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8FillTheHeart

Support for designing your own curriculum

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40 minutes ago, mms said:

But, for some of us that’s a good thing! I sometimes come across my old dissertations disguised as forum posts, written first in Word and carefully edited, and I cringe. The worst of it is that I can’t log in under my old user name to delete those monsters.

 

32 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

Me too. But I consider it evidence that I have grown up, as I should have over the last 15 years, lol

Lol... Guess I still haven't grown up, as I still post "dissertations" ... 😄 Probably because I hardly use my phone, except for rare texting bouts with DS#2 when he's off in the woods on a break from forest fire fighting... 😂

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49 minutes ago, Amccracken said:

...I've only been homeschooling for 8 years.  I'm no expert, but I feel like I could help a newbie,  if only with encouragement.  At the same time, High School is just around the corner and I wish I had someone who has walked that walk before who I could discuss ideas with...

It's not live discussion, BUT... I've linked all the best-of-the-best of past threads on homeschooling high school (including some threads on "DIY") in the motherlode pinned threads at the top of the High School board, and the College Board:

"High School Motherlode #1"

page 1 topics:
High School Time Table (what to do/when for each year of high school)
Teaching Executive Function Skills
Preparing for High School
Addressing Fears
Getting Started
Books & Resources
Making a High School Plan
Time Management
High School on a Budget
Expectations/Attitudes
Accreditation / Cover Schools

page 2 topics:
tests -- info, experiences, and comparisons on:
- PSAT  (National Merit Scholarship qualifying test)
- ACT / SAT  (frequent college entrance requirement)
- SAT Subject  (also called SAT II)
- AP  (Advanced Placement courses & tests)
- CLEP  (college credit by exam)
- GED  (high school diploma equivalency test)
- ASVAB  (military entrance exam)
- Compass/Accuplacer  (college placement test)
- IB (International Baccalaureatte program / diploma), and comparison with AP



"High School Motherlode #2"

post #1 topics:
Transcripts / Record Keeping
Credits
Grading / GPA
Honors Courses
Record Keeping / Course Descriptions / Letter of Recommendation / Volunteering
Graduation topics / Diplomas

NOTE: there are 3 posts of responses between post #1 and post #5 topics

post #5 topics:
General Threads on High School Subjects (Writing, Math, Science, Electives)
Home-Grown Courses / MOOC Courses
Extracurricular Activities
Outsourcing
Online Classes
Tutors
Dual Enrollment


"College Motherlode"

page 1 topics:
College Search Process
College Visits
Online College / College at Home / Distance Degree 

page 2 topics:
College Applications
Common App

page 3 topics:
Money Matters
Financial Aid
Scholarships
FAFSA / EFC
CSS Profile

page 4 topics:
Honors Programs / Phi Theta Kappa
Internships / REUs
NCAA

page 5 topics
Heading to College
At College
Study Abroad

page 6 topics
Alternatives to 4-Year College
Gap Year
Military
Career Exploration

Edited by Lori D.
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11 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

 

Lol... Guess I still haven't grown up, as I still post "dissertations" ... 😄 Probably because I hardly use my phone, except for rare texting bouts with DS#2 when he's off in the woods on a break from forest fire fighting... 😂

Your dissertations are some of the most useful things around here!  Don't stop now!

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7 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

It's not live discussion, BUT... I've linked all the best-of-the-best of past threads on homeschooling high school (including some threads on "DIY") in the motherlode pinned threads at the top of the High School board, and the College Board:
 

Thank you!! This is very helpful. Can't wait to check it out.

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17 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

Your dissertations are some of the most useful things around here!  Don't stop now!

Awww... shucks! You're sweet! 🥰

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I joined the facebook group.  But can I ask a silly question? Why not try to post more about DIY homeschooling here on the WTM forums?  Why reinvent the wheel?

I'd be more than happy to discuss what we're doing in our homeschool, but I have to admit that none of it sounds as lofty and noble as the things Ester Maria wrote about.  I suspect there are a lot of "newer" homeschool parents that are doing a bang-up job of putting together their own programs, but feel intimidated to post about what they are doing as being judged "not good enough". 

To be truthful, I'm not even sure what is meant exactly by DIY homeschooling or "designing your own curriculum".  When I read "design your own curriculum", I think "These ladies are writing books from scratch and teaching their kids from there".  Which is...outrageously intimidating, if it's true. If what you mean is "We're carefully selecting books to read and discuss, and I design my own questions, projects, and tests", that is far less intimidating!

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10 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

If what you mean is "We're carefully selecting books to read and discuss, and I design my own questions, projects, and tests", that is far less intimidating!

I can't speak for others but this is what I have in mind. 

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It is so strange to me that y'all even need to discuss this. How far the pendulum has swung since I started homeschooling in 1982. 😮 And it makes me sad. On FB, I have had to explain what a "support group" is (and that's what y'all are talking about: a support group vs a co-op) (also not a "meet-up.")

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1 minute ago, Ellie said:

It is so strange to me that y'all even need to discuss this. How far the pendulum has swung since I started homeschooling in 1982. 😮 And it makes me sad. On FB, I have had to explain what a "support group" is (and that's what y'all are talking about: a support group vs a co-op) (also not a "meet-up.")

