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Robin M

Book a Week 2020 - BW21: Lamplight by May Wedderburn Cannan

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Happy Sunday, dear hearts. Tomorrow is Memorial Day here in the U.S. and we honor the fallen who have died in service to our country around the world. 

 

Lamplight

 by

May Wedderburn Cannan
Source: Penguin Book of First World War Poetry

 

 

 

We planned to shake the world together, you and I
Being young and very wise;
Now in the light of the green shaded lamp
Almost I see your eyes
Light with the old gay laughter; you and I
Dreamed greatly of an Empire in those days,
Setting our feet upon laborious ways,
And all you asked of fame
Was crossed swords in the Army List.

We planned a great Empire together, you and I,
Bound only by the sea;
Now in the quiet of a chill Winter's night
Your voice comes hushed to me
Full of forgotten memories; you and I
Dreamed great dreams of our future in those days,
And all I asked of fame
A scarlet cross on my breast, my Dear,
for the swords by your name.

We shall never shake the world together, you and I,
For you gave your life away;
and I think my heart was broken by the war,
Since on a Summer day
You took the road we never spoke of, you and I
Dreamed greatly of an Empire in those days;
You set your feet upon the Western ways
And have no need of fame ---
There's a scarlet cross on my breast, my Dear,
And a torn cross with your name.

 

 

Link to week 20

Visit  52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers  around the globe.

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Ha, I've suddenly gone blank and can't remember what I read this week.  😀 

Oh right. Busy work week.  Finished a cozy mystery this past week - Miranda James "Murder Past Due" which was a very light read.  Had been listening to Seanan McGuire's Rosemary and Rue in the car, but changed to e book a couple days ago to read in the evening.

We watched The Princess Bride last night. James first time so his reactions were hilarious. A couple days ago we watched Sonic the Hedgehog movie in which I took issue with the disrespect for the military and the police and had the stupidest ending being an ad for Olive Garden, again using the military to do so and making a General look completely stupid. Sonic however was nicely done and went through lots of emotional moments, something that isn't allowed in the comics.  I watched a movie on my own which neither of my guys would have appreciate - Ocean's EIght with the all female cast which was well done. 

Edited by Robin M
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Hi Robin. Thank you for this thread, as always, and wishing you a Happy Memorial Day weekend. 

It's been so long since I've seen "The Princess Bride". 

I read a Baha'i book - 4 Stars -  The link is to my review with photos. I first read this book so many years ago when I was in my early teens. It’s an easy read – a sweet story of one of the early Baha’is, Lua Getsinger. Here's my favorite quote, which resonated with me now more than ever. 

“Anyone can be happy in the state of comfort, ease, success, health, pleasure and joy, but if one can be happy and contented in the time of trouble, hardship, and prevailing disease, that is the proof of nobility.”

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Recently I've finished The German Midwife for book club (okay, but I probably wouldn't have picked it for myself), The Two Towers, and The Return of the King. I had not read The Lord of the Rings since I was in high school. Unlike some of my high school friends, it wasn't a world I wanted to go back and spend more time in--too much evil. This time around the darkness feels appropriate somehow, and it didn't bring me down. I also feel like this is a very male world--the pageantry of war, almost all male characters. I could read and enjoy it, but again it doesn't feel like a world I can live in. Glad I reread the series though. Still haven't gotten to the later movies.

Last night I started one of my library books that was delivered, Georgette Heyer's The Convenient Marriage, and I'm already enjoying that very much. And on the treadmill I've been reading the next Captain Lacey on my kindle because the kindle just works so well for that setting. 

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23 hours ago, mumto2 said:

I started reading the first book in Nalini Singh’s Psy-Changling series and have to say I am enjoying it.  ...

I read the first dozen or so books before losing interest. I liked the earliest books most as they were more character (rather than world) focused. I hope you'll enjoy the series.

1 hour ago, Robin M said:

Happy Sunday, dear hearts. 

Wishing a happy Memorial Day to all.

Regards,

Kareni

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Today only, free for Kindle readers ~

The Dream by H. G. Wells,

 "A man from the future dreams of a past life in this mind-bending story by the author of The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds.
 
