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Are parents really failing miserably at crisis schooling?


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One of my FB friends said her 6th grade daughter has received over 450 emails from teachers about her schoolwork and they are overwhelmed. The mom is a teacher and is trying to keep up with her own students. Another friend, a twenty year homeschooler, said keeping up with online school for her three kids was so overwhelming that she removed them and went back to homeschooling. What I'm see is that those who are doing well at crisis schooling are either those who have self-motivated students or those who've dumped the school sent work and are just learning together. As a former public school parent and now a ten year homeschooler, online crisis schooling sounds like my worst nightmare, so I can definitely see people failing miserably or at least struggling.

ETA: My college senior is a chem major and he told me one of his classes involved watching online labs. Another involved an email that students had to respond to at a certain time and then, every 5 minutes for the next 50 minutes, the professor emailed slides related to the class. Many online classes aren't being done well.

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10 hours ago, Pen said:

Having done actual homeschooling in past and now this public school from home during CV19, I would say that by and large actual home school was easier.  I had control and authority, and had had a hand in choosing materials and assignments.  

Otoh, it isn’t “on me” now in the same way. So in that regard it is easier. 

This I can understand. Having done online charter school for a few years, I understand the frustration of having no control over assignments that are too easy/hard. I figured out how to work within the system and skip much of that. It sounds like crisis schoolers didn't know they had that option.

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47 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

If there is no parent at home, kids can go to daycare which are open. YMCA is helping with essential workers’ kids who need daycare. My county is going to allow babysitters for parents working at home under the new shelter in place order, just that it should be the same babysitter coming every working day. 

I am in Washington. child care programs are closed. I got a notice from the state, that since I am an essential worker, they would provide free daycare for my daughter through the local school district. But....she is 13 and they only go up to 12yo. She is middle school and when I called to inquire about the program, they said that it is only for elementary age students. I have no idea why they sent the notice to me since she doesn't qualify.

My coworkers got the same email. While their kids qualify by age, they refuse to send their kids, because they think they would be more likely to get sick there, and bring it home to the rest of the family. 

Most people who I know that provide in home care have stopped going to client homes. They don't want to get covid and spread it. In return, clients don't want them bringing it into the home. Even dog walkers, etc are no longer working. I obviously only know a minuscule amount of people doing this, but it seems unanimous among the ones I know. Maybe because we are Washington, and we were the earliest cases? Maybe we have stricter rules and more media coverage about 'flattening the curve". 

I am off work for 12 weeks unpaid. DD13 is special needs and I have no suitable care for her. I am supposed to go back in June. I can only do that if there are summer camps and other programming for her to go to. Otherwise, I will lose my job. 😞 

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30 minutes ago, Tap said:

 

I am off work for 12 weeks unpaid. DD13 is special needs and I have no suitable care for her. I am supposed to go back in June. I can only do that if there are summer camps and other programming for her to go to. Otherwise, I will lose my job. 😞 


Below is the revised rules from May 4th for my county and five other counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo and the city of Berkeley)

CAN BABY SITTERS AND NANNIES KEEP WORKING AND AM I ALLOWED TO HIRE THEM?

Yes. The County’s Order allows home-based care for seniors, adults, or children. This includes babysitters and nannies. It is not advisable to use a caregiver who is caring for children in multiple households.

CAN CHILDCARE FACILITIES CONTINUE TO OPERATE?

Childcare establishments, summer camps, and other educational or recreational institutions or programs providing care or supervision for children of all ages that enable owners, employees, volunteers, and contractors for Essential Businesses, Essential Governmental Functions, Outdoor Businesses, or Minimum Basic Operations to work are allowed under this Order. Such businesses must comply with the Social Distancing requirements as set forth in the Order.

To the extent possible, facilities must comply with the following conditions:

They must be carried out in stable groups of 12 or fewer children (“stable” means that the same 12 or fewer children are in the same group each day). 

Children shall not change from one group to another.

If more than one group of children is at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room. Groups shall not mix with each other.

Providers or educators shall remain solely with one group of children.”