 

Why does it make you sad?

I was 10 in 1982. I'm not sure how to respond to people lamenting "The Good Old Days".  It makes me feel a bit discouraged. 

 

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Rosie, please please please share your list! I would love it! And I think dd would, too. Don't if it's too personal.  But I love the concept. 

I'm second gen, and no, I don't think the good old days were any different than today. ATIA appealed, IMO, to some of the same insecurities and needs we see boxed programs addressing today.

I'm still out here making my own stuff for several subjects, using spines I like. It's so library dependent that I doubt it would transfer for anyone else. 

I search before I post, so that might account for some drop off. These forums are packed with good stuff.

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Just sent a message to join the FB group. I'm very excited you are doing this! My DS is heading into 8th grade and I don't want to end up outsourcing high school as a default. I would really love to make our final homeschooling years something special. I don't know anyone IRL who is very hands on or developing their own courses.

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6 hours ago, MissLemon said:

I joined the facebook group.  But can I ask a silly question? Why not try to post more about DIY homeschooling here on the WTM forums?  Why reinvent the wheel?

I'd be more than happy to discuss what we're doing in our homeschool, but I have to admit that none of it sounds as lofty and noble as the things Ester Maria wrote about.  I suspect there are a lot of "newer" homeschool parents that are doing a bang-up job of putting together their own programs, but feel intimidated to post about what they are doing as being judged "not good enough". 

To be truthful, I'm not even sure what is meant exactly by DIY homeschooling or "designing your own curriculum".  When I read "design your own curriculum", I think "These ladies are writing books from scratch and teaching their kids from there".  Which is...outrageously intimidating, if it's true. If what you mean is "We're carefully selecting books to read and discuss, and I design my own questions, projects, and tests", that is far less intimidating!

My goal isn't to attempt to reinvent anything.  It may be a dumb idea that completely flounders and falls under the "well, that was a waste of time" category.  My thoughts were more along lines of parents having an easy place to find support for the "selecting books to read, discuss, ask questions" approach to education without feeling intimidated and without their ideas being lost in voices of prepackaged, CC, coops, outsourced/online options which is the conversation that dominates most homeschooling discussions today.  

I can't personally fathom writing any more about it than I already do. I have been writing about it on these forums for almost 20 yrs. Posting isn't the same as a conversation.  I enjoy having conversations.  The odd thread here and there is not really conversational.  Maybe it is simply in the perspective.  It is hard to miss something you have never experienced. But it isn't my perception alone.  These conversations have been taking place on here for a while.  This thread touches on the surface of the changes and the level of conversation has decreased more since then:

 

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1 hour ago, elroisees said:

Rosie, please please please share your list! I would love it! And I think dd would, too. Don't if it's too personal.  But I love the concept. 

 

Are you talking to me? Which concept? 

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For the record, I post all the time about what we do, which is certainly not a boxed curriculum and involves making our own projects for every subject we cover. And I’ve had some of the same posters that complain about the changes in this forum also tell me that DIY mathematical education is intrinsically unnecessary and silly and that I shouldn’t suggest other people do it. Unless math is somehow exempt from the need for originality, I’m befuddled by this dual perspective.

However, I’ve also had very good conversations with people about how to educate my kids. I’ve looked at old threads, and I can’t say they feel all that different from the good threads now. Was the frequency different?

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As much as I am interested in the concept you are talking about @8FillTheHeart, I am not on FB and hope to never be (again).  

But you are inspiring me to post a topic on the general board that I have been mulling over for quite a while now.  

I think a possible solution to the "slow death" of the boards is to pull traffic here if possible form like-minded, from-the-ground-up type homeschoolers.  This board is already established, and some box/online curriculum people may find their courage by listening in on those threads.  

And the second solution is that those of us who enjoy these discussions take the time to have them (mea culpa).  

There is a real, and I think understandable, struggle right now (middle schoolers) between researching and teaching.  When all of my kids were in early elementary or pre-school, I actually had significantly more time to participate in threads that were not immediate "help me right now"  questions.  SO MANY of those threads helped to form me as a homeschooler.  I so appreciate those of you with older kids sticking around to participate in those threads.  I now find myself in a position where I might be able to provide some small degree of insight, but the time I need to actually school my kids and educate myself now takes significantly more than it once did.  This is a hard place to be in for me, because the theory threads really recharged my batteries and my motivation.  

But this thread has inspired me to help participate in the revival of the General Ed board here.  

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There are a number of comments about how the DIY/design-your-own element of homeschooling seems to be disappointingly shrinking, so I thought I’d address that sentiment from the perspective of a newer HSer. (We’re four years in.)

First, I think the posting on these forums might not completely reflect the amount of DIY that’s truly going on in homeschooling today, in part because those of us who are inclined that way are kind of overwhelmed time-wise (I have really young children in addition to my upper-elementary aged child and bathrooms and a kitchen that desperately need to be cleaned, let’s not even think about the piles of laundry!) and mostly looking for the advice/thoughts of those who have BTDT. I particularly value the experience that others have, especially those who are partly/entirely on the other side of it. Got a teenager who writes really well? Then I want to hear how you built towards that! That sort of thing is super helpful in organizing my thoughts. The other things I love here are the posts that have great lists of books others have read and loved (I live for those!), and the ones that explicitly or implicitly remind me that an experimental approach that’s thoughtful is highly likely to turn out wonderfully on all fronts in the long-term.

