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provenance61

Recommendations for World Literature novels/curriculum?

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I'm planning to teach a World Lit course next fall, and would greatly appreciate recommendations for specific novels and authors to include.  It's such a big topic to cover! The course will meet virtually once a week, for 15 weeks/semester, 2 semesters.

I previously taught American Lit and British Lit courses, using Prentice-Hall's Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes series -- along with specific outside novels selected with the wonderful suggestions from this group.  It worked well, and the series came with teacher's manual and supporting materials.  However, their World Lit course just doesn't seem quite as thorough for non-English language writers. So I'm also interested in recommendations for other curricula.

Thank you all for such wonderful suggestions on previous courses! 

Edited by provenance61

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Check out this past thread: "World Literature help".

And, if you could narrow what you're looking for, it would help us make recommendations:
- Are you are excluding British works, since you did a British Lit. course?
- Are you interested in works from the full timeline (ancients through modern), or do you want more modern works?
- Do you need/want secular or Christian, or does it matter?
- Do you definitely need/want a program or textbook, or are you interested in putting together a DIY course?

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Lori D, thank you! I remember your help with my British Lit course last year. 

A sampling from major periods, but probably emphasis on 18th century on.  I'm not excluding British or American authors, but want to put the emphasis on other cultures. For instance, I'd like to include another Shakespeare play and a few British/American authors since 1960. 

Our co-op is Christian but would like to use secular curriculum and be sensitive to different worldviews. Have tried to be very sensitive to parents' concerns and haven't run into many problems, although this year parents withdrew a student when we started Picture of Dorian Gray. And while I'd like to include Tale of Two Cities and Anna Karenina next year -- am concerned about length and difficulty of some selections.

The class size is likely to be 6-8 at the very most.  About 50-50, some are eager readers with a lot of insight, others don't seem to enjoy reading or have difficulty making connections in the literature. Everyone seemed to struggle this year with the research paper.

On the subject of curriculum, I'm mixed. There are a lot of resources out there for specific works so I don't absolutely need a textbook. I used many outside sources this year and have to say they made the year for us.  But at same time it is a LOT of extra work to put those together. I might be willing to put together a DIY course if someone can push me in the direction of some good resources or ways to manage workload.  

Thank you again for your help!

 

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Heart of Darkness

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Short stories by Guy Maupassant 

Crime and Punishment

1001 Nights

 

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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Here are some of the works that dd17 read for World Lit:

 

The Hiding Place

I am Malala (we read the young people's edition)

The Phantom of the Opera

Cry, the Beloved Country

The Importance of Being Earnest

The Black Tulip -- not as good as Dumas' other works, imo, but much, much shorter

Scaramouche

The Journey to the Center of the Earth

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16 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

 

I'd like to second 8's recommendation of One Day in the Life...

I also highly recommend Sofia Petrovna, by Lydia Chukovskaya. — It's a remarkable novel, a relatively easy read, and a take-your-breath-away portrait of life in the late 1930s for ordinary citizens of Stalin's Soviet Union.

Edited by royspeed
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Definitely Cry, the Beloved Country.

I also used The Pearl and The Good Earth (hands down my most favorite for lessons/impact/portrayal of the realities of life)
 

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Thank you for the recommendations, keep them coming!  I especially like the comments and will look into every one recommended.  And thank you also for the recommendation for Japanese short stories. It's nice to have a variety in length.

 

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23 hours ago, provenance61 said:

...A sampling from major periods, but probably emphasis on 18th century on.  I'm not excluding British or American authors, but want to put the emphasis on other cultures. For instance, I'd like to include another Shakespeare play and a few British/American authors since 1960...

On the subject of curriculum, I'm mixed. There are a lot of resources out there for specific works so I don't absolutely need a textbook... I might be willing to put together a DIY course if someone can push me in the direction of some good resources or ways to manage workload...

Excerpts from the LLATL: Gold: World Lit might provide the sampling of lit from ancient/medieval/renaissance times, plus a starting point for background info for you. That guide also uses a number of short works such as:

- early literature unit = myths; folktales; African proverbs, dilemma tales, parables; Japanese Haiku poetry; etc.
- medieval/renaissance unit = Thousand and One Nights (could just do selected short Arabian Nights tales)

You could also use short stories for some of the famous Russian and French 18th-19th century authors:
    Russia
"Queen of Spades", or other (Pushkin) -- or other short story

The Nose; (short story) -- or -- The Government Inspector (play) (Gogol) 
"How Much Land Does a Man Need" (Tolstoy) -- or other short story
    France
"The Storm" (Verne) -- (original title: "Fritt-Flacc") short story

"The Necklace"; or other (de Maupassant) -- short story
"Fight With a Cannon" (Hugo) -- short story


For contemporary (post 1960) British/American works... perhaps a series of short stories and/or shorter YA works from authors of different perspectives?