Known for such classic novels as The Time Machine and The Island of Doctor Moreau, H. G. Wells is considered one of the fathers of science fiction. In The Dream, he introduces a man from a futuristic utopia who lives the complete life of an early twentieth-century Englishman during a dream.
 
Sarnac, a scientist, falls asleep for a short while. But in a vivid dream, he experiences an entire lifetime two thousand years in the past. Under the name Harry Mortimer Smith, he moves from childhood to boyhood to manhood—and finally, a murderous death. As Sarnac tries to make sense of it all, his two lives will become entangled in a state between dream and reality."

Regards,

Kareni

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Trying to finish my Julia Spencer Fleming audiobook so I can finally read Hid From Our Eyes.  My listening time has gone way down in the past couple of weeks as I stream my audiobooks and the dc’s are using Zoom a great deal in the evenings again.  Two people on Zoom with Dh browsing is all our internet can handle so I have been downloading Grantchester episodes to the iPad.  I’m not suffering!😉

I did finish the first in the Psy Changling series and now have the second on my Kindle now. I was just about to ask if you had read them when you posted!

23 minutes ago, Kareni said:
On 5/23/2020 at 3:58 PM, mumto2 said:

 

I read the first dozen or so books before losing interest. I liked the earliest books most as they were more character (rather than world) focused. I hope you'll enjoy the series.


 I also read one of Nora Roberts earlier romances from the days when she wrote for Silhouette.  I am sure I read Second Chance back in 1985 when it was first published and was happy to read it again.    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/42069725-second-nature

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I didn't finish any books this past week.  I was busy graduating my second and writing her transcript!

 

2 hours ago, Robin M said:

We watched The Princess Bride last night. James first time so his reactions were hilarious. 

I hated The Princess Bride when I first saw it.  I thought it was such a stupid movie.  Now I love it because it's such a stupid movie.  😉  

Cary Elwes wrote a fun book about his experiences in filming the movie: As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of the Princess Bride.  I think you would enjoy it; I'm not sure what kinds of books James likes.

 

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10 minutes ago, Junie said:

I didn't finish any books this past week.  I was busy graduating my second and writing her transcript!

Congratulations to you both. That is definitely worthy of a celebration!!!

Regards,

Kareni

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Oh my. I recently discovered May Wedderburn Cannan. She's so little known.

I finished Girl, Woman, Other last week. Best book I've read in ages.

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6 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Congratulations to you both. That is definitely worthy of a celebration!!!

Regards,

Kareni

Thank you!!

Ds19 graduated two years ago.  When he told me he didn't want a party, I told him that I wanted a party because it was my accomplishment, too.  We went without the party because he is such an introvert.  I was hoping to have a party for dd17, but that, of course, is not going to happen.

I am determined to get a party at least once, though.  Maybe after dd9 graduates!!

All of my kids have been homeschooled since the very beginning.  Ds19 was ready to begin preschool/kindergarten at age 4.  Dd15 was due at the same time that school would start, so we started in June to get ourselves into a routine.  So, I am about one week away from completing my 16th year.  :)

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FINALLY have time to get started on Robin's The Lord of the Rings challenge! My thoughts on the opening chapters below. I promise they won't all be this long 😉


FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING - BOOK 1

Prologue:
Provides some great background, history, culture, and a good sense of the general character of hobbits: peace and comfort-loving; agrarian-based; with a strong sense of moral rightness and the importance of following the rules, as well as in honoring tradition -- for example, still living in reference to the rightful rule of a king, even though there hadn’t been a king for over 1,000 years: 

  • “Yet the Hobbits still said of wild folk and wicked things (such as trolls) that they had not heard of the king. For they attributed to the king of old all their essential laws; and usually they kept the laws of free will, because they were The Rules (as they said), both ancient and just.”