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1 minute ago, Arcadia said:


Below is the revised rules from May 4th for my county and five other counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Santa Clara, San Francisco, San Mateo and the city of Berkeley)

CAN BABY SITTERS AND NANNIES KEEP WORKING AND AM I ALLOWED TO HIRE THEM?

Yes. The County’s Order allows home-based care for seniors, adults, or children. This includes babysitters and nannies. It is not advisable to use a caregiver who is caring for children in multiple households.

CAN CHILDCARE FACILITIES CONTINUE TO OPERATE?

Childcare establishments, summer camps, and other educational or recreational institutions or programs providing care or supervision for children of all ages that enable owners, employees, volunteers, and contractors for Essential Businesses, Essential Governmental Functions, Outdoor Businesses, or Minimum Basic Operations to work are allowed under this Order. Such businesses must comply with the Social Distancing requirements as set forth in the Order.

To the extent possible, facilities must comply with the following conditions:

They must be carried out in stable groups of 12 or fewer children (“stable” means that the same 12 or fewer children are in the same group each day). 

Children shall not change from one group to another.

If more than one group of children is at one facility, each group shall be in a separate room. Groups shall not mix with each other.

Providers or educators shall remain solely with one group of children.”

I wish!  I don't think they are going  to open it up that soon here. The major programs aren't even allowing clients to book future camps right now.  I was looking for teen camps and none are forecasting being open for summer (at least on line they aren't). That may change with future orders from the governor, but we will have to wait and see. 

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4 minutes ago, Tap said:

I wish!  I don't think they are going  to open it up that soon here. The major programs aren't even allowing clients to book future camps right now.  I was looking for teen camps and none are forecasting being open for summer (at least on line they aren't). That may change with future orders from the governor, but we will have to wait and see. 

None of our usual summer camps are opened. The summer camps described in the order is for children of essential workers so I can’t send my teens to those even if they want to go. It’s not for the general public. They are to serve as Summer daycare so essential workers can go to work.

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10 hours ago, Plum said:

So implementation is the problem. That sounds familiar. 

I would say this is a big part of the problem.

I help my grandson 3x per week when he's here.  I suspect I'm the only one getting him to do his work and it's like pulling teeth.  A lot of busy work just to keep them from going backward.  All of it is online so the teacher can keep track, so there's pressure to perform. It's probably 4-5hrs of busy work with little or no instruction.  So boring for him.   When he's home with dad, who is teleworking, I think he doesn't do much because dad is busy with work.   In talking with a neighbor (at a distance) she said it's been hard.  She has 3 of her 4 in school.  Dh is working from home and needs quiet for his virtual meetings.   She's trying to navigate being the school administrator for all of this.  

My dd is a high school teacher in a lower income area.   It's a much bigger problem there.  Kids relied on school or  library wifi-  Most families do not have multiple devices and some parents are using it for work when the kids need it for school.   She and her fiance make their lessons flexible by doing video lectures but she told me some teachers are requiring kids to "attend" zoom classes at specific times, and they're taking attendance!!??   That cannot work for many of these kids.  So yes, they're falling behind.

And, then there's high school kids who aren't doing anything and don't care. 

 

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2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

If there is no parent at home, kids can go to daycare which are open. YMCA is helping with essential workers’ kids who need daycare. My county is going to allow babysitters for parents working at home under the new shelter in place order, just that it should be the same babysitter coming every working day. 

This is not the case here. Very, very daycares are open and they are only for essential workers. The governor made daycares who want to stay open to get a special pandemic license and there aren't allowed to be more than six children per room. Most daycares closed completely.

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6 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

 She and her fiance make their lessons flexible by doing video lectures but she told me some teachers are requiring kids to "attend" zoom classes at specific times, and they're taking attendance!!??   That cannot work for many of these kids.  So yes, they're falling behind.

 

Here schools have loan out laptops and chromebooks and iPads, depending on the districts. Some districts have used chromebooks and iPads for years for classroom instruction so students are used to using them. Xfinity/Comcast is providing free internet for low income households. So far the ones I know locally having morning Zoom classes are high school students in public schools and students of all ages in various private schools. 

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1 minute ago, mom2scouts said:

This is not the case here. Very, very daycares are open and they are only for essential workers. The governor made daycares who want to stay open to get a special pandemic license and there aren't allowed to be more than six children per room. Most daycares closed completely.