USA contemporary lit ideas
1967 = The Outsiders (Hinton) --  fast read; lots of guides out there
    written when she was 16yo; captures the great divide between rich and poor, but also the shared struggles of adolescence
1989 = The Joy Luck Club (Tan) -- author is 1st generation American of immigrant Chinese parents
      multiple perspectives: Chinese grandmothers, immigrating daughters, first generation American granddaughters
2001 = Peace Like a River (Enger) -- realistic; set in the 1960s; Christian author
     note: adult topic of a girl kidnapped to be the bride of an abusive recluse (she is rescued before bad things happen)
2005 = Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (Foer) -- 9-1-1 aftermath
2006 = American-Born Chinese (Yang)
-- graphic novel, Chinese-Amer. author; U.S. minority perspective + Chinese Monkey King cultural myth element
2007 = The Wall (Sis) -- picture book about the Czeck-born American author's 1970s/1980s growing up under Soviet communism
2009 = The Help (Stockett) -- African Americans working as domestic help in the 1960s Deep South
2017 = The Hate U Give (Thomas) -- or -- All American Boys (Kiely & Reynolds) -- YA novel; Black lives matter perspective by black authors

2000-present world contemporary lit ideas -- preview
African Savannah -- 2003 = Facing the Lion: Growing Up Maasai (Lekuton) -- nonfiction autobiography
Canada/India -- 2001 = Life of Pi (Martel) -- author is Pakistani immigrant to Canada
China -- 2001 = Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (Sijie) -- preview
German/Australian -- 2005 = 
The Book Thief (Zusak) -- YA novel; set in WW2; Australian author of German immigrant parents
Iran -- 2000 = Persepolis (Satrapi) -- autobiography; graphic novel -- preview
Malawi -- 2010 = The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (Kamkwanda) -- nonfiction autobiography
Pakistan -- 2013 = I Am Malala (Yousafzai) -- nonfiction autobiography
Sierra Leone -- 2007 = A Long Way Gone (Beah) -- nonfiction autobiography -- preview
South Africa -- 2008 = Invictus (Carlin) -- about events in the early 1990s


Previous posters have given some great suggestions, many of which I would echo. I will just note that if you are wanting an emphasis on other cultures or to understand other worldview, some of these books were written by Western non-native peoples, or white upper-class people living in that country. Examples:

- Heart of Darkness = Joseph Conrad, white Polish-English author, merchant sailing work took him briefly to Africa
- The Good Earth = Pearl Buck, white American author, of missionaries, who lived the first 40 years of her life in China
- Cry The Beloved Country = Alan Paton, white South African

Not suggesting that you automatically drop white or non-native authors, but just noting that they do come from a Western point of view, or from a more advantaged socio-economic point of view that may be a minority perspective.

I DO think Cry The Beloved Country is a must-read; author Alan Paton was an anti-apartheid activist, so there is great empathy for the plight of the black African characters in the book. And it is incredibly Christian in theme.

A also agree that in The Good Earth, Pearl Buck captures the hardship of Chinese ordinary/peasant life from around the turn of the century, as well as some of the mindset, very clearly. Even though she was a white "missionary kid" in China, she grew up/lived in China for 40 years, and was a keen observer of human nature and culture, so she is probably more realistic to true native perspectives than other Western historical fiction authors. Note about The Good Earth: at one point, due to extreme starvation, the wife kills the baby daughter to prevent her from suffering and to give the other children a better chance; also there are non-graphic scenes in which the patriarch of the family, as they rise in their fortunes, takes a concubine; when the older sons are late teens, one or both (can't remember now) either wants to or actually has relations with the concubine. Again, very non-graphic and non-sensationalistic or titillating, but it is part of what happens.

Edited by Lori D.
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If you want a variety of authors, but also want to give your slower/reluctant readers a break, short stories and novellas by world authors can be a good way to go.  Here are a few we've enjoyed, in no particular order.  

Sholom Aleichem: “The Passover Guest”       

Jorge Luis Borges: “The Secret Miracle,” “House of Asterion”  

Franz Kafka: ”The Metamorphosis” (novella)

Guy de Maupassant: "The Necklace," "The False Gems," "The Piece of Yarn"

Saki (H.H. Munro): "The Open Window," "The Story Teller"

Leo Tolstoy: "The Three Hermits," "How Much Land Does a Man Need"

Chinua Achebe: "Dead Men's Path"  (very different religious perspective)

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

Previous posters have given some great suggestions, many of which I would echo. I will just note that if you are wanting an emphasis on other cultures or to understand other worldview, some of these books were written by Western non-native peoples, or white upper-class people living in that country. Examples:

- Heart of Darkness = Joseph Conrad, white Polish-English author, merchant sailing work took him briefly to Africa
- The Good Earth = Pearl Buck, white American author, of missionaries, who lived the first 40 years of her life in China
- Cry The Beloved Country = Alan Paton, white South African

Not suggesting that you automatically drop white or non-native authors, but just noting that they do come from a Western point of view, or from a more advantaged socio-economic point of view that may be a minority perspective.


This is an important point to keep in mind, even/especially when the authors are non-white and non-native. Yoko Kawashima Watkins wrote a memoir, So Far From the Bamboo Grove, about her (Japanese) family's desperate escape from Korea at the end of WWII. She was 11 and had been born and raised in Korea. From her perspective, it was her home, and she was stunned and betrayed when even the servants who had served her family for her whole life turned against them. Well, there was some truly ugly background that she'd been shielded from; her parents were members of a violent and oppressive occupation regime, even if they personally were kind people. One certainly shouldn't expect to get a well-rounded image of what Korea and Koreans are like from her account, just as one shouldn't expect a well-rounded image of what Japan and Japanese people are like from a Korean or Chinese account. I'd still call her memoir world literature, but only in the loosest sense, as she wrote it in English for an Anglophone audience. If I were creating a world literature curriculum, I'd go for translated works that were written in the native language originally, and select excerpts from the works of non-native/English-speaking authors as useful supplements. 