Second, outsourcing/drop-off options, online options, and particularly the idea that you must be an “expert” or somehow “certified” by an external authority to do education well—all of that really does have an impact on the number of parents who are willing to take a DIY approach. (Also, the laundry. Oh, and the noise level that a house full of youngish kids all too frequently reaches, even if they are generally well-behaved, love to read, and have plenty of outdoor time/physical activity.) Yes, some parents simply aren’t that interested in actually putting in the work of HS, but I think many more are just intimidated and fearful of messing it all up. The notion that you need to be a certified expert—as opposed to only thoughtful and willing to put in the effort—to teach is strong, and I think it pushes many parents in the direction of the perceived safety of having someone else’s imprimatur on their educational plans.

Anyhow, all that is to say that I want to participate in these types of discussions here, and I guess from my perspective, if the discussions move a little (or even very) slowly, I think it’s more about people taking time to formulate a thoughtful response amidst all the other things they have to do. Which is okay with me, because I think we all stand to benefit from that type of exchange.

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I also want to put in a good word for drop-off options, because for us, while they in no way replace homegrown academics, they are instrumental in building up my kids' social lives. DD7 really misses the classes at her homeschool center. They are a big part of what made her fall in love with homeschooling, even though realistically, she didn't learn any academic skills from them. But then academic skills aren't the only thing we need in life... 

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9 hours ago, Lori D. said:

 

Lol... Guess I still haven't grown up, as I still post "dissertations" ... 😄 Probably because I hardly use my phone, except for rare texting bouts with DS#2 when he's off in the woods on a break from forest fire fighting... 😂

Please keep posting the long ones!

I have a folder filled with print outs of many older (early 2000's) threads from here-- quite a few pages come from you. 🙂  (and from 8!) 🙂   I pull out my folder every year when I do planning to remind me of those ideas and discussions that made me think about how school could be.  Some folks have been great to read for philosophy or ideas, the shaft of light that helps you see something different, and others have been very practical, very "here's how to break it down".  Both types are helpful.  

Anyway, I'm grateful for long-winded posters. 🙂

 

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5 minutes ago, square_25 said:

For the record, I post all the time about what we do, which is certainly not a boxed curriculum and involves making our own projects for every subject we cover. And I’ve had some of the same posters that complain about the changes in this forum also tell me that DIY mathematical education is intrinsically unnecessary and silly and that I shouldn’t suggest other people do it. Unless math is somehow exempt from the need for originality, I’m befuddled by this dual perspective.

However, I’ve also had very good conversations with people about how to educate my kids. I’ve looked at old threads, and I can’t say they feel all that different from the good threads now. Was the frequency different?

I’m not arguing, but I have not seen this on the threads I’ve participated in; esp the silly part. Forgive me if I’m wrong and did indeed miss something, nor am I dismissing your experience, but I have seen people claim that what you do might not be the necessary solution for a different family. I mean, what do you mean by intrinsically unnecessary? I personally think what you are doing with your children is great and I firmly believe in tailoring an education to a particular child using the strengths of the parent! And if someone else wants to do so, I hope they go for it! I hope that you have not experienced that sort of criticism, because that would indeed be narrow minded of those who are criticizing.
 

But, that doesn’t mean that it is the answer for every math problem a mother/child pair will have and that is why I’ve jumped in several times to reassure a poster that one can make a textbook work by pulling in a variety of resources to fill in gaps. Don’t get me wrong, your’s may very well be one possible solution! But, another possible solution is to use the curriculum you got and don’t let it rule you rather than start from scratch. And it is good to consider all one’s options.
 

Maybe we need a definition of curriculum? In my mind I have always seen a curriculum as a package: text, support material, assessment, plans. When I buy a curriculum say for spelling, I use the material pretty much as intended even if I tweak a few things here and there or supplement for reinforcement. When I create my own curriculum, I pick a text(s), think through what other resources (media, field trips) we might need, figure out what output I will require (which might involve prefab resources) and create my own lesson plans and schedule.
 

I would claim that before fourth grade or so I make my own math curriculum in that I have my own scope and sequence and do not teach from a teacher’s manual (though I do own and reference several teacher’s manuals/guidebooks), even if I do not create my own worksheets but use what has been published already.

Similarly to you and 8, I create my own curriculum for almost all subjects but it looks radically different from your projects or what 8 outlines in Homeschooling at the Helm and does with her own children. I do not have the mental and energy resources that you and she do and unit studies don’t work well here nor are we project people. That does not mean that what we do is not just as tailored to my children as what y’all do with yours.

Of course, then there are the non-curriculum curricula. I’d claim the first couple of editions of WTM were like that. For Catholics there was Designing Your Own Classical Curriculum.  These did a good job of presenting resources, describing output without giving particular assignments and forming a framework as a jumping off point for parents to put together something on their own. Of course, both SWB and Laura Berquist ended up publishing curriculum as well. On the math side in this category is Miquon which is really a philosophy of math education with some worksheets as a starting off point. Lore Rasmussen always intended for the teacher to pull in other resources and create their own worksheets as well, though most people use the workbooks as a complete curriculum.