_________________

chap. 1: “A Long Expected Party”
Love Tolkien’s laugh-out-loud sense of humor and gentle poke at human nature:

  • “Eleventy-first birthday” -- what a great number! 😄 
  • “as Mr. Baggins was generous with his money, most people were willing to forgive him his oddities and his good fortune.”   LOL! 😄 
  • “Practically everybody living near was invited. A very few were overlooked by accident, but as they turned up all the same, that did not matter… Bilbo met the guests (and additions) at the new white gate in person. He gave away presents to all and sundry - the latter were those who went out again by a back way and came in again by the gate.”-  😂
  • The Sackville-Bagginses...  were present. They disliked Bilbo and detested Frodo, but so magnificent was the invitation card, written in golden ink, that they had felt it was impossible to refuse. Besides, their cousin, Bilbo, had been specializing in food for many years and his table had a high reputation.” -  🤣
  • [re: the traditional after-dinner speech given by the host] “He was liable to drag in bits of what he called poetry” Tolkien's very funny poke at himself
  • “Gardeners came by arrangement, and removed in wheel-barrows those [guests] that had inadvertently remained behind.” LOL--the image that conjures up... 😂

_________________


chap. 2: “The Shadow of the Past”
Probably the key chapter to the entire trilogy -- with all the key history, key themes, and key choices in one place!

BUT... the chapter opens with one of the most hilarious instances of Tolkien's humor and poke at human nature: 

  • ”The talk did not die down in nine or even ninety-nine days. The second disappearance of Mr. Bilbo Baggins was discussed in Hobbiton, and indeed all over the Shire, for a year and a day, and was remembered much longer than that. It became a fireside-story for young hobbits; and eventually Mad Baggins, who used to vanish with a bang and a flash and reappear with bags of jewels and gold, became a favourite character of legend and lived on.”

And because Tolkien was a philologist and studied not only word origins but also the history/culture of the context of words, I looked up that phrase that he reference in the first sentence of the above quotations "nine days" -- refers to the expression:  

  • "nine day wonder" -- definition: in 1600, on a bet, English actor William Kemp danced the distance between London and Norwich in nine days; he wrote about his feat in "Kemp's Nine Daies VVonder"; the expression has since come to mean a novelty that loses its appeal after a few days.


Already setting up the connection of spiritual awareness/yearnings with an interest in/acceptance of the Elves:

  • Of all the legends that [Sam] had heard in his early years such fragments of tales and half-remembered stories about the Elves as the hobbits knew, had always moved him most deeply."
     
  • [Sam's simple faith, when caught eavesdropping by Gandalf, and what causes Gandalf to trust him:] " '...and Elves, sir. I listened because I couldn’t help myself, if you know what I mean. Lor bless me, sir, but I do love tales of that sort. And I believe them too, whatever Ted may say. Elves, sir! I would dearly love to see them. Couldn’t you take me to see Elves, sir, when you go?’ Suddenly Gandalf laughed. ‘Come inside!’ he shouted... Take you to see Elves, eh?’ he said, eyeing Sam closely, but with a smile flickering on his face. ‘...You shall go away with Mr. Frodo!’ “

Evil spiritual/moral connections with the Ring:

  • Gandalf's explanation: “A mortal… who keeps one of the Great Rings, does not die, but he does not grow or obtain more life, he merely continues, until at last every minute is a weariness. And if he often uses the Ring to make himself invisible, he fades: he becomes in the end invisible permanently, and walks in the twilight under the eye of the dark power that rules the Rings. Yes, sooner or later - later, if he is strong or well-meaning to begin with, but neither strength nor good purpose will last - sooner or later the dark power will devour him.”
     
  • Gollum's reality: "…[Gollum] found that none of his family could see him, when he was wearing the ring...  he used it to find out secrets, and he put his knowledge to crooked and malicious uses. He became sharp-eyed and keen-eared for all that was hurtful. The ring had given him power according to his stature”
     

Theme of mercy and potential for redemption:

  • Frodo, about Gollum: “He deserves death.”
    Gandalf: “Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. I have not much hope that Gollum can be cured before he dies, but there is a chance of it. And he is bound up with the fate of the Ring. My heart tells me that he has some part to play yet, for good or ill, before the end; and when that comes, the pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many—yours not least.”

