Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

JumpyTheFrog

College Football Hit By Covid-19

Recommended Posts

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/06/22/college-football-programs-hit-covid-after-resumption-voluntary-workouts

The NCAA allowed voluntary practices to begin June 1. (I don't follow football, so I don't know what "voluntary" really means.) Here is a list of football teams and the number of athletes who have tested positive. I haven't included any numbers from athletes in other sports.

Louisiana State - 30 players either have it or were in close contact with confirmed cases

Clemson - 23 players tested positive

UT Austin - 13 players

Kansas State - 14 players

U Houston - 6 players

Other colleges with cases, but the article didn't report numbers: Universities of Alabama, Mississippi and South Florida as well as Auburn, Florida State, Iowa State, Oklahoma State, Texas State and Troy Universities.

DH and I think that if the numbers are this high for football, they might be high for wrestling in the winter.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, JumpyTheFrog said:

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/06/22/college-football-programs-hit-covid-after-resumption-voluntary-workouts

The NCAA allowed voluntary practices to begin June 1. (I don't follow football, so I don't know what "voluntary" really means.) Here is a list of football teams and the number of athletes who have tested positive. I haven't included any numbers from athletes in other sports.

Louisiana State - 30 players either have it or were in close contact with confirmed cases

Clemson - 23 players tested positive

UT Austin - 13 players

Kansas State - 14 players

U Houston - 6 players

Other colleges with cases, but the article didn't report numbers: Universities of Alabama, Mississippi and South Florida as well as Auburn, Florida State, Iowa State, Oklahoma State, Texas State and Troy Universities.

DH and I think that if the numbers are this high for football, they might be high for wrestling in the winter.

My guess is that the numbers will be high for any sport, because the virus isn't being spread on the field, it's being spread in the dorms, and at team dinners, and when the athletes socialize outside of practice.  I agree that wrestling, and basketball, and other sports that are indoors with a lot of contact will have more spread during practice, but even something like cross country where spread at practice will be low, is going to have problems. 

I also think this doesn't bode well for a return to normal on college campuses.  

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, JumpyTheFrog said:

DH and I think that if the numbers are this high for football, they might be high for wrestling in the winter.

I can't believe anybody in their right mind will allow wrestling.
Colleges have to bend over backwards to make sure students are distanced by 6 ft in the classrooms; it's a freaking nightmare restructuring courses to accommodate that with tons of extra work for the faculty - if they allow wrestling, then we might as well save all the effort.

But then, sports always seems to have higher priority than education.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, regentrude said:

I can't believe anybody in their right mind will allow wrestling.
Colleges have to bend over backwards to make sure students are distanced by 6 ft in the classrooms; it's a freaking nightmare restructuring courses to accommodate that with tons of extra work for the faculty - if they allow wrestling, then we might as well save all the effort.

But then, sports always seems to have higher priority than education.

I think that basketball is going to be a bigger issue, because it's more of a money sport.  There's a lot of contact in basketball, plus it's indoors.  

It makes no sense to me that there can be football practice, when colleges around here are planning for most classes to be online, with small socially distanced sections of some classes that are either for freshmen, or that really need to be in person such as hands on nursing skills.

My niece/goddaughter has already said she isn't going back.  She's not a freshman, and her major isn't a particularly hands on one, so why take the risk of dorms if the classes aren't in person?  She'll stay at home, or maybe with us, and study online.  

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

My niece/goddaughter has already said she isn't going back.  She's not a freshman, and her major isn't a particularly hands on one, so why take the risk of dorms if the classes aren't in person?  She'll stay at home, or maybe with us, and study online.  

yes, if classes are all online, there is no point in shelling out big bucks for on campus housing and crappy cafeteria food.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, regentrude said:

yes, if classes are all online, there is no point in shelling out big bucks for on campus housing and crappy cafeteria food.

Exactly.  And if classes aren't worth the risk, then how the heck is playing a sport, or eating in the cafeteria, or having a fraternity party worth the risk?  

I get that college is an experience, and all those things are part of the experience.  I hope my kids go away to college one day.  But I also think that classes are the most important part of the college experience.  They shouldn't be down at the bottom of the list.  

I do get that there are international students who didn't leave in March, or students without family to return to, who would benefit from dorms at this point, especially if their financial aid makes that more reasonable than renting something.  But colleges could open up dorm space just for them, which would probably allow single bathrooms in a lot of place, because it would be a small number of students.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Exactly.  And if classes aren't worth the risk, then how the heck is playing a sport, or eating in the cafeteria, or having a fraternity party worth the risk?  