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We used this last year: https://www.christianbook.com/literature-cultural-influences-contemporary-voices-student/james-stobaugh/9780890516751/pd/516751?product_redirect=1&search_term=World litera&Ntt=516751&item_code=WW&Ntk=keywords&event=ESRCP

 

A few of the lessons/concept builder activities are Christian, so you could just use it as another list for ideas or use it as a jumping off point to build a completely secular study.  It was meaty, so we cut a book.  I also assigned three of the longer books as summer reading, with assignments/discussions completed as they came up in the schedule throughout the year.  If you have any specific questions, I still have the student book 🙂.

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When I was in high school our world literature class rotated in a three year cycle.  The year I caught was French and Russian literature.  I can’t say that I loved it, but I did read enough to get a feel for each.  We did a combination of novels, shorter stories, and poetry.  World literature is so huge that I don’t know how you narrow things down and pull it together without some sort of underlying link/theme.

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Short stories by Borges (Argentina) are excellent, and some of my older boy's all time favorites.

He also LOVED Crime and Punishment, and it is not as long as other Russian classic works. 

We have never read Camus (France) but he was next on our list. 

If you've got the time The Luminaries (NZ) is outstanding and a great yarn.  They are currently making the miniseries.  But it is long!

Edited by lewelma
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The curriculum I wrote (link in my sig) involves African and Asian lit. I really, really like the old Prentice Hall text World Masterpieces, which I used in that program. If you're looking for a source for lots of good excerpts and poems from a wide, wide time frame, then it's perfect. In terms of books in general, from that program, the biggest hits with my students have been Purple Hibiscus, Things Fall Apart, and Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, which my co-op class just discussed the other day. 

Seconding many of these... but I would avoid a few things that I've seen here and that always crop up in these threads about world lit... I wouldn't treat contemporary YA or adult literature by American or British authors set in other places as exemplars of the literature of those places. In other words, I would not treat The Book Thief or The Good Earth as world literature, even though the settings are well-researched and the books are both excellent. That sort of thing, which I see a lot. There are plenty of examples of good literature that is actually from Germany or China. Same thing with treating American immigrant literature as world literature. It's American literature. I would also avoid treating contemporary popular memoirs geared toward an American audience as exemplars of the literature of a place as well. So, for example, I would not read Trevor Noah's autobiography as "South African literature." South Africa has plenty of rich literature. It doesn't mean you can't read these things... they're great books - for history, for historical fiction, for current events, for just good literature and writing... just not for "world literature." If the goal of the course is beyond just that, then maybe they fit in.

 

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I did World Lit with my oldest when he was in 9th grade.  I found that a lot of recommended world lit was too brutal for him.  Also, like others have said, a lot of recommended world lit is written by Americans or British people.  What?  I didn't want to read that. I wanted us to study books written by people of other nations.  We would study Am and Brit lit in other years. But I also didn't want to read brutal books to him. He wasn't ready.

I'm going to cut and paste my notes from that year.  We actually did everything through Picnic at Hanging Rock.  If you see anything after Picnic (and you will), those were notes of other possibilities to do that year that we decided not to do (or ran out of time to do).

 Note: Don Quixote is actually two books in one. Cervantes wrote his book, and then a fan decided to write some fan fiction tales about the character Don Quixote.  Cervantes got mad about that, so he wrote a second part to his book to take back control of the character.  We chose to read only the first part, because reading both parts of Don Quixote was too much.  It's a THICH book.  And so is Three Musketeers, which we needed to find time to read as well. 

Also note, for 1001 Arabian Nights--there are original tales written long ago, but some of the more well-known tales (Ali Baba, Aladdin), were actually written by Europeans in the 1800s.  In my notes, I mark which are which.  We chose to read both kinds and compare them.

Below I'm including everything, even the things we decided not to do (found below "Picnic at Hanging Rock"), because you might prefer what we decided not to do.  It's a lot!  Hope something on here is helpful to you:

 

TO DO:
For 28 weeks, we will write essays on these book.
There are 8 weeks left over where there is no writing.  Just literature.  


http://www.shmoop.com/don-quixote/difficulty.html
Tells you how hard books are


Read this about translations: http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/art-of-translation/index.html
Do the activity where we create our own translation: http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/art-of-translation/index.html

9 BOOKS FOR THE ESSAYS:

1.  The Epic of Gilgamesh 
2100 BC, Sumeria
Should the gods have tried to "fix" Gilgamesh?  Or just destroyed him?  Should they have made Enkidu?

The commentaries under the scripture about Nimrod (scroll down past all the translations: http://biblehub.com/genesis/10-9.htm
Nimrod is Gilgamesh: http://www.christiananswers.net/dictionary/nimrod.html


http://www.shmoop.com/gilgamesh/difficulty.html
Translation by Stephen Mitchell --written as prose.  Is very accessible.  
https://www.amazon.com/Gilgamesh-English-Version-Stephen-Mitchell/dp/0743261690/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1469803712&sr=1-1&keywords=gilgamesh+stephen+mitchell#customerReviews
Or David Ferry  --written as poem.  Is also very accessible.
https://www.amazon.com/Gilgamesh-New-Rendering-English-Verse/dp/0374523835/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1469800793&sr=8-8&keywords=epic+of+gilgamesh

2.  Odyssey (Greek)  Translation by Stanley Lombardo  (BOUGHT)
700 BC

http://www.shmoop.com/odyssey/tough-o-meter.html
http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/615516-which-translation-of-the-iliad-and-odyssey-other-s/
Use this video lesson thing with the Odyssey: http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/odyssey/
Note: some of the things can be done before (look at a few pictures, but not all).  Some are best done after or during (some of the questions can't be answered until you've read the book, for example.)