(So much good stuff packed into Gandalf's answer here! ^^^)


Key choices in the chapter:

  • Gollum's choice is to give in to his lust for the Ring -- and take it by force and by murder of his friend [which may rule his future fate]
  • Bilbo received the Ring with the choice of Pity and mercy towards the murderous Gollum [which may rule his future fate]
  • Bilbo chose willingly to give up the Ring of power [which may rule his future fate]
  • Bilbo's choices affect others: "the pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many—yours [Frodo's] not least.”
  • Frodo's choice to sacrifice: he would prefer to stay in his life of comfort, but wants even more to protect his homeland from danger, so he chooses to carry the Ring, unused, and not knowing what to expect or how to be equipped for it, on a journey out of the Shire that is likely to be filled with danger and evil [which may rule his future fate]: “I should like to save the Shire, if I could... I feel that as long as the Shire lies behind, safe and comfortable, I shall find wandering more bearable: I shall know that somewhere there is a firm foothold, even if my feet cannot stand there again.”
  • Gandalf's choice, when offered the Ring of power, is to refuse, knowing it would destroy him and cause him to destroy all that he is steward of [which may rule his future fate]: "No! ... Do not tempt me! For I do not wish to become like the Dark Lord himself. Yet the way of the Ring to my heart is by pity, pity for weakness and the desire of strength to do good. Do not tempt me! I dare not take it, not even to keep it safe, unused. The wish to wield it would be too great, for my strength..."

A variation on the "choice" theme -- SO apt for our times right now! I love Gandalf's words here, and have used them more than once to encourage myself re: spiritual matters or unwanted life circumstances:

  • ‘I wish it need not have happened in my time,’ said Frodo.
    ‘So do I,’ said Gandalf, ‘and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given, us.'

Theme of Providence at work:

  • Gandalf's explanation about the quirk of circumstances that the Ring came to Bilbo: "There was more than one power at work, Frodo. The Ring was trying to get back to its master… Only to be picked up by the most unlikely person imaginable: Bilbo from the Shire! Behind that there was something else at work, beyond any design of the Ring-maker. I can put it no plainer than by saying that Bilbo was meant to find the Ring, and not by its maker. In which case you also were meant to have it. And that maybe an encouraging thought."
     
  • And... Frodo: "I am not made for perilous quests. I wish I had never seen the Ring! Why did it come to me? Why was I chosen?“   
    Gandalf: “Such questions cannot be answered… You may be sure that it was not for any merit that others do not possess: not for power or wisdom, at any rate. But you have been chosen, and you must therefore use such strength and heart and wits as you have.”

 

And thusly does Tolkien equip us for the quest that is the rest of the trilogy...

Edited by Lori D.
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Louisiana Longshot (Deleon)
Super light/fast/fluff murder mystery -- and humorous! I enjoyed it more than I thought. It took a few chapters for me to get into it and decide to "buy into" somewhat unbelievable world and the character, but once I let myself go... it was fun!

Edited by Lori D.
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Happy Memorial Day Weekend!

Reading:

"Dare to lead" by Brene Brown - love her writing style and humor.

Audiobook:

"Deceit" by Brandilyn Collins. Some of her books are hit or miss for me but this one along with a few others hold my attention.

I miss being able to pick up a book from the library - not just due to CV19 but also my long work days. I feel frustrated with Overdrive at times.

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11 hours ago, Junie said:

I didn't finish any books this past week.  I was busy graduating my second and writing her transcript!

Congratulations!

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Congratulations @Junie! How exciting for both of you! Only 17? I hope the Virus hasn't too much interfered with her plans.

Last week I finished Kafka's Amerika and have started on Henry James's first (second) novel, Roderick Hudson. James used to say it was his first novel, memory-holing its unworthy predecessor, Watch and Ward, which I read a couple of years ago and which was indeed dreadful.

A very Jamesian sentence from only the second page: 

Quote

"What is it you mean to do in Europe?" she asked, lightly, giving a turn to the frill of her sleeve--just such a turn as seemed to Mallet to bring out all the latent difficulties of the question.

It's no wonder James failed as a dramatist. Can you imagine his stage directions? "Then turn the frill of your sleeve, in such a way as to convey all the latent difficulties of the situation, which nobody will say out loud, but which all the characters present, as well as the audience, must understand clearly--with all the implications, in the context of European-American social tensions--from that point on." 