Same here. The daycare is for essential workers. What is going to be relaxed is that “regular” babysitters are going to be allowed so a friend could hire someone staying alone (to minimize risk) to come over daily to her home to help like a daytime nanny to her young kids. If my friend wants to minimize risks further, she could do online grocery order for her nanny as well so that her nanny is basically only going to her home, nanny’s car, nanny’s home. 

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I have one good friend that is really struggling because both her and her husband have to work.  She works from home and needs to do video calls all day and her husband has to be onsite.  All 3 of her kids have to share one tablet because she needs the other for her work as well as her phone.  Two of her kids are great at working independently, but the other needs quite a bit of help and direction.  They are doing it and figuring it out, but she finds it very time-consuming, energy draining, and stressful to juggle it all.

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11 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Here schools have loan out laptops and chromebooks and iPads, depending on the districts. Some districts have used chromebooks and iPads for years for classroom instruction so students are used to using them. Xfinity/Comcast is providing free internet for low income households. So far the ones I know locally having morning Zoom classes are high school students in public schools and students of all ages in various private schools. 

That was also what was proposed where my daughter works too, but the reality is different than the expectations. 

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Just now, PrincessMommy said:

That was also what was proposed where my daughter works too, but the reality is different than the expectations. 

We have that system (loaner laptops, subsidized internet access) going on for years so that helps. The only change is that Xfinity/Comcast used to charge a low fee for low income households, they change to totally free. 
When my kids were with the online public school many years ago, they reimbursed low income families for internet access. They also supplied the computer and printer, as well as the study materials. UPS got to know us very well.

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13 hours ago, Terabith said:

Yes.  It's horrific.  I think the main issue is that parents are trying to work full time from home, so kids are more or less having to keep themselves on task.  Parents don't technically have authority to alter assignments, which are often designed to take up 6-7 full hours a day, and are scattered across 80 bazillion electronic platforms, each of which has its own complicated sign in and password.  

I mean, the quality and amount of work varies a LOT by district and teacher.  But it's not at all what homeschooling is like, and it's being done on top of parents working full time.  There are also issues of juggling devices and whether your internet connection can take multiple simultaneous zoom meetings. 

 

I have decided to make sure the kids get their required assignments done each day. They have optional assignments and we barely even look at them. And I just assume teachers are flexible. My youngest wasn't feeling great on Monday so it was fine for her to catch up on Tuesday.

It can be frustrating to help my youngest kid because I have work meetings. If I'm not in a meeting I don't usually have trouble helping (which for the most part requires me to show her where to click). She does NOT like doing school work at home, so getting her to change her mindset is the hardest part. 

The older kids (7th grade and up) have their own logins to Google Classrooms, which is basically the dashboard for them with links to any other platforms they need. I do a basic check in on them each day to see if they need help with anything, and I check grades at the end of the week (really just things they have/have not turned in). But I know I am lucky that they are able to work pretty well on their own.

So I guess on my end it has been stressful but not horrific. It is getting better as I get more used to it. But as you say, there is a lot of variance. We were told the kids are not meant to be spending more than 2.5 hours per day on work. 

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Short version of why it's a train wreck here:

1. unrealistic time commitment demands from school, with unrealistic and meaningless work expectations

2. lack of textbooks, materials, and supplies

3. constraints on device availability and connectivity

4. constraints on availability of supervising/helping adult time, especially in two working parent families

Longer anecdotal story:

I withdrew the girls a couple of weeks before things shut down (writing was on the wall, and I wanted their withdrawals to be processed and their homeschool registration to go through).  I still get the emails for Youngest's class though.

Her first grade teacher wanted:

*four separate online contacts throughout the day, at specific times

*the use of 6 different websites, with different passwords

*seatwork to be completed, with a structured schedule from 9am to 3pm.

Y'all. We ain't doin' it.