I get that college is an experience, and all those things are part of the experience.  I hope my kids go away to college one day.  But I also think that classes are the most important part of the college experience.  They shouldn't be down at the bottom of the list.  

The best would be to have as many classes as possible in person by utilizing every large space on campus. There should be nothing with higher priorities than classes for a college, which means repurposing all conference rooms, concert halls, ballrooms, gyms, and meeting spaces to hold classes. Any indoor athletic space can be put to better use for actual education.

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, regentrude said:

The best would be to have as many classes as possible in person by utilizing every large space on campus. There should be nothing with higher priorities than classes for a college, which means repurposing all conference rooms, concert halls, ballrooms, gyms, and meeting spaces to hold classes. Any indoor athletic space can be put to better use for actual education.

That is what DS's university is doing, except for the part about using athletic facilities. They announced that in order to allow proper distancing, they will be moving many classes to nontraditional spaces and may be extending class times into the evening. They are currently planning on in-person instruction for classes with less than 100 students, while classes with more than 100 will have virtual lectures and smaller labs & recitations. Food service will be preorder and pickup, and they will require masks in all public spaces, including in dorms outside of one's own room.

But they are also tentatively planning for sports to go ahead, although with restrictions on the number of spectators. The football team is on campus practicing now (no illnesses so far), but ultimately what sports, if any, are allowed to go ahead will be controlled by NCAA.  I'm sure NCAA would extend everyone's eligibility another year if they cancel this season, but that complicates so many other things. DS is planning on staying for a grad degree anyway, so he could still use his full eligibility, but there will be lots of kids who simply can't afford to stay a 5th year. Plus most athletes really can't go a whole year (or more) with no access to training and maintain their level of fitness and skills. There's also the financial issue of universities needing to honor athletic scholarships even if they have no revenue coming in from TV contracts and ticket and merchandise sales. At FBS schools, football and basketball generate a huge amount of revenue, often covering the costs of the entire athletic program and then some — at DS's school football not only covers the entire cost of the athletic program, it subsidizes some academic programs as well (e.g. they donated a million dollars to the library building).

I mean, if varsity sports can't happen safely, they won't happen, and that's life. But the impact on athletes and on college finances will be considerable.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our local University’s team has started practice and they did have player’s report who tested positive.....they are not with their teammates.

Unfortunately the decision is financial totally.  Even if they don’t let a single spectator in the money for televised will make a huge difference to the University.  The player’s want to be there.............

Will it work.....who knows.  Can’t quite see how you are going to keep that many people in a bubble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An area high school just announced a positive diagnosis on their football team that has been practicing together for a couple weeks.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

At FBS schools, football and basketball generate a huge amount of revenue, often covering the costs of the entire athletic program and then some — at DS's school football not only covers the entire cost of the athletic program, it subsidizes some academic programs as well (e.g. they donated a million dollars to the library building).

 

What does "FBS schools" refer to? I was under the impression from years of reading at Inside Higher Ed that only about eleven football programs were profitable. The rest all either lose money or are only "profitable" due to all the donations to the program. Is this not the case?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mumto2 said:

Our local University’s team has started practice and they did have player’s report who tested positive.....they are not with their teammates.

Unfortunately the decision is financial totally.  Even if they don’t let a single spectator in the money for televised will make a huge difference to the University.  The player’s want to be there.............

Will it work.....who knows.  Can’t quite see how you are going to keep that many people in a bubble.

Yeah, I think almost all college athletes want to be with their teammates and want to train and compete this year. I think most would literally rather get Covid, figuring they are healthy and could recover quickly, than give up the whole season. DS is definitely in that camp (he will just have to stay away from me!).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, regentrude said:

I can't believe anybody in their right mind will allow wrestling.
Colleges have to bend over backwards to make sure students are distanced by 6 ft in the classrooms; it's a freaking nightmare restructuring courses to accommodate that with tons of extra work for the faculty - if they allow wrestling, then we might as well save all the effort.

But then, sports always seems to have higher priority than education.

 

35 minutes ago, regentrude said:

The best would be to have as many classes as possible in person by utilizing every large space on campus. There should be nothing with higher priorities than classes for a college, which means repurposing all conference rooms, concert halls, ballrooms, gyms, and meeting spaces to hold classes. Any indoor athletic space can be put to better use for actual education.