8, I hear you on the change in tone. I don’t think Facebook will be any more of a good medium for conversation than here. 
 

I would personally like to see more of the nitty gritty details of other people’s plans. I’ve found so many resources thanks to others describing what they do! But, I also like to know what day to day looks like, what an actual lesson looks like, how all the resources look pulled together.

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6 minutes ago, mms said:

8, I hear you on the change in tone. I don’t think Facebook will be any more of a good medium for conversation than here. 

True. I think of WTM forums as long format podcasts while FB is talk radio. 

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4 minutes ago, mms said:

But, that doesn’t mean that it is the answer for every math problem a mother/child pair will have and that is why I’ve jumped in several times to reassure a poster that one can make a textbook work by pulling in a variety of resources to fill in gaps. Don’t get me wrong, your’s may very well be one possible solution! But, another possible solution is to use the curriculum you got and don’t let it rule you rather than start from scratch. And it is good to consider all one’s options.

 

Oh, absolutely, I don't disagree with that. I just mean that I've seen very reflexive reactions to the idea that you would teach mathematics in a different sequence that the standard US sequence. 

Anyway, that's my pet peeve. I've had trouble having conversations about how to teach math in a non-standard ways without people seeming kind of offended that I'm dismissing the standard sequence and the standard approaches. But then math is probably the subject people are least creative about, on average. 

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12 hours ago, Rosie_0801 said:

The only subject I've created is what we (not so) lovingly call "Bitchery." That's just a reading list and discussion though. 

This one, please.  🙂

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2 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

There is a real, and I think understandable, struggle right now (middle schoolers) between researching and teaching.  When all of my kids were in early elementary or pre-school, I actually had significantly more time to participate in threads that were not immediate "help me right now"  questions.  SO MANY of those threads helped to form me as a homeschooler.  I so appreciate those of you with older kids sticking around to participate in those threads.  I now find myself in a position where I might be able to provide some small degree of insight, but the time I need to actually school my kids and educate myself now takes significantly more than it once did.  This is a hard place to be in for me, because the theory threads really recharged my batteries and my motivation.  

But this thread has inspired me to help participate in the revival of the General Ed board here.  

Yes, the bolded is my situation and my experience here at the boards as well.  As my children have gotten older, the amount of time needed for me to read, understand, and plan for school has dramatically increased.  My K-12 education was so sorely lacking that I have spent a ridiculous amount of time re-learning and then figuring out how to teach my children with a big dose of educational philosophy reading on the side.

I don't assume, however, that this is every homeschool mother's situation, but constantly having to stay a step ahead of my children has been my constant.

That, unfortunately, limits my time to interact here on the boards except for the quickie response-type answers on curriculum choice, etc.

I'm not on FB (and will never be again), and it thrills me that this forum is still pretty active.  I'm so grateful for it.

@8FillTheHeart I would love to have a snapshot of what DIY looks like on the high school level.  I've done DIY off and on through the years for K-6th, but I can't quite wrap my head around what that looks like with high school.  I read through @Lori D.'s motherlode HS posts in the recent past, but I'll go back through them and look specifically for the DIY info.

ETA: I saw in my profile it lists my join date as 2017, which is bizarre.  I've been reading here since 2010 at least.

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I will say that knowing how other people have approached DIY has been helpful this year. We did mostly DIY for years, and then DD started college classes, and was happy, so I drifted away, but her senior year is going to be mostly DIY again because she really, really dislikes the way her college did online in the Spring, and doesn’t want to take classes at a different school that sound interesting only to have them become “read and answer questions” vs discussion or “watch video and write report” vs live lab. So, we’re piecing things together, usually with a big pile of books, and trying to find discussion outlets where appropriate. 

 

What makes me nervous about jumping into give advice is that I have just one kid. And what she needed and thrived on doesn’t necessarily apply to other kids (as an example, she spent most of middle school reading history books from around the world, usually high school textbooks and trade books, and drawing a comic book summary of it with the main characters as snakes. I’m not sure that’s a strategy to recommend to anyone else!) 

With my tutoring kids/bonus kids, I DIY my sessions, but I also have to make sure that what I do will support whatever materials they are using in their classroom or at home. It’s different than DIYing for my own kid, where I am there all the time. And different from DIYing for a classroom, where everything is a compromise and usually isn’t just right for anyone.
 

 

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I am interested and did request to join via FB.  However, I do think that perhaps we should try for something here. I help moderate a page for moms on FB and I think about half of my job is deleting posts that break the rules (we don't allow advertisements).  

As we are entering high school (and doing high school work in junior high), I have so many concerns and questions about how it works to develop your own curriculum. I have created my own plans for subjects prior, but I wasn't trying to count them for credit.  I would welcome a discussion here for sure.  