I own the paper Cliff's notes for Odyssey.
Online literature guide: http://www.bibliomania.com/1/7/189/2456/frameset.html
Another online lit guide: http://www.penguin.com/static/pdf/teachersguides/HomerOdysseyTG.pdf

Could take LTW ideas from some of the questions on this page: http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/odyssey/explore/key-points.html
After reading, study how Star Wars is an epic story.

Sun    Mon    Tues    Wed    Thurs    Fri    Sat
            8/31 125-143    9/1 144-162    9/2 163-181    9/3 182-200
9/4 201-219    9/5 220-238    9/6 239-257    9/7 258-276    9/8 277-295    9/9 296-314    9/10 315-333
9/11 334-352        9/13 353-371    9/14 372-381 //            


3.  The thousand and one arabian nights (OWN)
940 CE

Use this video guide: http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/
On Friday's use the questions on these pages.  The first section on the first Friday, the second section on the second Fri…
http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/the-thousand-and-one-nights/explore/key-points.html

Read the "Getting Started Tab" on the first Tuesday
http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/the-thousand-and-one-nights/read/getting-started/

Read the "Expert's View" on the second Tuesday:
http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/the-thousand-and-one-nights/read/look-closer.html

Look at the slideshow on the third Tuesday: 
http://www.learner.org/courses/worldlit/the-thousand-and-one-nights/explore/slideshow.html#slideshow_1


http://www.shmoop.com/video/arabian-nights/  (5 min video)

READ THESE:

Originals:
First week: 
Introduction (my book)
The Story of the Merchant and the Genius (my book)
    Read the Story of the Second Old Man on Gutenberg (Gutn).  Was cut from this children's book because of adultery

Second week:
The Story of the Fisherman (my book)
The Story of the Porter and the Three Ladies (my book, but called "Story of the Three Calenders…)

Newer stories:
Third week:
The Seven Voyages of Sindbad the Sailor (my book)
COMPARE TO ODYSSEY

Fourth week:
Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (my book)
Ali-Babba and the Forty Thieves (need to find)


Original stories:
• The Merchant and the Demon.
• The Fisherman and the Jinni.
• The Story of the Porter and the Three Ladies.
• The Hunchback cycle.
• The Story of the Three Apples, enframing the Story of Nur al-Din and Shams al-Din
• The Story of Nur al-Din Ali and Anis al-Jalis
• The Story of Ali Ibn Baqqar and Shams al-Nahar, and
• The Story of Qamar al-Zaman.

On Project Gutenberg: 
Merchant and Demon
Fisherman and Jinni
Hunchback
Story of the three apples

Added ones that we ought to know:
Ali Babba and the 40 Thieves
Aladdin
Sinbad the Sailor


4.  Don Quixote 
1605, Spain

Read from Oct 8th to November 13 = 37 days.  922 pages divided by 37 = 25 pages a day.
I need to stay a day ahead of Logan and see if anything can be skipped.

Will stop to talk about this one, but not as much as Gilgamesh or Odyssey, since it's so long.
First day: 
Read this summary from Shmoop: http://www.shmoop.com/don-quixote/
Then read about the prologue, which we're not going to read for ourselves: http://www.shmoop.com/don-quixote/part-1-book-1-chapters-1-8-summary.html
Read the timeline on page 8-9 in the BACK of the book.
Discuss the poem on page 11 in the FRONT of the book.  Try to figure out the endings.
Then, skip to page 19 to start the book.
Be sure to read the italics and the footnotes.

Read Shmoop from time to time and tell Logan something from it.

Read Shmoop when get to the ending to explain that the author was ticked off by the fan fiction and wanted to end it for GOOD.

Order The Count of Monte Cristo by 11/1

10/8 Sat    10/9 Sun    10/10 Mon    10/11 Tues    10/12 Wed    10/13 Thurs     10/14 Fri 
19-44    45-70     71- 96    97-122    123-148    149-174    174-200
10/15    10/16    10/17     10/18    10/19    10/20     10/21
201-226    227-252    253-278    279-304    305-330    331-356    172-184
10/22    10/23     10/24     10/25     10/26     10/27     10/28 
185-197    198-210    210-222    223-235    236-248    249-261    262-274
10/29     10/30     10/31     11/1    11/2    11/3    11/4
275 -287     288-300    301-313
11/5    11/6    11/7    11/8    11/9    11/10    11/11

5.  The Three Musketeers (Dumas)
1844, France

6.  Collections of 6 Short Stories and 2 Poems 
1886, Russia

Fiction 101Week 1:   1840s Turgenev The Country Doctor pg 1272 (1818-1883)   6  (Read aloud)  (read aloud/study in one day)
Week 1:   1842 Gogol pg 518 The Overcoat (1809-1852)  20  (read aloud/study in 4 days)
Week 2:  1886 The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Tolstoy)  pg 1234 (or in our little books) (1886)  37
Week 3:  1899 Chekov pg 185, The Darling (1860-1904)  9