But I'm only a hundred or so pages into Roderick Hudson, as gardening has taken up most of my spare time. Gardening in Texas spring is a game of 'plant it fast, mulch it deep' and hope neither the heat nor the flooding spring rains kill it. I planted a couple of trees in the fall -- a tree won't survive a spring planting because there's not enough time to establish its root system before the summer drought -- and I have my fingers crossed for their first summer, but they look good. When I went to buy mulch and compost (our city makes them both and sells them cheap: your yard trimmings and, um, "bio-solids" from the water treatment plant, don't ask), I paid while a clerk looked on from a distance, drove over to the unmanned loading area with my receipt, and loaded up on my own. I understand they don't want to risk transmission, and it was hospitable of them to trust me to load up what it said I'd paid for, but I would have appreciated some employee help with the lifting.

 

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17 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Louisiana Longshot (Deleon)
Super light/fast/fluff murder mystery -- and humorous! I enjoyed it more than I thought. It took a few chapters for me to get into it and decide to "buy into" somewhat unbelievable world and the character, but once I let myself go... it was fun!

 

Unbelievable as in science fiction or unbelievable as in somewhat unrealistic? I am always keeping a list of light mysteries and like to add to it.  :)

 

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3 hours ago, Violet Crown said:

Congratulations @Junie! How exciting for both of you! Only 17? I hope the Virus hasn't too much interfered with her plans.

 

She will turn 18 this fall during her first semester.

Her plans have changed, but she's looking forward to some new opportunities.  She will actually be moving to campus (out of state) at the beginning of June.  The college has a summer work program that offers 40 hours/week at state minimum wage plus free room and board.

She has not been able to work at her job here since mid-March, so working on campus is a really good plan.  The amount of $$ she will earn this summer on campus should be equal to or greater than what she would have made here from March through August.

She is kind of young, but I feel ok about it.  She tends to make good decisions.  Plus, her brother is at the same school and also working this summer.  He works for security, so he has a good handle on what is going on on the campus.  

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30 minutes ago, Liz CA said:

Unbelievable as in science fiction or unbelievable as in somewhat unrealistic? I am always keeping a list of light mysteries and like to add to it.  🙂

Unbelievable as about that same amount of "willing suspension of disbelief" for watching an action movie with a super-skills-trained agent. Not super power super hero -- more like Jason Bourne level of skills. (And the "twists" of what is learned about the characters in this little town.) Not a ridiculous amount of unbelievable, just a bit. But the fun makes it easy to make that "jump".

Edited by Lori D.
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I am finally starting to get my reading groove back. I wasn't able to read much from mid-March to mid-May, but one thing I discovered and enjoyed was LA Theatre Works. Their audio productions of plays are a high caliber, and they have a lot of freebies but apparently they also take them down - most of the ones that I listened to have now disappeared but are replaced with a new batch. You could also check your library - I found some on both Overdrive and Hoopla.

So far, I have listed to:

Lost in Yonkers by Neil Simon

The Sisters Rosenweig by Wendy Wasserstein

Crimes of the Heart by Beth Henley

Park Your Car in Harvard Yard by Israel Horovitz

Lips Together, Teeth Apart by Terrance McNally

An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde

The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.

They do stay up longer than a week, though. A couple weeks, I think? @Lori D. I keep trying to catch - but keep missing -  the National Theatre weekly releases. And from what I can tell it doesn't look like you can go back later and stream them for a fee, either. 

--

Congratulations, @Junie I hope you get that graduation party with the third one 🙂 I love throwing parties. Meanwhile, I am super happy to read that your daughter's plans are not completely derailed. Best wishes to your recent grad!

 

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56 minutes ago, Liz CA said:

 

Unbelievable as in science fiction or unbelievable as in somewhat unrealistic? I am always keeping a list of light mysteries and like to add to it.  :)

 

I read a few in the series a few years ago and remember them as highly exaggerated fun.  I probably need to revisit this author........light and funny sounds perfect.

@Junie Congratulations to both you and your Dd.  I am glad she is going to be able to enjoy some of her plans for summer.

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1 hour ago, Penguin said:

... @Lori D. I keep trying to catch - but keep missing -  the National Theatre weekly releases. And from what I can tell it doesn't look like you can go back later and stream them for a fee, either. 