ETA; started a thread on the High school board. 😃

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I was going to quote everybody, but to quote Inigo Montoya: "there is too much, I will sum up..." 😂


Agreeing and adding to the most recent posts above of @MissLemon and @Monica_in_Switzerland and @mms and @Plum -- that there may be problems in taking the potential conversation to FB:
1. not everyone who would like to participate in such conversations is on FB (that would be me)
2. potential for a FB group to move away from the original idea 
3. and I'll also add: moving to FB could potentially drastically reduce amount of eyeballs seeing the conversation in order to even be able to participate; plus, potentially fewer people could mean much reduced amount of conversation of any type -- there's only so much any one person can contribute to such conversations -- it really helps when there's a "village" discussing 😉 


Also: I love the thoughts of @Publia and @Zoo Keeper and @Monica_in_Switzerland and @mms about working to "reclaim" the General Board, or to start threads on the various educational boards to spark new discussions. Now that most people are on their summer breaks from school (if not year-round schooling), would be the perfect time to do this, and help people who are planning for next year, as well as giving people who are new to homeschooling and new to these boards some new perspectives and deeper thoughts about educating their children. And during summer break, people have more time to ponder and think about educational philosophies and de


 

7 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

My goal isn't to attempt to reinvent anything... My thoughts were more along lines of parents having an easy place to find support for the "selecting books to read, discuss, ask questions" approach to education without feeling intimidated and without their ideas being lost in voices of prepackaged, CC, coops, outsourced/online options which is the conversation that dominates most homeschooling discussions today.  

I can't personally fathom writing any more about it than I already do. I have been writing about it on these forums for almost 20 yrs. Posting isn't the same as a conversation.  I enjoy having conversations.  The odd thread here and there is not really conversational.  Maybe it is simply in the perspective.  It is hard to miss something you have never experienced. But it isn't my perception alone.  These conversations have been taking place on here for a while.

I think part of it is that you have an educational background and understanding of educational philosophies that have drifted to the background in the past 30 years as newer educational approaches and philosophies have come (and gone) and come, in the educational realm as a whole (not just in homeschooling). Also, virtually all of your educational peers who were familiar with those older ideas (as well as competing older ideas and philosophies) have "retired" and moved on from these boards. Together, both of those facts mean that you're always having to "start over" in sharing your educational philosophy, to build common ground for discussion with new, younger homeschoolers.

I imagine that because during your homeschooling years you've also had to multiple times physically move to different cities and rebuild relationships and just get used to "the new place", that it must feel very exhausting to have to do the same thing on a board that keeps changing every few years as "older" people leave and "newer" people come.

I also think that in the past 30 years, as the internet and chat boards and social media have developed, *overall* the nature of chat boards is that it is harder to have lengthy discussions (unless you're a dinosaur like me with dissertation-length posts 😂). Twitter limits you to 144 characters, for goodness' sake. And while i-phones are great for instantaneous access, they are a bear to type out long messages -- we're trained to do short texts on them, with emoticons and shorten words or use abbreviations in place of whole phrases. Our brains are literally being rewired by our interactions with visual media and computer communications, with one result being that we don't have the stamina and "tolerance" for reading much beyond a few sentences or a paragraph before we're clicking and scrolling to the next thing. It is extremely difficult to have a conversation of any depth that way.

I totally understand if moving to a FB group is better for meeting your needs, and as a platform for being able to share from your ideas and wisdom. I just also hope it does not mean we lose you from these boards. 😍

Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.
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So, I joined the group!  Yay.  But to me, that's a problem.  I followed a link that was posted in a forum that's visible to the public, and was allowed to join without being asked any questions.  It's possible that 8, who happens to know my first name, guessed that it was me, but I have a pretty common first name so she could have been wrong.  The group is "private" and not "secret" which means that other people can see that I'm a member.  

I'd love to have a place to talk about these issues, and if it was a "secret" group, where people received a link by PM, and had to answer questions and be screened, and agree to some kind of boundaries to participate, then I might be interested in participating, but without those protections, I'm not willing to talk about things using my own name. 

I'll also freely admit that some of my anxiety about this comes from the fact that I'm a special educator and an adoptive parent, two groups where privacy concerns are huge.  I'm not judging those of you in other circumstances if you choose to participate!  

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6 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

So, I joined the group!  Yay.  But to me, that's a problem.  I followed a link that was posted in a forum that's visible to the public, and was allowed to join without being asked any questions.  It's possible that 8, who happens to know my first name, guessed that it was me, but I have a pretty common first name so she could have been wrong.  The group is "private" and not "secret" which means that other people can see that I'm a member.  

I'd love to have a place to talk about these issues, and if it was a "secret" group, where people received a link by PM, and had to answer questions and be screened, and agree to some kind of boundaries to participate, then I might be interested in participating, but without those protections, I'm not willing to talk about things using my own name. 

I'll also freely admit that some of my anxiety about this comes from the fact that I'm a special educator and an adoptive parent, two groups where privacy concerns are huge.  I'm not judging those of you in other circumstances if you choose to participate!  

I have a second FB account that’s anonymous. It’s come in handy with his new job when I want to comment but I have to watch what I say and where because my name is attached.
A friend just changed her last name in FB because her dh is a police officer. Obviously she has a lot to say but it can’t reflect on him. Plus safety is a factor. Everyone that knows her understands why she changed her name. No questions asked. 
All that to say, sometimes it’s freeing to have an anonymous account. The people that know you will know it’s you but no one else will. 
I also get it’s difficult enough juggling one social media account so why would anyone possibly want another? 😊

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I think the idea that your identity on these forum is unidentifiable is a false sense of security.  We have moved over the yrs and people have known who I was simply bc of my posting on these forums even though I had no idea who they were.  (8 kids, 1 autistic, ages, etc.)  I had one mom tell me she had a file of my posts.  😉  I think the fact that your kids go to Catholic school and you have an adopted child with disabilities and that you are a SN teacher means that you are easily identifialbe to anyone who meets you if they have read the forums.  It is what happens when you post publicly.  (I never post anything that I don't want strangers to know.  What I post, I'd pretty much tell anyone.)