Glencoe World Lit (hardback)

These all have introductions and discussion ideas before and after the stories/poems

Week 2:  1886 Tolstoy: pg 937 How Much Land does a Man Need?  (1828-1910)  11
Week 3:  1889 Chekov pg 951 The Bet  6

Poems:
1900s
Week 3:  Pg 975 Lot's Wife, Anna Akhmatova (1888-1966)
https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/anna-akhmatova
Week 3:  Pg 1018 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn "Freedom to Breathe" (1918-2008)


http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/614938-crime-and-punishment-dostoevsky/
http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/604872-calling-lovers-of-the-russian-novel/

7.  The Hiding Place Corrie Ten Boom 
1940s, Holland

Lit guide: http://www.gradesaver.com/the-hiding-place/study-guide/essay-questions

Note:  This is also a movie

Purchased 1 copy (1/15/17)
Reserved 1 copy fm library  (1/15/17)--abridged version for 9-12 year olds
Purchased 2nd copy (1/18/17)


8.  The Little World of Don Camillo: The Don Camillo Series, Book 1 (Giovannino Guareschi)
1947, Italy.  

A series of 3 books about post WWII Italy, a small town and the inevitable skirmishes between the local communist leaders and the parish priest.
Several of them have been made into movies (black & white, 1950-ish.) 

Not literature, but is well-loved and teaches lessons about tolerance.  

Ordered 2 copies (1/15/17)

ORDER THE PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK MOVIE NOW    

9.  Picnic at Hanging Rock Joan Lindsay
1900, Australia (written in 1967)

No Sparknotes or Cliff's Notes. 
Ambiguous ending--the reader guesses whether it's real or not, etc.  Is a "classic" but from the 1960s.  It's something many Australians know--one of their great books.

NOTE:  I bought The Secret of Hanging Rock on my ipad Kindle.

READ Picnic at Hanging Rock
READ The Lady or the Tiger (Collier Greatest Short Stories, Volume 1, pg 123
READ The Secret of Hanging Rock (on my ipad Kindle.)
WATCH movie


Ordered 2 copies (1/15/17)


LITERATURE GUIDES:


http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/449103-free-literature-guides/

NOTE:  Get the paper copies of Cliff's Notes or Spark Notes or Shmoop.  It's irritating having to endlessly scroll.
Cliff Notes are identical on paper vs online.

EXTRA BOOKS FOR FUN:
Timeline by Michael Crichton
Micro by Michael Crichton

SHORT STORIES FOR THE IN BETWEEN WEEKS:

Consider a Norton's World Lit anthology for short stories:
http://www.amazon.com/product-reviews/0393933547/ref=acr_offerlistingpage_text?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1
Or other anthologies: 
McDougal Littell's Language of Literature series has a World Lit book that I like. You can find use copies cheap on Amazon too! 

POETRY
From these places:  A country in South America, a country in Africa, China, Japan, India, a Native American nation poem. 

Idea:  read a few poems and turn them into prose.  

Article about the importance of poetry:
http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/04/why-teaching-poetry-is-so-important/360346/?utm_source=SFFB

Website with list of a bazillion poets.  Try to find world lit poets on this list:
http://www.famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets.html

Indian poetry:
http://www.famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/sarojini_naidu/poems/4561

Native American poetry:
http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/a-cry-from-an-indian-wife/


Ukraine
http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/anna_akhmatova/poems/13

Rewrite this poem as a short story:
I Wrung My Hands by Anna Akhmatova
I wrung my hands under my dark veil. . .
"Why are you pale, what makes you reckless?"
-- Because I have made my loved one drunk
with an astringent sadness.

I'll never forget. He went out, reeling;
his mouth was twisted, desolate. . .
I ran downstairs, not touching the banisters,
and followed him as far as the gate.

And shouted, choking: "I meant it all
in fun. Don't leave me, or I'll die of pain."
He smiled at me -- oh so calmly, terribly --
and said: "Why don't you get out of the rain?" 

WTMer:
We also did many alternatives to book reports. For example, a catalog for an artistic child. They would draw or copy illustrations, and product descriptions contained far more detail than a Q&A worksheet, plus it was fun. I also allowed, ummm actually encouraged, snarky sarcastic projects for books they hated. A kid might spend MORE time making fun of something they didn't like than writing a boring essay, and give so much more detail and memorable observations. Cranky poetry for kids who hate poetry is kind of ironic because I think the level of work is tremendous.  (for eric, too)

Kolodny:
Another thought is to occasionally have him pick out a line or two that he has strong feelings about - loves the rhythm, hates the image, reminds him of an experience of his own or more he's heard about, etc - and write a response. Give him some choices.

Also, choose a few lines with a definite rhythm - such as the 1st stanza of the poem on this email, which has 9 syllables in all but one of the lines- and have him create 4 lines, using a topic of his choice, using only 9 syllables per line. This would give him a feel for the rhythm, and (hopefully) some appreciation for the writing, whether he likes the poem or not. And if you do any Shakespeare this year, this definitely would tie in with Shakespeare's meter.

Also, don't reject songs - they ARE poems, and some may appeal to him more than traditional poems - and could be a transition to more formal poetry.