Yes, just one week, and then back into their vaults. 😞 

Sorry you missed the The Barbershop Chronicles -- that was quite enjoyable! This week is Our House, and next week is Streetcar Named Desire, both of which we're passing on. We'll have to check out your LA Theater link! 😄 

Edited by Lori D.
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I have been reading:

Thinking, Fast and Slow https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005Z9GAJG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_IpdZEbXVQ5W98

And

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Happiness Is a Serious Problem: A Human Nature Repair Manual https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003JJEGNG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_VqdZEbV9S3WSK

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Some bookish posts ~

Books That Grab You by Jo Walton

More:

Author Murakami DJs ‘Stay Home’ radio show to lift spirits

https://apnews.com/c3cc8b243b14a36ce7e512fa00fe0cbd

An Ode to Bookstores

http://matthewberkman.com/index.php/2020/05/20/an-ode-to-bookstores/

From the Word Wenches: Opening Lines

https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2020/05/opening-lines.html

From reddit: Your favourite obscure book?

https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/ghey4s/your_favourite_obscure_book/

Regards,

Kareni

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I just finished a book that I won in a Goodreads giveaway.

It was a pleasant read, but I don't believe I'll be reading it.

 "Nadja Bikram traveled to the distant planet of Skiathos to work one problem, a puzzle that had vexed her for seven years. On reaching the savage desert world, she found the survey team she was to join in disarray and its leader missing. As a State Department officer, it was up to her to take command and sort things out, but she swiftly discovered the harsh and brutal landscape held a hidden danger so lethal and dreadful that it threatened them all. Nadja would need to use her every wit, risking her life and the lives of those around her, to discover its origin, but would she find the answer before it was too late?"

Regards,

Kareni

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Kindle book on sale today. Not sure if I should get this. Did any of you love it, or did any of you not? I'm probably the only person who's yet to read this. 

9780007205233.jpg

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3 hours ago, Negin said:

Kindle book on sale today. Not sure if I should get this. Did any of you love it, or did any of you not? I'm probably the only person who's yet to read this. 

 

Negin, It seems to be one of those love-it-or-hate-it books. I loved it, but I love memoirs. And, having grown up both Catholic and around alcoholics, I could relate to it.

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@Negin I listened to an Audio version of Angela’s Ashes.  Liked it a lot!  Maybe loved. 

I don’t know if I would have liked it as a kindle though. 

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7 hours ago, Negin said:

Kindle book on sale today. Not sure if I should get this. Did any of you love it, or did any of you not? I'm probably the only person who's yet to read this. 

Nope. You are not alone, Negin.

Regards,

Kareni

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Today only, free for Kindle readers ~

The Luck of Roaring Camp And Other Tales by Bret Harte

 "The defining stories from one of America’s great wits

In the mid-nineteenth century, the Wild West grabbed ahold of American consciousness and never let go. With the discovery of gold, all eyes and wagons turned westward.

This collection of stories brings readers back to the American frontier. In “The Luck of Roaring Camp,” when a Native American woman dies in childbirth, the miners take it upon themselves to raise the child. Naming the baby Luck, the miners learn more about responsibility and class through raising the boy than they have through anything else in their lives. Other stories in the collection include classic prospecting-set short stories such as “Tennessee’s Partner” and “The Outcasts of Poker Flat” and the short novels “Muck-a-Muck” and “Selina Sedilia.” In this timeless collection, Bret Harte has captured the California gold rush as no other writer could."

Regards,

Kareni

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For all the Julia Spencer Fleming fans here I just finished the new book after a marathon relisten to the series and gave it a five star rating!  Hid From Our Eyes was a satisfying continuation of favorite characters https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/45046695-hid-from-our-eyes and an appropriate potential conclusion to a great series that answered essential questions like is the baby a boy or a girl?😂. She kept me up late last night because she didn’t answer that for a couple of chapters!  😉. I honestly think this one may have been edited a bit tighter and I enjoyed that as sometimes the character of Claire wanders.........  The case(s) in this particular book centered around three dead young women being left on an isolated roadway roughly 20 years apart.  Previous suspects are now influential citizens of Miller’s Kill including Russ, the police chief.  A new body is found and sifting through the 60 years worth of clues starts..........I did figure it out midway but greatly enjoyed the wrap up.