I have four kids.  My internet bandwidth is completely taken up by dh working from home and my boys' online classes (1 college, 1 jr high).  I sketched out a rough schedule of what it would've looked like if I had kept the girls in, and essentially they would've needed 1:1 devices, and more bandwidth than we have. We are a well-connected, well-educated, single income earner family.  Some of the other kids in dd's former class have parents that do not speak functional english, do not have internet in their homes, and have minimal education.  (We are zoned with section 8 housing with year-round agricultural workers who work in the nearby vineyards and orchards.)  Their kids have been spending days with family friends or with aunties or whomever while the parents work. The house down the street has 6 kids from three families, with grandma coordinating it all during the day.  For families with means, many have been hiring college students to come manage school time.  The state issued really good guidelines of how much seat time to expect from kids based on their grade level, and most teachers have ignored it.  They have very little experience in translating their traditional classroom management actitivites into online learning, and it shows. It's pretty ugly--very piecemeal and inconsistent. 

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No, not hearing any distress. We closed abruptly March 11th due to traveler spread .  Families had four weeks to get into a routine, while the staff took the four weeks to complete the food and laptop logistics, IT & zoom training, and decided what to teach in an extended closure.  The DE providers were organized and had a procedure; the AP students were already in prep stage so continued w/prep book & assignments until school resumed.  The YMCA here is the child care provider for health workers, Police, Fire, Transit workers who need it.  Our state of course has detailed plans for emergency closure - that was mandated after 9/11.  Reg. Ed. students returned to online class knowing that to earn credit, they needed to do the assignments and turn them in.  The results seem typical - those that do the minimum still do the minimum.  The rest grabbed the NPYL library card, checked out a laptop from the school and did the online enrichment via the school website until distance learning began.  The dc aren't running around, and many are biking or running in the evening and are enjoying time with gps or aunties.  Some of the international students went home as planned for Spring Break and stayed, leaving crowded living conditions in this hot spot -  the school has a procedure to tutor & remediate when they do return as K-7 often miss the Dec-Feb months when construction is off. 

In our network, most people have students that have routines and ecs.   I've given math provider links to families that need appropriate material and will benefit much more from on or above grade level material than the common core basic they are offered via the school.

I don't see much 'lost'. The school is providing core basic only as always.  The NYPL  and the school have provided e-books. The state and local govt have provided outdoor rec space.  We lost two weeks of core basic instruction -- most of April and May are normally scheduled review for state exams, so really this is an improvement.  Without having to test prep, targeted remediation can continue until end of June. I think there will be a a gain for middle and high school, especially if the weeks usually devoted to finals and  Regents Exams are used for remediation.

 

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A FB friend posted this:

Here is a list of the learning platforms I am learning as a parent.

1. Google Classroom
2. Epic
3. FlipGrid
4. Google Meet
5. Schoology
6. Raz Kids
7. Khan Academy
8. Google Slides
9. Google Docs
10. Loom
11. Seesaw
12. Go Noodle
13. Moby Max
14. Zearn
15. Quiziz
16. Happy Numbers
17. You Tube
18. Clever
19. Game Pigeon
20. Quizlet
21. Go Noodle
22. Discovery Education
23. Scholastic Education
24. Freckle
25. Padlet
26. Flocabulary

I have also been asked to learn messenger for kids and Marco Polo.

-----

I would say that in her situation, the parents are overwhelmed. Others, in different districts, don't have the same requirements to access all of these platforms, etc.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Arcadia said:

If there is no parent at home, kids can go to daycare which are open. YMCA is helping with essential workers’ kids who need daycare. My county is going to allow babysitters for parents working at home under the new shelter in place order, just that it should be the same babysitter coming every working day. 

This is good to know. My state is one of those transitioning towards opening next week. We have really not looked into what will open, what resources are available. We are going to shelter in place, grocery shop online and do the rest what we are doing. I hope all these resources are available for those who truly need it because the stories I keep hearing are very stressful especially for kids who are older, closer to college or graduating. The kids are stressed, parents more even though our ISD and others I know have resources for AP classes and stuff. I am just glad my oldest is at the age where we can transition relatively easily into homeschooling if we need to and do not have to make a decision of is it necessary ? Next school year is going to be difficult in ways I can't even comprehend and I am so glad homeschooling is an option available. In many countries it is not.