REJECTED BOOK IDEAS:
Tog book lists
http://www.tapestryofgrace.com/year4/
One Hundred Years of Solitude  (South America)  Gabriel García Márquez
Dei Sijie's BALZAC AND THE LITTLE CHINESE SEAMSTRESS
Facing the Lion_, (Africa) a memoir of a Masai man who lives in Northern Virginia during the school year, and goes back to Kenya to live as a Masai during the summer. Spirit of the Rainforest_(South America), by Mark Andrew Ritchie, is the firsthand account of a shaman among the Yanomamo in the Venezuelan Amazon rainforest. It is fascinating, because their shamans see our angels, and God's kingdom, but don't know God loves them. They call Him the Great Enemy Spirit, because the shamans see that when a baby or child dies, a bird comes and takes his spirit to to this kingdom, and they don't see what happens after that. The jungle spirits tell the shamans that the great enemy spirit eats children's souls -- because the devil is a liar. Anyway -- very worth a read.

Augustine's _Confessions_? He was African.  Translation by E.J. Sheed
The Good Earth for China
The Art of War  (China)
The Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx
Aeneid
Prometheus Bound
Plato's Apology
1Q84 Murakami (Japan)  NO--is 1000 pages long.  Tiny, tiny print.
Confucius
Bulfinch’s Mythology (or any other account of the Greek, Roman, and Norse Myths)
Plutarch, Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans
Dante, Inferno
The fairy tales of Hans Christian Anderson
Any substantial collection of the world’s major folktales


INFORMATION TO KEEP, BUT PROBABY DON'T NEED:

Any ideas for world lit in here: http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/606319-girl-books-for-high-school/

http://www.gradesaver.com/balzac-and-the-little-chinese-seamstress/study-guide/essay-questions
Book-balzac and the little chinese seamstress‏ 


Hang on.  Analytical Grammar has "world authors" and provides a list.  Can any of these be used for our literature needs?  Here's the list: 
Authors include:
Homer
The Bible
Dante Aligheiri
Niccolo Machiavelli
Miguel de Cervantes
Moliere
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Alexandre Dumas
Victor Hugo
Hans Christian Andersen
Henrik Ibsen--A Doll's House (maybe so.  Looks beefy.--noted on 7/8/16)
Jules Verne
Robert Service
Hermann Hesse
Antoine de Saint Exupery
Ayn Rand
Aleksandr Solzenitsyn
Elie Wiesel

Plan for Africa section of Glencoe book.
Glencoe: Night of Sine, pg 25, do activities on following pages    Poems and notes from pgs 52-56 (pg 56, just the "Extending your Response" Romance Reconsidered and Skill Minilesson.

Tselane and the Giant pg 43. Comment on the last para on pg 44.  Long, long, long. Short. Powerful.
Answer questions on pg 50-51


I thought I'd have time on non-writing weeks to study more literature, such as poem.  But it's not working out like that.  We need some solid time for grammar and spelling.  

This was the old plan, in case I need to refer to it:

Fill those 8 weeks with short stories and poems.  
Have Logan write a few poems or short stories  (COME UP WITH SOMETHING!)  Like my assignment in school: a modern fairy tale, oldest memory and how you felt--very very oldest memory, a poem)

From Glencoe book, coordinate short stories to books in this way:
1. After Odyessey: Do the Ancient Greece and Rome section.
2. After Arabian nights: Do the Southwest and South Central Asia section
3. After Don Quixote: Do the Early Europe section
4. Africa (scroll to bottom. I had started planning this back in Aug, but then realized I should coordinate Greece with Odyssey.)
5. Japan/China
6. Europe (Use book and also the poem I have copied on this page … scroll to "poetry" section of this page.)
7. South Americans
8. Native Americans  Native American poetry: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/a-cry-from-an-indian-wife/

Edited by Garga
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I really appreciate all the thoughts and recommendations. 

25 minutes ago, Farrar said:

The curriculum I wrote (link in my sig) involves African and Asian lit. I really, really like the old Prentice Hall text World Masterpieces, which I used in that program. If you're looking for a source for lots of good excerpts and poems from a wide, wide time frame, then it's perfect. In terms of books in general, from that program, the biggest hits with my students have been Purple Hibiscus, Things Fall Apart, and Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, which my co-op class just discussed the other day. 

Seconding many of these... but I would avoid a few things that I've seen here and that always crop up in these threads about world lit... I wouldn't treat contemporary YA or adult literature by American or British authors set in other places as exemplars of the literature of those places. In other words, I would not treat The Book Thief or The Good Earth as world literature, even though the settings are well-researched and the books are both excellent. That sort of thing, which I see a lot. There are plenty of examples of good literature that is actually from Germany or China. Same thing with treating American immigrant literature as world literature. It's American literature. I would also avoid treating contemporary popular memoirs geared toward an American audience as exemplars of the literature of a place as well. So, for example, I would not read Trevor Noah's autobiography as "South African literature." South Africa has plenty of rich literature. It doesn't mean you can't read these things... they're great books - for history, for historical fiction, for current events, for just good literature and writing... just not for "world literature." If the goal of the course is beyond just that, then maybe they fit in.

 

 

Farrar, I agree -- would like to avoid American or British authors set in other places when possible. Although not totally excluding it right now.