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More book challenge thoughts as Frodo sets out on his quest...

____________________________
 

FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING - BOOK 1

chap. 3: "Three is Company"
Tolkien says that this line was a motivating reason for writing the trilogy — to have a story and a world where someone would speak this line of his invented Elvish language: 

  • Elen síla lúmenn’ omentielvo, a star shines on the hour of our meeting

The sayings that the different races have about one another -- lol! 😄

  • Gildor the Elf [to Frodo who asks if he should wait for the tardy Gandalf]: "That Gandalf should be late, does not bode well. But it is said: Do not meddle in the affairs of Wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger. The choice is yours: to go or wait.’
    Frodo [to Gildor, about his advice]: "And it is also said... ‘Go not to the Elves for counsel, for they will say both no and yes.’ "

Another example of the theme of Providence:

  • “...Our paths cross [the paths of others] seldom, by chance or purpose. In this meeting there may be more than chance...’” [said by Gildor to Frodo]

Gildor, in parting, speaks almost a blessing or prayer over Frodo who has expressed worries about finding wisdom and courage to continue with this quest:

  • “‘Courage is found in unlikely places… Be of good hope... we will send our messages through the lands. The Wandering Companies [of Elves] shall know of your journey, and those that have power for good shall be on the watch. I name you Elf-friend; and may the stars shine upon the end of your road...”

_________________

chap. 4: “A Short Cut to Mushrooms”
Sam’s threshold or point of no return moment -- his complete commitment to Frodo and the quest (a type of life-changing spiritual decision?):

  • Frodo asks Sam: "Do you feel any need to leave the Shire now—now that your wish to see [Elves] has come true already?"
    Sam replies: "
    Yes, sir. I don’t know how to say it, but after last night I feel different. I seem to see ahead, in a kind of way. I know we are going to take a very long road, into darkness; but I know I can’t turn back. It isn’t to see Elves now, nor dragons, nor mountains, that I want—I don’t rightly know what I want: but I have something to do before the end, and it lies ahead, not in the Shire. I must see it through, sir, if you understand me."

Another humorous exchange of quippy sayings -- lol! 😄

  • Pippin [who wants to travel by road to stop at the Golden Perch Inn for beer]: "Short cuts make long delays."
    Frodo. "Short cuts make delays, but inns make longer ones. At all costs we must keep you away from the Golden Perch."

And... Unexpectedly finding friends and allies along the way -- first the Elves (chap. 3), and now Farmer Maggot! 

_________________

chap. 5: “A Conspiracy Unmasked”
What true, loyal friends look like:

  • Frodo [on discovering his friends have been keeping a close watch on him]: "But it does not seem that I can trust anyone."
    Merry: "It all depends on what you want... You can trust us to stick to you through thick and thin—to the bitter end. And you can trust us to keep any secret of yours—closer than you keep it yourself. But you cannot trust us to let you face trouble alone, and go off without a word. We are your friends...  We are horribly afraid—but we are coming with you; or following you like hounds."

Edited by Lori D.
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I was reading the comments for book ideas in a blog I subscribe to.     http://frame.bloglovin.com/?post=7487728243&blog=473385&frame_type=none. and ran in to  (via the world building link) a new to me many book series that seems to be popular with the fans of Psy Changling.   Heart Mate by Robin D Owens           https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1244288.Heart_Mate?ac=1&from_search=true&qid=mQIAkJEpJ1&rank=1. The Goodreads reviews vary hugely and am wondering if anyone here has read it.   The talking animals in the world building are supposed to be amusing ............ as  @Kareni is laughing.

Edited by mumto2
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I do indeed indeed know Robin D. Owen's Celta series, @mumto2. I've read all fifteen of them!  It's an enjoyable series but not one I'm drawn to reread. I suspect you'd enjoy them, too. 

Regards,

Kareni

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Last night I finished   Unsouled (Cradle Book 1) by Will Wight

which proved to be an enjoyable fantasy. I may continue on with the series (it's fairly violent though).