Re: this, one of the schools near us has stated in their "phases of opening" that athletics will open before academic classes. No big surprise, they are one of the schools listed in the OP. 

I get that it's a money-maker, and they need that revenue (not just them, but all of them), and I get that classes can be done online while sports can't be, but......:sigh:  I share your sentiments, and wish it weren't this way. 

I'm glad by boys are not athletes, that's for sure, but how upside down is our world right now, where Universities are beginning sports ahead of academics.....and going to such extremes to socially distance proof the classrooms, campuses, etc.....but allow contact sports to resume (along with locker rooms, etc.). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe this is simply a sign of things to come. Frankly I’m glad to see it now, in June, hopefully soon enough to force some folks to take their blinders off. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TheReader said:

I'm glad by boys are not athletes, that's for sure, but how upside down is our world right now, where Universities are beginning sports ahead of academics.....and going to such extremes to socially distance proof the classrooms, campuses, etc.....but allow contact sports to resume (along with locker rooms, etc.). 

 

The original article also talked about football players from UCLA that want a third-party to be involved. They are worried that the college will try to make them play in unsafe conditions or revoke their scholarships if they decide they don't want to play this fall.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Seasider too said:

Frankly I’m glad to see it now, in June, hopefully soon enough to force some folks to take their blinders off. 

 

Yes, I think this will give colleges some useful data as they try to decide their plans for opening campuses back up in the fall.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the quote about UCLA:

Quote

The Los Angeles Times reported that 30 football players have signed on to a document saying they do not trust UCLA to act in the best interest of their health; the players demanded a “third-party health official” who can observe that COVID-19 prevention protocols are being followed, as well as protection for student and staff whistle-blowers and assurances that students will not lose scholarships or otherwise face retaliation if they choose not to return to campus.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re college sports being money-making - even if it’s not purely  profitable in terms of specific accounting for the athletic program, a winning team is often a huge recruiting tool for people who like the excitement of attending games. It fuels overall student enrollment as well as alumni engagement. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, JumpyTheFrog said:

 

What does "FBS schools" refer to? I was under the impression from years of reading at Inside Higher Ed that only about eleven football programs were profitable. The rest all either lose money or are only "profitable" due to all the donations to the program. Is this not the case?

Schools at which football is a really big deal -- the ones that play in bowl games -- Football Bowl (something -- Subdivision, I think).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, JumpyTheFrog said:

 

What does "FBS schools" refer to? I was under the impression from years of reading at Inside Higher Ed that only about eleven football programs were profitable. The rest all either lose money or are only "profitable" due to all the donations to the program. Is this not the case?

FBS are the Division 1 football schools that play in the bowl games. They may not all be profitable, but the 60 schools in the Power 5 conferences generally are. The claims that only a dozen schools "make money" from athletics is based on misleading methods of accounting. For example, scholarships are counted as full-price expenditures instead of actual costs (so on paper it looks like the athletic program is "spending" say $50,000 each for OOS athletes, instead of calculating the actual cost of educating and housing that athlete). Facilities are also depreciated, making it seem as if those are outgoing expenditures, so a football stadium may be depreciated by $1 million per year, and that is calculated as an "expense," etc. Even with those kinds of accounting issues, Ohio State's athletic program still usually generates a surplus of somewhere between 3 and 12 million per year.

 

12 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Re college sports being money-making - even if it’s not purely  profitable in terms of specific accounting for the athletic program, a winning team is often a huge recruiting tool for people who like the excitement of attending games. It fuels overall student enrollment as well as alumni engagement. 

 I've never been a big football fan, so I really didn't get how much of a thing this really is at a lot of colleges. It's a HUGE deal and generates a really strong sense of identity and school loyalty, which translates to a huge alumni program and a LOT of donations. DS's uni takes in half a billion dollars/yr in donations, most of it from alumni, so that is another way in which a strong athletics program can indirectly lead to subsidies for academics.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For our SEC school football not only brings in tons of money to the school but it is the entire community. The cost to the the city if football doesn't happen is huge. It's the kind of thing where every hotel within three hours is booked, restaurants are swamped, etc etc. on football weekends. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, TheReader said:

how upside down is our world right now, where Universities are beginning sports ahead of academics.....and going to such extremes to socially distance proof the classrooms, campuses, etc.....but allow contact sports to resume (along with locker rooms, etc.). 

Well the reason they are allowing football practice to start "ahead of academics" is because that is the only way to be ready for the fall season — in a normal year, they would have been on campus even earlier. If they wait to start practice when all the other students return to campus in late August or September, they won't be ready when the season starts (if NCCAA allows the season to start).

