Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Violet Crown

Need very specific German 1, 2 textbook

Recommended Posts

Friends,

I need to order a couple of German textbooks. 

Dd has been advised that this summer is a good time to get her German in place, while she has significant down time. Her classics tutor has offered to push her through German 1 & 2--possibly 3--this summer, "meeting" several times a week. But he has no suggestions for a textbook.

She can read and speak French reasonably fluently. She can read Latin easily, and is doubling down on her Greek. She plans to use FSI German (dated, but free and familiar to her, and which she found very useful back in her French 1 & 2 days, with its relentless oral drills). Her tutor is fluent in German. So spoken language is not an issue. 

She wants a textbook that will (1) directly teach German grammar, unlike FSI; (2) have a minimum of conversational elements; (3) be at a college rather than high school level; (4) be significantly more recent than the Cold War-era FSI. I want a textbook that I can order two copies of: one for her and one for the tutor, who is flat broke due to being stuck in the US but unable to legally work. The goal is not to order a beer in Berlin but to read academic papers in German.

I have zero German; dh lived in Germany as a child but has forgotten every word of it.

Any suggestions? I'd like to order in the next couple of days.

Edited by Violet Crown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So after writing all that out, it became clear to me that what we want is a German grammar with exercises. Does anyone have any experience with any of these? Or another not on that list?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wondering if you might possibly prefer a German for Reading Knowledge textbook--these are usually designed for graduate students who need to pass language exams, so they are oriented toward learning to read academic articles. The only one of these I have ever used was the Jannach book, but that was 35 years ago.

Here is a newer iteration of that book (first edition was by Jannach, later editions were Jannach & Korb, this one is just Korb):  https://books.google.ca/books?id=7HluCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=german+for+reading+knowledge&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjY18Pj4fnoAhWQvp4KHbq8A2kQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=german for reading knowledge&f=false

ETA: Here's another, from a UK publisher: https://books.google.ca/books?id=dYWiDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=german+for+reading+knowledge&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjP7MXa4vnoAhVFip4KHXZ2CvIQ6AEISTAE#v=onepage&q=german for reading knowledge&f=false

As an alternative, here is a well-reviewed open source text: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/a-foundation-course-in-reading-german

Hope that helps!

 

Edited by Emerald Stoker
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik Wiederholen und anwenden by Rankin and Wells? It is designed to go into first and second year German grammar in depth. It is written primarily in English, despite the name.

It has plenty of good exercises and is definitely a grammar.

Emily

Edited by EmilyGF
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Emerald Stoker said:

I'm wondering if you might possibly prefer a German for Reading Knowledge textbook--these are usually designed for graduate students who need to pass language exams, so they are oriented toward learning to read academic articles. The only one of these I have ever used was the Jannach book, but that was 35 years ago.

Here is a newer iteration of that book (first edition was by Jannach, later editions were Jannach & Korb, this one is just Korb):  https://books.google.ca/books?id=7HluCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=german+for+reading+knowledge&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjY18Pj4fnoAhWQvp4KHbq8A2kQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=german for reading knowledge&f=false

ETA: Here's another, from a UK publisher: https://books.google.ca/books?id=dYWiDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=german+for+reading+knowledge&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjP7MXa4vnoAhVFip4KHXZ2CvIQ6AEISTAE#v=onepage&q=german for reading knowledge&f=false

As an alternative, here is a well-reviewed open source text: https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/a-foundation-course-in-reading-german

 

3 hours ago, EmilyGF said:

How about Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik Wiederholen und anwenden by Rankin and Wells? It is designed to go into first and second year German grammar in depth. It is written primarily in English, despite the name.

It has plenty of good exercises and is definitely a grammar.

Emily

Thank you both! I've forwarded the links and names to dd and will see what she thinks.

ETA: She likes the look of the British one, German for Reading Knowledge, and the Hammer's Grammar and Usage. So I've ordered those. Thanks again!

Edited by Violet Crown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violet I’m not experienced with German texts but I notice you linked the Practice Makes Perfect ones—I’ve used these for French and English (exchange student), and like them. They are thorough grammar drills. We’ve never finished a grammar book cover to cover in any language (well maybe one small one), but pages from the Practice Makes Perfect have been torn and thrown around quite a bit here 😂

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a German professor who homeschools her kids, and I'd definitely recommend the German for Reading approach, if the goal is to cover a lot of material in a short period of time. Foreign language reading skills are required in many graduate programs, so she'll have a head start by using the materials you've purchased. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used the Practice Makes Perfect one. DS is highly motivated to learn German and uses a variety of methods to self teach, but he admitted that grammar was becoming an issue. I got him the workbook and he said it helped solve the problems he'd been having. I can't say he liked the workbook since he felt is was too repetitive, but it did help him understand grammar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...