 "Sacred artists follow a thousand Paths to power, using their souls to control the forces of the natural world.

Lindon is Unsouled, forbidden to learn the sacred arts of his clan.

When faced with a looming fate he cannot ignore, he must rise beyond anything he's ever known...and forge his own Path."

Regards,

Kareni

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Ok, so am I the only one who thinks the beginning of the Lord of the Rings is BORING!  I have reread this many, many times -- yearly for a long time, although lately it is more like every few years -- i didn't think much about it until now but normally I skip a great deal of the beginning.  I like all the friendship parts, but I usually skip a lot of the party and then the forest, and Tom Bombadil, and barrowdowns....  Well, I guess I'll continue to trudge through it, desperately waiting until they finally get to Bree (not sure why but that is where I normally stop skipping so much).

Read the new MurderBot book, yay! and the new Penric book, yay again!

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10 minutes ago, LaughingCat said:

Ok, so am I the only one who thinks the beginning of the Lord of the Rings is BORING!  I have reread this many, many times -- yearly for a long time, although lately it is more like every few years -- i didn't think much about it until now but normally I skip a great deal of the beginning.  I like all the friendship parts, but I usually skip a lot of the party and then the forest, and Tom Bombadil, and barrowdowns....  Well, I guess I'll continue to trudge through it, desperately waiting until they finally get to Bree (not sure why but that is where I normally stop skipping so much).

Read the new MurderBot book, yay! and the new Penric book, yay again!

Penric...........Another series I need to read!

I just started the new Lady Darby.  There have been some great new releases this month!

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3 hours ago, LaughingCat said:

Ok, so am I the only one who thinks the beginning of the Lord of the Rings is BORING! 

No, you are not. Tolkien has always bored me. The movies not so much, but the books bore me. To each their own. 

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10 hours ago, LaughingCat said:

Read the new MurderBot book, yay!

I read this yesterday, too, and enjoyed it.

 
 "I’m usually alone in my head, and that’s where 90 plus percent of my problems are.

When Murderbot's human associates (not friends, never friends) are captured and another not-friend from its past requires urgent assistance, Murderbot must choose between inertia and drastic action.

Drastic action it is, then."
 
Regards,
Kareni
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Some bookish posts ~

MIND-BOGGLING BOOK SCULPTURES YOU CAN OWN

https://bookriot.com/2020/03/18/best-book-sculptures/

Natural talent: the 16 year-old writer taking the world by storm

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/may/16/dara-mcanulty-nature-writing-diary-of-a-young-naturalist

From reddit: Looking for fantasy books with female leads to read or listen to in quarantine.

https://www.reddit.com/r/fantasy/comments/ghgggh/looking_for_fantasy_books_with_female_leads_to/from

From AAR (All About Romance): the Wayback on Wednesday: Chatting about Heyer

https://allaboutromance.com/96452-2/comment-122658

Regards,

Kareni

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Howdy! Nora Robert's newest book Hideaway arrived so all else has stopped while I read it.  I have way too many chunky books sitting around that I've started and put down. Hoping to settle down with Fellowship of the Rings soon.  I've been sitting on a heating pad for the past few days. I picked up the two cats together, of course they went limp,  and I must have bent the wrong way because I  pulled a hip muscle.  Stupid, since I've done it in the past and the same thing happened, which means I didn't learn my lesson the first time.  Ouch!  

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1 hour ago, Robin M said:

Ouch!

Ouch, indeed. I hope you'll soon feel better, Robin. Enjoy that Nora Roberts book. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts.

Regards,

Kareni

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4 hours ago, Robin M said:

Howdy! Nora Robert's newest book Hideaway arrived so all else has stopped while I read it.  I have way too many chunky books sitting around that I've started and put down. Hoping to settle down with Fellowship of the Rings soon.  I've been sitting on a heating pad for the past few days. I picked up the two cats together, of course they went limp,  and I must have bent the wrong way because I  pulled a hip muscle.  Stupid, since I've done it in the past and the same thing happened, which means I didn't learn my lesson the first time.  Ouch!  

 

Ouch!  Feel better soon!

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