From what I've read, the idea is for teams to be in as much of a "bubble" as possible. So for example, the team could be housed together, have mostly online classes, no parties allowed, etc. It's probably not that much riskier than just being a student living in dorms and attending classes every day. College football is a multi-billion dollar industry, so they're looking to see if there is any way they can make it work. Maybe it won't be possible, but I think most colleges are not ready to just give up at this point.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No parties? Do any college officials think this can realistically be enforced? That's the type of idea that makes me think they haven't met actual college students before.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s not just about the money (though it definitely is). Athletes want to play. It’s their passion. My son’s baseball season was canceled and he was withering before our eyes when we were on full lock down. He is absolutely willing to risk catching COVID rather than be restricted from participating in his passion for the next 2 years. 
 

Athletes get dismissed all the time like their skill/joy is not important. It’s what gives color to their lives and it matters. 

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, JumpyTheFrog said:

No parties? Do any college officials think this can realistically be enforced? That's the type of idea that makes me think they haven't met actual college students before.

I meant in terms of maintaining a "bubble" for a varsity team. It could certainly be enforced by coaches — get caught going to a party outside your bubble, you're off the team and lose your scholarship. Probably every team has a few idiots, but if that was one of the conditions for having varsity sports, most athletes would probably be on board with it, at least until the season was over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, as I understand it, athletes at DS's uni will be required to have daily temperature checks and weekly testing, plus additional testing before any competition. To me, it doesn't seem much more risky than dorm living in general, where kids will be sharing bathrooms, visiting each other's rooms, hooking up, etc., and athletes will be much more closely monitored and more frequently tested.

Even if NCAA ends up canceling all competitions (hopefully with extensions to eligibility), DS is hoping that the school will at least allow athletes to use the training facilities, because he can't imagine going another year without even being able to train. He feels like he would never be able to get back to where he was if he loses another whole year ("where he was" = on the Olympic selection list, NCAA Regionals champion, top seed for the cancelled national championship, and a First Team All-American). As Sassenach mentioned, for a lot of these kids, their sport is their passion and the thing they love most in the world. DS certainly cares about academics (3.95 GPA and planning on grad school), but his sport is the thing that really lights his fire, and he would be absolutely devastated to lose that.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not excited about students returning and sharing the virus they don't mind getting with the rest of us. One of universities is encouraging no travel and a shorter semester but, you guessed it, the sports teams are still traveling.  And the good news is that spring semester can go ahead as normal because the flu season will be over. Nice to know in our northern community there isn't flu and illnes in Jan, Feb, and March. It's all crazy.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, sassenach said:

It’s not just about the money (though it definitely is). Athletes want to play. It’s their passion. My son’s baseball season was canceled and he was withering before our eyes when we were on full lock down. He is absolutely willing to risk catching COVID rather than be restricted from participating in his passion for the next 2 years. 
 

Athletes get dismissed all the time like their skill/joy is not important. It’s what gives color to their lives and it matters. 

Exactly this. I have a high school wrestler who will be a junior this year. He was a top ranked wrestler in our state last year as a sophomore. College coaches have started calling. He will be absolutely devastated if he can’t wrestle this year. 

He’s also a straight-A student vying for valedictorian and plays football and baseball. But....his passion is wrestling and he wants/needs to compete for himself. He’s lifting, running, and eating to get his body ready for a wrestling season that should be six months away but is likely to not happen. I want him to be safe and healthy, but wrestling has been our mental health and sensory therapy for him for nearly a decade.

I would love to see a compromise where athletes can compete, with the competitions streamed online rather than have live audiences. Viewing could be subscription based so the programs would still earn revenue. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, regentrude said:

The best would be to have as many classes as possible in person by utilizing every large space on campus. There should be nothing with higher priorities than classes for a college, which means repurposing all conference rooms, concert halls, ballrooms, gyms, and meeting spaces to hold classes. Any indoor athletic space can be put to better use for actual education.

Yes.  That is what is happening at the university where I work.  Large lectures will be all online.  Smaller teaching groups (tutorials, seminars, etc.) will use all large spaces including performance, entertaining and sports spaces.  Wednesday afternoon is also traditionally kept free of scheduled classes so that teams can practise/play; not this year.  Classes will run from 9-6, five days a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Corraleno said:

Well the reason they are allowing football practice to start "ahead of academics" is because that is the only way to be ready for the fall season — in a normal year, they would have been on campus even earlier. If they wait to start practice when all the other students return to campus in late August or September, they won't be ready when the season starts (if NCCAA allows the season to start).