FWIW, I did add a question to the joining and I am not going to admit people who don't answer.  It is a simple enough question that not answering says more than the answer itself.  😉

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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5 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I think the idea that your identity on these forum is unidentifiable is a false sense of security.  We have moved over the yrs and people have known who I was simply bc of my posting on these forums even though I had no idea who they were.

Agreed. I actually feel considerably more private on Facebook. At least there, the group posts are private and not searchable by Google. I've always been quite indiscreet on these forums, because my basic info is more than enough to identify me, so there's almost no point unless I was going to be extremely zealous about it. The only thing I hope is that some people I know IRL don't figure out who this is ;-). 

I think what you get with FB is, yes, a bigger audience, and a faster pace. You also get fewer really thoughtful posts and need to put in a lot more work to make it run. So there's definitely a list of pros and cons. It's not one or the other. 

Edited by square_25

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3 minutes ago, Plum said:

I have a second FB account that’s anonymous. It’s come in handy with his new job when I want to comment but I have to watch what I say and where because my name is attached.
A friend just changed her last name in FB because her dh is a police officer. Obviously she has a lot to say but it can’t reflect on him. Plus safety is a factor. Everyone that knows her understands why she changed her name. No questions asked. 
All that to say, sometimes it’s freeing to have an anonymous account. The people that know you will know it’s you but no one else will. 
I also get it’s difficult enough juggling one social media account so why would anyone possibly want another? 😊

Yes.  I also have zero FB profile since I don't post anything other than on a private group.  My name is there and that I own TC, but that is all (plus a fake bday).  I figure my name is in my books, so it isn't a secret anymore (though I did have qualms when I first published them.)  I am not someone who actively FBs.  A fake profile requires an email address and that is it.  No one fact checks your FB name! 🙂 (My kids have accounts from their early teens and they don't use their real name.  They have never changed accts, so they have had to explain to people that is who they are and why. 😉

 

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The majority of my classes from 8th grade down were DIY, and about 1/3 of high school classes were DIY. I loved my own DIY classes!  I was pretty pleased with all of them.

Right now, my oldest just graduated and my youngest just finished 9th grade at a cyber school, and he’ll continue at the cyber school, so I’m out of the homeschool loop for current things.  I could contribute my past experiences, of course.

I don’t like FB for discussions.  How do you search for a post on FB?  If I join a group and if I get a notification that someone commented on something I wrote, and I click on that notification, FB will take me to the group page, but at the top. It will NOT take to me where the person actually commented.  It will take me to my post if someone “liked” it, but NOT if they commented on it.  And then FB will not put the posts in any order I can figure out, so I have to scroll, scroll, scroll to try and figure out which post I posted on and if someone wrote back to me on it.  It’s impossible sometimes to find the post. This is an absolute dealbreaker for what you want, 8.

So, I think doing this on FB would be pointless in the long term.  There is no way to go back in time and review threads, or tell a newbie, “Hey, we discussed that just a few weeks ago, here’s a link to the post.”  Instead, everything has to be done new each time because you can’t find old posts without endlessly scrolling.  Imagine 3 months from now and you’re thinking, “I remember back in June (if you even remember which month)  that there was a great post...but I can’t sit here and try to scroll through 3 months of posts.”

Or am I wrong? Is there some sort of search feature on FB groups where you can find keywords?  

Edited by Garga
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And as far as homeschooling and the boards changing over the past 20 years, I’m sure it has.  

In 1965 when my mother was 15 years old, she was parented completely differently from how I was parented twenty years later in 1985 when I was 12 years old.  And again with the way I parent my kids now is completely different from how my parents did things.

The way I got a job in 1995 when I was 22 years old is completely different from how 22 years old got jobs In 2015. I had a high school diploma and worked my way up a little ladder.  Nowadays, a 22 yo can’t get in the door of my old job with only that HS diploma.

A twenty-year time span can see dramatic changes.  As much as we can long for the good things that are gone with the past, it’s just the nature of life. The world changes. Values change. New opportunities exist and old ones are gone forever.

And of course, we miss the good and wish we could get it back. It’s sad, but it’s how things are.

 

ETA:  With that said—that’s no reason not to introduce a bit of the wisdom and style of the past to the next generation!  I think the idea of discussing DIY curric is excellent. And if no one else is talking about it, then why not try to get that conversational ball rolling? I think it’s a great idea, 8.

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33 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I think the idea that your identity on these forum is unidentifiable is a false sense of security.  We have moved over the yrs and people have known who I was simply bc of my posting on these forums even though I had no idea who they were.  (8 kids, 1 autistic, ages, etc.)  I had one mom tell me she had a file of my posts.  😉  I think the fact that your kids go to Catholic school and you have an adopted child with disabilities and that you are a SN teacher means that you are easily identifialbe to anyone who meets you if they have read the forums.  It is what happens when you post publicly.  (I never post anything that I don't want strangers to know.  What I post, I'd pretty much tell anyone.)