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It’s pretty bad. There’s a lot of parents that were never involved in their kids education to begin with. Those kids are completely falling off the map. Like many educational issues, there’s a huge class divide. 

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7 hours ago, Plum said:

True. My cousin, who is a math teacher at a charter, had to start from scratch because they didn't get notice the schools were closing and many kids left their books at school. 

Our district had bus drivers deliver devices to student's regular bus stops. I'm sure they would have delivered textbooks if needed, but not many classes use them anymore. I believe packets for elementary students either were delivered or mailed to elementary students. 

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Connectivity is a big piece of this. I know that local schools are providing free ipads for all students. We're in a rural area where Wi-Fi can be fairly sketchy... yet they still require hours of online work everyday for first graders?

Again and again, thank God I homeschool. I wouldn't make it as a school parent guys! I'm getting angry just listening to the stories! 

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Oh I totally agree Stella, most of the school teachers I know are working harder than ever! I also wouldn't make it as a classroom teacher 😄 Worst of both worlds for everyone at the moment.

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Several of my (community college) students are full-time students and have kids at home as well. I just set up an extended deadline schedule for one because she has to share the single computer with her kids.

A couple of others are overwhelmed with the work because their parent is an essential worker and they've suddenly had their younger siblings dumped on them for keeping up with the school.

Several of my coworkers at the CC are completely flooded (one of them told me if her marriage makes it out intact it's going to be a miracle 😞 ) because they've been working 80+ hour weeks trying to get stuff online for essential classes AND help multiple children with schoolwork AND their spouse is trying to work from home as well. 

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11 hours ago, mom2scouts said:

One of my FB friends said her 6th grade daughter has received over 450 emails from teachers about her schoolwork and they are overwhelmed. The mom is a teacher and is trying to keep up with her own students. Another friend, a twenty year homeschooler, said keeping up with online school for her three kids was so overwhelming that she removed them and went back to homeschooling. What I'm see is that those who are doing well at crisis schooling are either those who have self-motivated students or those who've dumped the school sent work and are just learning together. As a former public school parent and now a ten year homeschooler, online crisis schooling sounds like my worst nightmare, so I can definitely see people failing miserably or at least struggling.

ETA: My college senior is a chem major and he told me one of his classes involved watching online labs. Another involved an email that students had to respond to at a certain time and then, every 5 minutes for the next 50 minutes, the professor emailed slides related to the class. Many online classes aren't being done well.

We sent instructions to our students and parents how to turn off notifications to Google Classroom. They can do it through the settings.  

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Our school district provided a Chromebook for every student, if they needed one.  For elementary school students, assignments are sent out on Sunday and due Friday.  The work seems appropriate for my dd - keeps her busy several hours each school day (honestly, I have no idea how long it takes her).  I have seen several of her class mates parents complaining about the amount of work, but the ones I have seen complaining have a couple elementary aged kids and are working themselves.

 When you take into account the pressure parents are under either continuing working outside the home and worrying about being exposed to the virus, adjusting to working at home, or enduring the emotional turmoil of being laid-off (this was me - not easy to keep going without having time to process what just happened unexpectedly) it’s a lot to add on full on school.  I’m sure the kids pick up the stress that their parents are feeling.

I think our school district is doing what they can to not overwhelm any student or family.  I appreciate it.  

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I agree that this is hard logistically, mentally, and emotionally for the teachers.  From what I can see, most of them really are doing the best they can, and I think most schools are too.  Our principal and teachers have been wonderful.  But that doesn't change the fact that some things are hard.

My kids' class parents have a big fuss planned for Teacher Appreciation Week.  🙂  I take care to thank them as often as I can without being annoying.

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Well I innocently asked the question "what are you all doing for teacher appreciation week" in a facebook group focused on parenting.  Boy did that start a sh!tstorm.  Some parents joked that they would buy themselves something.  One went on a big rant about how dare anyone expect anything at a time like this.  (I wasn't actually even thinking about purchased gifts but ....)  Then of course the folks who are teachers responded to that.

So I guess there are more folks having trouble with "school-at-home" than I thought.  I was surprised how many indicated they don't feel the teachers are doing anything worthy of appreciation.  It makes me appreciate our school more.

