have new hips and/or knees.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I have

4 PBJ sliders, strawberries, grapes, crackers, peanuts and bottles of water
PJ type clothes for me
clothes for tomorrow
sweater
phone, charger, and headphones
blanket for me
the "folder of paper crap" and a notebook
cash
 

Wavering back and forth on laptop and/or other stuff to do while waiting around.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went ahead and brought my laptop and stuff to do.   DH didn’t seem to want to pack anything, did t even want to bring his phone.  I suspect I am going to be running home later to pick up some things for him.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I went ahead and brought my laptop and stuff to do.   DH didn’t seem to want to pack anything, did t even want to bring his phone.  I suspect I am going to be running home later to pick up some things for him.  

I dropped my mom off for her surgery this morning and all she had was her purse. 😳 I’m sure I’ll be making a few trips back and forth as she starts thinking of all she’ll need for the next few days. Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Sitting here in the waiting area.   Just waiting waiting waiting.   🙄.  No time estimate, just “the nurse will come get you when she’s ready for you”

Hope the time goes by fairly quicly!  Good luck to you both!

Link to post
Share on other sites

He’s back in pre-op now, they are supposed to come get me when he’s finished with that, while he’s waiting for actual surgery.   At that point I am goi g to get an actual timeline of events.   Then I will be able to go get my stuff to do out of the car.  

There are a lot of people here, they seem to be just churning right on thru.   Not quite like a fast food place but it does remind me of that.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok next time I have to do this sort of thing....backpack.  There’s a whole lot of moving room to room in pre-op (waiting area, pre op room, pre op waiting area, pre op room again, etc etc).  But there a lot of waiting in between.   I didn’t bring the bag of stuff in because I figured there would be some back and forth.   A backpack would have helped.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/28/2020 at 6:14 AM, Scarlett said:

I guess I wasn’t thinking when I posted, but you are right, many if not most hospitals are not allowing anyone in.  Ugh, that is so scary to me.  And so much more work for the poor nurses and other staff because family helps so much.  
 

 


My mom has cancer surgery two weeks ago. My dad wasn’t even allowed in the hospital with her, not for the pre-op consultation or anything.  It was actually really difficult because she had a very hard time coming out of anesthesia, they discharged her way too soon, and we weren’t able to be there advocating for her.

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...