From what I've read, the idea is for teams to be in as much of a "bubble" as possible. So for example, the team could be housed together, have mostly online classes, no parties allowed, etc. It's probably not that much riskier than just being a student living in dorms and attending classes every day. College football is a multi-billion dollar industry, so they're looking to see if there is any way they can make it work. Maybe it won't be possible, but I think most colleges are not ready to just give up at this point.

Oh, I get that aspect of it, I just meant that they are so willing to bend over backwards to make football work.......but academics can take a backseat. These are meant to be institutions of learning, after all.....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, 2squared said:

Exactly this. I have a high school wrestler who will be a junior this year. He was a top ranked wrestler in our state last year as a sophomore. College coaches have started calling. He will be absolutely devastated if he can’t wrestle this year. 

He’s also a straight-A student vying for valedictorian and plays football and baseball. But....his passion is wrestling and he wants/needs to compete for himself. He’s lifting, running, and eating to get his body ready for a wrestling season that should be six months away but is likely to not happen. I want him to be safe and healthy, but wrestling has been our mental health and sensory therapy for him for nearly a decade.

I would love to see a compromise where athletes can compete, with the competitions streamed online rather than have live audiences. Viewing could be subscription based so the programs would still earn revenue. 

Yeah. Mine is a runner. Optional summer practice for XC starts in a couple weeks. He is sooooo excited to run again and to see actual people who aren’t us. 😉 . I’m excited for him too; he needs both the exercise and the team community for his mental health. Running is such a vital piece of his sense of self and balance; it can’t all just be academics. And, he’s looking ahead to running at university and wants/needs the season to further prove himself. 
 

But. We are also terribly nervous.  I can’t begin to imagine what his senior year will look like, but if it can’t include running...Ugh. Of course, if it includes coming down with Covid, obviously that would be a much, much worse outcome.
 

One of our colleges in the state just announced there will be no varsity sports for fall semester, and the high schools are floating all kinds of ideas to try to keep at least those that can be reasonably distanced.  I think no matter what the school year looks like, it’s going to suck for everyone. Poor kids. 😞 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, regentrude said:

The best would be to have as many classes as possible in person by utilizing every large space on campus. There should be nothing with higher priorities than classes for a college, which means repurposing all conference rooms, concert halls, ballrooms, gyms, and meeting spaces to hold classes. Any indoor athletic space can be put to better use for actual education.

Where I teach, they are looking at using every space on campus, including the football stadium (while still playing football and other sports).  They are trying to figure out how you can have even a class of 45 all six feet apart, wearing masks, and a faculty member wearing a mask, along with other students being ZOOMED in because they are quarantined is going to work in these spaces.  The faculty are leery.  We just built a new classroom building and the budget per classroom to have all of the electronics in place to allow for high-quality taping of classes along with including distance-learning students was $40,000.  To try to take a place that was not even designed for teaching to be able to handle these demands is going to be extremely expensive.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not just college football. There's an incredibly depressing article in today's WaPo if you're a MLB, NBA or men's and women's soccer fan:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2020/06/22/sports-return-florida-coronavirus/?utm_campaign=wp_todays_headlines&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_headlines

As the sports world inches toward a return amid the pandemic, Florida is a crucial location. Major League Soccer, which plans to relaunch with a tournament beginning July 8, joined the NBA in using Disney World as a hosting ground. The WNBA is set to hold a 22-game season at IMG Academy in Bradenton. Every major sports league has multiple franchises in the state, and half of Major League Baseball’s 30 teams have their spring training facilities there.

But Florida has also become a coronavirus hot spot. The state began reopening May 4, when it recorded 819 new cases, and a spike has followed. Florida added more than 3,000 new cases for the first time Thursday, surpassed 4,000 on Saturday and added nearly 3,500 on Sunday. On Monday, it surpassed 100,000 total confirmed cases.

 

In mid-May, Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) invited sports leagues to come to his state, suggesting at a news conference that Florida residents were “starved” to have sports back and that the state could host events safely. “If you have a team in an area where they just won’t let them operate, we’ll find a place for you here in the state of Florida,” he said then.

More than a month later, conditions in the state are challenging that notion. While Florida is far from the only state confronting an outbreak, its spike poses a particular challenge for teams and leagues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...