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I got a chance to talk to my neighbor today. She said her 7 year old had 3.5 hours of work on the computer and it was just too much for him. She said the assigned math used a website that required mouse skills he didn't have and he was so frustrated by trying to use the mouse that he couldn't focus on the math at all. She emailed the teacher and said they weren't going to use it and she was just going to give him problems or do real life math. Other than that, they are just trying to read regularly.

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For my district. The kids have a four day school week and Friday off.

High school

“Learning Posted: Learning is posted by 8:30 a.m. by classroom teachers.

 MON/WED
Per 1 8:30-9:20
Per 3 9:30-10:20
Per 5 10:30-11:20
Per 7 11:30-12:20 
1:00-2:00  Office Hours

TUES/THURS 
Per 2 8:30-9:20
Per 4 9:30-10:20
Per 6 10:30-11:20
1:00-2:00  Office Hours 

Online Chats and Office Hours

Will be offered by teachers Monday-Thursday between 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Attendance

Attendance recording will occur through your child’s daily meetings and interactions in Google Classroom with their teachers. Teachers and ******SD will monitor attendance data to ensure that students are engaged in their learning and to follow up with families where there are concerns.

Grading and Assessment

Teachers will give feedback to students which is critical to their learning progress, however, formal grading will be suspended until further notice. Assessments will be used for giving feedback, adjusting instruction and identifying additional support needs.”

Middle school 

“MON/WED
Period 1   8:30-9:20
Period 3   9:30-10:20
Period 5  10:30-11:20
Student Support - small group/1:1 office hours
Period 1   12:00-12:25
Period 3   12:30-12:55 
Period 5   1:00-1:25    

TUES/THURS
Period 2    8:30-9:20
Period 4    9:30-10:20
Period 6    10:30-11:20
Student Support - small group/1:1 office hours 
Period 2   12:00-12:25
Period 4   12:30-12:55
Period 6   1:00-1:25”

Elementary

“Student Work: The total time spent on each class should follow these guidelines as closely as possible, Monday through Thursday. This includes Google Meet and outside work time. This would not include office hours or small group/1:1 additional support.

TK - 2nd grade: 1-3 hours per day

3rd - 5th grade: 2-4 hours per day

Learning Posted: Learning is posted by 8:00 a.m. by classroom teachers.

Daily Class Meeting via Google Meet:

8:00-8:15    TK
8:15-8:30     K
8:30-8:45    1st
8:45-9:00    2nd
9:00-9:15    3rd
9:15-9:30    4th
9:30-9:45    5th 
*This schedule may be adjusted by your school  site after the first day

Subjects

Daily Classwork via Google Classroom: Reading, Writing, Mathematics, and Physical Education

Integrated or Up to Twice per Week: Science, Social Studies, Art, Music, Social Emotional Learning, Digital Citizenship”

 

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On 5/1/2020 at 10:52 AM, Arcadia said:

We have that system (loaner laptops, subsidized internet access) going on for years so that helps. The only change is that Xfinity/Comcast used to charge a low fee for low income households, they change to totally free. 
When my kids were with the online public school many years ago, they reimbursed low income families for internet access. They also supplied the computer and printer, as well as the study materials. UPS got to know us very well.

But here, parents who had Comcast but had to cancel or can’t pay their bill because they lost their jobs, now don’t qualify for free internet. It’s only for new customers. Over 70% of kids in my large district qualify for free or reduced lunch, and despite the schools giving out chrome books, I’ve read that many kids can’t actually connect to the internet or log into their classes. Some teachers said as few as 30% of their students are participating in online learning.

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10 hours ago, SKL said:

Well I innocently asked the question "what are you all doing for teacher appreciation week" in a facebook group focused on parenting.  Boy did that start a sh!tstorm.  Some parents joked that they would buy themselves something.  One went on a big rant about how dare anyone expect anything at a time like this.  (I wasn't actually even thinking about purchased gifts but ....)  Then of course the folks who are teachers responded to that.

So I guess there are more folks having trouble with "school-at-home" than I thought.  I was surprised how many indicated they don't feel the teachers are doing anything worthy of appreciation.  It makes me appreciate our school more.