You mentioned the Prentice Hall text World Masterpieces. I'm looking at one in their Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes series with this title. I thought their American and British Lit texts in this series were very thorough, but when I purchased a copy of this one I wasn't sure. It also seems that they were marketing this at 10th grade.  Maybe it's just that there's SO much excellent world lit that I'm just being overly hard on what they can fit in the text. Anyway, please let me know if it's the same one. Here's a link to the teacher's text: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0130547980/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I'd also be curious about how much you ended up supplementing this text.  I supplemented quite a bit from the British Lit textbook, but mainly for novels and a number of great recommendations from others.  I actually enjoyed going outside the anthology a bit.  

 

 

 

 

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Garga, just...wow. Thank you for the very detailed discussion. I will definitely take the time to think through all of it.

You recommended the Glencoe World Literature. Do you happen to have the text and can give me the ISBN? It makes it easier to find the text, particularly when some of these are 10-15 years old. I'll also look at the short story anthology you mentioned.

 

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2 hours ago, provenance61 said:

I really appreciate all the thoughts and recommendations. 

 

Farrar, I agree -- would like to avoid American or British authors set in other places when possible. Although not totally excluding it right now.

You mentioned the Prentice Hall text World Masterpieces. I'm looking at one in their Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes series with this title. I thought their American and British Lit texts in this series were very thorough, but when I purchased a copy of this one I wasn't sure. It also seems that they were marketing this at 10th grade.  Maybe it's just that there's SO much excellent world lit that I'm just being overly hard on what they can fit in the text. Anyway, please let me know if it's the same one. Here's a link to the teacher's text: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0130547980/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I'd also be curious about how much you ended up supplementing this text.  I supplemented quite a bit from the British Lit textbook, but mainly for novels and a number of great recommendations from others.  I actually enjoyed going outside the anthology a bit.  

That's not the one I used. I actually know all these Prentice Hall books now. The selections are similarly good across the three different series I know - there's the older set (World Masterpieces, American Experience, and British Tradition) which are out of print, the "Penguin editions" of those books which are still in print, and the Timeless Voices series which is also more recent and slightly easier to find. All are good, though I don't have a TOC for the Timeless Voices to compare them right now - I can get you the older ones if you want... I, ahem... have quite a collection at this point. I like the assignments and structure in the older edition the best. It's way dumbed down for all the Penguin editions in my opinion. But the selections aren't.

We did a year of Asian and African lit (with a few other things thrown in along the theme of "heroes") - that's my GPS Core One. This year, we did European and British literature - that's Core Two, which isn't out yet. But we used World Masterpieces for both. I added in more British poetry, as that's what was primarily missing, in my view. We did not read everything, but we did use it a good bit alongside full books. Things Fall Apart, The Dark Child, Purple Hibiscus, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Ramayana (the NK Narayan version), Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, and Kitchen. We also did some added other excerpts, like from Journey to the West (why would you leave out the Chinese epics, World Masterpieces!?). But mostly World Masterpieces covered it. So... excerpts from The Book of Ruth, Gilgamesh, the Mahabharata, The Pillow Book... plus lots of poetry and some short stories. Lu Xun and Moro Ogai and Wole Soyinka and so forth. Plus we did readings for heroes, so that covered a number of things that weren't Asian or African lit, but it's paired a bit. Like, Siddhartha is the hero book for our India unit. That's a great world lit read too, of course, just not Asian lit.

ETA: It has a couple of different covers, but here's the one I like best: https://www.amazon.com/Literature-World-Masterpieces-Inc-Prentice-Hall/dp/0136916929/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=prentice+hall+world+masterpieces&qid=1590466625&s=books&sr=1-7

Edited by Farrar

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16 hours ago, Farrar said:

That's not the one I used. I actually know all these Prentice Hall books now. The selections are similarly good across the three different series I know - there's the older set (World Masterpieces, American Experience, and British Tradition) which are out of print, the "Penguin editions" of those books which are still in print, and the Timeless Voices series which is also more recent and slightly easier to find. All are good, though I don't have a TOC for the Timeless Voices to compare them right now - I can get you the older ones if you want... I, ahem... have quite a collection at this point. I like the assignments and structure in the older edition the best. It's way dumbed down for all the Penguin editions in my opinion. But the selections aren't

ETA: It has a couple of different covers, but here's the one I like best: https://www.amazon.com/Literature-World-Masterpieces-Inc-Prentice-Hall/dp/0136916929/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=prentice+hall+world+masterpieces&qid=1590466625&s=books&sr=1-7

 

Farrar, thank you for clearing up the confusion about the two Prentice Hall textbooks with similar titles. 

I have an inexpensive used copy of the newer "World Masterpieces" (from Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes series). I'm attaching a few pics of the cover, ISBN, and Contents by Genre and Country.  Would you be willing to take a look at this TOC and give me your thoughts comparing this to your earlier text? 

Upon looking at the selections organized this way, I'm a bit happier with the selections for an anthology. I just didn't care for the main TOC which lists them by theme and doesn't organize by country. I'm thinking I may organize by main time period (ancient, medieval, Renaissance, modern).  

I'd also welcome any other thoughts on the TOC I'm attaching from this particular anthology.  

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@provenance61 That's a very different selection than my books. I think the one I saw was more specifically geared toward American literature. This one is a bit all over the place. Those are great selections... but they're not structured around "world literature" as a theme. There are a lot of American authors, for one. There's less of a perspective on historical progression, for another. Or on selecting key works. I personally would not choose that for a course if world literature is the guiding emphasis for the course.