FWIW, I did add a question to the joining and I am not going to admit people who don't answer.  It is a simple enough question that not answering says more than the answer itself.  😉

Absolutely, and I know that I often over share here because I don't have any real life homeschoolers I can turn to.  But the last thing I need is another place to do that!
 

 

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17 minutes ago, Garga said:

Or am I wrong? Is there some sort of search feature on FB groups where you can find keywords?  

You can search. The search doesn't always work ;-). 

You can also make a file of important threads, or an album that people are supposed to post specific kinds of thing in. There's a way around all of this. But yes... FB groups are absolutely not organized like an encyclopedia. 

Edited by square_25
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8 hours ago, mms said:

I would personally like to see more of the nitty gritty details of other people’s plans. I’ve found so many resources thanks to others describing what they do! But, I also like to know what day to day looks like, what an actual lesson looks like, how all the resources look pulled together.

I've done DIY from K to 12 for both my kids.  My older informed me last night that he very much values what we did in highschool, and that he is alone at college amongst the homeschoolers to have actually done DIY through highschool. I outsourced only 2 classes for my older (both fell flat) and none for my younger. I have really had no choice because there are basically no options here in NZ for outsourcing, especially for gifted kids. 

I am always happy to share how we have created a learning environment together, but I really need a thread with a questions.  It looks pretty bad to just start a thread to discuss myself. haha. 

 

Edited by lewelma
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7 hours ago, square_25 said:

Anyway, that's my pet peeve. I've had trouble having conversations about how to teach math in a non-standard ways without people seeming kind of offended that I'm dismissing the standard sequence and the standard approaches. But then math is probably the subject people are least creative about, on average. 

Oh, let's start another argument, Square.  We can usually really get it going! How about the value of drill vs investigations. Just to switch it up, you take drill and I'll take investigations. 🙂 

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So, I signed up for Facebook and joined the group. This is huge! I’ve avoided Facebook for years. Does anyone know, is it possible to be on there without friending anyone and just be in a private group?

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49 minutes ago, lewelma said:

Oh, let's start another argument, Square.  We can usually really get it going! How about the value of drill vs investigations. Just to switch it up, you take drill and I'll take investigations. 🙂 

 

Hahahahaha, there we go :D. Good idea! 

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32 minutes ago, mms said:

So, I signed up for Facebook and joined the group. This is huge! I’ve avoided Facebook for years. Does anyone know, is it possible to be on there without friending anyone and just be in a private group?

I have no friends on my Facebook account. I have it specifically for some disability specific groups.  

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4 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I have no friends on my Facebook account. I have it specifically for some disability specific groups.  

I have friends, but post very rarely. I mostly have FB for groups. 

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7 hours ago, dmmetler said:

What makes me nervous about jumping into give advice is that I have just one kid. And what she needed and thrived on doesn’t necessarily apply to other kids (as an example, she spent most of middle school reading history books from around the world, usually high school textbooks and trade books, and drawing a comic book summary of it with the main characters as snakes. I’m not sure that’s a strategy to recommend to anyone else!) 

 

And yet these were the sorts of posts that convinced me that I could homeschool high school. Clearly anything weird my kid did would be less weird than what you others made work!

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I haven't seen this mentioned here, but one big problem I have with FB is the recursive nature of the posts.  Sometimes I come late to an interesting topic, and I see there are already 30 posts, with replies within other replies, sub-posts within posts.  Some are long and informative, some short like "following!" and "me too".  Sometimes if it's a post longer than 5 lines, you need to click again to reveal the whole thing.  I know it seems weird to write when all I'm doing is waving a cursor around, but it gets exhausting.  

One thing that drew me to these boards is the linear nature of the threads.  If I'm late the conversation, it's a matter of simply reading: start to finish.  (like with this thread!)  

If this applies to you, may I suggest google groups or groups.io?  

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8 hours ago, elroisees said:

This one, please.  🙂

 

'Queen bees and Wannabes' and 'UnF### Your Boundaries workbook' have been the main two. (We have severe time constraints, so it took us 3 years to get through Queen Bees.) Also, modern sex ed books often cover healthy relationships and literature often covers unhealthy relationships. "No Mr Wickhams!" when she was a small person watching Pride and Prejudice on video became "No Mr Compeysons either!" when she was a somewhat bigger person watching, then reading Dickens. 'Ophelia Speaks' is the next on our list. We've also done a little on how the brain works and need to find time to fit in more of that. 'A Child's Guide to Trauma' was a good one too.  She also has a set of emotional intelligence cards she uses frequently, to help her figure out what is bothering her and if she can do anything about it.

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4 hours ago, square_25 said:

Agreed. I actually feel considerably more private on Facebook. At least there, the group posts are private and not searchable by Google. I've always been quite indiscreet on these forums, because my basic info is more than enough to identify me, so there's almost no point unless I was going to be extremely zealous about it. The only thing I hope is that some people I know IRL don't figure out who this is ;-). 

I think what you get with FB is, yes, a bigger audience, and a faster pace. You also get fewer really thoughtful posts and need to put in a lot more work to make it run. So there's definitely a list of pros and cons. It's not one or the other. 