I can't tell you how sad reading this makes me feel. I don't care about the teacher appreciation week stuff...whatever on that. It makes me sad they're not feeling teachers are doing anything worthy of appreciation. The guidance from my state said 15-30 minutes per day. The guidance from my district was to aim for 50% of the content we'd normally cover, strive to connect with the students, and to keep in mind the emotional needs of students and realities of their home situations. 

Students tell me that most days my lessons take about 15-20 minutes to complete. A parent looking at them would never know that a typical 20 minute lesson takes me about 2-1/2 to 3 hours to prepare. Deciding on the content and how to best condense it and deliver it virtually, searching around for videos or other virtual resources, adding in supplemental info to make it interesting, finding or making memes to make it fun, adding in notes and bitmojis to personalize it, creating simple tools to collect feedback about their learning and how they're doing. Add in 5-10 minutes to load it into Google Classroom each day.  That's just lesson prep time--not everything else that's necessary to make it happen.

😪

 

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My oldest dd has a lot of friends who are teachers and we're in NJ where things are super crazy.   She was telling me yesterday her friends are having a really hard time.   A lot of them have students not turning in work or not showing up for online classes, then they are expected to call all of their parents to find out if they are having issues that can be helped or something they can work with them on.  Then parents are calling them back late at night or texting them all the time.    Luckily most of her friends don't have kids of their own yet but it's not just the kids and parents having a hard time.  A lot of the teachers are pretty much hating all this too.  

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I dislike the term crisis schooling. I’m not sure what that is supposed to be. My kids are distance learning, and our experience is different depending on the school and kid.  Each kid has their own school-issued device, and dh and I work busy FT jobs. 
 

My public school 12th graders classes converted to a college format with taped lectures and online discussion. She does not have zoom sessions, and the work requirements did not change. She has a very academic 12th grade class. 
 

My public school 10th grader has one zoom class and I’m not sure about the others. He spends about an hour a day on schoolwork, so I believe the classes have been dumbed down. He is gifted so he moves at a quick pace, and his 10th grade class is definitely not academic. I assume the expectations for his classes match with the general student in his classes. 

My private schooled 6th and 7th graders have not missed a beat. Their teachers have zoom classes throughout the day and they are learning content. Their entire grade has four and nine kids, respectively, so their zoom sessions are effective. Even when their grades are combined, they still have a small class. The private school took a week to get up and running with distance learning. 
 

we are struggling with my private school 3rd grader. His teacher spends 15 minutes with them every morning and does not teach content. She does not provide any support. We have a daily list of workbook pages to complete. We are having trouble keeping up with his school work. I don’t enjoy his materials, and they are not set up for one-on-one teaching. 
 

I’m short, my independent kids are doing well. Smaller class sizes are definitely beneficial with online delivery. Elementary school is difficult under this model, and I may decide to homeschool my 3rd grader next year if we continue distance learning. At least then I could focus on critical content and use materials of my choice. i am also considering signing my 10th grader up for more college classes next year. I would rather him earn college credits if he is going to be online schooling either way. 

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1 hour ago, 2squared said:

I dislike the term crisis schooling. I’m not sure what that is supposed to be.

Crisis schooling is when you want your kids to attend a school outside of your home and you've designed your lives around that, but because of this crisis, you're forced to have them home, which your lives are not designed for.

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11 minutes ago, Danae said:


And the schools and teachers are scrambling to transition rather than being able to take the months necessary to design and develop true online courses.

I understand the definition, but I don’t think it appropriately describes our reality, except for my 3rd grader perhaps. The other four are definitely distance learning. 
Calling it crisis learning gives a connotation  of panic and suboptimal learning. We don’t have any panic in our household, it’s the opposite actually. Our lives are relaxed and slower paced. The kids have shorter school days. 

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1 hour ago, 2squared said:

I understand the definition, but I don’t think it appropriately describes our reality, except for my 3rd grader perhaps. The other four are definitely distance learning. 
Calling it crisis learning gives a connotation  of panic and suboptimal learning. We don’t have any panic in our household, it’s the opposite actually. Our lives are relaxed and slower paced. The kids have shorter school days. 

When people come up with terms like this, they're speaking generally, not about you in particular.

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