Some of this gets to what is the right approach to studying literature. I don't actually think this is a bad one. I'm not sure what the guiding principles were in their choices, but going deep on a number of themes is a good approach. I just sort of came at this topic in a different vein... thinking about what is "world" literature and how do you cover it widely and effectively.

I'll see if I can snap the TOC of one of my older World Masterpieces for you for contrast. They're very inexpensive to find. You just have to get them used.

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Some of the newer World Masterpieces have more added, mostly some stuff from the 80’s and 90’s... 

 

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And here’s an example of the assignment style. I like that there are lots of things to choose from for absolutely everything.

 

6E57881D-96E6-438A-9CA0-92B7337F1E66.jpeg

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By contrast, the Penguin edition has similar selections, though less overall. The assignments take up more room though. There are lots of tidbits in the text on the side as well. So here’s from the same text - this is just a couple of the pages of stuff that follows. 
 

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Farrar. thank you for sharing.  That was the one thought when I first got mine, that there were many more American authors than I'd expected. I really didn't expect that.  My book is copyright 2002.

I like the one you posted, with selections arranged by time period and culture.  I'd be more comfortable working within this kind of structure. I can't see just hopping around. With both American and British Lit, I went chronologically.  Do you happen to know the copyright of your book? (I'll look back and check on the link you sent as well).

I'll have to look at both of the ones you mentioned. The Penguin one may have less but I do like some of the "tidbits on the text" you mentioned.  Is the Penguin one also with the same name? How confusing, I wish they'd renamed if they changed that much. Thank you, I'll hunt these down and take a look.

Thank you also to the other poster above who mentioned Learning Language Arts Through Literature. I'll look at this too, although probably as a supplement. I have a copy of the British Lit one and like some of the study questions they have.

 

 

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3 hours ago, provenance61 said:

Farrar. thank you for sharing.  That was the one thought when I first got mine, that there were many more American authors than I'd expected. I really didn't expect that.  My book is copyright 2002.

I like the one you posted, with selections arranged by time period and culture.  I'd be more comfortable working within this kind of structure. I can't see just hopping around. With both American and British Lit, I went chronologically.  Do you happen to know the copyright of your book? (I'll look back and check on the link you sent as well).

I'll have to look at both of the ones you mentioned. The Penguin one may have less but I do like some of the "tidbits on the text" you mentioned.  Is the Penguin one also with the same name? How confusing, I wish they'd renamed if they changed that much. Thank you, I'll hunt these down and take a look.

Thank you also to the other poster above who mentioned Learning Language Arts Through Literature. I'll look at this too, although probably as a supplement. I have a copy of the British Lit one and like some of the study questions they have.

 

 

The Penguin edition also has works by subject, though it has a different section at the start that has myths and so forth - things like Native American and African stories that aren't in the older edition. It is confusing that they have the  same title... but since I have them both, I can see why. It's clearly the next "generation" of the book. It includes like 70% of the same texts, organized in much the same way, sometimes with the same illustrations, just set differently and sometimes with some of the same supporting text to introduce the works. Each unit in the Penguin edition additionally has a connection to a short American lit or contemporary work. And each unit is introduced by a big name scholar with a short writing about a work from the period or included in the unit. I like it less because it feels like a lot of bulk. I like the flexibility of having a lot more works and I'm not fond of the graphic organizers and vocabulary work and things like that. I do think the "tie in" works and the intros by the scholars are a neat feature that contextualize everything. But I like the original better. Of course, I may be biased. This was the textbook that introduced me to writers like Italo Calvino and Gabriel Garcia Marquez in the early 90's, so it has a special place in my heart.

The Penguin editions are still in print but have been around for awhile, so they are super easy to find.

Edited by Farrar

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On 5/25/2020 at 10:20 PM, provenance61 said:

Garga, just...wow. Thank you for the very detailed discussion. I will definitely take the time to think through all of it.

You recommended the Glencoe World Literature. Do you happen to have the text and can give me the ISBN? It makes it easier to find the text, particularly when some of these are 10-15 years old. I'll also look at the short story anthology you mentioned.

 

I finally got around to checking the bookshelves, but I’ve since gotten rid of those books.  However, I’m pretty sure I only used those books when we studied Russian short stories and I can direct you to where to read those stories for free online.

Note:  I only studied those particular stories, because they were the ones in the books!  If other stories had been in my anthology books, I’d have used them instead. I wasn’t very picky about which stories I used.  These just happen to be the sort of popular stories that make their way into anthologies. If you have a different anthology, you might just want to use the stories in yours.

If you want to use those particular stories that I used, I have found copies of the stories for free online. There was a lot to unpack in each story and we had a lot to discuss as we read them.  (I copied and pasted this from my “notes” app on my ipad and so I’m sorry if the font is odd. I can’t change fonts on the ipad to correct it: )

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13437/13437-h/13437-h.htm

Project Gutenburg has 4 of the stories I studied with my son, though the titles are slightly different:

 

The District Doctor (which my book called The Country Doctor)

The Cloak (which my book called The Overcoat)

The Darling

The Bet

 

Here’s where to find “How Much Land does a Man Need”. https://www.online-literature.com/tolstoy/2738/

 

Here’s “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” (though I bought that one as a super skinny little book from Amazon):  http://www.classicallibrary.org/tolstoy/ivan/index.htm

Edited by Garga

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I was unpacking boxes and found a book I had forgotten about, Bruni Schulz's The Street of Crocodiles and Other Stories.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart

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