 

I know that I am not completely anonymous here, but it would take effort for someone to figure out who I am in real life. I"m sure it wouldn't take a huge amount of time, but it would still require someone to make a purposeful attempt to dox me.  But on facebook, my name is right there, and you can easily figure out where I live based on pages I've interacted with. 

My weirdness about this topic is because I kept "bumping into" local people in large national groups and feeling like I needed to bite my tongue to avoid offending someone or getting pounced on.  That's disappointing because the whole reason I seek out bigger or different groups is because we've struggled to find a community we really belong to here.  I do not feel like I can speak openly in the local groups.  I have to bite my tongue a lot in my area.  It's a small town and everyone is in everyone else's business and has an opinion about it. 

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11 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

I know that I am not completely anonymous here, but it would take effort for someone to figure out who I am in real life. I"m sure it wouldn't take a huge amount of time, but it would still require someone to make a purposeful attempt to dox me.  But on facebook, my name is right there, and you can easily figure out where I live based on pages I've interacted with. 

My weirdness about this topic is because I kept "bumping into" local people in large national groups and feeling like I needed to bite my tongue to avoid offending someone or getting pounced on.  That's disappointing because the whole reason I seek out bigger or different groups is because we've struggled to find a community we really belong to here.  I do not feel like I can speak openly in the local groups.  I have to bite my tongue a lot in my area.  It's a small town and everyone is in everyone else's business and has an opinion about it. 

Yeah, that seems to happen in not-so-small towns, too :-/. I do bite my tongue a lot as well here in NYC. The place is big, but the secular homeschooling community is small. 

Edited by square_25

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3 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Yeah, that seems to happen in not-so-small towns, too :-/. I do bite my tongue a lot as well here in NYC. The place is big, but the secular homeschooling community is small. 

 

My family is a unicorn here.  I am secularly homeschooling a gifted only child in a rural Texas town. Oooh, just typing it out makes me wonder why I even bothered trying to fit in around here. It was doomed to fail from the start.

There are 2 or 3 other secular families here, but they are either radical unschoolers or into super woo-woo pseudo-science.  When I've tried to talk about what our day looks like or books we use, people have just stopped me and said "This is all too weird" and laughed. 

 

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14 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

My family is a unicorn here.  I am secularly homeschooling a gifted only child in a rural Texas town. Oooh, just typing it out makes me wonder why I even bothered trying to fit in around here. It was doomed to fail from the start.

There are 2 or 3 other secular families here, but they are either radical unschoolers or into super woo-woo pseudo-science.  When I've tried to talk about what our day looks like or books we use, people have just stopped me and said "This is all too weird" and laughed. 

 

Oh, boy. That does sound like a mismatch!! 

Well, we do have hundreds of secular families here. Most are, however, radical unschoolers or anti-vaxxers or other kinds of conspiracy-theorists. Oh, and some are associated with the acting world, but those tend to be pretty un-academic. 

I do know maybe 3 or 4 that are homeschooling a gifted kid and are not radical unschoolers. So we're ahead, I guess? But that's a pretty small field, lol.

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I've got loads of opinions on various homeschool topics. Stuff like "Most Secular Science Programs are Dull and Uninspiring" and "Maybe the 5-Paragraph Essay is a Waste of Time" and "It's totally fine to skip dissection labs if your child has no interest in a scientific field".  I'd be more than happy to pontificate on those ideas, but I suspect that a lot of people with kids older than mine will roll their eyes and mutter "Newbie" under their breath.  

And maybe I am an idiot newbie, lol.  I'm homeschooling an only child. I've only been at this for 6 or 7 years.  I have no proof of concept yet. My entire "methodology" in teaching this child is based on him and his interests and strengths. It isn't based on an over-arching philosophy of education.  I've read only a few books on pedagogy and set them aside because they didn't resonate with me. 

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35 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

And maybe I am an idiot newbie, lol.  I'm homeschooling an only child. I've only been at this for 6 or 7 years.  I have no proof of concept yet. My entire "methodology" in teaching this child is based on him and his interests and strengths. It isn't based on an over-arching philosophy of education.  I've read only a few books on pedagogy and set them aside because they didn't resonate with me. 

Honestly, I think that's the best way to go. And I'm certainly interested in other people's ideas, no matter how many kids they've homeschooled! 

If I felt like it, I could decide that very few people on this forum have enough "experience" to talk about math education. I've taught many, many students in class settings over the years. I've been doing math seriously since I was a kid. I have an IMO gold medal and a math PhD. I've spend tons and tons of time thinking about math pedagogy. I've written and tested my own class at AoPS. I've now taught little kids in homeschool class settings. 

You know something? That does NOT make other people's experiences with teaching math invalid or uninteresting to me. I have informed opinions, but I do not and cannot have everyone else's lived experience. Other people's lived experiences are incredibly interesting to me. 

This is all to say that we should all speak up. And yes, for those of us who are still at the beginning of this journey... we'll probably say something we'll wind up regretting later, as we see how things unfold. So what? That happens to all of us, no matter how experienced. Life is a never-ending journey of learning, right? I imagine all of us on this forum agree on that much. 

Edited by square_25
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